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Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

The Big Picture

10:08 min | 4 months ago

Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

"We have a special sort of conversation. Here we're joined by Mister Robot. Creator the Creator of the film comet The director of Amazon's homecoming. Yes Sam. Esmail saying what's up. Hello how are you? I'm so excited to be here. I'm such a fan. Oh that's very sam. You wanted to play a game with us. I did now. I want to know why you wanted to play that game with us and I also want you to explain the game. Well explaining it okay. I'll let me start by saying I'm a huge film. Learn as I think anybody who listens to the watch probably already gust. And I've always played this game with all my film nerd fans and so I figured one when I started listening to your podcasts. Which obsessed with a huge fan of I figured especially with Amanda Sort of counterpoint? To talk to your thinking Shawn's like I just thought this'll be a fun game to play the game. Basically and again. This is sorry for listeners. Who are not going to be in on this because it's so inside. It's not even that insight. It's but it's it's really not OK okay. I won't apologize here. We go is a good game in and you deserve it. It's the best director per decade and the best director who die who had their debut. That decade does that make sense. Did I explain this? Should we use an example to help people understand it? What's an example that we won't? Won't you trample on the choices that we've made here? Well we look at this decade. We had we had like a number of actually great film. Directors made their debut Jordan. Peele with get ou- Greta Gerwig with Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Man. This favorite with El Camino until nineteen many wonderful. Thanks well actually. Gertler made no thanks. But it's it's it's it's it's. It's good to bring up Vince. As an example because he actually that was his feature directing debut which is all coming up. Now the thing is it's not necessarily not saying what's the best directorial debut? Just the director that we appreciate. The most made that debut made their debut in that decade so I think that there's a couple of semantic complications around now and you know as well as I do that there are student films. Their short film features so. Let's lay the groundwork. Because Vince directed episodes of Britain. He directed the pilot breaking bug which I think was in the prior decade but we're talking feature directorial debut so that seems easy to Parse. It's not as easy to Parse as it seems. Now tell me why well. Are you talking about dual are GonNa be Spielberg is is a particularly complex example? Because of nine or you're talking about nine gallery 'cause that's TV while he made a movie when he was seventeen called firelight for five hundred bucks and is that a film. Is that a feature film even his parents saw. I wouldn't say a featured like a debut meaning. It was released in movie theaters got it. Okay commercially available. Commercially available attack. Those are good ground rules. I'm glad that we established that play into my less later on. I do consider to be because it didn't get released in theaters. Well it is a feature film but it was not this little guy but that is considering his feature debut his first full length movie right what. What's the movie after that? Then Land Express okay all right so yes we'll stick to that okay before we play the game now. The people understand the game I want but just add one other thing the interesting thing about this game and I think will when we go through. We'll see it's where the decades are hard because there's just so many amazing options and where the decades are not A. There's not a lot of options. I just find the conversation around that to be interesting because lanes a little bit about where movies are and where they're doing exactly specifically the nineties which I thought was just a burst of like creative inspirational film makers and then the very decade after the ONS which I struggled I struggled to find. I have some counterpoint to that point but I I wanna use this as an opportunity to pick a bone with you. Oh Wow okay I resent you. I resent your your appearance on this podcast because what I what we need. What this podcast needs is people like you making movies and television shows will but you love movies and you film in a very discreet way. Yes but and I mean I guess we're going to get into it right now. It's gotTa think about think about indie filmmakers. What happened let's say Ryan Kugler? Who Loved Fruitvale? Right mazing what happened to him. After he made fruitvale he went into the machine he went into the machine. And that's what's happening with a lot of these other directors and that. That's the difference between the nineties and now so I think. Pta came out with holiday today. Is he making you know Batman in two years and by the way no not dissing on Batman? I'm excited for When Matt Raises Version of it? Because I'm a fan of his but I think it's just the industry is dictating a lot of what directors are doing now and you know and not to 'em this point that's the machine that we're in right now so and that's more reflective of the decade so t to to get to my TV point. Tv's where you get to make the interesting shit. I don't know if I could have made mister robot as a feature in fact I tried well. That was my fault. Got a little long winded. With how long was that? That forty five. Our film now That feature from I wrote ninety pages of wasn't even into act tune. That's when I realized I was in trouble. Was there a divergent path for you where after comet you could have just doubled down and said I'll stay. I'll continue to stay kind of broke but I'll keep making movies will. Yeah I mean that was the plan I was going to make Mr Buzzing indie feature and got stuck with it and Steve Golan Who You know owns anonymous content who Read the pages of Missouri Button at the time detective had just come out and he just He had just produced. That and I thought women that will this is fucking coal. And I don't need to do anything with this. I don't need to refashion the script that I had in mind and fitted into this to our box and honestly I was just really more. I remember thinking I was way more excited about true detective than I was about anything. Elsa came out there. Trust them into. What are your thoughts on true detective because I have no idea? I don't love thank you. Yeah I think I think I see yes. The first season I think true detective on its face is like a accomplished piece of television filmmaking and also I'm a huge fan of cary Fukunaga always and forever Perhaps not for the same reasons. Assess it to me actually wrap. It was such a turning point. Anything his best thing that he's done. I'm not even going to say Jane Eyre Okay. I haven't I haven't seen that I haven't seen the new Bond movie I but I'm really looking forward to it because I'm also a bond person and also I just you know I think true true detective as this carries best thing. I think that's probably true but my issue with detective is not actually true detective itself. It is the dialogue around your detective. And also I think that's a pivot point in terms of when and how we started evaluating TV in terms of tracking shots and the actual just the athletic like filmmaking as a way to bring the an experience. What is this athletic yet? Flex now and then on twitter people are now saying slaps what what is all? I don't understand that you want to explain the Internet. Let's start with the athletic because Amanda I. I've heard you use a lot and I've I've been on a lot of sets of never heard anyone say the words. I think the first person he was at my friend on the TV critic Philip asking and I think it puts its finger on this idea of money that you bring her up because she wrote this she wrote. It was a harsh. I mean whatever I respect her reviews she dissed my one episode of Mister Robot whereas all one tracking shot. I assume yes is what you mean by athletic because I do think that Filmmaking and TV and everything is more than cameras and more than where the camera is and there is such a absolutely station online. The damore as more aspect of filmmaking and I think that the tracking shot is caption of that and just like. Oh Wow. Did you see what he did. That was so cool. Oh my God. The camera is moving. You know don't you think it but don't you think has a to me every every sort of choice that you make with the camera has an effect and yes to some extent it it takes you out of it and draws attention to itself but to some extent. I really I mean what do you think of the Copacabana Sean? And I and I and I do. Actually I think even tracking protective is effective. But you know we're doing a podcast right now. That isn't essentially about how we talk about. Film and like establishing a Canon of source. And the cannon is so reliant on where do we put the camera and what did they itch on showing us an either. Don't respond to that artistically at some point. I'm just like Yay like fancy camera. Shots you got it. Congratulations to you but I do also think it distracts from the other equally important. I feel making that. Don't get enough credit. I think code is also a specifically athletic is code for Masculinity. You know it's code for this sort of The might of the male filmmaker. Now that's not always true if you watch like strange days for example. Kathryn bigelow is doing a lot with the camera yet. It is unorthodox and cool and might have what would otherwise be deemed kind of masculine energy. But I do think that true detective and largely the dialogue like you're saying was about a lot of dudes being like Yo. This is sick now. Personally I thought it was sick. Oh okay but I I would. I was not a fan of those scripts and I don't think that story is very strong but I thought that was really well

Director Mister Robot Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Amanda Sort Esmail SAM Batman Kathryn Bigelow El Camino Amazon Cary Fukunaga Shawn Gertler PTA Twitter Spielberg Ryan Kugler Mr Buzzing Britain Copacabana Sean
"esmail" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

05:49 min | 6 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Without Fail

"The beggar. Yeah and they have all the power yes and then it just like fully flips and it was crazy especially the mister robot role and because as the older like guys as I grew up watching including including the guy I ended up casting Y was we're coming into to try out for this this job for this for this thing I wrote and they're reading my dialogue. You know because Christopher Chris later I mean he he got the role got thorough. Yeah 'cause you'd seen him. I'm sure right like watching him. Oh Yeah I mean look Pump up the volume was I was one of those movies on on the VHS tapes. That I repeatedly wanst until it broke. yeah yeah. That must've been so. So that's the surrealness and then you and then by the time you get up onset it's kind of like things are in Mo- I mean things are you know that's a real too because there's a huge each company now of fifty people or or so coming together to do this but But I think the then you're into the process and it's less about Out the kind of overwhelming impact of more about Now can I get this right because you know that was the other thing those in the back of my head. What if this doesn't turn out to be good rain? How many more chances I get here you know? Yeah because like the one thing that you had released your indie feature comet had like like closed within the first month that had opened yes. The reviews weren't no user not great. I was not getting any calls got released. I and I was I was very concerned and and so this was kind of like okay. Here's my second at Bat and if this was another swaying I I didn't know if it was going to say that I mean how many times you know how many chances you get right. When did you know that you you you? When when did you know you had a hit? I mean is it. I mean I you know I mean you'd never I mean look I I do think when we were in the middle of shooting season one and the reviews are pouring in and they were pretty unanimously. Good and I was like Oh my oh God okay this is. This is a good like I was letting it in and we were filming a scene with with Romney and who plays Elliot Mister robot and Frankie who plays Shayla Out on the stoop and in the middle the shot a cab rolls in with the ad for Mister robot on there and we have the cut I remember thinking okay. This is like okay. We're a real shot like with really have it ruin the but I gotta say it was like just as one of those surreal moments. Where sounds like it feels like it just started to feel like people were talking about the show in the city And I remember thinking this is really cool. Like people started stopping Rami. And and we you know and it started to get crazy and I just felt like there was just something in the air that summer fifteen summer when a miserable was airing and we were shooting it was just it. Just yeah it was like it was pretty cool. Yeah I was like okay I can breathe easy. The show is going to be. Okay okay right so is your life. Anxiety Free No. No no no but the anxiety is a type of anxiety not worrying about car car insurance. It's worrying about well what's going to be a great episode of television are what's GonNa be a great feature you know that that that's the kind of anxiety the idea. Okay well. Is there still anxiety. Is there still that sort of existential anxiety lake. Oh that you could fail. Yeah for sure but you can't be anxious shis about it. You know what I mean like. Just say at the end of the day I the one thing I kind of always go back to whenever I start writing something or think about filming something is I have to be a fan of this. Goes back to that five year old kid when I saw French connection. I want to enjoy this. It has to be enjoyable for me and if that doesn't work then then then it wasn't you know then that's out of my control. Then that's not something I can you. You know sort of negotiator or manipulate it. Just it just if I can stay true to that if I end up enjoying it. And by the way that's how I felt about comet it did not ended up working out outside of the audience of one me but I have to be okay with that and I just have to whether that. Yeah Yeah Yeah. So what are your parents like. They didn't want you to be a filmmaker. How do they feel about an hour? They finally on board with you being a filmmaker. No my mom's still talks about my cousins who you know. They're they're lovely people that one's a doctor and married with three kids and I think one I think they're about to have a grandkid one's a lawyer. Yeah and my brother is a lawyer for twitter. Actually and and he just had his kid and she that Komo her is success. She's like why can't you be. Why can't you be like that? This is weird and I it. It doesn't matter and that wraps up my conversation with him smile without fail hosted by me and produced by Molly Mesic and Sarah Platt. It's edited by me and Devin Taylor. Peter Leonard Mix episode music by Bobby Lord. If you like without fail leave us a review. Tell your friends about it and thanks for listening..

Christopher Chris Mister robot Pump Molly Mesic Peter Leonard Bobby Lord Mo- I Rami twitter Devin Taylor Romney Komo Shayla Out Sarah Platt Frankie
"esmail" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

09:20 min | 6 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Without Fail

"Last year? We did a pilot season of the show to see whether people would like it where they want to keep going and they did. They subscribed they listened. And so now we will have new episodes episodes three times a month from now till forever ask and you will receive people so if you haven't subscribed yet go ahead and sign up and on our our first show back today. I'm talking with one of the hottest directors and show runners in Hollywood. Sam Esmail the person behind the hit show mister robot and most recently the hit series is on Amazon. Homecoming starring Julia Roberts which was nominated for three Golden Globe awards. Although it didn't win any of them now people familiar with me or Gimblett. The company I co-founded which makes podcast that you're listening to right now and many others. You might remember homecoming began. Its life as a Gimblett. PODCAST and Gimblett was very involved in the making of that show in fact I did a whole series of stories on turning the homecoming podcast into the homecoming. TV show and the reason season. I am very excited to talk to Sam today without fail. It goes back to an interview I did for that series was interviewing Sam along with the star Julia Roberts and there. There's a moment from that conversation. That just stuck with me to moment when Julia was raving about Sam Sam is incredibly good at understanding people and how we work and what makes people As highly creative as they can be and and is highly motivated as they can be to hear you talk. It really does sound like you. Both it was really this sort of like almost instant creative coming together in a weird way has happened before is that like was unusual. Oh it's it's I I mean I've done one moving them one television show at side of this so my experience is limited but the fact that she and I hit it off so oh quickly so early is practically unheard of. I mean the first thing we do is like yeah doc. It's true every day. Listen to them talk. I was struck by crazy. All this must have been for Sam like just three years earlier before Mister robot came out. No one had ever heard of Sam Esmail now here. He was palling around with Julia. Roberts one of the biggest movie stars in history with a career spanning more than a quarter of a century like it was nothing Sam. He's old in Hollywood years over forty and he'd been trying to make it as a filmmaker for decades the very same decades that Julia Roberts have been winning Oscars and setting box office records and becoming the highest paid actors in Hollywood history. was that like to struggle for so long. And then have his breakthrough be so sudden and happened so relatively late and and so that is what I wanted to talk to him about. Invite him to our studios for compensation you. You've had a lot of success now but it. It was a long time coming. Yes did not have prior to that. Yeah so I want to talk about the prior yes and so we did and it turns out that the prior the long winding path through multiple failures that led sam to where he is now is an incredibly fascinating story. That goes places that I never expected. It's a story that starts a longtime back in Sam's childhood with his early love of movies although not necessarily kid movies I remember very early early on watching. It's this is gonNA sound so pretentious but it's true it's it's I was watching French connection I must have been like five or something something maybe even younger for four or five watching the French connection fringing the French connection land. I just remember that car chase scene. You know where it where it's they're about the head the baby carriage and you're just like freaking out and then the baby carriage has no baby. It's just a bunch of garbage in there and I just that's moment specifically stuck out to me and I remember watching that movie pretty obsessively but it wasn't until I saw et that. That's when I started to think about doing it myself. And how would we at this point now. I think I'm about eight or maybe seven and it's the first movie I saw in the theater. My parents were really. They didn't understand. They had no kind of way to conceptualize why I was so obsessed with movies. Because they weren't they weren't a they weren't American and be bigger than they didn't really have movie theaters so So completely American phenomenon to them going to the movie Yes And they didn't didn't end the popcorn and like they'd just. The whole thing was ridiculous. The popcorn is ridiculous by the way it is worth it. Yeah but they actually didn't go to the movies with me because they didn't want to buy a ticket for themselves they would just send me and by myself and then just pick coming up later and they did that actually throughout my they never went to the movies with me and they would only just drop me off but when I was seven And they drop me off to C. E. T.. The reason why I wanted to go was I mean everybody in school was talking about it. Oh my God. ETA was the biggest staying. And because I was kind of quietly growing this obsession at home with movies I thought. Oh my God this is just GonNa blow my mind and I go well and I watch it and I am bored beyond belief really. Yeah I mean it was just sort of this domestic drama about this relationship between this kid in the alien and I'm like where the chase sequence. Where is the action whereas the fun and I just didn't having fun at all I didn't care about the recent pieces and the dressing? Et Up as a girl. Frogs and the school. I just didn't care I didn't care and I walked out and I remember thinking I can do better than that and that's that it was really I mean I that's when I now by the way Spielberg I really don't mean the disown you if you happen to let me listen to this Actually in a weird way you inspired me to be filmmaker it But yeah that's I just remember having that feeling like I could touch that like. I knew that I had specifics specifics on what I liked. I wanted to experience going to the movies. I kind of knew that I have voice there but My parents didn't want me to be a filmmaker. In fact I remember when I was in the sixth grade and And they had because you know I was. It was very very well known the my home that I wanted to be filming. I used to literally take figurines like you know Gi Joe Toys R.. Star Wars Toys and create movies right movies on script and use them and time it out to the ninety minute timer the to run time so they they saw saw my obsession with this and they were worried that this was going to stick and I remember in sixth grade. Apparent Teacher Conference they talked to my teacher are and they said you know. He wants to be a filmmaker. Can you can you. Can you convince them not to do this. You know hate eight and I remember my teacher looking at me and she asks me. Is this true dude. Do you WanNa make movies and I said Yeah. That's that's what I want. And she kind of looked at me and then slowly look back and said to my parents. He'll grow out of it and when she said that. Ah I remember getting so angry that I said to myself in say this. I'll lab I said to myself now now just because of what you just said. I will be filmmaker like I will never give up. I will this is the one thing I will do. Wow yeah that's fascinating. Yeah so this is kind of a law. Spite the GOP I think about this because I feel like spite there. Is this element of like. He said I couldn't do it. And I'm GONNA prove it could right. It's really powerful. Yeah there's a line What's the best revenge Lee? Good life you because you're right it's it's more about proving it to them but then you know behind that is probably probably something about proving it to yourself and for whatever reason fuels me so you you know at this age in sixth grade. You're vowing I'm going to. I'm going to prevention. You're wrong yup. And indeed six years later when Sam graduated from high school he headed up to New York University. NYU and its renowned film. School in a nod to his parents who still didn't want to be a director. He minored in computer science but majored in film and in one thousand nine hundred eight he graduated so this is where so so this in the.

Sam Sam Julia Roberts Sam Esmail Gimblett Hollywood Golden Globe awards Amazon Mister robot director New York University NYU Lee GOP
U.S. and Iran trade new threats

First Light

00:28 sec | 6 months ago

U.S. and Iran trade new threats

"The hour the Iranian general who replaced the leader killed by the U. S. airstrike in Baghdad is vowing revenge and Iran is abandoning their remaining limits of its twenty fifteen nuclear deal Esmail Ganis threat comes as the blow back over the U. S. killing of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani mounted with Iraq's parliament calling for the expulsion of American troops France's finance minister says the current tensions in the Middle East could affect global economic growth and re invent invigorate the Islamic state group

Baghdad Iran Qassem Soleimani Iraq France Finance Minister Middle East
Iran has already replaced Soleimani, here is everything we know about Esmail Ghaani

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Iran has already replaced Soleimani, here is everything we know about Esmail Ghaani

"A new Iranian general is stepping out of the shadows to lead the country's elite college force after the U. S. killed its previous had possum solo Monty ash mail Ghani is now responsible for Tehran's proxies across the Middle East as the Islamic Republic threatens retaliation to the U. S. harsh revenge for killing Solomonic while much still remains unknown about the sixty two year old Johnny western sanctions suggest he's been along in position of power in the organization the new leaders first duties will likely be to oversee whatever retaliation around intends to seek for the US airstrike really fire that killed his longtime friend still Amani cyber attacks are one way around might consider retaliating against the US in the wake of that killing cyber security expert Adam Levine says this threat is not just Iran's government against the US government infrastructure businesses and consumers are all at risk of being hacked however prepared we may or may not be think about our inch county airport facing off against nation state hackers from Iran or a credit union in Michigan or a health care system in Baltimore cyber attacks continue to be the issue all across the country actually but meantime a new Mideast conflict could mean a return to conscription for the military services on problem forty be escalating Mideast tensions and fears of a new US war there has also renew talk here of a possible return to a military draft CBS news military consultant Jeff McLaughlin at this moment our military is pretty over stretched and a major conflict did it come to that might actually force any administration to consider the possibility of selective service whose website went down as a result of increased traffic Tom forty CBS news

Ghani Tehran Middle East Islamic Republic United States Adam Levine Iran Michigan Jeff Mclaughlin Monty Ash Solomonic Baltimore CBS Consultant TOM
"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:34 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Baht which is in its fourth and final season on USA network Mister robot at work there's a blurry line between his attempts to be a force for good and his attempts doesn't know what's real and what's a figment of his imagination and neither do we Mala pretty knowledgeable about computer networks and hacking and college he was put on academic as to the Internet but his real ambition was always to make movies let's security expert he's just walk into a cafe called Ron's and sat you changed it to Ron when you bite your first ron coffee shop six years ago because your wife I was fast one of the few spots that has a fiber connection with Gigabit so I started intercepting the traffic on your network that's what I noticed something using tore networking to keep the servers anonymous you made it really hard for anyone to see it which makes me the one in control.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Pinot and I remember Prince Learning the Batman theme song he was very into Adam the purple rain it's interesting his name is prince that was his given name like explain why not I think that they felt that there was just something in the classroom would make teacher and authority figure kind of unsettled here so they would call him skipper instead and I think Prince of course it was his name it was his father's name it was something that he held very closely I'm the artist formerly known as Prince that's right I think that one of two princes in that household and in the ninety s when he was quarrelling with Warner couldn't in good faith live under his given name he had to kind of foresake it was the only time he had called my cell phone and on a stray piece of paper I had and he he just wanted to call there was a lot of speculation in the press that something might be wrong and he told me let's he also wanted to talk about the idea of cellular memory this idea that mound that something that that really aligned with his religious views and with the feelings he'd been the plane was made an emergency landing because prince was he trying to tell you do think when he said flu like symptoms Yeah I've I've poured due to signal that while he felt that he was fine and on the men that there he couldn't really put his finger on what it was maybe so he died four days after lutely nothing I I saw no evidence of it ever and I was bouncing on the balls of his feet I remember once we were in that elevator at Paisley the same one and to think that in that same space he would he would later be found dead it's just something that I really I had no inkling of of what he was up against by Dan Pipe and brings called Prince the beautiful ones.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Doc enga- sweater curbs uh-huh Bloom strike the EH.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:04 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Song if I was your girlfriend my guest and pipe and bring is the editor of Yeah I remember this vividly I was I think sixteen years old I'd just it was really listening to a lot of classic rock and jazz and things like that and and in the song prince is singing under the persona that he called and then there's all these various the`real synthesizers on there and of course a drum machine playing wants to be a woman so that he can be closer to his partner and get the Frank I don't think it it it was really a haunting but beautiful song it to be hearing when you wrote that you felt like you were breaking the law prince objected it was completely `harmonious and when he told me this we were sitting Paisley Park really felt like a sanctuary or cocoon I could see that I had I'm a guest blues ier more dissonant and he felt that he aside so he really resisted the idea that he was in any way a lawbreaker natural or Alchemy to describe his music did you use either of those words in USA because very very particular festivities ideas about which words belonged in his got to his kind of secular music it would be wrong would be violation ONC is about rules and he pointed to all the work that went into his late on his first album that he'd had to learn how to mix them how to master them how to program really came a lot from his father he thought that Mac magic or magical out which words you would use because magical is not one that I would use to describe me that is the kind of story book quality to it more fairy tale vibe something when Prince died pipe and brings edited the new Prince Book The beautiful ones this message comes from NPR sponsor Tele Doc have you ever needed a doctor late at night is an more teletok's board certified doctors can diagnose treat and we're to my interview with Dan Pipe and bring who was collaborating with prince on his memoir before Prince working with Prince and photos and lyric sheets that were found in Paisley Park parents what are some of the ways his parents were different from each other really formed the kind of two polls of being and he said in my last conversation with gripe to his father but if dj put on something funky he was gonna WanNa who was your oppressively free I think and who would not someone who worked two jobs one is a musician at nightclubs and the other prince two I mean that that vast work ethic that that commitment to attention there a lot and that's something that he would explore throughout live long enough to do that but what did he tell you about the lyric to enough pertaining to his parents divorce which was a word that they were reluctant even to us goal to kind of make their relationship work was something that he felt was hidden from him three even used him sort of as a a human shield she said go tell your father that he has to be nice to trying to figure out how he embodied them and how he could unify that's right how can you just leave me standing alone in the world so cold interesting because I I would have thought that his mother was just as bold as his father given a sort of whirlwind love affair involving a lot of travel and gifts and kind of active romance more quotidian day to day stuff to to indulge that that romantic side.

"esmail" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:09 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My dad was the only one I could talk to Sam Esmail welcome to fresh air that is one of the great opening scenes in TV history it's so it's really so good and you know it's funny because so much of what we hear in that scene comes in one way or another from your life I mean it's not autobiographical but you can draw on what you know from it I mean so you did some hacking when you're in college you edited form so you know something about the foreign world when you were scratching around for a living you know about being different because you grew up Egyptian American and Muslim in New Jersey so like so many of the talking points from their opening scene I'm sure you could relate to but you took what you know and then you drove it to a totally different place and I really think you did not know yes for sure honestly it's that outsider mentality is is what I think the only character and my life sort of overlap and that has a lot to do with growing up in an Egyptian American household while trying to assimilate into American culture and that sort of tension you know because not only was I born in Jersey than my parents took me down to South Carolina which is which is somewhat cruel transaction the to to be raised and and and and the North Carolina and yeah I've always kind of constantly have to deal with this concept of this idea of being very different than than the others what was your initial idea for Mister robot well I think you know I always say there's three factors the kinda led to creating a sort of a number one you know growing up being really into programming and kind of being a little faster with the hacker culture I I wanted to tell a movie or at our television show or some sort of story that authentically represent in that world because a lot of the on the movies that came out Hollywood specially it and then you know late nineties and even then in the two thousands were very corny and have nothing to do with realistically what was what what hacker subculture is all about I'd say the second and third things because it kind of happened very close to one another was a financial collapse in two thousand eight and the Arab spring that happened a few years after that those two things this concept of a revolution which so tied into again the hacker subculture those two things sort of kind of helped me develop the character valley and why you want to be a hacker why he wanted on the sub culture why he had this sort of grandiose vision of starting a revolution in changing the world because I was so moved I was so horrified by the financial collapse and how this sort of the top one percent or kind of doing these really criminal activities on a large scale and getting away with that and then and then seeing how technology helped people in their countries rise up and have a voice and star revolution and so all those things are coming coalesced into their character valley and it started there and then from there the story Mister about kinda spun out only it is mentally ill he has dissociative identity disorder which used to be known as multiple personality disorder so parts of himself he's kind of fragmented into other people who he thinks he's talking to are seeing and we the audience it took us a very long time to learn that it's father was actually one of you know part of elites personality that Ellen's fathers actually long dead what did you want to have dissociative identity disorder I think when we start when I start piecing together who Ellie and as a character is I wanted to really represent his his loneliness and a very authentic way and because his isolationism is part of what drives him to hack people I mean that was the sort of irony twists in his character is that he's so alone but yet he's able to access the sort of the most intimate details of everyone around him to stay true to that kind of person that kind of extreme the Ellie it goes to dissociative identity disorder sort of fit what Eliot was sort of experiencing because he wasn't able to essentially connect to people and the sort of the contrast so that is that he just dissociates from them and in fact there is also this very profound fear that he has and even just talking to them you can see that in the pilot when he can't even bring himself to go into his friend's birthday party so the de ID was just something that really fit I think what Ellie its journey was ultimately going to be about across the whole series which is about this young man who cannot dis deep fear and this sort of deep isolation room can't find a way to connect with other people part of what we heard the Elliott character say rummy Malick's character say in that opening scene what with the fantastic wifi at this coffee shop he says it's great for the part of my mind that doesn't allow good ticket to exist without condition which is a beautiful way of saying too good to be true but I I I really like the words you chose to describe that but that does that describe you with that you're always thinking this is too good to be true this that your mind doesn't allow good to exist without condition I think that I mean you know I suffered a lot from social anxiety disorder I still I still work through that even now I had a deep fear of the world around me and I think that's part of the journey we wanted to tell about Elliott on say that again that's something that we drew from hacker culture there's a lot of No Way not only paranoia but it it kind of beyond that I'll just a lot of distrust in what's going on around us and I think that's where that line came from is at can we fully allow ourselves to feel good about something without feeling like the other shoe is going to drop and I think that's a constant anxiety that's prevalent around in society right now let's take a short break and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us my guess the Sam Esmail who is the creator and lead director and writer of the series Mister robot which is in its fourth and final season we'll be right back this is fresh AIR at seven seventeen support for KQED comes from eight by eight offering cloud based communication solutions across voice video meetings.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:56 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"It was easy to admit that made it easier because the limitations of where you can put the camera went on Romney was in that Hoodie made us just closer to who your first job working in film was editing porn and I yep now my first so we gotta talk about it so first of all I mean your parents are Egyptian and Muslim so I did they know that you were editing porn no I mean honestly they didn't know I didn't tell them I got away with a lot because they were often American culture and they weren't honestly that interested in my life I mean I wanted to be a filmmaker since I was eight they kept being I told them that they were sort of in denial about that for a long time in to the point where when I went to Nyu I just lied and told them I was going 'cause they weren't GonNa pay for it if I went to if I said I was going to film school so I just told him in computer programming and so yeah so I kept a lot of the mice verve ambition into filmmaking you know a secret from them and in fact even now I mean my mom Kinda knows I avid TV show but it's it's it's a such a vague concept her she doesn't watch the show I don't think she really sort of you know wraps her mind on the okay so when you're editing porn did you get turned on while you were editing no turned off I mean you know it's a lot of close ups of human anatomy and not necessarily like you know the most hygenic human human anatomy shots and you know it's it's a lot and it's a lot of you get to see a lot of like the mechanics of it in terms of you know okay stop now do this and you know and there's a pause I don't know how graphic you WanNa get like there's a lot of you know people needing to a refresher are to get back into the mood there's a lot of that going on it yeah it's not a turn on at all the opposite I would say you probably can't describe what I'm really wondering what the outtakes where like I mean again it's a lot of soft penises if you want me to be honest it's a lot of a lot of guys freaking out and having to 'cause you know the porn that I was editing was you know a lot amateur porn so it wasn't like big porn stars so there was a lot of guys doing it for the first or second or third time and you know they would freak out and a lot of times it's because I was also on the shoot to sometimes and lot of times we would have to cancel it because it wasn't going to happen you know so how did you make a salary editing amateur and stars their production still amateur EXAC- exactly exactly like yes the Roger Corman porn yeah that I mean honestly that it was yeah it still paid extremely well I mean at least you know being twenty six and just having graduate film school it paid my rent and then some so I was I was kind of you know it was kind of like ah not not not necessarily happy to do it but for me because editing was you know came easy and it was on the computer and I kind of understood tech really well in the configure out how to use filed cut for the easily it it was pretty easy for me easy money for me and are we talking about the Internet Porn era or is this still theaters none on this was Internet porn sure yeah okay so titles there's some great porn titles that are puns or plays on the titles of real movies or TV shows. Do you have any favorites it's now the the ones that I made were spin offs of reality shows 'cause reality shows that started to get really popular what porn did was Kinda jump on that so I think the porn I ended up editing a lot of was this one called blind sex states because at the time there was there was a show called I believe blind date and it was a reality show that was obviously super fake but it was a reality show where two people.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:02 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I gotta rewrite this it's just I don't I think this guy's annoying and I don't want to I don't think anybody's GonNa WanNA spend Every week with this person listen and then Rami came in and when he did the scene he added this vulnerability it's almost like I can hear it in his voice just in that clip that you played where doesn't come off commanding or either autistic people even though the words are that he added this subtext that it was coming from a place of real pain Gene and real vulnerability and real wanting to connect and that was the spark that really made that character from the wife why don't we hear the that you just mentioned where he's talking to the psychiatrist and she basically wants to know why are you so angry why are you afraid offering you and he won't tell her anything but what we're hearing is what he's thinking this is Romi Mallet from Mister Robot Oregon is it that we collectively thought Steve Jobs was a great man even when we knew he made billions off the backs of children that it feels like all their heroes counterfeit world itself just one big hoax spamming each they're running commentary masquerading insight our social media faking is intimacy or is it that we voted for this rigged elections but with our things are property or money I'm not saying anything new we all know why we do this not because hungry games books makes us happy because we want to be sedated because it's painful not to pretend because we're cowards that's seen from Mister robot my guest Assem S. mail the Creator and lead writer and director of the series Mister Robot is in its fourth and final season on the USA network after a break we'll talk about growing up in an Egyptian Muslim family in New Jersey and South Carolina and s males first film Job Editing Porn Terry Gross and this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from trader Joe's where the concept of fresh is something they take seriously like the rush episodes of their podcast inside trader Joe's available wherever you get your podcasts but it's not just a podcast that's fresh trader Joe's has fresh fruit for rush meat fresh veggies fresh fashion and fresh values on everything in the store for fresh air take walk outside or listen to this podcast more at traderjoes dot com and trader Joe's on Instagram let's get back to my interview with Sam 's mail the Creator and lead writer and director of the TV series Mister Robot which is in its fourth and final season on the USA Network Mister robot stars Rami Malik as Elliot a hacker who can't connect with me apple and feels uncomfortable around them he's tried to withdraw from the world while at the same time he's tried to control it through his ability to hack into a giant corporate computer network we see the world through Elliott's is but we can't always trust what we see because he has associated identity disorder or d I d a mental illness that used to be called multiple personality disorder rummy Malik whereas a Hoodie in the character of Elliott and when he wants to hide from the world he doesn't want to be seen he wants to look as invisible as he as he kind of feels and when I interviewed Rami Malik in November of two thousand eighteen I asked him about wearing the Hoodie and I wanna play for you what he had to say about the Hoodie before we did the pilot I just walked around the streets of New York with my head down in the Hoodie on and I said I said to her costume designer early on I want an outfit that if you are surveilling him from a above or anywhere he can put his head down and blend into the concrete and that was the way I approached preparing for him at some points I would go into elevators and I remember trying to identify where the camp whereas were in for days I wanted to see if I could go undetected and not have any human contact with anyone and that takes quite a toll on you but does make you aware of how how much we are being watched in the World Romi Malik and some s Mallarme wondering what it was like for you you to shoot him in a Hoodie so much of the time because as he said he wants to be invisible from surveillance cameras you are a camera and he your job is to train the camera on him so as the director what were the pros and cons of the Hoodie of course it off often like in conversation right right right why don't I don't really know if there are any cons honestly because one thing about him wearing a Hoodie and every c gene is you don't ever have to worry about continuity and you can kind of always like you know swap scenes around and not have to After worry that he wasn't during that in the prior say he's always wearing a Hoodie but you know to me odd that so this is something directly lifted from my life I wore a hoodie every day and for me that was easy to visualize visualize just just with myself walking down the street a piece of and framing it that way to me just because you're too it's not about capturing someone's face it's about capturing that that person connect character and always trying to tell a story with however you put wherever you put the camera on that person so it's not about just getting both I is and set having it symmetrical and you know we wanted to frame and always express what Elliott is doing who he is and Elliott was so one of the characters in Mister robot now is a trans woman named white rose who heads a group called the dark army played by D. D. Wong and publicly she's known as the male Chinese Minister of State Security describe the character and why you wanted to create a trans woman character for the series well you know. DVD is all about identity and so we so just starting with Elliot here's a guy that wants to hide from the world that wants to hide his identity though wants to me it doesn't honest as possible by hiding in a Hoodie blending into the concrete like Ronnie said and then and then to Kinda then about the opposite of that person the the ultimate serve antagonist to that person nemesis to that person is this person that knows who she is knows her identity and it's the rest of the world that voices heard to hide it and I just thought that was such an interesting kind of counterpoint to what Elliott Elliott emotional journey about here is a here's a woman who knows who she is but it's told by society that she can't be that and so she has to then find the way eight to still kind of hold onto that identity and stay treated identity in spite of that in so in in that way she's stronger than Elliott because she wants to she wanted to find that person that she knows she is she believes she is and so I I love when a protagonist antagonist re really mirror each other like that in in really the most you know sort of opposite extreme james because it's at contrast I think really kind of makes the most interesting conflict between the two well let's take a short break here and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us my guest I'm s mel who is the Creator and lead director and writer of the series Mister Robot which is in its fourth and final season we'll be right back this is fresh air this message comes from NPR sponsor capital one with the capital one walmart rewards card you can earn five percent back at Walmart on line two percent at Walmart in store restaurants and travel and one percent everywhere else when you want all that you need the capital one walmart rewards card what's in your wallet terms and exclusions apply capital one and a Halloween is supposed to be a scary time of the year but you've seen the news real life is so scary racist genesis scary climate change of scary fear in an age of real life horror on NPR's code switch my guest Assem male he's the Creator and lead director and writer of the TV series Mister robot which is in its fourth and final season on USA network a heads up to Paris what's the next chapter includes a section that might not be suitable for young children will be talking not explicitly about his first film job which was editing porn I think.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:19 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From them and in fact there's also this very profound fear that he has an even just talking to them and you kind of see that in the pilot when he can't even bring himself off to go into his friend's birthday party so D- was just something that really fit I think what Elliott's journey was ultimately going to be about across the whole series which is about this young man who cannot through this deep fear and this sort of deep isolation can't find a way to connect with other people part of what we heard the Elliott character say rummy Malik character say in that opening scene with the fantastic wildfire this coffee shop he says is it scratched the part of my mind that doesn't allow good to see to exist without condition which is a beautiful way of saying too good to be true but I I really liked the words you chose to describe that but that does that describe you that you're always thinking this is too good to be true this that your mind doesn't allow good to exist without condition I think that I mean you know I suffered a lot from social anxiety disorder is still I still we'll work through that even now I had a deep fear of the world around me and I think that's part of the journey we wanted to oh about Elliott honestly that again something that we drew from hacker culture there's a lot of paranoia not only paranoia but it kind of beyond that I'll just a lot of distrust in what's going on around us and I think that's where that line came from his at can we fully lower selves to feel good about something without feeling the other shoe is going to drop and I think that's a constant anxiety that's previn arrive in society right now for the character of Elliot the social anxiety and the dissociate identity disorder go hand-in-hand with him being a hacker because really the only way he can connect with people is through technology and the only way he can learn about who people are through hacking for you did social anxiety issues connect with your your I don't WanNa say obsession I don't know how if obsessed or not but connect with how involved you were with technology when you are in in college I mean you you you create a startup you work in the computer lab you did some hacking yes the short answer is yes you know I had social anxiety meant I did not want to go out a lot because it was afraid to go out I was afraid of other parties as afraid of embarrassing myself so I stayed in my door from room and or I went to the computer lab and instead I tried to talk to people online it felt safer and when you are in that position in where you're just by behind a computer and essentially replacing a social life with that so then when you're in behind that computer on you have the sort of wherewithal to sort of pick up and try and learn how to get into people's email accounts or people social media accounts I'm at Ah when I was in college it was specifically email accounts then that becomes your form of socializing with people I think that's honest the kind of more common route that hackers find themselves in or I it's sort of the way hackers sort of at least in my experience to hackers the I knew growing up that's how they became the that's how they started going down that road is that is that finding that replacement of of connection with people was that true for you like in your limited career as a hacker Did you feel like you were replacing intimacy with hacking females Oh yeah yeah and I you know I I think I've spoken about this I'm not exactly proud about this but definitely acme girlfriend or you know at the time we were so often on on again off again back in college and then I know I actor college and sent out this email was talking you know trying to essentially show off to her and out this blast email to the hire campus of her college and then got busted aunt and again of not very good hacker got busted pretty easily 'cause I used a worked the computer lab at Nyu and they essentially traced it back to the the employee's computer at the lab and was times stamped of at the time when I was working there and and so they found out they they caught me pretty easily and I got fired put on probation so that was though sort of my now's the time where I was like okay well I'm going to give up on this hacking pursuits not for me until you were caught did it feel good to hack your girlfriend and her college or did you feel like you're violating her it I'm trying to I'm trying to I I WANNA be on strike because I think I think I should I should say it now it felt terrible mission do this but but in the moment if it felt like the only way to know the truth I guess that's the only way I can say is that wanted to know how she felt about me because I didn't trust if she with what she was telling me was true and so I wanted to know if she really liked me I thought maybe she didn't or maybe she likes somebody else or you know and I don't have prob- probably had twenty theories back then about what it was has it we weren't connecting on and did you find out what you wanted to no no no I think it it it ah I ultimately I think we weren't right for each other I mean I think that's the answer right I think I think I was not in a very healthy place with myself things idea was way worse than it is today I wasn't coping with it at all I was indulging it I was probably getting worse and I think it was probably very difficult to be in any kind of relationship with not not just romantic friendship or any sort of one on one connection because I was had this real deep insecurity in deep fear of other people and now I mean like you're a director you have to not only connect with people you have to give it them at vice about what the emotions are that their characters experiencing you have to hold everything together and make sure that relationships are good on the set there hopefully good on the set so how do you deal with your social anxiety in your job as director withing my wife really if it wasn't for my wife and I don't know if I would be able to handle my social anxiety as adequately I will say as I do right now which is to say that you know onset though I will you know to me the work is the work right I'm there to make to tell the story of as best I can and I don't really have those same fears as if I'm at a party where the whole point the whole purpose is to socialize and to Chit Chat Pat and to share you know to share opened up about your private life and to ask people about their private life and that's where my wife really really was able to hold my hand I couldn't even go to any of the awards shows at first year with Mister robot without her being there holding in my hand the entire time to ask you about casting Rami Malik he's so good in this series and man his eyes there's just so expressive you can tell just by looking at his eyes what his State of mind is like how paranoid he is at that moment however worried he is how did how did you realize through auditions how good he was how did you choose him. Well I mean honestly the is it was in that sense it was easy because when we were auditioning people and we must have seen I would say close to one hundred guys is if not if not more The the scene the scene that we audition with was that coffee shop scene and there was also the scene later on with the this therapist we kinda goes on this this rant about society and everybody and again we had great actors coming in so wasn't them I always thought it was a script because they would come in they would do those scenes and they would do these beautiful interpretations of the scene but the character just came off very cold obnoxious and And I was almost going to tell you say let's not do this this doesn't make sense uh.

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:23 min | 8 months ago

"esmail" Discussed on Fresh Air

"As a hacker who breaks into the network of a giant corporation that he considers evil when SNL started writing the series he thought movies about hacking usually got it wrong wrong. It's not about what firewall or security protocols are on your phone it's about how do you exploit people and using their vulnerabilities figure way to break into a system s mail hacked his girlfriend's email when he was in college how did it feel before he was caught I should say a fell terrible notion do this but in the moment it felt like the only way to know the truth I wanted to know how she actually felt about me well as attached about social anxiety editing porn and more my guest Sam snl is the Creator and lead writer and director of the TV series Mister Robot which is in its fourth and final season on USA Network Mister Robot Stars Rami Malik as a hacker who's tried to withdraw from the world while at the same time as trying to control it through his ability to hack into a giant corporate computer network there's a blurry line between his attempts to be a force for good and his attempts burn the system down shadowy networks he's up against have made it hard for him to tell if he's the one in control or if he's being manipulated he also doesn't know what what's real and what's a figment of his imagination and neither do we because he has dissociated identity disorder D I d a mental health diagnosis previously known as Multiple Personality Disorder Director Sam 's Malas pretty knowledgeable about computer networks and hacking and college he was put on academic probation because of hacking when he was twenty back in the dial up era before broadband he created a startup designed to give easier dial up access to the internet but his real ambition was always to make movies let's start with the opening scene of season one of mister robot Elliott Rami Maui character is a hacker who at this point in the story also works as a cybersecurity expert he's just walk into a cafe called wrongs and a sat down eh table opposite the owner Iran but your real names for hit Meta you chain instit- Ron when you bite your first Ron coffee shop six years ago now you've got seventeen of them today more coming next quarter I like coming here because your wife I was fast I mean one of the few spots that has a fiber connection with gigabits beat good so good it scratched that part of my mind part that doesn't allow good do exist without condition so I started intercepting all the traffic on your network. That's what I noticed something strange when I decided to hack you you have I know you run a website called Plato's boys you're using tore networking to keep the servers animus you made it really hard for anyone to see it but I saw it onion routing protocol it's not as anonymous as you think it is whoever's in control of the exit nodes is also in control the traffic which makes me the one in control.

"esmail" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"esmail" Discussed on KCRW

"Is press. Play. I'm Madeline brand Reena Esmail studied music at Juilliard and Yale. She's taught music and composed numerous works. She's currently the composer in residence with St. symphony where she works with people experiencing homelessness and incarceration here in LA. Here. She is at a recent special performance KCRW explaining her involvement with St. symphony and how she met founder violinist VJ Gupta vision. I are two of very few people of our generation who are South Asian descent who are in western classical music, and so for years people would tell us, oh, do, you know, each other and and. We went to all the same schools. We did all these things at different times. And we were just in kind of each other's peripheral orbit until of all things we met at a conference in India. I just remember like I spent a year in India studying on a Fulbright and one of the things that occurred to me there was that homelessness looks really different. So it's something where there's abject poverty, but people are out on the streets. People are on your stoop, people interact with you, and you get to know them. So I mean, there are many people who were homeless or living in shantytowns or Steph where I would I would actually feel like I knew their name. I would have conversations with them, and I had this serious reverse culture shock when I came back to America. And I would be remiss if I said that I ever really recovered from that culture shock because we see in America people who are experiencing homelessness or even. Like animals that we eat or consume or whatever they're all hidden away. So when you come back, you're just aware that there are these things that are happening. And you don't know what they are. And you can't see them in front of you. So to me being on skid row and doing work on skid row was a place where I just felt like I was able to really interact with people in the same way. I had before. And so how did you get involved with St. symphony? Well, so I just called when I moved back to L A in two thousand fourteen and I said, hey, I want to be involved. What does that look like what does that mean as performers? I mean, you're playing a thing that is composed for you to play especially if you're a western classical performer, and you don't improvise you would just you would decide what your plan play that. But as a composer, it's very special because you can be an engineer of space, you decide, you know, these are the people who I want to be in the room. These are the people who I want to make music with one another. This is how I want them to interact, and I think when we start discussions with music, and when we start discussions by being with another in a way where everyone's happiness and everyone's ability to moat is bound up in each other's those discussions that are tougher are easier to start I think. And we talked earlier about being the child of immigrants and that tension being raised in America child of immigrants and being raised in the tradition of western classical music as the best music you now are composing in Indian the Indian tradition as well. And so how is it for you VJ Singh? It terrifies him. How's it for you do that it terrified me as well initially because I think when you say, you're a composer? And you look like, I look the first thing that people will ask you is do you do anything with the music? It seems like an innocent question. But for someone who spent their entire life just trying to be a good western classical orchestral composer. If feels like, oh, did I do something wrong that I, you know, I'm not proficient in both things, admittedly. I started out feeling very guilty. That I wasn't. Doing this thing that I looked like I should be doing, and it almost made me shy away from it. Because I thought I don't want to be in a situation where I'm speaking for a musical tradition. That's from the culture that I'm from. But not really know about it. And so I mean ten years ago, I actually started studying Hindustani classical music because of that. And because of just being able to have that knowledge, I feel like I'm able to compose music that's truly most of my music not the piece that you'll hear today. But almost every other piece is between these two worlds of Indian and western classical music, and my idea is just that we're from these two cultures that are truly on the opposite sides of the world from one another. So in the saddest satisfactions, there's no way that we can live in both places at once. But to me, you know, if we can't do that physically. Maybe there's a way that we can do that musically, and we can live in both places musically. So that is my goal, and if people who are orchestral audiences or quarrel audiences come to my my music, they'll be able to see something. Themselves in it. But also if an Indian audience comes to my music, they will also be able to see themselves in it. So I mean that's my goal. Interesting because you're talking about earlier how that sort of that was not a sense of shame that you had. But a sense of oh, I need to just put this aside. And did you feel that way as well? Yup. And focused entirely on the western tradition. You know, as a child of immigrants, we always have to make a lesser version of ourselves and take this sliver that also fits into western culture perfectly. We just had to figure out what's the thing. That's going to look like we belong wherever we are. So you get really good at doing that. But then you also feel like maybe you're not able to be your whole self. You know, and I mean, the thing that I think is so mazing is like the very things that you have to hide about yourself when you're younger are the exact things that make you unique when you're older so sense of celebration rather than shame. Exactly. Yeah. Okay. So I think now it'd be a good idea to hear a little bit more than happy to. So we're going to bring on the Cortes. Yeah. Just just a couple of words first of all to introduce our incredible violas. Tanya Burton are cellist Dustin sale and violinist. Mitch Newman's these walk on the state..

St. symphony America India Reena Esmail VJ Singh VJ Gupta KCRW LA Yale shantytowns founder Mitch Newman engineer Steph Tanya Burton Dustin sale ten years
"esmail" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"esmail" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"I am pretty sure he wasn't very happy with me for leaving. Tell me about the conversation. What happened? I went to him. And I said look. You know, my parents are pressuring me I saw applied to Dartmouth. And I got in. I said that had I'd have to leave in two months. So it's kinda short notice for the presidency v. To be leaving. And and he just kind of said, okay. He didn't really say much. He said, okay. What do you think? He was mad because he didn't return my calls or emails after that. Oh, really? Yeah. The company kind of went under and failed. And I'm sure he lost a lot of money and. Yeah. And you've never spoken to him since I not not a lack of trying. I've tried to reach out them several times. He just doesn't it doesn't respond. Oh, how's that? Make you feel. I feel terrible. I mean, it goes back to you gave me a lot of money really believed in me, and the people that were working for me really believed in me. And and I failed them I felt them. I didn't I didn't do a good job. Yeah. Wow. I mostly just imagining it from his perspective. Like he's like he's like this big investor. I imagine I don't know who he has that I'm imagining like sort of like a a an investor type person who's like you still like sort of like taking big bets on these founders and like and like you're in the middle of it with them. And then all of a sudden his like, the the main guy the person he's fit the bet on his like I wanted to get creative writing. And the semester starts really soon. So I gotta go. That creative writing class in a surprise to no one did not put Sam on an immediate path to fame and fortune. There is still lots of prior for him to get through including one of the lowliest jobs in Hollywood, which is saying a lot that's coming up after the break. Is episode is brought to you by three and a half degrees. The power of connection a new podcast from Facebook three. And a half degrees is hosted by David Fisher Facebook's, vice president of global business and marketing partnerships in each episode Fisher looks at the internet and its impact on two different business leaders. You'll hear each person's story and this apprising connections..

Sam David Fisher Facebook Facebook vice president Fisher Hollywood two months
"esmail" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"esmail" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"In fact, I did a whole series of stories on turning the homecoming podcast into the homecoming TV show. And the reason I am very excited to talk to Sam 's Mel today on without fail. It goes back to an interview I did for that series. I was interviewing Sam along with the star. Julia Roberts, and there was a moment from that conversation that just stuck with me. It's a moment when Julia was raving about Sam, I mean, I think Sam is incredibly good at understanding people and how we work, and what makes people as highly creative is they can be and and is highly motivated as they can be to hear you both talk. It really does sound like you both. It was really this sort of like almost instant creative coming together. In a weird ways has that happened before is that like was unusual. Oh, it's I I mean, I've done one moving of them one television show side of this. So my experience is limited. But the fact that she and I hit it off so quickly. So early is practically unheard of. I mean, the first thing we do is like, oh, yeah. It's true every day. Listen to them talk. I was struck by crazy all this must have been for Sam like just three years earlier before mister robot came out. No one had ever heard of Sam 's mail, and now here he was palling around with Julia Roberts, one of the biggest movie stars in history with a career spanning more than a quarter of a century. Like, it was nothing. Sam he's old in Hollywood years over forty and he'd been trying to make it as a filmmaker for decades, the very same decades that Julia Roberts have been winning Oscars and setting box office records and becoming the highest paid actress in Hollywood history was that like to struggle for so long, and then have his breakthrough be so sudden and happened so relatively late. And so that is what I went to talk to him about to invite him to our studios for compensation you you've had a lot of success now. But it was a long time coming. Yes, did not have a lot excess. Prior to that. Yeah. So I want to talk about the prior. Yes. And so we did. And it turns out that the prior the long winding path through multiple failures that led Sam to where he is. Now is an incredibly fascinating story that goes places that I never expected as a story that starts a longtime back in SAM's childhood with his early love of movies, although not necessarily kid movies. I remember very early on watching this is gonna sound so pretentious. But it's true. It's it's I was watching French connection. I must have been like five or something or maybe even younger for for her. I watching the French connection fringing the French connection. And I just remember that car chase scene. You know, where where it's there about the hit the baby carriage, and you're just like freaking out. And then the baby carriage has no baby. It's just a bunch of garbage in there. And I just that's moment. Specifically stuck out to me? And I remember watch. That movie pretty obsessively. But it wasn't until I saw ET that I that. That's when I started to think about doing it myself, and how old were you at this point. Now, I think I'm about eight or maybe seven, and it's the first movie theater. My parents were really they didn't understand. They had no kind of way to contextualized why I was so obsessed with movies because they weren't they weren't they weren't American and be vigor up in Egypt, and they didn't really have movie theaters. So so this was completely American phenomenon to them going to the movie. Yes. Zoe. And they didn't end up popcorn. And like, they're just thought the whole thing was ridiculous..

Sam Julia Roberts Hollywood Egypt Mel Zoe three years
"esmail" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"esmail" Discussed on The Watch

"I think that was that was what the what the the season was doing and it was for them and it was about their their emotional arcs. I, I don't know. You know, like Netflix is not bullshitting when they said we don't tell people about the numbers like they, they don't, and they play their cards close to the vest. So I don't really know where they're at about. I love the world that we made, and and there's a lot of imagination that was that was poured into it. And I think there's actually there's just much more potential there. And I think that Justin and scenarios performance in in the show made them very intriguing characters. So kind of just like sitting around thinking about it. There's there's, there's more there's the big little book tour man. We city field book tour is right. Ticket for that, but you never know it. It's it's it's business, but it's also about people and who wants that. You know, I don't wanna be. I wanna be guy who forces this thing out into the world, and it's sad and everyone's like, does don't do it. And that I think that just takes a little bit of time. I do think the season and the show found a lot of people and made a lot of people happy in their their viewing experience in. So I don't know. We'll see. It's just sitting up there on on on my Roku right now. It's strange to imagine that it just exists right now. I could call it up on this computer right now. Would you let me know please don't have you guys gotten much. I sure there are lots of Easter egg blog posts about maniac, but as people have people brought up the big hug bug. Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay. That was I saw max putting that out there on that was that was a little. I think, a little arrangement between he and care. That was awesome to put it there in that scene. Billy through it and destroyed it. No see from the trigger -tective Saturdays mug. Usually, Andy can speak to this. Usually when you have a prop that's going to break someone wheels, a cart with eighteen of them. Also, I did discover first hand that the beauty of TV said is everyone takes their job extremely seriously, which is great. Everyone is passionate about their particular lane and prop. People will populate stuff with props like they will bring a lot of props and they will bring you out options. And if you don't say anything, they will bring you like seven of those options, but the mall out. Finally, we're lucky to have you here Patrick because we're, we're fans, but also we know that you have listened to this podcast once or twice, and because we have welcomed Sam Esmail onto service, kind of an informal ombudsmen at times and criticize us for things, I'd like to give you a chance on the microphone of their issues with us. Oh, do you have a war or just some notes, some direct direction you'd like us pursue? You know, SAM's note famously just for context was you guys should start watching TV shows again. Star Wars got a little aggressive, but we've tried to adjust his his, his desires, your show. We've missed a show. We've sold short. Is there something Chris was really wrong about the like to bring up again? So we could talk about it. Oh, we could get into the leftover season three. The final thoughts on leftover season three. Chris wants to get a it down to happen. Even hurt. Yeah, I can't even remember what like, well, no, actually, I know I know what you were picking back then though, too. It's it's sort of the the show, kinda like maniacs sorta asked a lot in terms of letting go of realism. You were saying you were saying something a couple of weeks ago that I responded to two, which is that it's hard. It's hard for the emotional stakes to feel real when it is not realism. And actually I think Jona on the first day of crap when we were chatting, he was like, can't happen, won't watch it. And then he said that like his, his sort of aesthetic is just sort of like fantasy no side by, yeah, I just want real things because I feel it. I just feel it. It's a real when it's realism, and it's not like, sir, this is an arby's dreaded..

Chris Sam Esmail Netflix arby us Justin Jona Billy Andy Patrick
"esmail" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"esmail" Discussed on The Watch

"It's my number one. Boy, it's degree. I'm so happy. You're still doing this. I've been doing it the whole time. You haven't been listening every time. It's Alison, Herman. It's fantasy just like lemme. Tell them now publicly. I'm so grateful for their support their appearances on this podcast. Yeah, it was friend of the pod in my executive producer, Sam Esmail who mentioned to me in Albuquerque, a week ago. What a good job everyone was doing in the podcast, don't you think I said. Because I one hundred percent because you only listen to dual threat with Ryan russillo. That's kind of my dad's. You're only guy didn't consume any you want to be honest, I denied many podcasts. That's not exactly true right there was that one day where you really driving Santa Fe podcasts are incredible. I only listened to the Dave Changsha. That's true. That is it's hard to imagine a podcast more suited to my interests, but the watch seems like a soft landing for me now that I'm bad, she's good to see you what's up, man. You're back from New Mexico. Andy. If you live under watch rock for last couple of weeks has been in New Mexico shooting the pilot episode of his show briar patch with Dawson. She was there with the great Dennis hopper, the ghost. I know you tell us a little bit about the experience, so I guess I have ton of questions. I'd love to answer them. One thing I want to know is what are you gonna miss about the q. You know, you're talking to a guy who just spent forty five nights in the same hotel room. And when I say hotel room, I don't want people to think like sweet. This is not dot colleague here. This was collie. I'm in Mr. Hollywood. Like I had a big hotel room doc, Hollywood state at a pretty quaint, you know, being be, yeah, it wasn't like that either. It wasn't a very small hotel room with a balcony that I would like into a prison cell itself because it was like a balcony. But then there was like some next that why did they make six inch balconies? He was a six inch felt like sledded stone knows maybe the sun. You know, I'm gonna miss the experience. It was. It's really it was an incredible experience. Yes, a total dream and what was incredible and also disarming was you know the people who do this regularly, the people who work in production, the people who are who are in the show crew. It is a Carney life, you know, in a way that is very different from the life lives that we've lived up to this point. I mean people some production people were there for three or four months to work on the show. Some people are still they're closing the office onto the next one..

New Mexico Sam Esmail Dave Changsha Dennis hopper Ryan russillo Alison executive producer Carney Albuquerque Mr. Hollywood Hollywood Andy six inch one hundred percent four months one day
"esmail" Discussed on Diagnostics and Usage

Diagnostics and Usage

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"esmail" Discussed on Diagnostics and Usage

"But you've got this fine aperture control, which lets you control the blur in portrait mode. It's got louder speakers and the iphone ten had allowed speakers, but it's got even louder stereo speakers and it allows you to record video in stereo up every iphone up until this one records the audio from your video and mono. And. With the upgraded processor. Apple was very careful to say that face ide- it's just a tiny bit faster. They didn't want to. I don't know if you noticed they didn't wanna call the space ID to because. Oh, seems like even give us how much better? Yeah, it's better. I can't wait for the reviews. I'm dying for the us because I bet you it's going to be so negligible. It's gonna be. I remember when touch ID came out there like it's twice as fast, and I think that's what we're all kind of hoping for to get from this, but they didn't say that they updated the what do they call it the something. Are you talking about the hardware in the notch? Yeah, no, that is exactly the same. That hardware is. I tickle. And on the new chip. Yeah, and so nothing there got upgraded. I mean, the probably isn't even anything there to upgrade in the first place, but it was a little disappointing that this s model normally in the Esmail you look out for some kind of hardware feature, touch, ID, three touch, and we got a new chip, but we always get a new chip. And so this was kind of a disappointing hardware upgrade to go to s year. But now it's, you know, I retweeted a bunch of tweets from Gherman and I wanna I wanna read his tweets verbatim because I really think he said it better than I could ever say it. I'm an essentially. He said, I quote, very little incentive to upgrade from the ten to the tennis. He goes the three GS had video recording and voice control. The forests had Siri, the five s had touch ID the six had three d. touch with four k. video this time around. You've got depth control and photos. But that likely doesn't make the bar for ten owners to to fully to fully upgrade. And I, I really agree with that statement. It just it it. It makes sense. The other thing he said was that it seems like it is the smallest year-over-year upgrade and I phone history, a single flagship model..

Gherman Esmail Apple Siri tennis four k