18 Burst results for "Ernest Becker"

"ernest becker" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:11 min | 2 weeks ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Yeah, you gave me about five road there that we could shoot off so I'm Gonna I'm to try to come around to all of them are or get the Minnesota I. I'll see if I could do it, but I you mentioned James Lindsay who I've had on the show of course who wrote the book with with Peter Begosian about how to important conversations? One of the things that I'm sort of amazed by by the sort of James Lindsay Peter Bogosian Michael Shurmur the more I would say left leaning largely atheist crew is that many of them are suddenly going? You know all those religious people we were screaming about. They're not so bad and they're appearing onstage with religious people. There you know I don't know if you know but just about six or eight months ago. I was on stage in front of fourteen thousand students at Liberty University with Jerry Falwell junior right next to me, and it was just absolutely incredible and sure we have some differences. We have some theological differences. We have some. Spiritual differences and political differences but nobody cared. Everybody was thrilled. It was wonderful. But? I'm curious what you think about that. The fact that some of the main drivers of secularism are suddenly. Go looking at you guys. Go and what you're. You're a lot nicer than than that other crew over there. But Yeah I. Don't think it's just modern intersectional ISM. That we're strange bedfellows, I think we have a very similar system, and that's why we actually argued Dave, you can't argue with people that you don't have the same victimology with. We have the same epistemology as atheists like we, we do have demands. Of of we have different man's of literature, and we we, we come at things believing that there are external forces, the difference being that the natives would believe in all in a strictly material universe, but but material is super important to Christians as well and the idea that truth lives externally. Is it's it's really important to us as well so I think that yet that we find ourselves on the same is with respect to where victimology and. You know this I mean Christians are perfect and you know we've slammed in our thousands, and we've made some massive mistakes and one of my favorite quotes of a Christian theologian. Augustine who said that the church is a whore, but she's my mother. We're aware dame of the things that have happened in history that are stupid. There's a lot of people who used the scripture to do. Some really stupid things But yet we find ourselves now. Debating with people who samant the small jet we can't. I can't have a conversation with you if you can define reality the way that I define reality and so to me once again it's an it's an epistemological factor. Do you sense young people that are that are showing up now. Sure the lights and the music is something, and you're explaining sort of the end of secularism, so they feel that there's a whole there. But, do you? Do you sense just like in the last couple of years, maybe because of the culture war because of social media that the whole that they have. To be way bigger that it's maybe not just spiritual, but it's also very community based, you know. We got all of these tools and APPS and we thought it was GONNA make us more connected, and in many ways, social media made us antisocial, and now people are trying to find community in oddly more traditionally whether there's lasers are not. Proof right. Yeah absolutely I. Remember. There was a book written to the Nineties by guiding hot him. Talk, the title of Bowling alone, and it's sort of a sociological book just looking at. The erosion of community in America. Beginning with the Bowling Leagues, you know how like bumbling leagues were like? They replaced Church for. You know my grandfather's generation. And a now yet? That's gone, so there's definitely there's definitely a sociological factor. I think that to be quite honest with you. The sociological factor may vary will be one of the biggest factors in the church where all we understand the value of community. We believe the allegedly. That were not made to be alone. There was one thing in the garden. That was wrong. A lot of people think that you know in Genesis story that God Greece's garden. It's like it's perfect. Paradise was not optimal for living and the one thing that was wrong was that Adam was alone and so. Know. He creates even so created for one another and we need one another desperately, so that's definitely attended of our faith. And there's definitely still theological. To Church. And the there's a giant I also believe that. There's There's this book written by Polar Prize Winner I think his name is Ernest Becker The title of it was the denial of death, and he was in his book. He's naked. He sort looking at secular and kind of what it's done in modernity. And he believes that with the death of God. Society sort of like okay well now I, because I need somebody to validate my reality, the validate my existence to see me because we need to be seen as human beings, and that's why we need relationship, and so he believed that the first option that modern stride was the love option. In that and that's why everybody talks about having the one finding the want like like three hundred years ago. Like Love wasn't the reason why you got married. You know like, but now we put all this emphasis. That's why we have apocalyptic hookup culture. You know in New York because we're all alternative, find God. And for somebody to validate your your living. So to me. That's what the saying. Are you saying not on tinder? Is that what you're telling me Oh? He's definitely on tender. He studied at least searching for people. He's going after the the ease left the ninety nine going up to the one So I think that I think that what you said is absolutely right in a roundabout way I think that you know we're. We're looking for love. We're looking for romance, and I think we you know in in a strange way we do find it in community. We find that validation that we we need. But, but in a in a more spiritual sense date yet we found we find it in God in that he and that's what I believe. That's what we teach. We teach that God's the one who sees you. He's the one who. Goes after us. You're not the one who's been going after him, but he's been the one that's been pursuing because he knows you knows that against you and he loves you and for so when people sort of when that settles them. there's a lot of things in their life change and being part of a community. Is.

Bowling James Lindsay Peter Bogosian Liberty University Jerry Falwell James Lindsay Minnesota Peter Begosian Ernest Becker Michael Shurmur Dave Augustine America Greece Adam Paradise New York
"ernest becker" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

The Adventures of Memento Mori

05:54 min | Last month

"ernest becker" Discussed on The Adventures of Memento Mori

"Inflicting the least amount of harm for beneficial outcome. Autonomy what's in the best interest of the patient and justice? Every patient is seen as equal. In Normal Times these principles are framed in addition to logical way with the patient being at the center. In Times of crisis like we're in right now, the ethical focus shifts from being in the best interest of the individual patient to the best interest of society understood in the utilitarian sense of the greatest good for the greatest number. The same four principals have meanings depending on who is framed at the center, the patient or society. For example in a pandemic, if a patient with the virus code designation into cardiac or respiratory arrest, and the medical staff is not fully dressed in P.. They cannot assist the patient. The life of that doctor or that nurse, the lives of their families, other patients, and the future lives become more important than life of that person dying in front of them. The unthinkable coldness of the real version of any of these thought experiments is is something that very few people ever have to really confront for most of US moral philosophies, a luxury to sort of like fun thing to read about and think about and talk about on podcasts and for some people. It's really brutal data day. decision making. Tool it's important to note that doctors and nurses are not making these decisions on their own or on a case by case basis. There are ethics committees that work with triage units to make these decisions system-wide. That's hospitals now. Let's talk about us. Individual citizens and this mask situation. America has this fundamental. Problem? It has many, but but one of them is that we are so enamored of the idea of freedom. In capital F-, freedom. And we're so. That is so deeply part of the country and the way that people consider themselves Americans. That they in my opinion misread. A lot of things as impinging upon their freedom. Right like it's like well I'm not gonNA wear masks because this is America in America were free to do whatever we want, and and don't tread on me and all that Kinda stuff freedom doesn't mean that you do whatever you want with no consequences. That's the first thing that's not what freedom it's. The second thing is that. You understand like when you know. There are stories that have come out of people getting angry that other people were wearing masks, which is. Which is truly bananas because they're wearing masks for you. They're not wearing them for them. They're wearing the for you bonkers. It's truly bonkers and. Then! There's another level where it's like if you want to. Live in a place that provides you freedom. That place has to has to function right like. A non-functioning state. Will not provide you any freedom at all, and in order to function properly right now. We all have to do this thing. We all have to wear masks. If everyone wears masks, we win. That's just it like straight up. If everybody wears masks, the rate of transmission falls below way below one. and. We get to go back to normal. You get to go back to the freedom that you so desire. And if nobody wears masks, you don't like if nobody wears masks like. Millions of people die and everyone is sick and the hospitals are overrun and. The healthcare system breaks down and the food chain breaks down, and if that's more freedom, somehow you have a weird conception of freedom towards the end of the first season of the good place yet realized that this show isn't about the after life at all. It's about friendship. It's about what the characters are willing to sacrifice for the others well being. And, this wouldn't you know. Is a philosophy called contractual ISM. Developed by TM Scanlon, his book, what we owe to each other the reason I love it so much as it starts from the premise that we all things to each other. It's not the the name of the book isn't do we owe something to each other question mark it's what do we owe to each other and it seems to me that right now. When we are again all going through the same thing, the think the ferry basic minimum that we owe to each other is to try to not make each other sick. What do we owe to each other? That is the question Tim scanlon asked decades ago and it is a question. I will try to answer. Or the next three hours sir. Thanks, we all have a voice in our head Bev. Voice doesn't tell us what to do or not do, but it does. Warn us when we do. Things don't feel good or right the difference between reasonable. What does it mean to be a reasonable person? I may have a different definition. Liked it then why choose to be good every day? If there is no guarantee reward, we can count on now or in the afterlife I argue that we choose to be good because of our bonds with other people and our innate desire to treat them with dignity simply put. We are not in this alone. What we owe to each other. More Michael Sure Ernest Becker and some existential dread. After this. Do you consider yourself fun of podcasts? Show it by donating to the adventures at Memento. Mori donates ten dollars or more, and we'll mail you. A MEMENTO MORI keepsake a hundred dollars or more. We'll give you a post. Credits.

America US respiratory arrest Tim scanlon TM Scanlon Mori Ernest Becker Michael
Living Life By Your True Values

Duct Tape Marketing

08:18 min | 6 months ago

Living Life By Your True Values

"This is John. John is my guest. Today is Dr John De Martini. He is a world renowned specialist in human behavior. A researcher author author and global educator on his most recent books has called the values factor the secret to creating inspired and fulfilling life. So let's talk about values. Shall we welcome John. Thank you for having me. Thank you appreciate the time here. So let's give people a little I read kind of the official stuff that you do. But let's give giving people a little bit of background. How'd you get here to to where you are today? Well I was a I started when I was seventeen. Actually I I had a dream to travel the world into teach. I set out to do that at age. Seventeen almost eighteen and I god I. It just didn't give up on it. And I just kept of emerging. It had a learning problem as a child. I was told that I went in first grade. Never be able to read never ever built right now relocate Mounting never go very far in life and high school dropout was living on the streets from years and But then I met this amazing teacher named Paul Bragg when I was seventeen that made me after During his talk for the first time in my life I thought maybe I could to overcome learning problems. Someday I could read become intelligent and I'll tell you what that was the most inspiring night and the turning point of my life and I never gave upon. I had to. I learn how to pronounce words and spell and practice speech things. I had a speech problem and I just I never gave up on it. I just and this is is the thing I just love doing much so at seventeen you were still not reading or even speaking well. I didn't read my first book till I was eighteen was it was it ultimately neurological solar psychological. or well I had when I was very young I had a speech impediment so I had to go to Speech pathologist very young. And then I when I got into first grade I had what they defined. Now's dyslexia. I I wasn't able to put it all together together. The only way I've been through school by asking smart kids questions and and but but you know when you really really really really WanNa do something and there's no turning back on it you can turn your life around. That's what happened to me. Just I had such a desire to win and I never thought I'd ever be intelligent. I had a desire to be intelligent and man when I went out on the pursuit of that it was like a relentless pursuit that I I I had with. The help of my mother had read thirty words a day and pronounce them and spell them properly and put them in a sentence and say I could go to bed until at thirty new words a day when I was eighteen and my vocabulary groove and eventually took a ged in high school equivalency test and a college entrance exam. And and I went on and then I end up being a scholar so I I just never give up on IT I. I've read now over thirty thousand books and I just I love reading. I just love learning and you people might have heard me introduce you as a doctor John D. Martinez so you now have even achieved advanced degrees. Yeah did I did ten years. Here's a college in almost in. Yeah I just. I wanted to be a teacher philosopher heater. That's so high fulltime travel around the world today researching and teaching students all of the world today every country. So I've I've been quite Hundred and fifty four countries in this January one hundred fifty four and you reside you were telling me before we started recording Somewhat unique home I live on ship call. The world went on their most time. I'm traveling like my residential last eighteen years on a condominium private condominium ship that travels all over the world I often on his I travel placed. That's right so mentioned the name of one of your core works is called the values factor. I wonder if you could define that. Term values factor. Yeah well every individual regardless of gender or age or culture lives moment by moment by a set of priorities a a set of values themes that are most important to least important in your life an every in this hierarchy a set of values that they hold things that the most importantly sports so this set of values is unique to them and it determines how they perceive what they decide and how they act the the perception decisions Actions are dependent on these values and whatever's highest on their value they spontaneously inspired intrinsically to pursue and this this is where they'll excel and fulfill and expand whatever's low in their values lower in the party's they'll require extrinsic motivation to get them to do it so they'll need lead punishment if they don't do it rewarded. They do kind of things in order to get them to do it. And this is not where they excel. This is where they kind of held back and finding out what's really truly truly truly most important people's lives and structuring their life through prioritize action a delegation to pursue that it's extraordinary it capacity to build momentum and go on to greater achievement as an entrepreneur or is anybody in any field early. I'm fascinated by that. And that's what the values factor is How do we get people to live concurrently in line with what they value most so they can be inspired so let me make sure? I'm I'm hearing this right. You're suggesting that people have these values even if they haven't it really associated words or names with them you're saying that they make decisions based on them and part of the job is to figure out what they are. Well if you ask somebody what their values are they'll tell you social cliches and ideologies and I'd idealisms that are injected in inculcated from individuals individuals like mothers fathers preachers teachers conventions traditions mores of the society that their subordinates and conforming to but I'm not interested in that I'm interested in what their life demonstrates I look at. I have thirteen value determined to help look objectively what their value determined. Germans are so how do they feel their space because things are really important to me fill their space with how they spend their time. They find time time spent time on things that are truly valuable. What is it the energizes when they're doing something on their values? The energy goes up there not to damage goes down. Wears their money. Being spent look carefully at how they spend their money tells you what the priorities are where they most organized and ordered where they most disciplined disciplined spontaneously. What is that they think about visualizing affirm inside internally dialogue with themselves about how they want their life that shows evidence coming true not fantasies but what are they converse with other people about most about what they wanNA keep bringing the conversation to what inspires brings a tear of inspiration to there is what exactly is it? The consistent persistent goals that they've been pursuing that are actually coming true not the ones fantasies that are self-defeating and what is the thing that they love studying about reading about learning about in listening to I look at those value determines to get a clear understanding what their life is truly demonstrating not their fantasies about what they hope it will be. However would you suggest also that there are a lot of people that fifty sixty seventy eighty percent of their lives? They're living outside of those things that you just described exactly. Most people people are comparing themselves to others putting on others on their pedestal. Minimize themselves into the pit living vicariously through other people paying high nine dollars for other people's brands instead of building brand around themselves and they are basically doing one. Emerson warned not to do n being imitating people which is sort of a death breath sentenced to their their self worth their empowerment and key. The key is to giving themselves permission to not subordinate to the world on the outside but to let the voice navision vision on the inside direct their destiny and take command of their life as as Ernest Becker says instead of conforming to the collective heroes you WANNA BE A. They'd be the individual hero within and so in the process of doing it. Most people don't give themselves permission to do that. They they live in the shadows of others instead of on the shoulders of giants.

Dr John De Martini Researcher Paul Bragg Speech Pathologist Ernest Becker John D. Martinez Official Emerson
"ernest becker" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:30 min | 11 months ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Support for NPR comes from national car rental who wants you to know that with a membership in our complimentary Emerald Club you can skip the counter and and choose any car in the aisle at participating national locations. You can even select an upgrade without paying extra learn more at national car dot com slash. NPR When Sheldon Solomon was eight years old his mother told him about death. This was the day before my grandmother other died of cancer and I remember my mom sank to me. Oh say goodbye to grandma because she's very ill and I knew that but then she died ride the next day and I just remember because I was looking at postage snaps that I collected at the time of dead presidents and I was like Wow Washington stead Jefferson's Jefferson's dead grandma step that would be fine except for me being on duck in the long run sheldon realize that one day his time would also come decades later. That story reemerged in his life. He was a young professor at Skidmore College. He was searching for a book in the library when something in the fraud section caught his eye but was a book by a recently deceased cultural anthropologist Ernest Becker and that one was called the birth and death of meaning than in the first paragraph Becker says I want to understand what makes people act the way they do and I said Oh me too. Finally somebody not writing turgid jargon. That's a non pharmacological intervention for insomnia just asking a straightforward straightforward question you know what makes people act the way that they do show some more books on the shelf by the same author site grab the next book the denial Nihil of Death and again the first paragraph Becca writes the idea of death. The fear of it haunts the human animal like nothing else else. It is a main spring of human activity and in my gut that brought me way back to being eight years old I I I knew that that statement was at the very least true for my own life and suspected that it was true for most folks looks as well. Sheldon reached out to friends. Tom Presents key and Jeff Greenburg like him. They were young psychologists. All three of them fell in love with Ernest Becker books. The central idea captivated them was that people construct mental defenses to ward it off the fear of death. The three psychologists wrote up a paper elaborating on this concept. They would eventually call this idea terror management theory. They sent off their paper to a top journal certain they were going to rock the world of psychology. We didn't hear anything for about six months and then we got the review in the paper was rejected with a one sentence review. The reviewer said something along the lines of I have no doubt that that these ideas are of no interest whatsoever any psychologists alive or dead so this is a bit of a blow well well Jeff and Tom said Oh. I don't think they like it and be an even more immature than they. I said no they love it. They're just being coy but it turns out they weren't because the same paper was then rejected at almost every psychology journal sometime in later the researchers ran into the president of the American Psychological Association at a conference and the asked him why the people had been rejected and we just said hey we you think these are good ideas to which he replied they might be but psychology is an empirical discipline. you guys are experimental. Boura mountains psychologists and so why not try to gather evidence in support of Bekker's claims and it was in response onced to that suggestion that we generated what we call terror management theory which is basically just our effort to take all of Bekker's is ideas to generate hypotheses that we could subject to empirical scrutiny so one of the criticisms of Becker as you alluded to a second ago is that his work was not empirical he was making claims that he didn't have evidence for he was making these these intuitive leaps involving logic and philosophy but they won't based John on empirical data and experimentation and and you set out to try and fix that one of your first experiments involve judges in Tucson Hooah dealing with prostitutes prostitutes. Tell me about the study what found sure certainly so you know a nutshell. What terror management theory states is that the uniquely glee human awareness of death gives rise potentially debilitating existential terror that we manage hence the term terror management management by embracing culturally constructed belief systems that give us each a sense that life has meaning and we have value and as you? I said what would people said back in the days in the nineteen eighties as well you know this is philosophical and psychoanalytic speculation. What we reason does is that if becker is right if our beliefs about reality serve to minimize death anxiety won't let's see what happens if we remind that some people of their own mortality because what should happen is they should cling more likely to their beliefs so the first study was is done on municipal court judges in Tucson Arizona. I think we had about thirty judges and we randomly divided them into two groups have for the judges judges were reminded of their mortality by in the middle of a bunch of questionnaires being asked to just write down their thoughts and feelings about their own mortality mortality and then we show them actual court case of an alleged prostitute which was the most common crime. Tucson's municipal court at the time and we just ask them well. How much bail would you set. That's the amount of money that you have to pay to not be imprisoned until your trial. So what we found is in the control roll condition. The judges set an average bail of fifty dollars and that was good because that was the average bail for that crime at the time however the judge is reminded that they were going to die. they set a nine times higher bail an average of four hundred and fifty five dollars in what was astonishing is not only the magnitude of that difference but also the vociferousness the judges resistance when we told them at the end of the study what we had done. They just said there's no way that your idiot death questionnaire could could have in any way altered the way that. I objected this particular case so I guess the tail message as if you're going to court for a traffic ticket you better hope that the judge hasn't driven past the summit. Jerry on the way to court that day.

Ernest Becker Sheldon Solomon NPR Jeff Greenburg Tom Tucson Emerald Club Skidmore College Jefferson Becca fraud professor American Psychological Associa Jerry Washington Tucson Hooah president Bekker Arizona
"ernest becker" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of the tennis Prager show is. Happy. Yes. It is. You know, why? Because too happy make the world better and the unhappy make it worse. Happiness is all virtue. Yes. It is. Say moral virtue. It is not merely an emotional state. The pursuit of happiness is a noble end. The pursuit of fun is pointless. But the pursuit of happiness. Yes. Life liberty and the pursuit of happiness people smarter than the editors of the New York Times. I know that's hard to believe actually wrote that in the declaration of independence of the United States of America in pursuit of happiness. We have the happiness our very very very rarely do. I have a guest. That's a fact maybe twice a year. It is extremely rare. So you can imagine my respect for the guest that I am about to introduce you. We'll give you official by graphical data on the man is Dr Gary Applebaum, he's from Maryland. He's a geriatrician that means one who works with the elderly set. Correct. Dr. At a hospice physician. Hospice, I'm going to define it lay terms. Tell me if that is accurate it is the care given to people who are terminally ill and near the end of their life precise. You didn't say it was a place. So you are well-versed did as a service not a place could Dr Applebaum received his medical degree from the university of Pennsylvania when it was Shakespeare friendly that is his own addition. I might add good band. You're a good band. Doctor. Thank you. And then train them internal medicine and geriatrics at Johns Hopkins University has been attending university for the last four years. I made that up. Here. It is true. Throw in something silly. I feel that I have failed. You my listeners then he was John Hopkins University faculty he is a recipient of the geriatrics clinician of the year award given by the American geriatrics -ociety to one physician each year, and he's currently national medical director of four seasons. Hospice and palliative care while supervising care for over four thousand patients with life limiting illnesses in nineteenth states. You're sort of an emperor of an opinion that capacity. Let me ask you. I I always find this the subject, by the way of today's happiness. Our is hope and if anybody can deal with that question, I think honestly, it is someone who his life is devoted to people who seem to have hope. So that's why it's. Going to be very important to me. But I I really do want to ask you most young people are not. But just I think by design and not saying, it's good. It's not good. But are not interested in old people. Maybe their grandparents, you know, there's a lot of love grandchildren for grandparents often. But generally, speaking young to stay with young. Why did you at a young age decide to go into the medical field of the elderly great question? But before I answered I wanna thank you. And you've spoken of how your mother is. Maybe just appointed. She only had one son is a doctor. But yes, yes. But I will tell you that I have prescribed for people that I sense heavy severe vitamin h deficiency. I have I have prescribed your book and the happiness our for years, and it's made a difference. So what your brother has I will tell you seriously Dennis what you've done for America with the book and with the overall topic because happiness is so so very important outcomes. In medicine are there's tests there's diagnostics and there's medicines. But truly attitude attitude is everything, and and that's why I'm pleased to be here today to talk about this hope is an important part of it. How did I get involved in this? My first twenty years was in geriatrics, and I went into the field of internal medicine, and it was an interesting time in the eighties. When it was being recognized that no more where children little adults than seniors were just old adults. They were different you have to treat children different. Hence pediatrics. And we found that seniors tolerated medicines and treatments differently. And we need to treat them differently. So the field of geriatrics in America's really only since the eighties when I trained, and when it was at Hopkins training one thing that I found was the wisdom of these folks the advice, they could give you the way they handled their illnesses having had a full life behind them. It was really really unique and just plain joy, the fact that if if for no other reason day, they appreciate what you're doing for them. And you could make a big difference because at that time. Seniors who are being vaccinated people weren't focusing on on their hypertension. There were a lot of things said, oh, they're just old. So for the first twenty years, I really enjoyed dealing with people dealing with seniors who had not really been fully focused on. Then I changed at the end of twenty years and decided to focus a little more narrowly because what I really really enjoyed was talking to people who had end of life challenges, you know, people who knew and doctors told them that you know, we cannot cure you, and and at that point there are many patients who had lives very well lived and the last chapters were gonna go well in less they had a really unique focus on that last period of care. So at that point about ten years ago, interestingly in America, we were also realizing we need to professionalize the field of hospice and palliative care so can years ago, they started offering board certification to physician so now there's several thousand physicians in America who decided, you know. And this isn't just seniors, obviously, you know, twenty. Thirty percent of we care for unfortunately are younger people, but what they have in common. And what what young people don't want. What you realize you're not mortal, you're not immortal. What's gonna be what's going to happen? So we're dealing with people who have realized mortality and Arul is to make the most out of what's left, maybe not quantitatively. But certainly qualitatively, and I found it to be just an incredible blessing to be able to take that as a result do something that most people do not. And this is new in history people were surrounded by death. Historically, we are not now. The denial of of of the Nile of mortality, there's a very famous classic by Ernest Becker denial of death that that is what people do at almost any at any cost. You don't you are chosen to be immersed with people dying. How has that affected you? But once you get over the fact that we're all going to die, then the rest is joyful. I mean, we get over that. And we realize it's fascinating to see people that I work with. I mean, the the angels of hospice care the people in our team, the nurses, the aids social workers chaplains music therapist. These are angels who go from person to person knowing that patient will die. But the fact that they've made it a better journey. We don't even use the term die in our organization seasons. Hospice, we use transition. As a final sort of term because we get getting into theology. People have different beliefs than when you spend enough time with people who are getting towards the end you start thinking about what's after that end. But I will tell you the people you deal with in the people I work with it's not a fear of death anymore to fear of of a bad death. We like to the term that we've coined is the perfect end of life experience role that around in your in your brain a little bit. It's going to happen is going to be perfect. You're going to be miserable. Or is it going to be that brings me to another question? My non-professional and therefore far less numerous experiences in this regard. But nevertheless, I've had like everybody knowing people who who were at the end of life. Very few people have a good and of life. The last six months year, two years five years, maybe wracked with pain and disease. Family problems financial problems. How many people have a good end many many? And and nothing else what I'd like to convey to all the listeners that it doesn't have to go that way. And unfortunately in America, only about forty percent of people having had the experience of good care at the end is not known what? Well, well known. And and I think that it doesn't always go that way. And I will tell you for the thousands and thousands of people we care for who again it. It's the issue of hope diagnosis is made. And you know, you're not gonna live forever. And you're gonna live shorter than you thought you were going to live. Now, what is going to happen with that time? If we're going to send people in who are going to make sure that you're at home rather than emergency room that you're focusing on creating legacy projects for your kids, you're doing ethical wills for the future. So people will benefit from your knowledge when you're focusing on active, we doing things, and we're managing the symptoms exquisitely. That's a whole new ballgame. That is not something to fear is something to wake up every day and say the days are short. What are we gonna do with them? So when you add that hope that there's going to be something. Good tomorrow. They're already over the hope living forever. You get over that. And and unfortunately, most people have the experience you have. And it shouldn't be that way. It really shouldn't Gary Applebaum from Maryland sting wished man, working in the.

America Johns Hopkins University Prager New York Times United States Dr Applebaum Dr Gary Applebaum Gary Applebaum university of Pennsylvania Ernest Becker Maryland official Arul Dennis medical director
"ernest becker" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"To we want to grow and expand ourselves. But then when else is expanding quicker than me. How do we stop judging and comparing and will you tend more you you tend to only really compare yourself to people who are similar enough to you that their success, somehow means you're lack? You know, you don't tend to yourself. I'm sure you don't compare yourself to world champ champion gymnasts. Now, LeBron James or something like you don't really like compare yourself with him because it's not like it's not like that's close enough to what you do to feel that his success somehow threatening to you might compare scarcity minds. Well, you might compare yourself to other people who do video podcasts and who have thought leaders on their show, and you might wonder fringe on that with. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Also fam-, and you might think that their success somehow minimizes your success there that the ten million people that watched them somehow made the two million people that watched your less. Yeah. Whereas if you actually encounter one of those people on the street, you'll see that just touching one person is enough to make your day, better Hughes going changer. One person one person whimpers is enough. You should be making work to impact one person. Not to be like why need to change the world. That's right. If that happens that happens. To actors dude like movie stars. You know, you've seen these movie stars. And you're like, oh, man. They're so cool there so famous they make such beautiful there. Celebrate around because they're compare yourself to the younger hotter. Newer actor. I'm a has been I'm the it's forty something fifty not this young guy. Dude. I seen interviews. I think it was with Ethan Hawke who adore. I think he's wonderful. He's a so many amazing films. He was talking. He was talking about how he was a movie and he's getting the best reviews of his career. And how does it feel very honest? It was like you can have ninety nine amazing reviews. But then there's like that one review that is that and you're like, oh, they saw through my put forth their day. No. So again, it can play with us both ways. Right. One person. That tells us something nice could make your day. But one person that tells us something negative can ruin our that year. Human beings are so sensitive. I've always asked myself. This question is like war. So now, why is it that a great day? We're sad that it's going to end too soon and a bad day. We're sad. It's never gonna end right or relationship with time. You know, it's been a great day of like, oh, I wish this allows for so long, but it's going to be over soon in forty onto it. Yeah. Like, you said the bad thing. Never do you think it's gonna last forever. Like, why can't we be like, oh, the bad day will end very fucking quick. We just like let go of like anger. You know, what do you think holds us all back? The most was the thing that holds us back from our greatness from fear. What fear failure fear of success? Fear the judgment of other people, I think all those fears are rooted in the fear of death. And there's a theory it's called terror management theory, and it comes from Ernest Becker's work and the denial of death. But these psychologists than these studies basically say that if you remind people of their mortality. In subliminally. They tend to become more judgmental of the other more sort of hostile towards people who are different than them when you allow people of their more Tonia, and that's why politicians populist politicians like the man we have an office. He uses fear to get people to hate the other two immigrants or this or that. And it's like he's keeps using these words like it's dangerous coming after us. It's threat because you reminded people of their mortality, what makes people recoil and become like Morgan Austin towards the guy to vote in Japan. And even they're not even thinking mortality just a threat any kind of threat. You know, isn't the the country or the cultural Bhutan is that what it is every five times a day, they focus on their death..

Ethan Hawke LeBron James Ernest Becker Tonia Hughes Morgan Austin Japan
"ernest becker" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Can. Very. Very good, man. Just to say bad wisit? Welcome to very bad wizards Tamla summers from the university of Houston. Dave. It's that time of year, the listener selected episode. What do you think our listeners are gonna make you research for this one Jordan Petersen's entire autobiography? How he how he grew from from lobster at the bottom two lobster at the top. I looking over the suggestions, I was actually quite happy that none of them seemed with the exception of that I'll get to. But none of them seemed to research intensive for me. So today's episode we're going to in the first segment, we're going to each list our favorite topics, and then we will try to agree on five to six finalists last time. We did this. We chose six finalists. Oh, and in the second segment, we will continue our discussion of notes from underground incorporating part to in to the discussion, and that will conclude our notes from underground discussion. So the last time we did a listener selected episode. The six finalists one was ethics of care. Feminist critiques of ethical theory. That was in third place pedagogy and teaching was one that was towards the bottom. Implicit bias this came in second place, moral uncertainty. I think the of of the topic we eventually talked about with Wilma Casco. I think that was what was generating people wanting us to talk about some of the stuff that he's been doing friendship was one and the psychology of personality, which was the eventual winner just beating out implicit bias. So we ended up doing three of those. Right. Hopefully, this will be as fruitful. Yeah. And we we got a lot of suggestions. Right. One hundred twenty five suggestion. Yeah. All right. So I've whittled my list down to about seven, but really one of them. I think is more of an opening segment than a mean segment, but I'll just throw it out there. Why don't you go first? All right. Are we doing these in any order? I'm not. No, okay. So. Self-deception? Actually think there's a lot to be talked about when it comes to self-deception that we've touched a little bit on motivated reasoning. But there is a a good conversation to be had about things like the above average effect. You know, why why we seem so bad at assessing our own skills and abilities. And just conceptually. What how is it possible? Conceptually psychologically, self-deception really possible. What are we doing when we're deceiving ourselves? We at some level. No. I think I'm sure I saw this one. Yeah. Should've kept the the names of everybody. We will give credit. I have I have the names. I should have. But anyway, that would be a good one. I like, yeah. My my first one is from Stephen Kinsey. Where's that denial of death episode bitches that book fucked me up for a year and a half is this podcast, you're immortality project without even knowing what an immortality project is in relationship denial of death. I can pretty much say, yes. So this is the what Ernest Becker denial of death which read, but I have not. Yeah. So I'd be interested in doing this. It would require reading a whole book. But it's not a hard book to read his it. No, no, no. It's not hurtful, and it's good. It is good. It was good. When I read it in college haven't read it in a long time. So so, but it's interesting self-deception, by the way was Scott Harshbarger. Okay. Only because only because the people keep demanding Tamla. Yes. Star Trek where you're. They're gonna win. I have to put it put it in just because they're few mentions. I wanna pay attention to the listeners. I wanna give them what they want. These are beloved patriot supporters. If they want us to talk about certain episodes of Star Trek. Then you who are we were we? In particular. There's an episode. There's an episode suggested by Dominic Lulu Lulu, the inner light and to light and measured man. Inner light probably being my favorite Star Trek episode of old maybe for patriot bonus. How about that? I know I knew I knew I had to do that though ready. But after this, okay. This was also a couple listeners one Sandra wit were. And also, Gary flood both of them requested a cough story and one of and and in addition talked about took off I think in his will express, the desire that all his work, be burned not published and his first translator when against that wish and published it so the ethics of that might be a good way of leading into the Costco story yet..

Jordan Petersen Tamla summers Dominic Lulu Lulu Stephen Kinsey university of Houston Dave Wilma Casco Ernest Becker Scott Harshbarger Costco Gary flood cough Sandra wit patriot
"ernest becker" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Can. Very. Very good, man. Just to say bad wisit? Welcome to very bad wizards Tamla summers from the university of Houston. Dave. It's that time of year, the listener selected episode. What do you think our listeners are gonna make you research for this one Jordan Petersen's entire autobiography? How he how he grew from from lobster at the bottom two lobster at the top. I looking over the suggestions, I was actually quite happy that none of them seemed with the exception of that I'll get to. But none of them seemed to research intensive for me. So today's episode we're going to in the first segment, we're going to each list our favorite topics, and then we will try to agree on five to six finalists last time. We did this. We chose six finalists. Oh, and in the second segment, we will continue our discussion of notes from underground incorporating part to in to the discussion, and that will conclude our notes from underground discussion. So the last time we did a listener selected episode. The six finalists one was ethics of care. Feminist critiques of ethical theory. That was in third place pedagogy and teaching was one that was towards the bottom. Implicit bias this came in second place, moral uncertainty. I think the of of the topic we eventually talked about with Wilma Casco. I think that was what was generating people wanting us to talk about some of the stuff that he's been doing friendship was one and the psychology of personality, which was the eventual winner just beating out implicit bias. So we ended up doing three of those. Right. Hopefully, this will be as fruitful. Yeah. And we we got a lot of suggestions. Right. One hundred twenty five suggestion. Yeah. All right. So I've whittled my list down to about seven, but really one of them. I think is more of an opening segment than a mean segment, but I'll just throw it out there. Why don't you go first? All right. Are we doing these in any order? I'm not. No, okay. So. Self-deception? Actually think there's a lot to be talked about when it comes to self-deception that we've touched a little bit on motivated reasoning. But there is a a good conversation to be had about things like the above average effect. You know, why why we seem so bad at assessing our own skills and abilities. And just conceptually. What how is it possible? Conceptually psychologically, self-deception really possible. What are we doing when we're deceiving ourselves? We at some level. No. I think I'm sure I saw this one. Yeah. Should've kept the the names of everybody. We will give credit. I have I have the names. I should have. But anyway, that would be a good one. I like, yeah. My my first one is from Stephen Kinsey. Where's that denial of death episode bitches that book fucked me up for a year and a half is this podcast, you're immortality project without even knowing what an immortality project is in relationship denial of death. I can pretty much say, yes. So this is the what Ernest Becker denial of death which read, but I have not. Yeah. So I'd be interested in doing this. It would require reading a whole book. But it's not a hard book to read his it. No, no, no. It's not hurtful, and it's good. It is good. It was good. When I read it in college haven't read it in a long time. So so, but it's interesting self-deception, by the way was Scott Harshbarger. Okay. Only because only because the people keep demanding Tamla. Yes. Star Trek where you're. They're gonna win. I have to put it put it in just because they're few mentions. I wanna pay attention to the listeners. I wanna give them what they want. These are beloved patriot supporters. If they want us to talk about certain episodes of Star Trek. Then you who are we were we? In particular. There's an episode. There's an episode suggested by Dominic Lulu Lulu, the inner light and to light and measured man. Inner light probably being my favorite Star Trek episode of old maybe for patriot bonus. How about that? I know I knew I knew I had to do that though ready. But after this, okay. This was also a couple listeners one Sandra wit were. And also, Gary flood both of them requested a cough story and one of and and in addition talked about took off I think in his will express, the desire that all his work, be burned not published and his first translator when against that wish and published it so the ethics of that might be a good way of leading into the Costco story yet..

Jordan Petersen Tamla summers Dominic Lulu Lulu Stephen Kinsey university of Houston Dave Wilma Casco Ernest Becker Scott Harshbarger Costco Gary flood cough Sandra wit patriot
"ernest becker" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"Gut. Check to help me make my decisions in life. So because death all the junk falls away, all the stuff that doesn't matter all the stuff that we tell ourselves matters. But but really doesn't it really all falls away. And what we're. Left with is like the meat of what's important in. What's true? And so I have developed this like little strategy that I use to help me use that in my present life. So if I'm fairly hopeful for a lot of situations. I got so much like literally what kind of yogurt? Do you wanna buy like, okay? How about this now? But what I do is like if I have a decision to make I will think about that decision. And then I'll close my eyes and imagine myself on my deathbed looking guy on the present moment. And I imagine how I would feel on my deathbed if I went with option A, and then I observe how I feel in my gut like do I feel light and good or do? I feel kind of a pit in there. And then I observed the same thing for option B, and it's actually remarkable the clarity that we get when we frame decisions in how we will feel about them in our death. And how there's like a visceral reaction that we have. To that. So that that whole thing takes like five seconds, and I observe how I feel am from my deathbed, and it's helped me make so many decisions and get myself out of that decision paralysis that are so prone to that. It's something I incorporate into pretty close to my daily life, something I was kind processing as you were speaking is I feel like if somebody were to take this the wrong way, or if they were to not process it as fully in deeply when they're making decisions they could often choose to make the selfish decision something that serves themselves and not others, and maybe not so much with like close loved ones, but maybe with strangers and others because when you're on your deathbed, you're probably not imagining, you know, the random stranger at the grocery store, or, you know, on the customer service line, or whatever how do you combat that? And allow this to this processing in this kind of aware. Of death to empower your or support you in making the world a better place or in spreading love instead of just in focusing on what's going to benefit you and your core. People the most if that makes sense. Yeah. Absolutely. That makes me think about things and the first one is at either leave that in death. The truth comes out that again, all that Ansari stuff in our lives comes out and our true humanity comes out, and so if you're making a decision in light of your deathbed, and you are at your core a selfish person, then that's what's true. And that what is what will manifest in your decision? But if you are a person who is someone who cares for others and wants to help others deeply in your humanity and your filled with love than that will also come out on your decision. And I believe that most people. The very very very most people are that have that core of love. And so I think that's that's really where it comes out. I don't I don't know that we have a ton of control over it. Also makes me think of a psychological concept called terror management theory, which is was developed by Ernest Becker back in the seventies. And his hypothesis is that everything that humans do in our lives. Everything all the decisions that we make great and small they're all come from the fear of death, which is really interesting and kind of like blows your mind to think about and I don't know if I necessarily believe that. But there were a group of psychologists after he passed on that continued on his work, and they did sincere management steady, psychological studies and one of them was they took basketball players, and they wanted to expose one group to the idea of death. And then the control group to just, you know, have them. I'm not exposed to the idea of that. So they they divided up into two groups and they gave them each a pep talk. And then had them do a free throw challenge and the control group they were basically just given a normal pep talk..

Ernest Becker basketball Ansari five seconds
"ernest becker" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"So you know, that has that going for them. Yeah. So that's it. I mean. Yeah. I think it's probably a good strategy is to build up your base. And if you walk into a publisher, and you show them that you have a podcast just averages one hundred thousand down that's gonna they're not even going to blink. They're gonna sign you. Right. Then I think there were more in the position of shaking off publishers. Okay. Cool. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So how did your your process coming out of religion happened? Because when you're you're actually as you put it you you were a Christian for thirty nine years. You were a pastor. So you were still a Christian by the time you made it into the pulpit, right? Well, of course, why would I even want to be in the pulpit, if wouldn't well it okay, something you brought up was the with the nondenominational churches, you you were in. You didn't get a theological education. No. No. So they take the best Christian and put the Christian in the pulpit. Yeah. And the most charismatic. So yeah, I get. So I was raised Presbyterian by pretty liberal parents. They their their religion was very social cultural and not a big deal by the time. I was eleven or twelve years old. I was drummer already I got recruited by the Baptist to be in their praise team. And it was a big difference. The message was about heaven and hell and salvation and it just over at the Presbyterian church. It was just lovey dovey. The I wish I wish to God I'd stayed there. Because what what took me into fundamentalism and radicalism was was this, you know, staunch. You know, if you deny me before men all deny before my father in heaven, if if you're lukewarm I'll spit you out of my mouth, and there's all this macho call to like, go, go big or go home within fundamental Christianity. And you know, so to you know, in my mind, I was I was elevating myself to a more powerful radical position in God's eyes by going from Presbyterian to Baptist and in when the church split over the gifts. I went with the gifts and became kind of a charismatic guy been because I was musical I became a worship leader in next thing. You know, I'm leading worship that that lasts forty five minutes. And by the time, we're thirty minutes ends the place is just a mess of like, you know, bodies laying around and tears and wailing enhance raised and banners flying towns so alien to me like why do people act like this? Well, they wanna. Touch power. They're getting high. There and they wanna feel special you have to. I mean to me, my my new bible is Ernest Becker's the denial of death in his theory is is that when as human beings, unlike the rest of the animal kingdom, we are aware of our own existence where where are impending death, and we're aware that it could happen at any second without our permission or knowledge in so it's just horrifying and given those facts, it's amazing that any human ever gets out of bed or a or even you know, it's just it's it could be paralyzing fear. And so what we do to help. Compartmentalize it as we do things to give our lives, meaning, and so all these things what Ernest Becker calls immortality projects to one either convince yourself that you're not gonna die that you're gonna live forever. And or couple that with all right? So just in case, I do become worm food. I'm gonna leave my Mark. And that could be having children. That could be winning a gold medal that could be, you know, making your Mark in some way that that people are gonna remember you after you go because the last thing that anybody wants to admit is that I'm meaningless an there's not I'm literally just an aunt in an ant hill. There's I mean, there's just no nothing here that's going to that's lasting or permanent or meaningful or a purposeful. Right. Which is why we had a baby Salter apparent died. Has like, Yep. Okay. We need some. We'd been at the point of we'd been we're thinking, you know, three or four years out and found out my strange father had died, and it was like, okay. There's no time to waste. Pass on the seed pass on the gene. So anyway, the point being is that in those circles of praise and worship and in this mortality project..

Ernest Becker publisher Presbyterian church gold medal Salter Mark forty five minutes thirty nine years thirty minutes twelve years four years
"ernest becker" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

17:00 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on KNSS

"S s. We will take your calls next hour with Dr Marilyn schlitz, author of death makes life possible also consciousness and healing as well. And Maryland, would you tell us the story of the reincarnation of the little child? Well, there's so many stories. Let's this one had stepped birthmarks or something like that. Right. Well, Ian, Stevenson was a very unusual psychiatrist who developed a very strong interest in trying to document cases of reincarnation, and he collected about a thousand case studies of young children who had had some experience of a past life that they report it to their family. He went in and investigated did corroborating evidence interviewed people read medical reports. And in about thirty five percent of the people that he identified they had some kind of unusual birthmark. So it's not a typical mall, but some kind of unusual birthmark, and it was often associated with the cause of death of the person that the young child. Child remembered, so there were numerous examples where for for instance, one child remembered being a man from a different village in Asia. And he Stevenson then went and investigated, the biography of this person that the child remembered being and it turns out that that person was shot through the chest in the same place entry and exit where the bullet ostensibly went through the body. And so that becomes a kind of biological source of evidence for reincarnation in these young people, you know, it's not absolutely evident, but or evidence, but it's still compelling in our film, we interviewed Jim Tucker who now works in the same institute at the university of Virginia that Ian, Stevenson had founded and. He tells the story of a young boy who, you know, very early just about the time he learned to speak remembered being his grandfather, and he would tell his dad when his dad was changing his diapers. I used to change your diaper. And that it was kind of shocking for these parents, sure. And then this kid started remembering other things about the kind of car that he used to drive and so as a little test, the parents, Scott a bunch of pictures from the dad and the first of all they had a class picture when he was in elementary school. And so this would be the child's grandfather. And they asked him to pick out which one was him. And he had no problem finding himself in the lineup. And then they were going through some of the other snapshots, and he saw his car, and he said, that's my car. That's my car. I used to drive their car. And so again, it's not definitive evidence that there is a kind of survival of consciousness or identity after bodily death. But these instances give us really compelling idea. Is about what is possible that it's truly remarkable in. Remember, the case study of the little boy who claimed that he was a World War Two pilot. And he knew things about the plane when it landed too hard, the tires would blow up in really nobody knew that other than the crew and the pilot, and he was telling this parents this, and they and they got that verified, and they took him to a reunion a World War Two veterans. And he he knew several of the people from his unit. It was an amazing store. Do you? Remember that case, I'm I'm vaguely remembering it, I don't remember the details of it. But I think you're right. These things are phenomenally intriguing, and it's very exciting. I know that the university of Virginia right now is hiring post doc to work part time with them and part time at the Monroe institute to do some psycho physiologic. Research on this. We're right now setting up lab here at Sofia to look at the psycho mantis him. This was a technique that was used by the ancient oracles in Greece. And they ostensibly were able to identify and communicate with spirits by looking at our gazing upon a reflective surface and Raymond moody developed this protocol where he put people in a darkened room put a mirror on the wall aluminum the mirror in such a way that you couldn't see your own reflection. But because you're kind of going into a trance state people start to see things and hear things inexperienced things. And you know, there have been a number of experiments looking at people's ability to make contact with their departed loved ones, and to have those kind of conversations that they never had a chance to have. And it has been. Shown to be extremely useful for bereavement counseling. So people have an opportunity to have the conversation. They can see it. They can see their the spirits, and so what we're doing now is bringing that idea into a virtual reality environment. So we'll have people sitting with the virtual reality goggles, looking at a mirror in a sensory deprivation procedure, and we're going to record and try to understand what it is that people are experiencing when they enter that state one of our very special guests, author and researcher, Rosemary, Ellen guy Lee. Uses black mirrors to do a lot of this. It's really strange. Uh-huh. Interested in talking to her. Yeah. Just a deal with Tom if you would Maryland, and he'll he'll get you in touch with her. Her website is visionary living dot com. You might be able to Email or straight through there. Okay. But what you're saying? Even that title for a website is really not so much about what happens after, but how those ideas and beliefs inform how we live now. And you know, we know that people believe different things, even within a common culture. We have to do is look at the political debate. That's happening right now to know that people justify their beliefs based on different kinds of evidence. And while in our culture, we tend to hold in a steam, the idea of ration rationality about reason about the idea of objectively we we make appeals that if we have good objective data that then is the evidence it's gonna shape our belief. But what we see is that it's most often something else. It's most often a person. Direct experience something emotional are transformative, and that's what really shapes our belief, and then we just rationalize the rest of it in the name of objective data. Absolutely. Our special guest. Dr Marilyn schlitz were talking about really things dealing with consciousness in the other side. How many people who believe in life after death also believe in God? What do you think the percent is Maryland? I think it's a tricky question, of course. I love that about you, George. I think that it really depends on what people believe going into it. And what they define God to be for example in the Christian tradition. There can be a lot of fear of you know, the afterlife because it can be met with you know. Well, as long as if hell is involved, of course. Right. Helen damnation can be very very scary. Whereas if you're coming from a Buddhist tradition where there isn't a God per se, but there's this idea of consciousness is the ground of all being so in a certain sense of consciousness becomes God that can be a much more beautiful journey towards something that allows us a sense of safety and hope optimism. So I think, you know, those preconditions that shape what our culture tells us is true can very much influence how we think about the afterlife and how we hold our relationship to the divine. You talk about the denial about death that so many people have what why do they what are they afraid of? I think we as human beings are hardwired to be afraid of uncertainty, and because we don't definitively know, it becomes a scary prospect, and I think people will go to great extremes in order to buffer that terror that people have there's a really fascinating area of social psychology called terror management theory that was developed out of the work of Ernest Becker who wrote that great book denial of death, and they have found that if people are functioning in a in a normal way, and they get triggered by some reminder of their mortality, it can lead to very pathological types of behaviors. But if you can bolster their sense of personal worth their their value in the world, and you you enhance their self esteem, you'll see. See that when you trigger them. They actually become more altruistic they care about other people. So I think if we can approach this idea of death, and the great mystery of it with an open heart, and that kind of skepticism that is productive. I think he can become a great exploration and a wonderful adventure for people. Probably could when did you did, you know Edgar Mitchell before he passed on. Yeah. Very well with them for years, wonderful person. Edgar said in the interview, I did with him for death makes possible that you know. I mean, I was really interested in his story because he was a person who had been fighting in Korea. He had been a test pilot, and he talked about, you know, being on those aircraft carriers where when they would go off on a mission. And then they had to come back and find. The aircraft carrier in the middle of the ocean. It was like a needle in a haystack. And so for him. That was a scary moment when he got in the Apollo capsule and went to the moon. He said, you know, there was plenty of space on the moon, and it was hard to find. But you know, his thing that he said that I thought was so wise is that he felt it was much more important to live a good life and to be a good citizen to be loving and kind toward other people than it was to spend a lot of time worrying about what's going to happen next. And I just thought that's you know, it's a powerful notion. And he was a great man is there definitive evidence to prove that there's life after death. If you're in a court of law. This was challenged death was challenged could you prove that there's life after death. So this would make. A great reality show. In a courtroom. Let's do it. I want to do it. So you have a judge and a jury, and you have people representing different points of view on controversial topics. So take this one, you know, life after death, and you have these people arguing there various positions with witnesses that come and go exactly giving their own personal testimony based on their experiences. Linda corpse put it right there. And then you get into this question of what would shift people's mind about that question? And is it the data is it the fact that Ian, Stevenson collected? These nearly thousand cases and showed that thirty five percent of them correlated with the birth birthmarks. Is that what's gonna persuade people? Or is it the personal experiences that somebody's reporting? You know, I had a conversation with my departed dad, and he told me to go to this closet and find something, you know, that's really persuasive for people. Much more than cumulating. A lot of data is saying I think so too Dr Merrill, Lynch. Let's with us. We're going to take phone calls next hour about life after death. Let's talk a little bit Maryland. And the time we have remaining here about consciousness, and how important it plays in its role that it plays with all of this. What would you first of all say consciousness is? Well, I think again, we can have many definitions for me it's been about our awareness and also our lack of awareness of what we're not aware of. So by that I mean when I first talked about Thomas Kuhn's book on paradigm. Chefs we live in a paradigm or worldview, and the interesting thing to me about worldviews is that we don't even know that we have them. And yet, they're the most important thing that shapes our experience, so it's like we're walking through life with these colored glasses on and it it shapes our experiences, and so we can't see those things that lie outside of our expectations. And I think part of the process of becoming aware is becoming aware that we're not aware and that we have what's called in attentional blindness. For example, we are prime. To perceive those parts of the world that we expect to see. And if we don't expect to see them, we simply don't see them. And I think that that is a remarkable aspect of what our consciousness is all about. It's a lot of it functioning on autopilot at the unconscious level. And to the extent we can, you know, turn the light on what those experiences are, and what shapes our awareness, where are we placing our attention that then offers us a point of liberation into expanding. What we understand to be true. Do you believe that the consciousness lives outside of the brain? I do I think consciousness is something that has intelligence. It is self correcting. It is reflective and so you can go into rainforest and. I see that as consciousness manifest in the forest because every nook and cranny is filled with life and with that intention to manifest life. And so I do believe that consciousness is something much bigger than our individual brain. I don't think it's an epi phenomena, the brain and at the same time, I think the brain is kind of like, you know, the radio that is taking the signal in. So if you destroy the brain, you may destroy the radio, it doesn't mean you've destroyed the consciousness or the signal or the signal exactly keeps coming. I it exactly will will science ever meet. The spiritual side of all of this. I think so I mean, I think we're getting closer and closer all the time. I just spent time with Sophia the Android. She's a robot. Now, I've heard about her. Yeah. She'd be great for.

Maryland Stevenson Dr Marilyn schlitz Ian university of Virginia Edgar Mitchell Jim Tucker Asia Raymond moody Greece Ernest Becker Sofia Monroe institute Scott Thomas Kuhn Helen damnation Apollo
"ernest becker" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

17:08 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on WRVA

"Hundred seven one four five. We will take your calls next hour, Dr Maryland schlitz, author of death makes life possible also consciousness and healing as well. And Maryland, would you tell us the story of the reincarnation of the little child? Well, there's so many stories. Let's just one headed step birthmarks or something like that. Right. Well, Ian, Stevenson was a very unusual psychiatrist who developed a very strong interest in trying to document cases of reincarnation, and he collected about a thousand case studies of young children who had had some experience of a past life that they report it to their family. He went in and investigated did corroborating evidence interviewed people read medical reports. And in about thirty five percent of the people that he identified they had some kind of unusual birthmark. So it's not a typical mall, but some kind of unusual birthmark, and it was often associated with the cause of death of the person that the young child. Child remembered, so there were numerous examples where for for instance, one child remembered being a man from a different village in Asia. And he Stevenson then went and investigated, the biography of this person that the child remembered being and it turns out that that person was shot through the chest in the same place entry and exit where the bullet ostensibly went through the body. And so that becomes a kind of biological sources evidence for reincarnation in these young people, you know, it's not absolutely evident, but or evidence Shaw, but it's still compelling in our film, we interviewed Jim Tucker who now works in the same institute at the university of Virginia that Ian, Stevenson had founded and. He tells the story of a young boy who, you know, very early just about the time he learned to speak remember being his grandfather. And he would tell his dad when his dad was changing his diapers. I used to change your diaper. And the it was kind of shocking for these parents, sure. And then this kid started remembering other things about the kind of car that he used to drive and so as a little test, the parents, Scott a bunch of pictures from the dad and the first of all they had a class picture when he was in elementary school. And so this would be the child's grandfather. And they asked him to pick out which one was him. And he had no problem finding himself in the lineup. And then they were going through some of the other snapshots, and he saw his car, and he said, that's my car. That's my car. I used to drive their car. And so again, it's not definitive evidence that there is a kind of survival of consciousness or identity after bodily death. But these instances give us really compelling idea. Is about what is possible. It's truly remarkable in. Remember, the case study of the little boy who claimed that he was a World War Two pilot. And he knew things about the plane when it landed too hard, the tires would blow up in really nobody knew that other than the crew and the pilot, and he was telling his parents this, and they and they got that verified and they took him to a reunion of World War Two veterans. And he he knew several of the people from his unit. It was an amazing story. Do you? Remember that case, I'm I'm vaguely remembering it, I don't remember the details of it. But I think you're right. These things are phenomenally intriguing, and it's very exciting. I know that the university of Virginia right now is hiring post doc to work part time with them and part time at the Monroe institute to do some psycho physiologic. Research on this. We're right now setting up lab here at Sofia to look at the psycho mantis him. This was a technique that was used by the ancient oracles in Greece. And they. We're able to identify and communicate with spirits by looking at our gazing upon reflective surface and Raymond moody developed this protocol where he put people in a darkened room. Put a mere on the wall eliminated the MIR in such a way that you couldn't see your own reflection. But because you're kind of going into a trance state people start to see things and hear things inexperienced things. And you know, there have been a number of experiments looking at people's ability to make contact with their departed loved ones, and to have those kind of conversations that they never had a chance to have. And it has been shown to be extremely useful for bereavement counseling. So people have an opportunity to have the conversation. They can see it. They can see their the spirits, and so what we're doing. Now is. Bringing that idea into a virtual reality environment. So we'll have people sitting with the virtual reality goggles, looking at a mirror in a sensory deprivation procedure, and we're going to record and try to understand what it is that people are experiencing when they enter that state one of our very special guests, author and researcher, Rosemary, Ellen guy Lee. Uses black mirrors to do a lot of this. It's really strange. Uh-huh. Interested in talking to her. Yeah. Just deal with the Tom if you would Maryland, and he'll he'll get you in touch with her. A her website is visionary living dot com. You might be able to Email or straight through there. Okay. But what you're saying? Even that title for website is really now so much about what happens after, but how those ideas and beliefs inform how we live now. And you know, we know that people believe different things, even within a common culture. All you have to do is look at the political debate. That's happening right now to know that people justify their beliefs based on different kinds of evidence. And while in our culture, we tend to hold in a steam, the idea of ration rationality about reason about the idea of objectivity we we make appeals that if we have good objective data that that then is the evidence it's going gonna shape our belief. But what we see is that it's most often something else. It's most often a purse. Direct experience something emotional are transformative, and that's what really shapes our belief, and then we just rationalize the rest of it in the name of objective data. Absolutely. Our special guest. Dr Marilyn schlitz were talking about really things dealing with consciousness in the other side. How many people who believe in life after death also believe in God? What do you think the percent is Maryland? I think it's a tricky question, of course. I love that about George. I think that it really depends on what people believe going into it. And what they define God to be for example in the Christian tradition. There can be a lot of fear of you know, the afterlife because it can be met with, you know, while as long as if hell is involved, of course. Right. Helen, damnation be very very scary. Whereas if you're coming from a Buddhist tradition where there isn't a God per se, but there's this idea of, you know. Consciousness is the ground of all being. So in a certain sense consciousness becomes God that can be a much more beautiful journey towards something that allows us a sense of safety and hope optimism. So I think, you know, those preconditions that shape what our culture tells us is true can very much influence how we think about the afterlife and how we hold our relationship to the divine. You talk about the denial about death that so many people have won't why do they what are they afraid of? I think we as human beings are wired to be afraid of uncertainty, and because we don't definitively know, it becomes a scary prospect, and I think people will go to great extremes in order to buffer. For that care that people have there's a really fascinating area of social psychology called terror management theory that was developed out of the work of Ernest Becker who wrote that great book denial of death, and they have found that if people are, you know, functioning in a in a normal way, and they get triggered by some reminder of their mortality, it can lead to very pathological types of behaviors. But if you can bolster their sense of personal worth their their value in the world, and you you enhance their self esteem, you'll see that when you trigger them. They actually become more altruistic they care about other people. So I think if we can approach this idea of death, and the great mystery of it with an open heart, and that kind of skepticism that. Is productive. I think he can become a great exploration and a wonderful adventure for people. Probably could when did you did, you know Edgar Mitchell before he passed on. Yeah. Very well. Right guy with them for years, wonderful person. Edgar said in the interview, I did with him for death makes possible that you know. I mean, I was really interested in his story because he was a person who had been fighting in Korea. He had been a test pilot, and he talked about, you know, being on those aircraft carriers where when they would go off on a mission. And then they had to come back and find the aircraft carrier in the middle of the ocean. It was like a needle in a haystack. And so for him that was a scary moment when he got in the Apollo capsule and went to the moon. He said, you know, there was plenty of space on the moon, and it was hard to find. But you know, his thing that he said that I thought was so wise is that he felt it was much more important to live a good life and to be a good citizen to be loving and kind toward other people then it was to spend a lot of time worrying about what's going to happen next. And I just thought that's you know, it's powerful notion. And he was a great man is there definitive evidence to prove that there's life after death. If you're in a court of law. This was challenged death was challenged. Could you prove that there's life after death? So this would make a great reality show. In a courtroom. Let's do it. I want to do it. So you have a judge and a jury, and you have people representing different points of view on controversial topics. So take this one, you know, life after death, and you have these people arguing there various positions with witnesses that come and go exactly giving their own personal testimony based on their experiences. Linda corpse put it right there. And then you get into this question of what would shift people's mind about that question? And is it the data is it the fact that Ian, Stevenson collected? These nearly thousand cases and showed that thirty five percent of them correlated with the birth. Max is that what's gonna persuade people? Or is it the personal experiences that somebody's reporting? You know, I had a conversation with my departed dad, and he told me to go to this closet and find something, you know, that's really persuasive for people. Much more than accumulating a lot of data is I think so too Dr Merrill, Lynch. Let's with us. We're going to take phone calls next hour about life after death. Let's talk a little bit Maryland. And the time we have remaining here about consciousness, and how important it plays in its role that it plays with all of this. What would you first of all say consciousness is? Well, I think again, we can have many definitions for me it's been about our awareness and also our lack of awareness of what we're not aware of. So by that I mean when I first talked about Thomas Kuhn's book on paradigm shifts. We live in a paradigm or a worldview and interesting thing to me about worldviews is that we don't even know that we have them. And yet, they're the most important thing that shapes our experience, so it's like we're walking through life with these colored glasses on and it it shapes our experiences, and so we can't see those things that lie outside of our expectations. And I think part of the process of becoming aware is becoming aware that we're not aware and that we have what's called an attentional blindness. For example, we are prime. To perceive those parts of the world that we expect to see. And if we don't expect to see them, we simply don't see them. And I think that that is a remarkable aspect of what our consciousness is all about. It's a lot of it functioning on autopilot at the unconscious level. And to the extent we can, you know, turn the light on what those experiences are in what shapes our awareness, where are we placing our attention that then offers us a point of liberation into expanding. What we understand to be true. Do you believe that consciousness lives outside of the brain? I do I think consciousness is something that has intelligence. It is self correcting. It is reflective and so you can go into a rainforest and see that as consciousness manifest in the forest because every nook and cranny is filled with life and with that intention to manifest life. And so I I do believe that consciousness is something much bigger than our individual brain. I don't think it's an epi phenomena, the brain and at the same time, I think the brain is kind of like, you know, the radio that is taking the signal in. So if you destroy the brain, you may destroy the radio, it doesn't mean you've destroyed the consciousness or the signal or the signal exactly keeps coming. Exactly, we'll we'll science ever meet the spiritual side of all of this. I think so I mean, I think we're getting closer and closer all the time. I just spent time with Sophia the Android. She's a robot. Now, I've heard her. Yeah. She'd be great.

Maryland Stevenson Dr Maryland schlitz Ian university of Virginia Edgar Mitchell Asia Jim Tucker Raymond moody Greece Shaw Ernest Becker Sofia Monroe institute Scott Thomas Kuhn Apollo
"ernest becker" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

17:09 min | 1 year ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Hundred seven one four five. We will take your calls next hour with Dr Marilyn schlitz, author of death makes life possible also consciousness and healing as well. And Maryland, would you tell us the story of the reincarnation of the little child? Well, there's so many stories. Let's just one headed step birthmarks or something like that. Right. Well, Ian, Stevenson was a very unusual psychiatrist who developed a very strong interest and trying to document cases of reincarnation, and he collected about a thousand case studies of young children who had had some experience of the past life that they report it to their family. He went in and investigated did corroborating evidence interviewed people read medical reports. And in about thirty five percent of the people that he identified they had some kind of unusual birthmark. So it's not a typical mall, but some kind of unusual birthmark, and it was often associated with the cause of death of the person that the young child. Child remembered, so there were numerous examples where for for instance, one child remembered being a man from a different village in Asia. And he Stevenson then went and investigated, the biography of this person that the child remembered being and it turns out that that person was shot through the chest in the same place entry and exit where the bullet ostensibly went through the body. And so that becomes a kind of biological source of evidence for reincarnation in these young people, you know, it's not absolutely evident, but or evidence shawl, but it's still compelling in our film, we interviewed Jim Tucker who now works in the same institute at the university of Virginia that Stevenson had founded and. And he tells the story of a young boy who, you know, very early just about the time he learned to speak remember being his grandfather. And he would tell his dad when his dad was changing his diapers. I used to change your diaper. And it was kind of shocking for these parents. Yeah. Sure. And then this kid started remembering other things about the kind of car that he used to drive and so as a little test, the parents, Scott a bunch of pictures from the dad and first of all they had a class picture when he was in elementary school. And so this would be the child's grandfather. And they asked him to pick out which one was him. And he had no problem finding himself in the lineup. And then they were going through some of the other snapshots, and he saw his car, and he said, that's my car. That's my car. I used to drive that car. And so again, it's not definitive evidence that there is a kind of survival of consciousness or density after bodily death. But these instances give us really compelling idea. Is about what is possible that it's truly remarkable in. Remember, the case study of the little boy who claimed that he was a World War Two pilot. And he knew things about the plane when it landed too hard, the tires would blow up in really nobody knew that other than the crew and the pilot, and he was telling this parents this, and they and they got that verified, and they took him to a reunion a World War Two veterans. And he he knew several of the people from his unit. It was an amazing store. Do you? Remember that case, I'm I'm vaguely remembering it, I don't remember the details of it. But I think you're right. These things are phenomenally intriguing, and it's very exciting. I know that the university of Virginia right now is hiring post doc to work part time with them and part time at the Monroe institute to do some psycho physiologic. Research on this. We're right now setting up lab here at Sofia to look at the psycho mantis. This was a technique that was used by the ancient oracles in Greece. Yes. And they ostensibly we're able to identify and communicate with spirits by looking at our gazing upon a reflective surface and Raymond moody develop this protocol where he put people in a darkened room. Put a mere on the wall, a luminated the MIR in such a way that you couldn't see your own reflection. But because you're kind of going into a trance state people start to see things and hear things inexperienced things. And you know, there have been a number of experiments looking at people's ability to make contact with their departed loved ones, and to have those kind of conversations that they never had a chance to have. And it has been shown. To be extremely useful for bereavement counseling. So people have an opportunity to have the conversation. They can see it. They can see their the spirits, and so what we're doing now is bringing that idea into a virtual reality environment. So we'll have people sitting with the virtual reality goggles, looking at a Amir in a sensory deprivation procedure, and we're going to record and try to understand what it is that people are experiencing when they enter that state one of our very special guests, author and researcher, Rosemary, Ellen guy. Lee uses black mirrors to do a lot of this. It's really strange. Interested in talking to her. Yeah. Just deal with Tom if you would Maryland, and he'll he'll get you in touch with her. A her website is visionary living dot com. You might be able to Email or straight through there. Okay. But what you're saying? Even that title for website is really not so much about what happens after but how those ideas and belief inform how we live now. And you know, we know that people believe different things, even within a common culture. All you have to do is look at the political debate. That's happening right now to know that people justify their beliefs based on different kinds of evidence. And while in our culture, we tend to hold in esteem, the idea of ration rationality about reason about the idea of objectivity we we make appeals that if we have good objective data that then is the evidence it's going to shape, our belief. But what we see is that it's most often something else. It's most often a person. Direct experience something emotional are transformative, and that's what really shapes our belief, and then we just rationalize the rest of it in the name of objective data. Absolutely our special guests. Dr Marilyn schlitz were talking about really things dealing with consciousness in the other side. How many people who believe in life after death also believe in God? What do you think the percent is Maryland? I think it's a tricky question. Of course, waiting for me. I love that about you, George. I think that it really depends on what people believe going into it. And what they define God to be for example in the Christian tradition. There can be a lot of fear of you know, the afterlife because it can be met with you know. As long as if if Hellas involved, of course, right? Helen damnation can be very very scary. Whereas if you're coming from a Buddhist tradition where there isn't a God per se, but there's this idea of, you know. Consciousness is the ground of all being. So in a certain sense consciousness becomes God that can be a much more beautiful journey towards something that allows us a sense of safety and hope optimism. So I think, you know, those preconditions that shape what our culture tells us is true can very much influence how we think about the afterlife and how we hold our relationship to the divine. You talk about the denial about death that so many people have what why do they what are they afraid of? I think we as human beings are hardwired to be afraid of uncertainty, and because we don't definitively know, it becomes a scary prospect, and I think people will go to great extremes in order to bu-. Buffer that care that people have there's a really fascinating area of social psychology called terror management theory that was developed out of the work of Ernest Becker who wrote that great book denial of death, and they have found that if people are, you know, functioning in a in a normal way, and they get triggered by some reminder of their mortality, it can lead to very pathological types of behaviors. But if you can bolster their sense of personal worth their their value in the world, and you you enhance their self esteem, you'll see that when you trigger them. They actually become more altruistic they care about other people. So I think if we can approach this idea of death, and the great mystery of it with an open heart, and that kind of skepticism. That is productive. I think can become a great exploration and a wonderful adventure for people. Probably could when did you did, you know Edgar Mitchell before he passed on. Yeah. Very well. With them for years, wonderful person. Edgar said in the interview, I did with him for death makes possible that you know. I mean, I was really interested in his story because he was the person who had been fighting Korea. He had been a test pilot, and he talked about, you know, being on those aircraft carriers where when they would go off on a mission. And then they had to come back and find the aircraft carrier in the middle of the ocean. It was like a needle in a haystack. And so for him that was a scary moment when he got in the Apollo capsule and went to the moon. He said, you know, there was plenty of space on the moon, and it was hard to find. But you know, his thing that he said that I thought was so wise is that he felt it was much more important to live a good life and to be a good citizen to be loving and kind toward other people than it was to spend a lot of time worrying about what's going to happen next. And I just thought that's you know, it's a powerful, no, Shannon. He was a great, man. Is there definitive evidence to prove that there's life after death? If you were a court of law. This was challenged death was challenged. Could you prove that there's life after death? This would make a great reality show. In a courtroom. Let's do it. I want to do it. So you have a judge and jury, and you have people representing different points of view on controversial topics. So take this one, you know, life after death, and you have these people arguing their various positions with witnesses that come and go exactly giving their own personal testimony based on their experiences. Corpse put it right there. And then you get into this question of what would shift people's mind about that question? And is it the data is it the fact that Ian, Stevenson collected? These nearly thousand cases and showed that thirty five percent of them correlated with the birth. Max is that what's gonna persuade people? Or is it the personal experiences that somebody's reporting? You know, I had a conversation with my departed dad, and he told me to go to this closet and find something, you know, that's really persuasive for people. Much more than accumulating a lot of data is saying I think she'll to Dr Merrill, Lynch. Let's with us. We're going to take phone calls next hour about life after death. Let's talk a little bit Maryland. And the time we have remaining here about consciousness, and how important it plays in its role that it plays with all of this. What would you first of all say consciousness is? Well, I think again, we can have many definitions for me it's been about our awareness and also our lack of awareness of what we're not aware of. So by that I mean when I first talked about Thomas Kuhn's book on paradigm shifts. We live in a paradigm or a worldview, and the interesting thing to me about worldviews is that we don't even know that we have them. Then yet, they're the most important thing that shapes our experience, so it's like we're walking through life with these colored glasses on and it it shapes our experiences, and so we can't see those things that lie outside of our expectation. And I think part of the process of becoming aware is becoming aware that we're not aware and that we have what's called attentional blindness. For example, we are prime. To perceive those parts of the world that we expect to see. And if we don't expect to see them, we simply don't see them. And I think that that is a remarkable aspect of what our consciousness is all about. It's a lot of it functioning on autopilot at the unconscious level. And to the extent we can, you know, turn the light on what those experiences are in what shapes our awareness, where are we placing our attention that then offers us a point of liberation into expanding. What we understand to be true. Do you believe that the consciousness lives outside of the brain? I knew I think consciousness is something that has intelligence it is self correcting. It is reflective and so you can go into rainforest and see that as consciousness manifest in the forest because every nook and cranny is filled with life and with that intention to manifest life. And so I do believe that consciousness is something much bigger than our individual brain. I don't think it's an epi phenomena, the brain and at the same time, I think the brain is kind of like, you know, the radio that is taking the signal in. So if you destroy the brain, you may destroy the radio, it doesn't mean you've destroyed the consciousness or the signal or the signal exactly keeps coming exactly will will science ever, meet the spiritual side of all of this. I think so I mean, I think we're getting closer and closer all the time. I just spent time with Sophia the Android. She's a robot. Now, I've heard about her. Yeah. She'd be great for you to interview..

Maryland Stevenson Dr Marilyn schlitz university of Virginia Ian Jim Tucker Edgar Mitchell Asia Raymond moody Hellas Ernest Becker Sofia Monroe institute Scott Thomas Kuhn Greece Helen damnation
"ernest becker" Discussed on Female Criminals

Female Criminals

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Female Criminals

"She lied to police and her parents to get out of trouble when she was caught driving recklessly when travis is death no longer elicited sympathy janine began telling intricate emotional lies when she got in trouble at school she wants told the administrators that her parents had never adopted her legally like they had her brothers and sister when her older sister received diamond earrings for christmas janine sulked for weeks even though the sewing machine she received had cost more she told classmates her parents didn't love her as much as her older sister then unfortunately for janine real tragedy struck again in nineteen sixty eight when janine was just seventeen years old her father dick passed away following a prolonged illness dick's death seemed to genuinely crush her janine would later say that the world went dark the day her father died in just two short years both her younger brother and her father the two people to whom she was closest in the world were taken from her these deaths impacted janin's life tremendously as you would expect guiding her in a direction she might not have otherwise gone anthropological studies conducted by dr ernest becker have shown that reminders of death tend to push us to bolder action in regards to what we want for example a man who desires fame might suddenly move to los angeles after the death of a personal friend a woman who refused to marry might suddenly elope in janin's case she turned all of her focus and energy at the end of her high school career into starting a family of her own and janine already had a bo willing to marry her her high school dropout boyfriend jimmy delaney their two year relationship to this point had been fueled by their mutual love for cars her racing them and him restoring them jimmy spent every extra penny.

travis janine dick janin los angeles jimmy delaney dr ernest becker seventeen years two year
"ernest becker" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Every person on earth first question yes do you have all these quotes stored in your head i do i mean i take a lot of notes on the notes application my iphone i tend to transcribe and write things down that inspire me particularly if a quote is well written i feel like a half to transcribe it so i take notes and i write down musings but it's not like i it's not like i study those notes and those quotes in order to be able to recite them verbatim it just happens that when i'm in the zone i tend to be in an associational thinker so i start talking about an idea and it creates a butterfly effect and thought we're like these different lines start to emerge and served up to my frontal lobe which actually reminds me a lot of that film limitless yes remember when he first takes the drug and he talks about how like just start to connect the dots quicker and the right thing just served up in the right moment the right right connection when i'm in the zone that tends to happen to me and the rest of my life becomes the labor of coal tiv aiding rest diets and all these other things so that when i'm in the zone i have all the resources that i need i know that state i do that when i'm on stage they're going crowd i always have and it's like i just know what to say even if my slides all jacked up it's it's right there thousand percent but i don't usually quote people because i don't remember the right are you paraphrasing actually nail these because like i have a nail a lot of them so here's one that i love for a guy called sheldon solomon he was talking about the ideas of ernest becker in the denial of death he said the explicit awareness that you're breathing piece of defecating meat destined to die and ultimately more significant than elizer potato is not especially uplifting.

sheldon solomon ernest becker thousand percent
"ernest becker" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"That the prospect of death not just of our own but of the people we love is so trump traumatic to even contemplate yet that i think it can cause of schism in our psyche and that from it can emerge this pardon me for saying this but a kind of perpetuating delusion that somehow this is how it's supposed to be in its beautiful when actually it's it's not just that it's not beautiful it's that we've committed no crime and we've afflicted with it worth with the death sentence it's actually like the most horrifying thing that you can possibly do is to have a sentient being and tell it it's going to die jack herro act said about birth no to have a child is to sentence a being to death correct ernest becker in his duck there was documentary me about his work called the denial earn the quest for mortality but of saint to have emerged from to have emerged from nothing to have a name consciousness of self deep inner feeling and excruciating inner yearning for life and self expression yet with all of this yet to die what else is wrong with the universe tear besides entry yeah there's two opposing forces right so so enterpise is breaking everything down but by bucky fuller said that life was sort of gloriously anti in tropic it was xtrac you know so where they where whereas interview wants to simplify things life wants to make things more complicated and sublime greater complexity organization and then you can have like emergent phenomenon so we'll have sufficient complexity something new can be borne right and he just have just a novel de engendering engine you know what i mean it's like outside of conquering death if there were other aspects of the universe that you could get rid of for example black holes right if you could laminate black holes from the universe would you do that i dunno i mean there are very interesting computational substrates right yeah you're familiar with the trans engine hypothesis now tell me so there's a guy called john smart you should get him here sometime he's brilliant dude and he came up with a theory to account for firms paradox so firmly sparrow.

bucky fuller john ernest becker
"ernest becker" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"As you're having them but also the author a refuge in a relief from despair from nihilism from nothingness i mean you say you know ernest becker when he says that character is a vital lie yeah that that this version of lar bring but even the consensus baseline version of lar ping which is to say i'm an american citizen and i'm jason silva and i'm an artist that to a certain extent we need to we need to summon coherence in our identity because without it than were also lost at sea like we need certain constraints jordan peterson talks about this you need the constraints of avoiding pain right or you don't want pain and you need to protect yourself for pain in the present but also in the future and you to take other people into account not just now but in the future all these things in these constraints are necessary to form a coherent narrative in a sense of person who had an osce to move towards a noble goal because by the way without that it is chaotic i mean when you read about it will who suffer from like deep personalization for example yeah d realization where they think that their own they they feel like everything is fake or like their own identity is not real any more that sounds like a pathology to meals people suffer a lot early start going they maybe they take too many psychedelic trigger some weird psychosis where they have the is asian experiences that persist past the second ballot were they walk around the world and they feel like they're not part of it anymore have you ever heard this story of honam and rahm the monkeygod you'll like the erika so this is to go into the concept of deeper sinologist pathology verses which is certainly can be or deep personalization as a form of realization an awakening and i think they're both very possible her so the allocation is the only thing that makes the difference well yeah that that would have framing you'll know this quote now as fuck it up with what is it the mystics swims in saying the market missed again the mad men are in the same waters but the mistica swimming the madman is drag okay so this is a heineman you know is the representation of the great servant you know which is the.

ernest becker jason silva honam jordan peterson rahm
"ernest becker" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ernest becker" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Uh suggested the modular theory of the mind endless split brain experiments we've discussed a little bit of the modular theory the mind with the evolutionary psychology episode but i don't know if we've talked about the split breen experiments i always found those kind of fascinating so do we have five like what are our fi uh are i think we are both into the centralism ernest becker amdex's slush exemptions them mojo dr uh something about ethics population i think we let's i i don't know if that you make the less maybe we shall table that until we have a better sense of like the article that we would discuss or leg uh we tabled the pitch the these uh you put it on their human topfive unanswered questions top oh yeah we do topflight do okay for sure exit centralism mojo dr top i've unanswered ju what do you think about human universal's i like it okay i would put that on in their in their now i'm forgetting so that's four forgetting what else intelligence yeah let's see intelligence and we could even get a guest for intelligence i have this sorta snobby idea that ems developing in that i wanna turn into like up popular op ed or something called it that it would be called like nouveau smart it's like you know halard nouveau riche people who've just are men to money but they don't like how to spend it with tasting class and they are it's a zuhdi always be sorted muddy like like you we have bail funny i think there is a analogue berlex mart p bowl like to have just sort of you know like they've discovered skeptical arguments against the existence of god there were the you know like they've come across a new body of knowledge or some new way of thinking and you know.

ernest becker amdex evolutionary psychology