19 Burst results for "Erin Minke"

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:18 min | Last week

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"Of representatives in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy one. He wrote that his nominee had served the country states and community with dedication and devotion more also was quick to point out that the state of massachusetts had already officially recognized the nominees methods however unconventional they might have been in population control and applied psychology. Sure the facts and events surrounding the nominee service were vague and morehead intentionally and carefully worded the resolution still the house voted unanimously in favor of it. Now i'm sure that a lot of things ran through. Moore's mind by then although slightly horrified he also wasn't surprised in a strange sort of way he also founded it amusing and could barely contain his laughter. You see he'd proven a point that no one he worked with actually read the resolutions. They voted on and that they hadn't for a very long time and thanks to moore's experiment they literally had no idea who they had just honored for their work on population control within minutes of approval he withdrew his proposal and everyone appeared stunned that he would pull the resolution before the ink had even dried and so they waited for an explanation now back then he still wore a tie to work and he might have tugged at it just a little before reminding them of the date april first and his resolution had been part prank part test to see if these professional politicians actually paid attention to the job that they had been elected to perform considering the results of the votes he was cleared that they most certainly did not because moore's carefully reworded proposal was designed to honor a man named albert desalvo otherwise known as the famous serial killer from massachusetts the boston strangler. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Erin minke in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called lor which is a podcast book series and television show and you can learn all about it over at the world of lor dot com and until next time stay curious..

morehead massachusetts moore Moore albert desalvo Erin minke boston cabinet apple
"erin minke" Discussed on Lore

Lore

03:00 min | 2 months ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Lore

"Know <hes> monsters wormholes witchcraft. This is a strange place. This part of the country you know just before. Thomas went missing this area. Got a name for itself. Yeah the bridgewater triangle. Yeah i teach folklore at the university. Now why would you want to go and do that after growing up with all those kooks turning your father's disappearance into something so clearly wasn't okay. I should go thank you wait. Don't forget this. You might wanna go to the lake. Take a look around. I'm sure the police miss something. Wait a second. How did you know that this was down at the lake. Where else would have turned up. I'm sorry i don't. I told you strange things are happening. Okay can i. Just ask you what this. This doesn't look like it's been in the woods for forty years does it. It sure doesn't now okay. <hes> i gotta go. Thanks miss becker. An sorry i i will just here. It's my home phone number. I still use a landline. No self service out here actually had the same tape machine since the seventies. They don't make things like they used to What's up oh nothing. I just the message. Light and wasn't on when i got home and the phone hasn't run all evening so maybe a finally gave up the ghost after forty years. Maybe he needs to be careful. Bradshaw things aren't what they seem right. Well i will get outta your hair. Call me when you wanna know more. You call sure thanks. Looks like you were right. Seems like there is a storm on the way you have one unheard message. Help car have more l. a. This episode of law was written and produced by me. Erin minke with research by sam albert and music by chad lawson. More is much more than just a podcast. There is a book series available in bookstores and online and two seasons of the television show on amazon prime video. Check them both out. If you want more lor in your life. I also make an executive produce a whole bunch of other podcasts. All of which. I think you'd enjoy my production company grim and mild specializes in shows that.

Thomas becker Erin minke sam albert chad lawson Bradshaw amazon
"erin minke" Discussed on Lore

Lore

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Lore

"Could barely contain their horror. I'm erin minke and this is lor..

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

04:53 min | 4 months ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"There are few things as traumatic as a house fire. When i was growing up a house directly down the street from my own a house lived in by a classmate of mine from school. Tragically caught fire one december night burning the entire structure to the ground. Thankfully everyone made it out alive but the devastation was complete. Family heirlooms wrapped christmas presents clothing toys photo albums name a precious objects and they lost it. And maybe that's why so many of us fear going through the same experience pull world history book off the shelf and you'll find a number of citywide fires listed to the great fire of london took place in sixteen sixty six destroying over thirteen thousand houses in making some seventy five percent of the people. Living there homeless an eighteen seventy one. It was the great chicago fire. Taking the lives of nearly two hundred fifty people. Rome has burned as has amsterdam. Munich edinburgh and moscow just to name a few and most of the city's on the list burn so easily because firefighting was usually sloppy. Slow or just plain non existent but then came frederick graff. He was a hydraulic engineer. Born in philadelphia in seventeen seventy five. Who worked for a long time as a carpenter and a draftsman but it was in seventeen ninety five that he took a job as an assistant to a man named benjamin latrobe. Who was an architect behind the center square waterworks. On the site of today's philadelphia city hall once stood one of his creations. The pump house it pulled water from the nearby river using steam powered pumps stored it in massive wooden tanks and then let gravity feed it out to nearby houses and businesses using wooden pipes. And frederick graff was right there. Beside him learning and thinking in eighteen o five. He was elected to the position of superintendent of the waterworks. There but he and others began to notice that the system was just not powerful enough. They needed something bigger and better and by eighteen eleven. He was guiding. The construction of a new facility. Frederick was also a fan of forward thinking all over the city. The water mains beneath the cobblestones were made of wood. And i'm sure they worked for a long while but would can rot or crack or warp out of alignment. So as frederick made improvements to the old system he began to replace those old wooden maine's with new iron ones but that created a new problem. You see for a while. If a fire broke out somewhere in the city one method of fighting it was to pull up the cobblestones tap into the water main and then use the water to fight the blaze when they were done. They plugged the holes in the main called fireplug for obvious reasons and then reburied them. It was smarts and inventive but the new iron pipes couldn't be tapped so easily. So frederick went to the drawing board and came up with the plan at various intervals along the new iron water mains. He would install permanent exposed fire. Plugs basically sealed faucets. That could if the need arose. Be used by firefighters. I probably don't have to say this out loud but just in case you haven't pictured it in your mind i will frederick graff. Had invented the fire hydrant today. It's a common fixture in every neighborhood both figuratively and literally. But when he first proposed the idea it was revolutionary as metal water mains began to spread to more and more cities. So too did this other fresh idea today. Firefighters everywhere. Along with dogs with full bladders have frederick graff. To thank for the tool that makes their job. More efficient and much more manageable in an odd twist to fate though it's impossible to say for certain. If frederick graff was indeed the inventor of the fire hydrants we know about his work from other sources but the actual patent for the device the document that would make a rock solid case for his inventiveness. No longer exists. Why because it was kept in the us. Patent office in washington dc which was destroyed in eighteen. Thirty six because a fire. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Erin minke in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called lor which is a podcast book series and television show and you can learn all about it over at the world of lor dot com and until next time stay curious..

frederick graff benjamin latrobe philadelphia city hall frederick Munich amsterdam moscow edinburgh Rome philadelphia chicago london Frederick maine Erin minke washington dc cabinet apple us
"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

04:03 min | 4 months ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"Robert. The offer was clear. Ford should by his invention and bring it into the company together. They could make ford car safer for every driver and when ford called him back. It seemed like his american dream was coming true but the second meeting didn't go quite the way he expected when he arrived they showed him their own version of the intermittent wiper inspired by his own creation. Of course they didn't have the benefit of roberts ten years of work so they showered him with questions and he answered all of them. Show us how it works. They asked him and will buy it as their conversations continued over time. It seemed like robert was on the team but then the line went dead. When ford finally rolled out cars with intermittent wipers in nineteen sixty nine robert than his invention weren't even mentioned and once it was on the market. The invention spread how far while the idea was so good that eventually robertson son. Dennis brought home the controls for a new system being used in mercedes cars when robert cracked open he realized it was also a copy of his design. It was a massive blow and for years. Robert struggled to come to terms with his. Life's work being swiped by the biggest automakers on the planet but robert was a fighter. Fortunately he had filed for a patent back in one thousand nine hundred sixty four and when it came through in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven gave him what he needed to take the fight to big companies that were scooping up cash from his contribution. It wasn't easy though. In fact the battle was hard enough that roberts family suffered. He poured everything he had into the struggle. Not just for the money but for his work to be acknowledged and never major losses. Along the way robert represented himself when no one was willing to take on the fight against big companies. Like general motors in those cases didn't always make it far but in the end robert would get some wins as well a jury ruled against ford in nineteen ninety and a judgment against chrysler ordered the company to pay him thirty million dollars. It was even appealed all the way to the supreme court as the company tried to dual the inventor into the ground. Fortunately for robert the justices refused to bend to the big companies pressure. It became a classic story of the underdog coming out on top. But there's one more thing that makes roberts invention fascinating is see. The whole project to prevent car. Accidents started out with an accident and a bad one but not a car crash. You see when robert was on his honeymoon celebrating his brand new marriage. He did what so many people do and popped open a bottle of champagne and that's when the cork became dangerous projectile. It hit young roberts. In the i his new wife phyllis rushed to his side as the blood ran down his face. The injury was bad enough that he lost most of the sites in his left eye. In the end it was robert. Kerns accident that inspired an invention that would come to define his life's work all inspired by the original intermittent wiper that we all benefit from every day. The lid of the human i. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Erin minke in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award winning show called lore which is a podcast book series and television show. And you can learn all about it over at the world of lore dot com and until next time stay curious..

thirty million dollars Robert Dennis Erin minke Ford robert robertson chrysler ten years second meeting today one more thing nineteen ninety mercedes one thousand nine hundred sixt ford apple roberts lore one thousand nine hundred sixt
"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

09:51 min | 5 months ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"Of england in the middle of the twelfth century. The king was so enamored with rollins ability that he gave him a large home. In the village of hemming stone in suffolk as well as thirty acres of land. So what had role in done to earn such gran wage. He was required to perform for the king's court. Every christmas in an act that was described as one jump one whistle and one fart roland. You was best known as roland the farther and he was a professional flatulence and he wasn't the only one. Hundreds of years earlier stories had been written about people who could break wind at the drop of a hat in japan between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries the were stories of a man named fukui tomino or ebay who performed elaborate for dances for japanese aristocracy and the tradition continued well into the eighteen. Hundreds joseph peugeot from france certainly made a good living tooting his own horn joseph for had been sculptor but probably didn't expect his son to go into such an explosive of work but joseph did well for himself. He first discovered his unique talent at a young age. While visiting the beach he'd gone for a swim and had taken a deep breath before ducking under the water as he floated beneath the sea. He felt something cold entering him from behind immediately ran out of the water. Only find some of the c. Leaking out of him the way it had come in when he got older. He figured out that he could suck in air the same way. Joseph eventually found work as a baker. He didn't let his day job get in the way of his passion. The often pretended to play musical instruments for the customers from behind the counter. Little did they know that he actually had turned his rear end into a special kind of trumpets is daily performances led him to believe that he could parlay his skills from the bakery to the stage. Today such an act would be seen as crass or low brow. Well people thought the same thing back in eighteen eighty seven two and they loved it. His act grew so popular that he took it to paris and began performing at the renown. Moulin rouge dressed in a red coats in white gloves. Lupita d'amato as he called himself warmed things up with some light flatulence. He would call out each break of wind with a whimsical name or description. For example he introduced the sound bride. Might make at her wedding and then let out a tiny squeak. He also imitated address maker ripping along piece of fabric by ripping apart. That was ten seconds long. He extinguished candles from several feet of way. He made popular songs from his rear. And just as his forefathers had done hundreds of years they performed for royalty from all over europe joseph's pista resistance by the way was his impression of a cannon blast which he fired out of his behind with all his might. The good news was that none of his toots smelled but that didn't stop women from fainting at the sound of them. It got so bad. Nurses were hired to stand by and carry female guests into the hall after they'd passed out despite the dramatic response though joseph. Pack them in at the moulin rouge at his peak he brought in twenty thousand francs per show eventually his act got so big. He started touring on his own performing for audiences until the start of world war one. The war efforts forced him into early retirement and back to his. I love baking. He even opened a biscuit factory into lawn before his death in nineteen forty five. But don't worry. They were real not air biscuits. This episode was made possible by norton. Three sixty with lifelock seems like every day everywhere practically everyone is connected to their devices. In fact the average person was connected almost seven hours a day last year and sixty four percent of adults admit to taking online risks for convenience. Sure all that browsing sharing banking and shopping nicks life easy but it can also expose personal information making you vulnerable to cyber criminals. There's of your digital life that can put you at risk. That's why norton three sixty with lifelock makes it easy to help. Keep it safe with device. Security that helps block hackers from devices of vpn for online privacy and lifelock identity theft protection to help you keep. What's yours yours. No one can prevent all cybercrime or identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses. But with the all in one protection of norton three sixty with lifelock. You can be less worried about becoming another stats. Save twenty five percent or more of your first year at norton dot com slash cabinet. That's norton dot com slash cabinet to save twenty five percents value. Like beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Even though a certain object may not be worth a lot of money it may have immeasurable sentimental value. A family photo album of babies blankets and a high school. Football trophy won't earn anything from subsidies but not having them would devastate their owners. But what does a person do when the thing they are given isn't only worth a lot of money but priceless sal. Dominic knew exactly what they would do they hold onto it. Dominic was born in nineteen. Oh four in forget east catalonia. In spain just along the french border he took an interest in the arts much to the chagrin of his father who was a strict disciplinarian is mother however supported her sons passions wholeheartedly. Dominic had also had an older brother who had died almost a year before he was born though he never met him. The weight of that child's death hung heavily among the family including and especially on the young dominic as he got older he was given the opportunity to truly explore his artistic side when he enrolled at the municipal drawing school at for garrison nineteen sixteen. Surprisingly it was his father who turned the family home into a gallery. The following year to support his son's endeavors. He put up his charcoal drawings for visitors to admire not long. After dominic had more traditional exhibition at local theater. He started to discover himself in college. In the early nineteen twenties he moved to madrid and developed a new look for himself one. That was not met kindly by his classmates. He was an odd fellow who grew his hair out and wore a long coat with stockings. In other words he dressed like a dandy but he talented and he surrounded himself with others like himself. One of his deepest friendships was with spanish poet. And playwright frederico garcia locker which they maintained until orcas untimely death during the spanish civil war in nineteen thirty six and nineteen twenty. Two dominic earned an art education. Like no other began spending his sundays at the famed pro museum in madrid studying the paintings of the old masters he'd sit and sketch learning how they formed their shapes and use their but the museum wasn't the only thing that had an influence on him. His own work was being shaped by the ever changing art movements around him. Cubism had been popular in places like paris but hadn't yet made its way to madrid. Dominic changed that while also experimenting with more avant garde movements like future ism and data as time went on the young artists continued to hone his skills meeting many of his contemporaries throughout his journey. These were painters who would go on to become legends in their own rights. Like pablo picasso and joan. Miro and word of his talent soon began to expand beyond his circle of friends. Reputation often preceded him wherever he went as he moved away from cubism and realism and deeper into surrealist imagery. The eccentric artists started creating his own personal style. He even moved beyond paintings into other mediums. Such as film despite dominic success. His father resented his behavior for one. The artist had entered into a relationship with a woman ten years younger than himself. He had also exhibited drawing that depicted an outline of jesus christ titled. Sometimes i spit with pleasure on the portrait of my mother. The title had been a part of the persona. He'd made for himself to fit in with his art scene friends. His father didn't care who he was trying to impress. His son had brought. Shame on the family. Dominic refused to apologize for the sketch in turn. His father kicked him out of the home and removed him from his will. His father may have disapproved of them but dominic paintings and drawings continued together a claim turning him into quite the celebrity. You often dined in upscale restaurants surrounded by friends and peers as other diners. Got of course. Those meals added up. And when the waiter would bring the czech dominik had no compunctions about paying for the whole table now being a celebrity it wasn't unheard of for him to get a free meal every now and then both for the instances when he would in fact have to pay the full amount. He came up with a foolproof way to avoid spending any money. He would take out his checkbook. Write out the amount for the bill and then sketch a little doodle on the back in a way he was making a bet that the restaurant wouldn't cash a check with a piece of original art by dominic otherwise known as salvador dali and more often than not. It was a bet he won. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Erin minke in partnership with. How stuff works. I make an award-winning show. Called lor which is a podcast book series and television show and you can learn all about it over at the world of lor dot com and until next time stay curious..

madrid Joseph Erin minke thirty acres ten seconds Lupita d'amato japan twenty five percent joan Miro france Dominic spain east catalonia ten years first year pablo picasso jesus christ dominik Today
"erin minke" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

10:43 min | 1 year ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Code Story

"So what does the future look like for the show? I kind of want to tell you about where we are right now and then we can go in the future so your podcast is getting about two hundred thousand downloads per episode. It's about three years old now. And for those who don't understand podcasts. Popularity anything around twelve hundred downloads in episode. That's like the top twenty percent of all podcasts. So if you're getting forty thousand downloads in episode. Only the top one percent. Get that so I have two hundred thousand downloads and episode which is extremely popular. Four for podcasting -T's world. You look at like youtube videos. And you're like other people get like one million downloads in the first minute of being uploaded but I I don't compete with that right. So podcasting was different. So with with those numbers you can really get sponsorships and all kinds of things. I two ads per episode and charge. You know quite a bit for those and it's amazing that I can put such a price tag on these ads and I won't go into those numbers but what is public is that Petri on is another thing that I'm getting revenue from N. It's got ten thousand dollars a month in Patriot funds so that is just phenomenal right there alone and then I've also got a shot because I've got so much graphic design that I've done on the podcast that I've got You know each episode has its own unique graphics which is overkill for podcasting. But I kinda like it so I just went with it and so you know so much of the graphic design that I've done on the show I've made into t shirts and stop so. The T shirts are selling really really good as well. So there's there's three kinds of streams of income here and combined is definitely more than what I was making as an engineer as well as allows me to pay top dollar for producers such to help me with the show. I'm getting comfortable now. I was trying to pour all the things that I was making back into the show but now it's more comfortable and this multiple streams is really helping a lot too. That's where we are with the current situation and then the future I mean I just want to build a better team to let me do less work but I'm not a person who does less work. I'm the personnel. Oh I've got more time going to build more things so if I have more time to do things I will be making possibly a second podcast or a book. Or or course and PAT. Flynn and some others kind of taught me this like you can use your podcasts to market your other stuff and instead of putting other ads in my show it would be great to take all the ads out one day and just market my own books or or courses because you know people are wanting to switch careers to be insecurity and if I had of course that taught them. Here's what you need to do. I think that'd be a great one. Two Punch of get him out and then pay these. This is a pay for course so that would be cool to do that in the future. And then I wouldn't need sponsors at that point because I could get the revenue from that that would be ultimate goal. So you mentioned Gary. You mentioned Seth Godin but I'm curious who influences the way you work like a CEO? Cto The name of person you look up to. And why I mean I have to look at other podcasters. Right and Aaron McKie's the guy who made lore and I'm not a big fan of floor or his work but I'm a big fan of how he just crushes at. This guy went from a no name so you look at Joe Rogan. Right he was he was on. Tv He was doing his own. Tv shows. Stand up comedy like when he starts a podcast. He's gone a million followers on Youtube on twitter. Ready is easy for him to become a popular. Podcast that's a magic power. I don't have so look at the landscape of who who's starting where I'm starting because that's who. I KINDA WANNA like mimic not somebody. That's completely in another semester's fear than I am. So Aaron McKie was this person who started as nobody with no followers on Youtube or twitter or anything and just decided to start podcasting and has since created a fulltime income out of it created a second podcast create his own. Tv show on Amazon. So this guy is just like. He's the trailblazer for me. And for a long time he was just a single person doing at all. That's just a huge influence to me to say. Okay what is this Guy Doing? And how would he do? Eight does kind of somebody who I follow very closely and I don't agree with you. Know all the things he's done in I actually. I've I firmly disagree on a lot of things like like he He was kind of starting podcasting in a space where there wasn't a lot as much competition so the way he mark is showing the way Iraq it would be extremely different and so he his way of you know this is how you get your show out there in my way are two different things but I really like his drive. And when you see somebody who just has like nonstop drive to just keep going and going and going. And he's got like two or three books made at this point. This just inspires me such a level that I'm like okay. That's you know you got. Kinda gotta look up and see. Where am I gonNA peak out? Where am I gonNa Room? I GOING TO PLATEAU ATCH. And there's these people that are above me that I'm just chasing and that's one of them right there Erin Minke from lower. If you could go back to the beginning what would you do differently for the show? Or what would you consider taking a different approach on? I feel like I did a lot of things right and some have very little regrets on how I would do it differently. There was just little things like I would focus on items ranking so much at the beginning and I would I would focus on just kind of little details that I just don't think matter as much as trying to get the word out maybe a little too soon as well. It wasn't ready for the New York Times. Now's pitching things to New York Times like. Hey did you guys write stories about the PODCAST podcasts? Did you check this podcast out? And it's like well. Maybe I wasn't ready for that at that point right you know. Maybe I just pulled a gun too early on marketing as well. When I hit a problem I just kind of overcome and adopt and just keep going. I don't really stress on it too much. That like aw man. That was a big mistake so yeah I just learned I just learned okay. Steered the other way. Let's keep going love it so last question Jack. You're getting on a plane and you're sitting next to a young entrepreneur. They've got the rich. They're starting their next big thing whether it be. You know building a product or building. A successful podcast. What advice do you give that person? I mean there's a lot of different things so it's like I really like Susko in series on a lot of stuff where he says be the purple cow. Stand out. Don't be it's hard for me because I have contradictions to this. So don't be the same as everyone else do. Be something different and then be the best in your category at that so like I didn't know there was a true crime. Meets CYBERCRIME CAT? There isn't a true crime. Made cybercrime category so that podcast category is something I invented in my own head and I was determined to be the best in that category even though nobody else even knew that category existed right so that was unique and the best so to be the first that space and the best. And that's based was that Combo I think is really important if you can accomplish that. That's great for the same time. I'm making t-shirts right. And that is not something unique at special at all cover ones had t shirts for hundred years and there's teashops on every corner. What am I doing making t-shirts but it's one of those things. Everyone t-shirts just like everyone needs gasoline for the cars food and I think you can create a gas station or a restaurant and kill it out there because people need the stuff stuff so I kind of took that concept Y. started making t-shirts. Everyone needs to wear something. You don't always have to be different. You just have to make something great. That people want that Cole. Greatness factor is the biggest thing to overcome. You can't just make something that's mediocre because people don't recommend stuff that's good. They don't rave about it on twitter or on facebook. Oh the thing is it's good guys. Check it out. No the only rave about stuff and only spread things that he's loved and then there are great and then they really want other people to listen to watch us or whatever. I'm a big fan of like make it great really analyze every part of its make it great and only put the great stuff out there so many interviews that I talked for hours and hours but then only published thirty minutes of it because that was the great parts of the interview right so it's kind of a really strict curator of wet goes in the show to make sure it's great as many seconds possible agree if not every second so You know I was just something that I think is really important at the beginning is for anyone starting out his is make it great and there's some other schools of thoughts like there's some people like Gary Vander Chuck. He makes a new episode of podcast episode every day and every day. It's not great. There are so many sucky episodes that he has and his theory is just get it out. Go go go go and so you couple schools of thoughts you can just keep putting stuff out there put content out there and see what happens or you can go bypass which is wait until it's ready and then put it out and make sure it's great when you do we`ll. Jack Thank you for being on Code Story. Thank you for telling the creation story of dark net. Diaries Fun to go through it all. Thanks for having me in. This concludes another chapter of coach story. Code Story is hosted and produced by Noah lab part season two episodes or co produced and edited by Bradley Dental. Be Sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts. Spotify or the podcasting Apps your choice support the show on Patriot Dot com slash coats story for just five to ten bucks a month and when you get a chance. Leave us a review. Both things help us out tremendously and thanks again for listening..

Youtube twitter Aaron McKie New York Times Gary Vander Chuck Jack Joe Rogan Seth Godin Amazon Spotify engineer Flynn Iraq Cto Erin Minke Apple Noah CEO Bradley Dental Cole
"erin minke" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Biggest music superstars hand picked I heard radio here in Las Vegas see the Backstreet boys he and many more Seacrest while the world is listening on the radio you can be there listen for your next year the Texan with access to our I heard radio music festival plus a thousand dollars spending cash a triangle get your free on get a free on with six infects heating and cooling this month only get a ninety nine dollar air conditioner inspection and receive one called a freon free remember call before six PM and get your AC fix the same day six and fix dot com extend when access to our I heart radio music festival thousand dollars spending cash I'm Danish words and I'm the host of noble blood the new history podcast from I heart radio and Erin minke focuses on the stories of some of history's most fascinating right from the infamous to the almost forgotten the world is full of ill fated love affairs bad decisions in family drama when you're wearing a crown mistakes I hurt media was number one for podcasts it's easy to see noble blood in the I heart radio I ever you get your podcasts from I heart radio number one for podcasts them roll humans make a lot and it's got to go somewhere some of it is treasured there was nothing else like this center a television some of those John they were totally indiscriminate on what they collected the only thing clear to me is that nothing last forever the femoral premature birth is the number one killer of babies those who survive often face birth defects and complications that affect them for life healthy birth is the dream of every parent for hundreds of thousands of families with the baby born too soon the reality is their baby's first home is the newborn intensive care unit it's the hardest thing they will never have to face and it's even harder on the baby this is a crisis that knows no boundaries fifteen million babies are born prematurely worldwide nearly one million will die before.

Las Vegas Seacrest Erin minke thousand dollars ninety nine dollar
"erin minke" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Thousand dollars to spend while you were in more than thirty of the biggest music superstars hand picked by radio arena here in Las Vegas the day times day see Backstreet boys leasing keys Hootie and the blowfish and many many more hosted by Ryan Seacrest listen for your next chance to text and when access to our I heart radio music festival thousand dollars spending cash I'm Danish words and I'm the host of noble blood the new history podcast from I heart radio and Erin minke focuses on the stories of some of history's most fascinating right from the infamous to the almost forgotten the world is full of ill fated love affairs bad decisions in family drama when you're wearing a crown mistakes I hurt media was number one for podcasts it's easy to see why fine noble blood in the I heart radio ever you get your podcasts I play high school softball for I think my mom and dad has never missed a game I play for the smell of my leather glove the sound of infield chatter and that incredible feel of the ball jumping off the bat I play for sacrifice buns and sacrifice fly because they taught me what it means to be teaming whether they're playing for their teammates their classmates or their community student athletes in North Carolina learn important lessons that we use for the rest of their life like respect for the rule time management skills and the value of hard work and sat I played high school softball for my friends to decorate my locker before every game I play for play for keeps play for fun play this message presented by the North Carolina high school athletic association and in North Carolina athletic directors association my name is Tom Thorton.

Las Vegas Ryan Seacrest North Carolina Tom Thorton Backstreet Erin minke North Carolina high school Thousand dollars thousand dollars
"erin minke" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"John Hawthorne road into Salem village that day even from a distance, it was clear that he was someone important, the black clothing, silver, lace, and gold buttons on his coat, the fancy jewelry and beautiful boots. All abyss spoke of a person of privilege and power. Two words that accurately described, John Hawthorne. With him was another well-dressed man Jonathan Corwin. They were making their way through the village toward a very special destination. The home of Nathaniel Ingersoll. It was a building that served double duty as the local tavern. What they called an ordinary back, then an Ingersoll ordinary was about to play host the opening pitch of a very long very deadly game. Because Hawthorne Corwin weren't just to rich visitors out on a giant through the countryside. They were the lucky pers- of Salem the magistrates had arrived trials. We're about to begin. This is on obscured. I'm Erin minke. Let's begin with systems. We talk a lot today, about systems that are breaking down or how we've stepped outside of the norm and are experiencing very unusual kind of life. It's a common way.

John Hawthorne Hawthorne Corwin Nathaniel Ingersoll Salem Erin minke
"erin minke" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"I'm trying to do things. Y'all going hard after the show like going out. I'm not you know what? Toko cost you Joan now. I don't know how that's not hockey talking. I know how. You talking to noise you made is going to vote you Puccio. Let's talk radio, but I'm gonna try to watch that movie stars born everybody's been hyping it up like, it's amazing. So I maybe need to see that. I think I'm gonna watch abducted a plane side this weekend. Oh. I told you watch the green book. Well, I'll do it breath. Have a great weekend at Mr. Bobby bones on Instagram gonna have you have a great weekend. Bobby bose? Few moments in early American history are as well known and yet equally misunderstood as the Salem witch trials more than three hundred years after they ended the tragic events of sixteen ninety two still feel fresh in relevant and rightly so because the story of Salem is about much more than just a community caught up in the grip of mass hysteria. It's a story about us. I'm Erin minke creator and host of unexcused a podcast series. That explores some of the darkest most misunderstood moments in history season, one was a deep dive into the Salem witch trials, and includes historian interviews intensive research and powerful storytelling, and you can binge. The entire twelve episode season right now subscribed to on obscured in your apple podcasts or iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts and begin your journey into the past. Learn more over at history uninspired dot com..

Salem Mr. Bobby bones Bobby bose Erin minke Toko hockey Joan apple three hundred years
"erin minke" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Twenty more plays one hundred more yards over double the rushing yards. Almost two yards more Peron and completely dominated time possession. You know at the box score tells you because if you watch the game the game told you Russell Wilson is better than back. But the box score tells you Dallas is way better than Seattle. This was a personnel mismatch. And I'm surprised it was this close. Seattle did not have a first down. A first down until they're forced possession. I said going into the game. Seattle's a great story. They're not a great football team. Dallas we think of them as dysfunctional Jerry Jones can't win playoff games. They're a highly functioning organization. This is an excellent roster. But because of the limitations at quarterback, they have to in a certain way and the game went the way it needs to go Zeke had a big day. They were at home defense did their part and enact as what he does often made one big play light. I did like Dax run late. Of course, he wouldn't have had to been hero. If he'd not on that awful pass on the previous drive. But if you look at the top ten players on the Seahawks and the Cowboys roster. Russell Wilson, Bobby Wagner. Make it for Seattle. The other eight best players Zeke Layton Vander Amari Cooper, Zack Martin Tyron Smith. Jalen. Smith DeMarcus Lawrence Byron Jones all Cowboys. Seattle has two great players. They are not a great team. Dallas is loaded with a limited quarterback. And I think increasingly this was actually a very classic Dak Prescott game. He was mostly uninspiring. His stats were mad. He's consistently infuriating an inaccurate. But Zeke big day defense delivered. And he makes a play late. We've said from day one about Dak it ain't pretty, but he has a certain personal resonance and calm in crisis. He tends to be better with the game on the line. Then he is in the first three quarters with just first downs on the line. But I do think this weekend is interesting because I think Dak Trubisky. Lamar are different versions of the same quarterback. The difference is Lamar and Trubisky. Have a ways to go until they get paid Dak is about to get paid. And hopefully once again Dak Prescott has the self-awareness doned or stand. There is a recipe for Dak to win. And those things all have to work and they all did this weekend. Home running defense, mega big play light. Because it's it's decision time on back real soon, and he'll win a lot of games in Dallas is not dysfunctional. They're going to of games they may win their division again next year but going forward does Dak want wins or lettuce. Because if he wants wins. This was classic. Dak it all had to work at home to not just beat Seattle. But understanding that Seattle personnel wise right now today isn't even close to Dallas. They're not look up ten best players between these two teams Wagner. Russell Wilson are in it. It is all Cowboys after that. All right coming up next calling right, Colin wrong and forty five minutes. There is a great discussion to going on it. It's a very healthy discussion, and it's kind of confusing. It's confusing to me it's confusing to people Carson Wentz is better than Nick foles. And every GM I talk to in every scout in every executive and everybody knows it. Philadelphia players note. But why does fulls? Make this offense look better, and why is full four no in the playoffs. And why is full has a Super Bowl wanted fulls when in Chicago explaining and I think it's pretty easy to explain the full Wentz dilemma for the record going to have to pay both of them this year. So you're going to have to make choice in Philadelphia, and the choice is whence. And I'll explain that coming up. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical events. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey. You started or dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done. Just yet starting.

Dak Seattle Dallas Zeke Layton Vander Amari Coope Russell Wilson Dak Prescott Dak Trubisky Bobby Wagner Cowboys Philadelphia Dax Peron Lamar Colin Jerry Jones Zack Martin Tyron Smith Salem Erin minke football
"erin minke" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"Weekdays at noon eastern, nine AM Pacific. There are four games this weekend. And the numbers are big Vegas thinks we're not we're going to have decisive winds India Kansas City. Chiefs favored by six. Dallas Rams Rams favored by seven Philadelphia at the saints saints favored by eight. That's a big playoff number. Yikes. And then there's there's that one game. That seems interesting to me chargers at New England New England favored by four and a half. That's the one. That's very interesting to me. Okay. I think it to trap bet Vegas is begging you to bet the chargers Vegas. Does this once in a while you see a number? You're like that. What that opened it five you watch the chargers. Push the ravens around for three and a half hours. And the ravens are the real deal there begging you to bet the chargers. I'll just say this Tom Brady again against the remaining AFC quarterbacks is fourteen. No. Philip rivers. Oh and seven against him. Lonzo and six and Patrick Mahomes, Owen one. Secondly, playoff football. What wins and playoff football best defense? Well, no the bears. Just lost best quarterback. Always wins the game. No, Russell Wilson Mazda. Dak best roster not necessarily. I mean. The texans. Have a better roster today. I would argue that in Indianapolis, you wanna know what went in football in the NFL and play offs situational football. Philadelphia. Situationally was great at the end of that football game. Dallas situationally. Dax run was great at the end of that football game. Who's the best situational football team in the NFL? So that game when I see all these lines. New england. I guess the lines in that game. I'm like man, that's a pick them. It started at five at feels like a trap game. Just remember this. Don't get caught up on the stuff that doesn't matter in this league. It's going to be snowing and twenty eight degrees in Foxborough. Remember that this game's not going to be pretty it could very well. Be just running game running game. You think Brady and rivers gonna be it's gonna be a firework show. My guess is it is low scoring situational football. That's my gut feeling. I do like New England in that spot. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey started or to dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done..

football Vegas Philip rivers New england Tom Brady New England New England Philadelphia NFL ravens Dallas Rams India Kansas City Rams Erin minke Russell Wilson Mazda saints Foxborough Salem AFC Dallas Indianapolis
"erin minke" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Write too as you can our Email is Hello at saver pod dot com. Where also in social media, you can find us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at saver pud. We hope to hear from you. We have a store online where you can buy like t shirts, and like laptop cases, or I don't know like bag bags like. Yeah. Oh, man. You can hold liquid in something with a picture from us. Not of of us know, we thought that would be creepy possibly. Yeah. But it could be a Cup of liquid that says heck and back to you. Yes. Wouldn't you want to drink out of a mug knit fest? I know I would I know you went to the store is is run by t public who helps us designs and they're mad geniuses. It's at a t public dot com slash saver. We hope to hear from you. If you're into buying stuff. I don't know check that out. Thank you as always to our super producers, Andrew Howard and Dylan Fagin. Thank you to you for listening. And we hope that lots more good things are coming your way. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey. You started or to dive in and bench the entire show. But we're not done. Just yet starting on January second we'll be releasing all six of our incredible historian interviews for you to hear in full. These were great conversations with the leading scholars in the world of the Salem witch trials, and you won't want to miss them. Learn more about the show over at history on obscured dot com and listen along on apple podcasts. Iheartradio or wherever you listen to podcasts and stay subscribed..

Salem Erin minke Twitter Andrew Howard Facebook Dylan Fagin Instagram apple
"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"War requires a lot from a soldier, intuition, dedication and resourcefulness dramatic to macgyver. A soldier's role can change from one moment to the next. And oftentimes the only tools they have to work with are the objects on their person at the time. You might not think you could patch up a wound with only a rifle knife, and some leaves you found on the ground. But when you're under enemy fire, you find a way and the United States military had to find a way when they ran afoul of the Chinese army during the Korean war the change in mountain reservoir known by American forces as the Chosin reservoir became a hotbed of action during the Chinese second offensive of nineteen fifty the war appeared to be over as u n forces advanced into North Korea in order to unite the two sides, a reunification wasn't going to happen. If the People's Republic of China had anything to say about it. One hundred twenty thousand Chinese soldiers infiltrated North Korea in an effort to stop the UN's advancement. They reached the reservoir. I while a special group of United States soldiers known as the x corps approached from the coast. I know they sound like characters out of a marvel comic book. But trust me, they were real superheroes. Fifteen thousand men from the marines and the US army were ready to end the war once and for all and bring stability to the region. You might be wondering why only fifteen thousand if the Chinese had deployed eight times that amount into the area, and that's because the United States forces had no idea the Chinese army was waiting for them. They snuck in and fortified their position waiting for the Americans to arrive. The X core held their own for over two weeks against the Chinese military, but the harsh terrain and brutal fighting had left them all but defeated stock in freezing temperatures and outgun the x corps the best of the best. We're running out out of ammo out of food and out of time. They were surrounded the enemy was closing in on thousands of US soldiers, many of whom had nothing to defend themselves with except broken guns and equally broken spirits. Worst of all, but mortar shells. They used to beat back. The Chinese forces had run dry. So they called in for an airdrop Tootsie rolls. They call them. It sounds silly. But codenames like that were necessary to prevent the other side from knowing what was coming in case. Someone happened to be listening in. Unfortunately, whoever took the airdrop order didn't understand the codename. The x corps got their supplies boxes and boxes of what they thought were mortar shells ready to lunch what they received however was far less explosive. They're pleased for Tootsie rolls had gotten them exactly what they'd asked for Tootsie rolls. Little chocolate candies wrapped up in wax paper. This might have signaled the end for the US forces now without an escape plan and their chances of survival dwindling after all you can't win a war with chocolate as you're only supply unless you're the ex gore. The men were quickly revitalized by the sugar rush bestowed upon them from overhead and they quickly realized that there little candies, although hardened by the reservoirs freezing winds became soft and pliable win warmed up in their mouths. They chewed them into a putty like substance, which they then spread over the holes in their weapons. Letting the wind freeze them in place with their bellies full and their guns back in action. The x corps were once again, a formidable threat, they managed to fight back just enough to get out of enemy territory and make their way to the nearest coast where they could regroup. It sounds almost too strange to be true. The idea that a simple chocolate candy saved the lives of so many American soldiers in Korea. But as it turns out to sea rolls made as good a patching material as they did a candy. Now that I think about it. It's a good thing. They didn't call in for an airdrop of lifesavers. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey started or to dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done..

United States x corps Chosin reservoir Chinese army North Korea Tootsie China mountain reservoir Salem UN Erin minke two weeks
"erin minke" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Book recommendations, so just a reminder, we do publish recommended readings for each episode on our website dressed podcast dot com. Hope all of you who bought Holly. The gifts that are merch store t public dot com for slash dress are enjoying them. And we promise to bring some new designs to the store while we are on break. So you can find those at again t public dot com forward slash dressed, many things users. Holly fry Casey p for all of their hard work on season one. We love you guys had just soon in twenty nineteen. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey. You started or to dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done. Just yet starting on January second we'll be releasing all six of our incredible historian interviews for you to hear in full. These were great conversations with leading scholars in the world of the Salem witch trials, and you won't want to miss them. Learn more about the show over at history on obscured dot com and listen along on apple podcasts, I heart radio or wherever you listen to podcasts and stay subscribed. We'll.

Salem Holly Erin minke apple
"erin minke" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"erin minke" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"And you have the nails being pulled down by every single rock in the earth is pulling with all of its gravity, but a tiny little kitchen magnet. Totally overcomes that it can lift the nail even though it's pulling it's being pulled down by the whole entire planet earth. Right. Exactly. Now, imagine a magnet the size of the earth. Right. I mean that would be that'd be extraordinarily powerful. And so you have basically like a gravitational blob the size of the earth still pretty ineffective compared to electromagnetism. So we if you compare it by object like you said, he's a proton put in extra proton the force are gonna feel from electromagnetism is so much bigger than the force of gravity. They're gonna feel towards each other the same with like two electrons or to quirks things. So in the scale of the particles that we know it's a really weak force. That's right. Exactly. And yet and yet it seems to dominate right? That's a bit of a puzzle like on one hand it super-duper week. And we're telling you that it hardly counts for anything on the other hand, it's responsible for the structure of the solar system and for the galaxy. And it's the reason the universe looks the way it is right. Right. And so that can be confusing to people like how do you reconcile those two things in your head? Like, why doesn't earth feel an electromagnetic force with the sun, which would be so much bigger than the force of gravity. It'd be pretty shocking. And that's actually the reason is gravity is different from the other forces. That it can't be canceled out. Right. If there was some huge electrostatic difference between the sun and the earth like a bunch of positive charges had a bunch of negative charges here. It would create such an enormous force that it would be very quickly balanced. Like, that's what lightning is, right? When there's a charge differential between clouds and the ground. It's it doesn't take that much before those charges wanna rearrange themselves to a lower energy configuration. They rushed down to the ground. They've rush up to the clouds the general to balance themselves out because you two kinds of charges positive and you have negative. So you can find an arrangement were basically, everybody's happy to equilibrium. Right. But that's not true for gravity. Okay. I get it. So for example, if the earth was every particle on earth had a positive electromagnetic charge every particle in the sun had a negative electromagnetic charge. There would be he pull from electromagnetism pulling earth into the sun yet. We'd be toast, pretty quick. Yeah. Not long. Huge even the opposite. If we were all positive and the sun was all positive. We would get shot out of the solar system very quickly. That's right. And that's why you know, early days of the solar system being formed. You have these gases the gas and dust coalescing and very rapidly things neutralize right because anything that feels electrostatic force to something else is going to find the opposite charge, and they're going to coalesce, and they're gonna make something neutral. That's why most of the things around. You are neutral. I most of the elements are neutral because any deviation from neutral results and a powerful force to neutralize it. So thankfully, the earth is made out of both like equal amounts of positive and negative particles. Right. That's right sort of balance electromagnetic Lii, and so even of the sun was all positive. We would look like neutral a neutral to to the sun. Yeah. That's right. We're on large scales. Earth neutral. I mean, there might be some residual positive or negative charge depending on the solar wind cetera. But basically this neutral, and so the largest force of the earth feels is the gravity from the sun even though gravity super-duper week. Right. It doesn't take a lot to counteract gravity, but it's the only player left because everybody else's sort of paired up and danced off for the night and gravity's just they're left holding the bag and gravity. Can't be balanced. Right. You feel gravity if you have any mass right only positive masses? No such things that negative mass to give anti gravity. Wow. Well, let's keep going, but first let's take a quick break. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch.

Erin minke Salem one hand
Do Whales Have Pop Songs?

BrainStuff

04:06 min | 3 years ago

Do Whales Have Pop Songs?

"I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and Evelyn Schnur biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking a comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the I heart radio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb. And as it turns out, humans aren't the only creatures the create and riff on catchy tunes Wales. Have pop music to during breeding season as male humpback whales swim along they sing the same song. Females never sing only males due to find a mate or to posture for other males the songs passed back and forth between the members of a pod each WALE, adding his own little flourishes. And as that pod meets other pods. They pass the tunes along until whole oceans ring with a song of the moment in the world of human pop music. What was the hot song of the summer will be dropped by every radio station in the fall to make room for the new hot thing? Research published in the proceedings of the Royal Society b suggests that the same is true for whale songs. The popular tune becomes gradually more and more complex. It's altered by different populations of humpbacks. But after a few years, the wheels grow tired of their complicated Diddy and start from scratch again the research team. Based out of the university of Queensland rated the complexity of song recordings of ninety five humpback whales from different populations in the Indian Ocean, of course, thirteen consecutive years. They found that over the course of a couple years. The same song spread all the way across the South Pacific from east Australia to French Polynesia lead author Jenny Allen marine biologist and the sedation ecology and acoustics laboratory at the university of Queensland said in a press release typically these songs changed gradually possibly through embellishments by individual singers. We suspect the embellishments allow bowls to stand out from their peers much teenage boys trying to stand out from the crowd. But every few years the songs are replaced always buy something simpler, suggesting there's a limit to the whales capacity to learn new material. Although there is evidently a limit to how much Wales can learn the build up and abandonment of particular songs signifies, a rapid cultural change over thousands of miles of ocean. Allen said that's basically unparalleled in non human culture. Dolphins. Do have fads too though. They have only been observed on a smaller scale an individual named Billy who learned to walk backwards on her tail and captivity later taught the trick to some wild dolphins after she was released the dolphin moonwalk really took off for awhile. Today's episode was written by Justin shields and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other catchy science, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey. You started or to dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done. Just yet starting on January second we'll be releasing all six of our incredible historian interviews for you to hear in full. These were great conversations with the leading scholars in the world of the Salem witch trials, and you won't want to miss them. Learn more about the show over at history on

Wales Indian Ocean University Of Queensland Jenny Allen Salem Katie Golden Evelyn Schnur Twitter Harvard Apple Lauren Vogel Royal Society Diddy Erin Minke South Pacific Billy Justin Shields Australia
BrainStuff Classics: How Do Accents Work?

BrainStuff

05:40 min | 3 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: How Do Accents Work?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here with another classic episode from our erstwhile host Christian Sager. This episode sets out to answer a question that lots of us around the office having backgrounds in theatre were curious about how do accents work. Hey, I'm Christian Sager. An I'm speaking with an American accent. But where to accents come from not just mine, but all of them. I let's figure out what an accent is accents are just a part of something bigger called dialects. And accent refers to the way a person or a group sounds a dialect refers to the accent in the grammatical features, inherent and a person's speech. So an accent is just a way of pronouncing a language every single person. Speaking has one your accent results from how where and when you learn the language, you're speaking in and it gives impressions about you to other people, no one has a single fixed accent determined by his or her experience because we can and do control the way we speak both consciously and unconsciously, in fact, most people change the way, they speak depending on who's listening and our accents can even change. When we have new life experiences, but we're to accents in general, come from, well, primarily two things isolation and human nature, we're social animals, and when we're in groups we like to behave in similar fashion and show that we belong, and we do this in multiple ways language is no different. When groups become distinct the way, they speak becomes distinct too. So if a single group, separates socially and geographically think of group f going to one island in group b going to another then over time they developed distinct dialects, they may eventually even sound like two different languages, humans are widely travelled species. And as distinct groups mingled with others their accents changed combining some traits while losing others. No accent is particularly better than another while you might hear some folks talk about accentless English with they're really talking about our dialects like received, pronunciation or. Or general American which are the reference varieties? They're transcribed in dictionaries and often taught to foreign English students, but they are accents and on the less. So what does your accent say about you? It depends on who's listening. You might have an accent that is associated with a particular place like London, for example. But some people may just associate that with England and in all languages, some accents have higher or lower perceived prestige. Meaning they are often associated with a higher social class. For example, Americans have often looked down on the southern US accent, the southern accent is associated with several stereotypes. But other English speakers say in the UK or ustralia might not share the same prejudice. They will however have their own stereotypes about accents. And these stereotypes won't completely carry over to other English groups either. So if there's an accent joke in a British film, your American friends might not get it at all. These perceptions are not based on anything inherent in the accent. If you play recordings of different accents to non English speakers, they won't be able to tell which ones are high or low prestige. But if you really feel that your accent isn't working, then the good news is that you can change it. You'll have to work at it figure out. Exactly how you'd like to sound. And then expose yourself to that as much as possible, but it is possible. Today's episode was written by Ben bolan and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finish the journey. You started or to dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done. Just yet starting on January second we'll be releasing all six of our incredible historian interviews for you to hear in full. These were great conversations with the leading scholars in the world of the Salem witch trials, and you won't want to miss them. Learn more about the show over at history on obscured dot com

Quicken Loans Christian Sager Salem America Lauren Bogle London United States England UK Erin Minke Ben Bolan Tyler Ninety Days Thirty Year