17 Burst results for "Erika Lee"

"erika lee" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

09:37 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"So surprised and shocked and they didn't go down and they stop son right there. They just seemed out the window you and split me off and kept driving. And it says she's experienced more incidents of anti Asian racism since the start of the pandemic, which is true for many Asian, American and Pacific Islanders. Over the past year, when it comes to the rise in anti Asian attacks. Many point to U. S history We've heard in the past 24 hours. Many describe anti aging discrimination and racial violence as on Americans. Unfortunately, it is very Americans. That's the voice of Erika Lee, speaking at a House committee hearing on anti Asian hate. Last week, she's the Regent's professor of history and Asian American studies, also the director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. She joins us now to discuss this further. Hi, Erica. Welcome to reset. Uh, hi. Thank you so much for having me. We've been living with the news of these shootings that took place in Atlanta for about a week now, So I want you to take me back to last week. What was your gut reaction when you realized this wasn't just a mass shooting, but a mass shooting that was targeting Asian businesses and Asian women? Core, of course, sadness, frustration. Here, but also a feeling that once worst expectations. Had come true. You know, this was following a year. That's not more of Anti Asian violence, hate racism. Often times lead and promoted by some of our leaders in highest office in the land. And so for those of us who who lived with this and you follow this It's been a long year. And, um, this pit in our stomachs that Began even before the virus came to United States just You know, just fell even deeper into this well of the spirit last week to be honest, Yeah. You mentioned the rise. Of course. Throughout this pandemic. How have you dealt with All of it. Fuck! Shit. That's a really, really hard question. I mean, you know, we we all get up and then we do. Our jobs were talking to folks like you who are asking. We're teaching. Our students were We're trying to educate those who have never heard about anti Asian racism, and we're trying to educate those who would deflect That this is actually happening. We saw this. They heard this. During the congressional hearings last week. Those hearings were the only the second time in U. S history that Congress Has paid attention to this issue in terms of of hearings before the House Judiciary Committee, and, um you know, this is this is what we need to do. But it is it's frustrating because Most most of us most Americans really should know this history should should recognize this as the racism that it is already in 2021. You would think so. But that's not Of course, always the case. Now in your testimony, Erica at that House committee hearing, you laid out examples of the long history of racism and discrimination against Asian communities here. Walk us through some of the key moments in history that you think led us to where we are today. Yeah, It's challenging to do this in just a few minutes, because it does. You know, it isn't a good example of this really long and deep rooted history. So you know, one of the very first things I think it's important toder stand is that While Asian Americans might be considered the cloak, quote model minority today a stereotype that is also in the ST ng For most of our history in the United States, we were considered Racially inferior, unfit for U. S citizenship placed along the same lines and hierarchy as African Americans and American Indians, so barred from becoming naturalized citizens just like Those groups prohibited from owning releasing land prohibited from marrying whites in some states or or serving on Juries where the defendant was white. Objected to social and residential segregation, all of the systemic racism Allowed, uh stereotypes, prejudice and vigilante violence to, um to spread so the largest mass lynching In U. S history. Targeted Chinese men in L. A in 18 71. We've got Legalized racism in the form of our immigration policies that first bar Chinese immigrant women because lawmakers believe they're prostitutes or potential prostitutes. And then by the 19 thirties. All other Asian groups are also barred from entering the United States or from becoming naturalized citizens be incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War. Two, of course, is is one example that many Americans had heard about. It's interesting that you bring up the largest mess. US lynching. If I Google that the first result that actually comes up is the 18 91. New Orleans lynchings of 11, Italian Americans. As you noted. The largest was the one of the Chinese immigrant men back in 18 71. Why the discrepancy? You think It's part of the problem that we're discussing here that 81 American history deep rooted long in the United States, substantial and incredibly important is just not being taught in our schools. It's It's being either willfully ignored as something that's tangential something that is seen as just an ad on when teachers might have time. Um I often think that you know when we're talking about race The go to is to consider the African American experience. And then American seemingly have no time. You know to think about the other histories of racism, and when we think about immigration were often focused on Let next immigration and also have no time to think about how immigration policies unequal immigration policies have affected other groups. When you think about your own experience as an Asian American woman, what comes to mind, Erica No way are taught at a very young age. You understand? At least this was the case of my family. One of my very first lessons from my parents, Woz. You have two strikes against you already In this country, you are Asian and you are female. So what That does is first of all. Repair you, You know for think of Life of racism and sexism, but it also highlights Hey, sense of needing to You overcome those issues in ways that You know, can be rather damaging. So smile all the time. The polite don't make a fuss. Work harder than anybody. Health. Um you know, these are there's the desire limitations, but I think that many Asian Americans, the nation American women and in general, have I've been have been facing for for our entire lives in the United States. You know, in your testimony, you talked about how the government is a part of this long standing problem. With that in mind. What do you make of the Biden administration's response to this surge? What are some ways that you think? And address the root cause of this long history of racism. First of all, like so many of the executive actions that he's taken in the early weeks of his administration's The proclamation condemning anti Asians, racism and xenophobia was incredibly important. I believe that no other president has Has taken such a strong stand as the racism was unfolding. Um, but at the same time Um you know my remarks, the one that you played earlier, Um, how many lawmakers are saying that this is un American? This racism is not who we are. I didn't want to name President Biden and the congressional hearing, but he is who I was thinking of. You know who this is? Yes, it's damaging is damaging training because our history shows otherwise. And I did note that when both he and Vice President Harris went to Atlanta Um, the vice president took a stronger stand and said racism is real and always has been. Xenophobia is real and always has been sexism, too. It's Erika Lee, Regent's professor of history and Asian American studies and director of the Immigration History Research.

Erica Erika Lee United States Atlanta House Judiciary Committee World War 2021 Congress Last week last week 18 Immigration History Research C New Orleans 11 L. A both President Two second time One
"erika lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:24 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As they immigrated to these shores. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of the expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught in our history books, It's almost impossible. To find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer that exists and that continues to endure. Relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady, the madam who runs the whorehouse or the degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive geisha who finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male. Partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. Stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says. With the expansion of the American Empire, we have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S military and Okinawa in South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies meted out collective punishment based on ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just excluded Asian immigrants, but the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women. Because of this idea that they were either prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 heart seller Act was signed into law, by Lyndon B. Johnson Heart Seller Act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that eraser? Is it more like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in L A. Can you tell me about that? In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents threw around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind it just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have been are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That master was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2 white men be chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry at a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and the $3000 fine and a school shooting in Stockton, California, where all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees in 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed. 30 students and teachers wounded. These two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Erika Lee Latin America Jason Oliver Chang 1982 Asia 1989 Los Angeles 18 75 Page Act Stockton Seattle 18 86 Vincent Chin $3000 19th century Chin South Korea United States Vietnam War 30 students early 20th century
"erika lee" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:30 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um, they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history. In order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before. I never knew that this happened and I've been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Oliver Chang Jason Erika Lee Connecticut African American Asian and University of Connecticut Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Senate Professor Latino Depression
"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We need to make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before. I never knew that this happened and I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Oliver Chang Jason Erika Lee University of Connecticut African American Connecticut Asian American Puerto Rican Asian and Asian American Studi Pacific Islander Senate Bill 678 Professor Latino Depression
"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:30 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the past 140 years in American history of committing violence against Asians. Almost as soon as they immigrated to these shores. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of The expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught. In our history books, it's almost impossible to find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century. Marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer. That exists then that continues to endure in relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady, the madam who runs the whorehouse or the degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive geisha who finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male. Partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. The stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says. With the expansion of the American Empire, we have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S military and Okinawa and South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies meted out collective punishment based on ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just Excluded Asian immigrants. But the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women because of this idea that they were either Prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 heart seller Act was signed into law by Lyndon B. Johnson, the heart seller act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that a racialism or like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in L A. Can you tell me about that? In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents who've around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind. It just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have then are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That massacre was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2 white men be chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry. At a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and the $3000 fine, and a school shooting in Stockton, California were all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees. 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed 30 students and teachers wounded these two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Lyndon B. Johnson Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Latin America 19th century Chin Asia 1982 18 86 Stockton Seattle 30 students 18 75 Page Act $3000 Immigration History Research C United States Vincent Chin early 20th century ST Valentine's Day Massacre Lee
"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before? I never knew that this happened. And I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry, Frustrated. There are so.

Maui Honolulu Jason Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Connecticut University of Connecticut African American Asian and Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Professor Senate Latino Depression
"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:19 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of The expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught. In our history books, it's almost impossible to find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century. Marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer. That exists then that continues to endure in relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady. The madam who Runs the whorehouse or the degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive Geisha, who Finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. Stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says with the expansion of the American Empire. We have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S. Military and Okinawa and South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that. Military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies made it out collective punishment based on Ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just Excluded Asian immigrants. But the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women because of this idea that they were either Prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 Hearts seller Act was signed into law, by Lyndon B. Johnson Heart Seller Act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that a racialism or like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in the lake, and you tell me about that. In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind it just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have been are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That massacre was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2. White men beat Chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry. At a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and a $3000 fine and a school shooting in Stockton, California were all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees. 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed 30 students and teachers wounded these two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Erika Lee Latin America 18 75 Page Act Vincent Chin Jason Oliver Chang 1982 Asia Stockton 19th century Seattle Los Angeles $3000 1989 18 86 17 Lee Immigration History Research C early 20th century Vietnam War ST Valentine's Day Massacre
"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history in order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before? I never knew that this happened. And I have been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Connecticut University of Connecticut African American Asian and Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Professor Senate Latino Depression
"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:31 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Headlines to the past 140 years in American history of committing violence against Asians almost as soon as they immigrated to these shores. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Asian Americans have been identified as foreigners rather than citizens. Erika Lee is director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota. It's the history of the expulsion of all of Seattle's Chinese and Chinese American residents in 18 86. It's the story of how hundreds of people were intimidated and then forced under armed guard to leave their homes and businesses. Herded together and forced to board a steamship out of town in 18 86. This episode is hardly ever taught. In our history books, it's almost impossible to find any monument or recognition or plaque or any historical marker. Related to this brutal history in Seattle, a city known for its progressiveness, a city that in the early 20th century. Marketed itself as a gateway to the Orient. This is nothing to bash on Seattle. It's just a reflection of the violence and then a racer. That exists then that continues to endure in relationship to Asian American history. The injustice, she says, particularly marginalized women, the stereotypes in the media images that permeate American popular culture. From the 19th century up through the present either focus on the Asian Dragon Lady, The madam who runs the whorehouse or The degraded Asian female prostitute or the submissive geisha who finds fulfillment in serving typically a white male. Partner or customer, or the well meaning Vietnamese prostitute from the Vietnam War era films. The stereotypes firmly cemented, Lee says. With the expansion of the American Empire, we have had such a long term heavy presence of U. S military and Okinawa and South Korea, the Philippines and the resulting sex, trade and sex work that has exploited Asian women. It's part of that culture of that. Military experience of the culture of US empire. Not only did American culture fetishize Asian women here and abroad U. S policies made it out collective punishment based on Ethnic stereotypes and nothing more. We have not just Excluded Asian immigrants. But the very first group that we actually barred from the United States were Asian immigrant women because of this idea that they were either Prostitutes or potential prostitutes. This is the 18 75 Page Act, which was our first federal immigration law passed in the U. S. But if we're discussing the paradox of both exploiting and punishing Asian Americans for the same supposed sins Wrap your head around this. The same immigrant group excoriated by society was later embraced as a shining example for all ethnic groups of how to successfully integrate into the dominant white economy and culture. Jason Oliver Chang is associate professor of history as well as Asian and Asian American studies at the University of Connecticut. He says that a half century ago, Asian Americans were dubiously characterized as model immigrants. When the 1965 heart seller Act was signed into law by Lyndon B. Johnson, the heart seller act established a new system. Governing U. S immigration by establishing a merit based approach that gave preferences to certain categories of people and eliminating the country quota numbers. And this dramatically opened up immigration to new flows of immigrants from Latin America and Asia and then became the preferred mode of immigration for a number of companies from agribusiness to high tech companies. These flows of highly skilled immigrants fueled a dominant image of who Asian Americans were in this period of rapid growth for Asian migration. There's this immigrant cohort that on one hand, is welcomed with open arms. And yet simultaneously subject to discrimination and violence. Violence, which Didn't even register in the national psyche. One of the challenging things among many with the idea of the model minority is that by recognizing discrimination, you're being targeted for violence. It disrupts a national narrative about success about civil rights progress. And it disrupts a convenient story about how Asian Americans fit into a liberal progressive society. And so in some ways, the erasure of their experiences is required to maintain that image of Asian Americans as the diligent worker as the person who won't rock the boat. Is that a racialism or like the failure to connect dots? Erika Lee spoke to us about the expulsion of Seattle's Chinese residents in 18 86. There was another sort of program in the 18 seventies in L A. Can you tell me about that? In 18 71 October 24. There was a conflict between Chinese people that led to the killing of a cop and another white resident. And that led to a majority of the residents around 500 people to descend onto the Chinatown where they killed between 17 and 20 people. I was able to read some first person testimony and just the gruesome details behind it just demonstrated a wholesale cleansing of a neighborhood grabbing Anyone at their disposal and lynching them in the streets on the premise that they were clearing out the impurities and making Los Angeles a safe place. Just gets back to that notion of eraser or at least of malignant indifference. This is a country that kind of savers. It's massacres. We all know about the ST Valentine's Day Massacre in Chicago. We know about Custer's last stand and the lynchings in the Jim Crow South. The Chinese massacre of 18 71. I'm embarrassed to say it's news to me. How does it come to pass that an entire society if I'm speaking for it? Fails to notice a crime so grave I think part of that comes from a deeply ingrained sense that Asians don't belong and that their history no matter how consequential important or Their contributions. However great they may have then are irrelevant to the understanding of the development of the United States. That massacre was 150 years ago. In the eighties, however, they were two other ghastly crimes. One the murder of Vincent Chin. In 1982 2 white men be chin to death a few days before his wedding Chin was Chinese, but he was blamed for the rise of Japan's auto industry. At a time when America was losing manufacturing jobs. His killers essentially got away with it. They receive probation and the $3000 fine, and a school shooting in Stockton, California were all the victims were Southeast Asian refugees. 1989, a mass shooting at an elementary school in Stockton was the worst the nation had ever seen. Five Children were killed 30 students and teachers wounded these two events put together demonstrate that there is a sense of no consequence for practicing violence against Asians. It's really difficult to paint a detailed image of who Asian Americans are in a society which knows very little about why they're here. And so in that absence, atrocities and the attacks on Asian Americans appear random, chaotic and episodic. If part of the problem is invisibility. You have a plan, at least for your home state. What is it? That's right. We need.

Lyndon B. Johnson Jason Oliver Chang Erika Lee Latin America Asia Chin Stockton 19th century 18 86 18 75 Page Act Seattle 1982 $3000 Vincent Chin Los Angeles Immigration History Research C 30 students ST Valentine's Day Massacre early 20th century United States
"erika lee" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

10:49 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Vladimir Putin a killer. No, the president gave a direct answer to a direct question. How is that how you don't ask my attentions? How is that constructive to the relationship? When you talk about diplomacy being primary between the US and Russia? How is calling Vladimir Putin a killer constructed to that relationship? President Biden is known President Putin for a long time. They've both been on the global stage for a long time. Worked through many generations of a relationship between the United States and Russia on but he believes we can continue to do that. Sake said by will continue to look to work with Putin on areas of mutual concern, such as efforts to stem Iran's nuclear program and more broadly nuclear nonproliferation. But she said that Biden is not going to hold back when he has concerns about Putin's actions. President Biden and President Putin certainly have different perspectives on their respective countries and how to approach engagement in the world. But where they agree is that we should continue to work for wait. Look for ways to work together, as was noted, and part of President Putin's comments and There are areas of mutual interest. New Start, which we just extended for five years is an example of that. Basically, Russia is also a member of the P five plus one as we look ahead to what's possible there as it relates to You know, preventing around from acquiring a nuclear weapon, So we're confident that we can continue to look for ways where there's a mutual interest mutual national interest, But The president is not going to hold back clearly when he has concerns when he has, whether that it is with words or actions. But Saki noted that the U. S ambassador to Russia remains in Moscow, while must go has recalled its ambassador to the United States back to Moscow itself. Russia's relations with the United States and the European Union already have plunged to post Cold War lows after Moscow's annexation of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula. Election meddling hacking attacks and most recently the jailing of Russia's opposition leader Alexei Navalny that followed his poisoning that was blamed on the Kremlin. Meanwhile, the United States and China will face the new test and they're increasingly troubled relations on top officials from both countries Meet in Alaska Secretary of State Anthony Blinken arrived today in Anchorage for two days of talks after a trip to Japan and South Korea. Or discussions about the world's two largest economies were a major topic. Blinken and Jake Sullivan, president Biden's national security advisor, planned to meet with China's top two diplomats. Difficult. Discussions are anticipated over trade, human rights and to bed Hong Kong and China's western Jingjiang region, as well as Taiwan. China's assertiveness in the South China Sea. And the Corona virus pandemic. No agreements are expected, and the White House framed it as then initial chance to address intense disagreements. More from reporter Nick Harper in Anchorage. First meeting under the Biden administration comes with a problem over priorities. The U. S. Wants to raise concern about human rights in Xin Jiang on democracy erosion in Hong Kong. China would rather speak about removing punitive trump era sanctions against Chinese officials. Both sides of hardened their positions going into the talks, and as such, the White House says no agreements or concrete and constructive steps are expected to come out of the discussions. I'm Nick Harper in Washington. And you are listening to the evening news on Kpfk, Berkeley, Kpfk, Los Angeles KFC at Fresno Online KPFK Donald, This is an hour long newscast. There's each night at six with a half hour edition on the weekends, and it is archived online kpfk that orc I mark Miracle. The 21 year old white man charged with murder and attacks on three Atlanta area massage parlors, faces arraignment in court. Tomorrow. Robert Long reportedly has admitted fatally shooting six Asian women, a white woman and a man. Cherokee County Sheriff's Department spokesman Captain J. Baker is drawing harsh condemnation for This statement following long's reported confession to police. He understood the gravity of it and he was pretty much fed up. But it didn't have the end of his rope and I mean, if there was a really bad day for him, and this is what he did. Baker also said that long reported a sex edition just addiction and said he attacked the parlors to get at the root of his temptation. Asian American civil rights groups. The questioning why long Is not yet facing hate crime charges after he admitted killing eight people, including six Asian women, pointing to the seemingly sympathetic comments of Captain Baker. Being win is a Georgia state lawmaker. We've seen this type of commentary before the framing of the perpetrator and finding reasons to justify a horrific crime. And the fact There is just trust between communities of color and law enforcement. This is one of the reasons why that distrust exists. Monica Tamar ANF is the president of the Asian Pacific American Alliance. She said in a statement that these murders show how both racism and sexism shaped the specific ways that Asian women experienced violence. Tamar F. Said Asian women are fetishized as sex objects. And perceived as deserving of violence. The House Judiciary Committee today held a hearing on the discrimination and violence that Asian Americans have faith historically, and since the onset of the cove in 19 pandemic, House Judiciary Committee chair Jerry Nadler calls the rise in violence. On American Asian American lawmakers were testifying Kristina Honest, ed reports hate crimes against Asian Americans in the US are on the rise. According to the stop A P I hate crimes index. Nearly 3800 incidents were reported in the last year, and according to the Center for the study of Hate and Extremism, there has been a nearly 150% increase in anti Asian hate crimes over the previous year. Both projects are run by the California state universities. Those hate crimes include racial slurs, murder, elder abuse and violent assaults on Children. Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas displayed graphic photos of Asian hate crime victims, including one of a man and a boy who are stabbed in the face. Three year old baby cut. Father cut Assailant did this heinous act because he thought Family was Chinese. And infecting people with a Corona virus. He thought the family was Chinese, and they are infecting people with the Corona virus. Take your heads out of the sand. Someone as we look at the outrage. Let me put into the record. The 45th president, always referring to coronavirus that the China virus or kung fu let me call his name President Trump. Recent attacks, including the killing of an 84 year old San Francisco man in February have raised concerns about worsening hostilities towards Asian Americans. The hearing planned in advance comes two days after a young white man gunned down eight people in Georgia. Six of them were Asian women and also comes during a pandemic year in which the former president Donald Trump repeatedly used inflammatory rhetoric about the Corona virus. But Republican Rob Roy of Texas defended free speech at the hearing. Former federal prosecutor used an old statement about lynchings when doing so. There's old sayings in Texas about, you know, find the all the roof in Texas and get Atoll of tree. Uh, you know, we take justice very seriously, and we ought to do that around up the bad guys. That's what we believe. Um, my concern about this hearing. Is that it seems to want to venture into the policing of rhetoric. In a free society. Please speech, and he then went on a tirade against China's Communist Party. Here's an excerpt. I'm not going to be ashamed of saying I pose Chai calms. I oppose Chinese Communist Party and when we say things like that we're talking about that. We shouldn't be worried about having a committee of members of Congress policing our rhetoric. Because some evil doers Go engage in some evil activity, as occurred in Atlanta, Georgia. Because when we start policing free speech, we're doing the very thing that we're condemning when we condemn what the Chinese Communist Party does to their country, making crimes out of thought crimes out of speech. This is one of the ways in which American racism works. Erika Lee, a professor of history and Asian American studies at the University of Minnesota, called Roy's comments irrational since the hearing was about hate crimes against Asian Americans, not China's Communist Party. We warned against the dangers of this false equivalency, which was at the heart of the hearing. Conflicting us with a with a foreign government has been an age old way. Of denigrating us separating us making us other on New York representative Grace Meng also spoke out against Roy's message. We cannot turn a blind eye to people living in fear..

Jake Sullivan Erika Lee Nick Harper Vladimir Putin Grace Meng Putin Alexei Navalny Roy Robert Long South China Sea February five years Asian Pacific American Allianc Monica Tamar European Union Anchorage White House Jerry Nadler Baker Washington
"erika lee" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:41 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Turning now to the U. S. Economy. Weekly jobless claims ticked up unexpectedly last week A veces Aaron cutter ski fills us in it was a year ago, jobless claims started surging, and for the past year they have remained historically high. Last week, another 770,000 Americans filed first time applications for unemployment benefits and increase from the prior week and the 52nd straight week of elevated filings. Ah, year into the pandemic, the labor market has sputtered nearly 10 million shot. Boobs lost have yet to be recovered. A separate report out today shows manufacturing continues to rebound sharply and again, the Dow in record territory again today. It's a 33,183. It is up triple digits. It's up nearly 200 points. That's nice. NASDAQ was really plummeting, and it's retreating from its earlier losses. Just a tiny bit but still way down. Our good news If you've not filed your taxes yet this season we continue Following this with CBS is Diane King Hall. Your tax deadline is delayed. The IRS is postponing the usual April 15th deadlines who may 17th this year. In a statement, the IRS commissioner acknowledged tough times for people and said The agency wants to do everything to help taxpayers navigate the pandemic. The delay only applies to federal taxes, State filing deadlines maybe different here in the Commonwealth. Senate President Karen Spilka and House Speaker Ronald Mariano have announced the Senate and the House will act immediately to align the state's tax deadlines with the feds. In a statement they brought the Senate and the House expect to include this in already moving legislation that addresses emergency paid leave unemployment insurance and tax relief on forgiven tpp loans. Student loan forgiveness might be on the way after all, according to experts, who see the tax break included in them $1.9 trillion stimulus package as the indicator The House Judiciary subcommittee is holding a hearing on the rise of violence and discrimination against Asian Americans. CBS is Stacey Lynn, with war from Capitol Hill. The hearing comes amid a spike in assault on Asian Americans nationwide, and there's a lot of finger pointing at the former president's rhetoric. Erika Lee is a professor of history and Asian American studies at the University of Minnesota. These words matter, especially when they repeatedly came from the White House during the previous administration, many lawmakers addressing the committee With words of support like Congressman Steve Cohen. Congress sees you, We stand with you who do everything in our power to protect you. Stacey Lynn CBS News Capitol Hill.

Erika Lee Steve Cohen Stacey Lynn Congress Diane King Hall 33,183 $1.9 trillion April 15th CBS Last week today Capitol Hill IRS last week CBS News 770,000 NASDAQ Ronald Mariano a year ago Senate
"erika lee" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:07 min | 6 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WTOP

"Hey, Finn. There's breaking news about the AstraZeneca Cove in 19 vaccine. The word came from the European Union's drug watchdog director Emer Cook, The committee has come to a clear scientific conclusion. This is a safe and effective vaccine its benefits in protecting people from covert 19 with the associated risks of death and hospitalization outweigh the possible risks. The shots of the AstraZeneca vaccine have been suspended in several European countries because of reports of blood clots. It's here in this country, CDC director Dr Rochelle Walensky says it's clear the pace of the vaccination effort is picking up as of March, 17th more than 113 million doses of covert 19 vaccine have been administered over 73 million people have received at least one dose, including 40 million who are fully vaccinated. Covad reinfection is rare but not impossible. CBS is Elise Preston has the latest information elderly patients who have recovered from Cove in 19. Are at greater risk of getting the virus again and a new study, Danish researchers discovered while most Cove in 19 victims were protected from re infection. Within six months, people over the age of 65 were on Lee protected less than half of the time The Senate has just confirmed. Javi Yerba Sarah is health secretary becoming the first Latino to hold that job. President Biden plans to meet with Asian American leaders when he goes to Atlanta tomorrow, the scene of SpA shootings that left eight dead today. Congress is looking into the uptick in violence against Asians. Figuring comes amid a spike in assault on Asian Americans nationwide. And there's a lot of finger pointing at the former president's rhetoric. Erika Lee is a professor of history and Asian American studies at the University of Minnesota. These words matter, especially when they repeatedly came from the White House during the previous administration, many lawmakers Dressing the committee with words of support like Congressman Steve Cohen. Congress sees you, We stand with you Who will do everything in our power to protect you. Stacey Lynn CBS News Capitol Hill, Jefferson County, Alabama, one of the places in the South, where.

Stacey Lynn Steve Cohen Emer Cook Erika Lee Elise Preston March, 17th 40 million Congress Atlanta President Senate Rochelle Walensky European Union CBS tomorrow CBS News 19 victims Javi Yerba Sarah six months CDC
"erika lee" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:30 min | 10 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And do up stations while there are none left coast to coast 19. Johnson. No. Didn't short They did have a hit and 61 with baby. Oh, baby, you never from Brooklyn. All right. We are talking about all things Cove in 19, particularly from a legal perspective, and we are doing that with Quentin Brogden and I've got a link to crane Brogden Rogers Com on rolly dot net. Very interesting sight in a very interesting practice and certainly cope it from the legal perspective is a very interesting topic. And we were just about to broach the idea of the vaccine. And of course, this is this is nothing new because vaccines have been mandated for school kids and all of that, and very often when there is a new incident, that's the first time some people find out that G. You don't have the right to sue. So what's up with this? Well, Rollie, you've got two entities in your lives that may require vaccinations, mandatorily or otherwise, your employer and your government. If it's your employer, it's going to need to satisfy the 88 The American with Disabilities Act. It's going to need to be job related. It's got to be consistent with business assess itty or justified by some direct threat, and it has to be no broader and no more intrusive than necessary. So, for example, healthcare providers, schools, nursing homes. Other employees that work with huh? Environments. You know, nursing homes, For instance, they custom Erika Lee can and have required their employees to be vaccinated against not, you know, even predating Cove it right. But other employers who may not be able to meet that standard have not been able to have not required it number one and wouldn't Presumably be able to meet that standard. But even those employers who can meet the standard they still under Title seven another federal statute they have to accommodate an employee's sincerely held religious belief. Ondo, also under the ADA. If the employee has a disability or medical condition that might make them susceptible to the vaccine, the employer may not be able to require that employees to be vaccinated even if they're in the high risk environment, and they meet all the other standards. So It's It's a kind of is. The answer is it depends when it comes to the employer. And the longer answer is perhaps, but with some exceptions. And then you get to the government. If you want to go there, we can talk about that. Yeah, absolutely does with the employer one thing assuming you have a preexisting condition, You also have to find a doctor who was willing to Ah, document that and many of them just like those who won't give out a narcotic for extreme pain because they don't want the paperwork and the finger pointing. It's hard to find somebody who will write you that exemption except in extreme extreme cases, But of course All that's out. The window went when it's the government and a number of people who are concerned about the government, perhaps passing mandatory vaccination. Look back to the Supreme Court from about 1905, where the Supreme Court says Yes, we can do it. That's on a federal level. So where are we now? Well, that's right, and you hit the nail on the head. The case it's most often discuss is a 1905 United States Supreme Court case and involved mandatory smallpox vaccinations. Because of a smallpox outbreak in Massachusetts and the case, Jacobson versus Massachusetts, and there was a fine of a whopping amount of $5, which I presume in 1902. I guess when the statute was passed in the 1905 was quite a large amount, and the Supreme Court said that states do have the police powers you know, to enact reasonable regulations to protect public health, public safety in the common good. And vaccination mandates were exactly the kind of permissible state action to protect the public health and sure the rights of the individual may at times under the pressure of greater, you know, communal dangers. He subjected to restrain, you know, that's what the language of the cases. So the question today is in light of a lot of new case law and changes in jurisprudence, which is just a fancy word for Cases, hands down by the courts and the legal environment. We're swimming in his lawyers. And is that 1905 case still good. Justice Samuel Alito, one of the Supreme Court justices said. You know, just a couple of weeks ago and a legal convention. He mentioned this case and essentially said We're in a new environment. We're you know, being subjected to what he called a constitutional stress test where We are undergoing previously unimaginable restrictions on individual liberty. Those were his work, and he said this case from 1905. Was handed down, you know, in a different Time and it did not, he said Quote it did not involve sweeping restrictions imposed across the country for an extended period. And it does not mean that whenever there is an emergency executive officials have Unlimited unreviewable discretion, So at least one of our justices is saying that case is not a blank check, and so we're still going to be looking at these issues on a case by case basis. That's that. That's heartening, because I know many people want to make that decision for themselves, not be not be forced into it by some mandate on now, in, uh, if that were to pass, there's gonna be a mandate interventional line up. The problem that I see is that, like a number of issues regarding health care is you might have no redress You there. There. There's a secret vaccine court and things like that. But assuming here comes the cove it and you know, vaccine rollout and somebody is is severely injured. Long term. What's the likelihood that they're going to get compensation? Well, uh, you know, there is a vaccination statured that Limits your compensation. Federally. Yeah, And so you know, I've looked at those cases over the year in the statute makes it very unlike profitable if you will for any lawyer to pursue that it essentially shields the vaccine makers. And the idea, presumably, is that for the greater good, we're going to roll this out. We know that some people have adverse reactions, but we're Mandating this for the greater good and we're protecting the companies that makes the vaccines so that they will make these vaccines and More people will be aided, then will be injured, and inevitably there will be some adverse reactions. I guess the defense of that, you know, we know certain numbers of people will die every year from taking aspirin. Certain people die every single year from adverse reactions to ask, Believe it or not, no, absolute so, but we still sell aspirin it you know your CVS store on the corner. We don't take it off the shelf because we've decided as a society that Mork Good. And they're more beneficial things that flow from aspirin. Then from those individuals who suffer those adverse reactions, they're in the minority. More people, you know, obtained benefits, the difference of balancing terms. Yeah, but the difference and it's a big one. And I know you know where I'm going is that nobody is putting a gun to your head and say, Take that aspirin. It's an individual choice. You assume that people are able to with to weigh the risks for themselves and make decisions now we're talking about you don't have a choice here and you, You basically are going to take one for the Gipper, and it's further common good, So let's say, somebody says Now, obviously, if it's an employer situation, like we've talked in the employer is granted that discretion they may be out of a job. But here here comes the government and they say you got it. You got to get this shot and you say I am doing it. What? Is what are their possible remedies. Well, that Hit the nail on the head, because when you're dealing with Children and vaccinations, typically that's enforced at the schoolhouse door. You can't get into. You can't continue to attend the school. Your Children can't unless they're vaccinated. Or unless they have some kind of waiver for adults. That's going to be very, very difficult to enforce so you can pass a mandate. But if I decide not to do it, how will you will you tax me? Will you impose a penalty on T ony such as what Obama care, Uh did, uh, what will that be The attempted way to do it where I can perhaps abstain from the vaccination, But I'm going to pay more in taxes. If I do isn't a mandate that really involves a tax. Is a way to enforce it. Do you incentivize states? If you're the federal government by withholding Medicare, Medicaid, you know federal funds if a certain percentage of the population You know, Sort of like what they did with seat belts mean Lim?.

Supreme Court aspirin United States Supreme Court smallpox Quentin Brogden Brogden Rogers Com Massachusetts Brooklyn Johnson Justice Samuel Alito Obama Rollie Erika Lee Ondo executive Quote Medicaid
"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:56 min | 10 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Maps also has a similar app, which will show you if you're headed toward us hot spot. And if the area has any restrictions like closed restaurants, covert 19 isn't the only medical threats spreading this year. A tic tac challenges encouraging teens to get high on Benadryl. Dr. Erika Lee Belt is director of Washington Poison Center, She says this could be a result of the pandemic. It may be related to the increasing stress of online school being at home, not being able to connect with friends. High doses of Benadryl can lead to heart problems, seizures and even death. Felons get a second chance and taxpayers take on restitution. Cairo radios Hannah Scott explains why the county prosecutor pushed the new felony diversion plan just approved program of first for King County. The reading first time low level felonies to community organizations, rather than court community thinks that they have some skills at the court process doesn't possess. In order to turn someone's life around. It would not apply to violent crimes or domestic violence, but would cover theft, property damage and other low level crimes. Sandberg says the 90 to 150,000 Dollars allotted to cover restitution will be a drop in the bucket to what taxpayers are usually on the hook for when there's a trial public defender comes don't get paid, and in order to force the wrongdoer to pay. We have to bring them back into court. These offenders get only one shot. If you were a full time nurse or educator and have a child getting ready to head off to college, you might save some money if they apply to Pacific Lutheran University, The private university in Tacoma says it will cut tuition for students whose parents are full time nurses or teachers University says it wants to recognize their hard work and sacrifices, particularly during the pandemic. Incoming first year, students for fall of 2021, who qualify can get at least half off their tuition, which means a scholarship of.

Dr. Erika Lee Belt Pacific Lutheran University Washington Poison Center Sandberg Tacoma King County teachers University Hannah Scott Cairo theft prosecutor director
"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:53 min | 10 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Above 3500 and thought to include some backlog cases from the weekend. It's unclear of today's reporting is partially from a backlog also or if rates have really skyrocketed that sharply. We should know more later this week. And on the Colbert 19 front here in Washington. It's good news and bad news. First doses of vaccine shipped to our area within mental late December, Healthcare workers and first responders will be up first, followed by nursing home residents until eventually, everybody else, but this will take about 6 to 9 months to one full. That's why Spitter says it's vital to follow the safety guidance. Don't gather it Thanksgiving so that everybody can make it out the other side of this lengthy timeline. That's Cairo radios. Hannah Scott reporting. The Washington Poison Center is warning parents of a dangerous TIC tac trend among teens known as the Benadryl Challenge. Cairo radios Nicole Jennings has more. The challenge encourages young people to take high enough doses of Benadryl to get hallucinations. Doctor. Erika Lee Bell, director of the Washington Poison Center, says too much Benadryl can cause seizures and irregular heartbeat and even death. People's body may react differently, so they may experience confusion or a fast heart rate while other people don't if your child has taken the challenge, you should call the Washington poison center. Even over the counter medications should be stored in small amounts and out of reach of young Children. If you're planning to drive our mountain passes tomorrow, it looks like we're going to get a break from any weather system for Thanksgiving. The next shot at any precipitation will calm late Friday Friday night. That's a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. And speaking of whether your pyro forecast for tonight calls for cloudy skies and lows near 40 Right now it's 46 degrees in downtown Seattle. I'm medicated for breaking news highlights, podcasts and more download the Cairo radio at Cairo radio appear for what's next. Welcome to the Tom and Curly show Tom tangy here. John Curley, taking a rare holiday off even got a gentle jumped the gun on his Thanksgiving holiday. So Jon is not here. But dres from sunny L. A. Is that a Bally filling it? It's been great, okay? So moving on. This is we've been talking Dres and I have been talking a lot about What's going on in this country right now, and the new president elects number One concern is dealing with covert 19 and especially this weekend with Thanksgiving. It's going to be one of those problematic holidays in that. People will want to be getting together sort of, like Fourth of July and Memorial Day and all of this. It's one of those holidays where people we wanted.

Washington Poison Center Cairo Washington hallucinations Tom tangy Erika Lee Bell Colbert Hannah Scott John Curley Spitter Nicole Jennings National Weather Service Seattle Bally president Jon
"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:46 min | 10 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Encouraging teens to get high on Benadryl. Dr. Erika Lee, Belt director of the Washington Poison Center, says this could be a result of the pandemic. It may be related to the increasing stress of online school being at home, not being able to connect with friends. She says. It's a dangerous challenge. Since high doses of Benadryl can lead to heart problems, seizures and even death on the cove in 19 front, here in Washington, it's a good news. Bad news situation. First doses of vaccine shift to our area within mental late December, health care workers and first responders will be a first followed by nursing home residents until eventually, everybody else, but this will take about 6 to 9 months to one full. That's why Spitter says it's vital to follow this. Safety guidance. Don't gather it Thanksgiving so that everybody could make it out The other side of this lengthy timeline that's Cairo radios. Hannah Scott reporting long term care facilities are discouraging people from leaving for Thanksgiving para seven TVs. Tracy Leon has more senior homes have been locked down since the start of the pandemic. That means no visitors, but it doesn't prevent residents from leaving and then coming back to get residents to stay put. Many long term facilities are offering catered dinners. Others are providing outdoor tents to visit family or drive by dessert. If you're planning on driving our mountain passes tomorrow, it looks like we're going to get a break from any weather system for Thanksgiving. The next shot at any precipitation will calm late Friday Friday night. The National Weather Service says that conditions in the Cascades are improving through this afternoon into the evening. Yeah. Checking on your Cairo We're going to have a cloudy, mostly dry night tonight with.

Dr. Erika Lee Cairo Washington Poison Center Belt director Cascades National Weather Service Tracy Leon Hannah Scott Washington Spitter
"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"erika lee" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"F D I C Over 19 isn't the only medical threats spreading this year. That's coming up after a traffic jack with Tracy Taylor Miley, We're watching the travel times right now sitting at 52 minutes from Tacoma to Olympia and Olympia to Tacoma at 35 minutes, a lot of heavy traffic heading south found this afternoon. Not only from high rate 18 and heading out towards the Puyallup River Bridge, but again leaving 5 12 most of the way to joint base. Lewis McCord and the weather is not working in our favor for this one. We're definitely on the slower side of things. South End of the Valley Freeway, leaving Ellingson before 10 and 5 12 where 5 12 crowds. Just a smidge as we get closer to the fairgrounds. Drivers are heading north right now are experiencing some delays outside ashore like we had some really great shoes. They're one 75th those of clear We're still looking at some heavier traffic around highway to I found four or five still touching the brakes, a shy of the rather the bottle over highway heading out to the older would interchange. We're still locked up out of Bellevue in south and four or five Valley Freeway looks pretty good. Just a slight hesitation is you Leave Valley Medical Center traffic brought to you by whole foods market prime members. Here's a last minute deal through November. 26 stop by Whole Foods Market for a whole turkey raised with no antibiotics ever won 90 £90 organic it to £99. While supplies last Cairo Radio Real time traffic and Tracy Taylor now from the Cairo Radio New Center at my Northwest, calm a new tic tac challenges encouraging teens to get high on Benadryl. Dr. Erika Lee, Belt director of the Washington Poison Center, says this could be a result of the pandemic. It may be.

Tracy Taylor Miley Tacoma Olympia Leave Valley Medical Center Cairo Radio New Center Tracy Taylor Puyallup River Bridge Lewis McCord Cairo Washington Poison Center Ellingson Dr. Erika Lee Belt director Bellevue