6 Burst results for "Erica Anderson"

Health Care Challenges for Transgender Youth

61 Minutes

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Health Care Challenges for Transgender Youth

"Doctors from treating transgender youth with puberty, blockers, testosterone arrest region and surgery to assist their transitions. As part of a new culture war. Similar bills have been introduced and at least 20 other states. In some cases, doctors could go to jail. Many physicians and therapists are appalled. Like Erica Anderson Ah, highly respected gender psychologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who's transgender herself. It's a very ominous development. It's a bad sign. Have you ever seen anything like that before in your lifetime? No. No. And it zero overreach on the part of such legislatures. Clearly, they are demonstrating their ignorance. And prejudice. At least six major medical associations have weighed in against these bills, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, of which Dr Lee Savio Beers is the president. I'm going to read you something that was said in support of this law in Arkansas, One of the Republican senators said gender affirming treatments are quote at best experimental and at worst, a serious threat to a child's welfare. These air, not experimental treatments there, really based in scientific literature. They're based in decades and decades of expert experience, and they're backed by a number of major medical organizations to let's say there was a young Person and they're on hormones under the lawn, Arkansas. A doctor has to take those hormones away. Yes, And if the doctor decides to move forward, they face significant penalty. Is there any medical rationale for this legislation in your opinions? No. There is not The field of transgender health care has

Erica Anderson Dr Lee Savio Beers University Of California American Academy Of Pediatrics San Francisco Arkansas
"erica anderson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"erica anderson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On in the community were aware ahead of time or as way are alerted, and it's been able to help US plan. And communicate with him more effectively. Thank you for that. Meghan glad that you were able to express that to us and brings up another point that if I could go back to you, Lisa, Pick up what? Ah! Sonoma has 3/4 of the long care facilities in what he described as high fire prone areas. Would you suggest people in Sonoma could do about that? I mean, specifically, there's an ombudsman. There's all this concern about enforcement and so forth, but forgetting inspection records accessible online, But in terms of what ordinary people Khun do who have their loved ones? Living under these kinds of circumstances. What options do they have? Well, I want to say, you know, taking matters into our own home hands and making sure we have information is one of the best things we can do. Just like our caller I've heard from. We spoke to one woman who keeps a police who keeps a scanner actually on, you know, after Recent fires for her mother, who lives apart from her such you can call her mom to know if a fire is coming, and this is one of the people who started that buddy system up in grass Valley that I was talking about. We've seen a lot of these kinds of community groups come together where people are really trying to help each other. And as you said, we found in 23 counties in California. More than 75% of people 65 older are living in these fire prone areas. We've also seen some technological solutions. For instance, there's now technologies where, for instance, if you're hard of hearing or death that might shake you out of beds that you can get an alert. If you can't hear your phone, for instance, you certainly won't be able to see the flash that some phones have for people who are hard of hearing. We've also seen a lot of people come together to try to distribute this information, other languages. That was definitely a problem that we've seen during the North Bay fires and other fires. You know, there's just all of these populations in California, where we often called them vulnerable communities. This is something I've been thinking about a lot of use that word earlier where we talk about older people who are vulnerable or the disabled or sometimes people who Are not primarily English speakers. However. What we I feel like we found in the serious is not necessarily that the people are vulnerable, but the systems are vulnerable. Often these people are very resilient. Older people have a lot of experiences that they can teach the rest of us about howto live with fire, for instance. And so what we're really looking at are these multi pronged approaches of living with fire. How can we strengthen the regulation? How can we really examine where we live? And how can we make sure that we can get out and their neighbors can get out when something occurs. And that brings up the whole question of availability of transportation, which is a big question in his whole calculus who we're talking about? Whether you're talking about nursing homes of residential communities, all of them, at least on paper, require planning and training and fire drills, and we're just not seeing compliance. Yes, And also we do have a sheet for people who have a loved one in a care home facility that they should really check out. We came up with questions that you can ask the facility to find out what their emergency plan is to find out what kind of vehicle they have to get out. May bring another caller on Erica joins us next, Erica. Welcome. You're on the air in form. Thanks for taking my call. I call Erica Anderson. I'm a psychologist in Berkeley many years and I'm concerned about a resurgence of ages and in America an issue that underlies all of the ones we've been talking about today. A Z young psychologist. I worked with elderly people, and I felt great distain from my colleague about why would I do that? And I'm concerned because during the pandemic, we've seen the disparities. All the disparities, health disparities and hoo Ah, promised Cove it and we've had political leaders. Espouse the view that we're we can sacrifice a few older people for sake of the economy. I find us just morally reprehensible. And I'm concerned that there are too many people in America who share that kind of view. Whether they say it or not. And I'll take my answer off. Thank you for those comments. Erica, either Molly. At least I want to say something about ageism and escalating ageism in America or hearing caliph. I will. I will say that we heard that from a lot of folks. We heard about this concern, and I think Erik is raising an excellent point. You know, the state of California. The thing I would say about that is that the state of California is facing this. They call it the great wave. People don't like it when you call it the silver tsunami, But we've got this huge population of folks over 65. It's coming. You know that that's coming into that age in California, and it is it is. It is a societal concern that we're all going to have to deal with it have some solutions for because We've got this very, really concerned that we're not gonna have enough places for people to live in these years and that we can't afford to continue to live and live safely. In these years and safe from any number of things getting, I'd say about Erica's point. That's excellent is you know the real concern that we see about having facilities and risky areas isn't just the physical destabilization that happens when people are evacuated? It is also the mental destabilization and we see that psychological first aid is a concern that nursing homes and assisted living have to take into consideration and prepare for because especially with folks who have dementia. There are both mental and physical repercussions of moving someone. There are tremendous psychological effects on people of wild with wildfires, traumatic effects and not like that, of course, but When you think about smoke on DH, particularly those who have compromised immune systems, and here's Jane. In fact, I'll go to you on this. Polly Peterson Jane writes. Those nursing homes with respiratory conditions.

Erica Anderson California America Sonoma US Meghan Khun Polly Peterson Jane Lisa grass Valley Berkeley North Bay Erik Molly
"erica anderson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"erica anderson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Hear about it. You never hear about it. Because media goes full blackout. News organizations. Don't cover a million people showing up in Washington DC, saying, hey, we should end abortion. You don't see that happen? They don't want that. Because as we've said and proven far too often. It doesn't fit the narrative of things like they claim are women's rights. Tony cats. Tony cats today. So good to be with you. Eight three got Tony eight three three four six eight eight six six nine Eric Anderson is at the March for life in Washington DC. She is a freelance journalist also author of the book leading leaving cloud nine leaving cloud nine the true story of a life resurrected from the ashes of poverty, trauma, and mental illness. You can find that at Amazon dot com wherever fine books are sold. You're there. First how cold is it? And Secondly, how many people are there. Hi, tony. Thanks for bringing me on to talk March. It's very cold air frozen fuddy. And there is no everywhere. Everyone is in really good serious. And I just heard the president of the March for life geomancy Nathan that she thinks might might be March that she's ever seen. So it's pretty exciting. And lots of people are here, I'm on the National Mall, and it's basically we're up at the front here. Ben Shapiro just gave a speech, and it's all the way back to the Washington. It is just fantastic. So the March itself is this about overturning Roe v. Wade or is this about something larger than that? I mean, certainly most people here want to see Rosie way overturned. I mean, one of the things they just mentioned what about forty six years ago. Seven men on the supreme court where the ones that need it happen. And we're the ones that ultimately created this March which happens every year and nothing ever stopped it, including no storms and government shutdown. But I mean, I think ultimately those of us who are so Weiss there to not be a need for that. We want a culture of life to prevail and for people to not feel like that's the choice that they need to make. And so ultimately, yes, we wanna see Roe v. Wade overturn more. So than that. We want women to feel like they don't need to make that decision that they can be empowered to choose life and have options in inside of that choice. And so I think everyone here is just so committed to education resources donations awareness, all of those things talking to Erica Anderson, author of the book, leaving cloud. Nine available at Amazon dot com or about your soldiers at the March for life in Washington DC, we talk about and you, and I know each other well, and then we've all had these conversations. This is a March that gets a million people and gets absolutely no coverage from mainstream coverage from network television, or or cable outlets. Why is that? Well, there's one thing that we've been talking about over actually where I work at the independent women's forum, which I'm not hearing in that capacity with them, but we have we've coined the term progressive privilege, and it means that if you're not for me progressive, and they have the privilege of being covered by media and all the things, and it's ironic, I guess at the March for life is one day prior QC women's March, which is slowly imploding on itself. But I have no doubt that you turn on CNN tomorrow that women's March will be covered wall to wall. And I haven't been watching CNN today. But my best guess is on the top of their priority list. That's about narrative. Right. I mean, a million people show up mostly women, and it's supposed to make news. But it's this great, by the way am on CNN's website right now. And now there is you're not you don't exist. You're don't exist right now. According to to CNN a lot about Karen, and Michael Pence's astonishing moral apocryphal, but nothing about you and the and the March for life. Do you find that as the March grows? You're starting starting to make movements on a federal side. Do you have more senators are or I shouldn't say you. But are there more senators are there more members of congress who are willing to a move on on this subject? And and and do you feel that there is a move in public opinion on the subject of abortion? Oh, yeah. I definitely do. I think public opinion has changed much more to the pro life side in the past decade. And I I don't think that it needs to show that that young people, especially are changing their mind. It's much more common for young people to at least being more at least the against abortion in the second third trimesters have they used to be. I mean, a lot of technology more that we can see the more that we could truly understand about life from conception. We know that, you know, a heart starts beating at ten eleven days after conception. I mean, this kind of stuff in this kind of knowledge is hard to deny. And so here's the March. You know, you are seeing I mean, you care is like incredible. But I have also I I met a woman just a minute ago who said she heard thirteenth grandchild was just born. And that was what made her say she had to come today. And so you have all ages all races. You have all religions here. So this is not. Like, a one minute group type of person, it is all kinds of people that believe in life, and this is important and while yes, I do think we're making progress on the political side. It's unfortunate one thing that I think is unfortunate is that Democrats believe in life ever have actually been driven out of their party. And that's a whole other conversation get half. But there is a democrat for like group. I saw they were having a gathering yesterday. And I believe there is like one democrat politician speaking at the March events this weekend, and and I really think that's really sad. The Democrats have driven the flight for life you go out of their party. And it's something that they should need to address. Erika.

Washington DC CNN Tony Amazon Roe Wade Ben Shapiro Erika National Mall Erica Anderson president Rosie Eric Anderson Weiss congress Nathan Michael Pence Karen forty six years
"erica anderson" Discussed on Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"erica anderson" Discussed on Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

"And in sort of use up your energy there you will find a way to get the other stuff done but even more importantly you'll start to build a habit of prioritising your strength over everything else and so those are the two practical approaches i would take if if i was in your position i would first just try to figure out what it is i mean good at and in the easiest way to do that is just to sort of survey the people that know you well enough and have formed an opinion about you and ask them and then the second thing once i know what it is that i'm good at i would start to build a habit of polling from that first and letting everything else fall to the wayside until i find a way to to deal with it as well because that's gonna give you the permission once you balance it out to use your strengths and let your weaknesses get handled elsewhere so with all of that said i've got as usual some articles for you some things that i recommend checking out so first we've got which character strengths are most predictive of well being this is by scott barry kaufman it's published in scientific american beautiful mind section us you can find that on there website second is how feeling grateful can make you more successful this is by erica anderson confronted and forbes in the leadership section and third is we need to talk about the importance of selfawareness this is by gary vina chuck and you can find it on his medium profile.

scott barry kaufman erica anderson forbes gary vina chuck
"erica anderson" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

This Week In Marvel

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"erica anderson" Discussed on This Week In Marvel

"Robert captain roger number forty four says siegert empire number three was great but as always a gun pudge every time i think i see the old steve coming out it turns quickly it quickly turns bad yeah no one from on the six one six scott miguel roy says dear agent emin benjamin morse we just know you love that six one six designation so happy six one six marvel day from your friends at horizon labsi knee as five some williams says after reading squirrel girl number 21 i'd love to see more to europe's between the guy's what should their team named who am uh i regret if there might i angsting instinct is fish and chips but older really work because chips there's no chips but i like you talk about braindrain yeah like or maybe like braindrain circuits are the chips the computer chapels also occurred revision sheriff's fish and chips the nuts uh the lot the ads all right we'll figure that will come watch what are your guy's a suggestions yet floor share that team from a squirrel grow coit and john chipman conch and brain drain yeah we we have a good one through is just koibla in braindrain net but chipman come on all new chip chips oh my god fix it working at full level of yeah area now we did it we did it guys fish and chips they saw we just got pitches to ryan north and erica anderson and we'll moss anyway uh ms moore will nineteen was great but kind of scary the way things are going it could be a glimpse into the future um yeah terrifying.

steve miguel roy emin benjamin morse williams chipman erica anderson Robert captain europe ryan north
"erica anderson" Discussed on Bizcast

Bizcast

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"erica anderson" Discussed on Bizcast

"You're listening to the discounts on the sea sleep network looking to the biz gassed you work hard and your business and you want to know what it takes to get to the next level the biz gas is where we unity bestselling business authors thought leaders agencies we'd executives to bring you an inside look at what it takes to succeed in business to do whether you're the leader of a fourteen one hundred company or your companies just taking off what vowed to here will help you take your business to the next on your host kevin brain welcome to the show i'm so pleased welcome erica anderson to the show eric is the founding partner of prudius international a coaching consulting and training firm that focuses on leader readiness she's worked with senior executives at a variety of companies that we know like g nbc universal facebook and hyatt among others she's with us today to talk about her book b bed first get good at things fast to stay ready for the future eric anderson welcome to the show what do you mean by be bad verse oh that's the cork russian ryan so the reason i pulled that out as the title is the whole book is about how important it is especially now to be able to learn things new things quickly and continuously in fact i think it's the core skill for everybody given how the world works now and how quickly everything's changing and so the book focuses on the mental skills that people who are great it doing that use and the one that is hardest for everybody that i know almost everybody is this idea of being bad first that when you're first learning something you're going to be bad at it and to be able to do that gracefully and without getting in your own way i think is essential to learning well that is the trick isn't it i i know most of us like feeling competent we don't like feeling like no failure being bad what does it take for us to be willing to do that to be bad.

kevin brain erica anderson founding partner facebook eric anderson ryan prudius nbc