30 Burst results for "Eric Westervelt"

What Stops Western States From Intentional Burning As A Way To Prevent Wildfires?

Environment: NPR

04:01 min | Last month

What Stops Western States From Intentional Burning As A Way To Prevent Wildfires?

"A historically destructive wildfire season across much of the western US has renewed debate over intentional burns. Those managed wildfires would help clear forests and grasslands of dangerous levels of vegetation built up over decades of fire suppression. But experts say we will need to intentionally burn many more acres to get the West's wildfire problem check NPR's Eric Westervelt reports in Colorado three of the state's five largest wildfires in history have burned this year in California. Five of the biggest on record have occurred just since August fire colleges say that while people right now might not WanNa hear it. The most effective prevention strategy is to use. More, fire to fix the region's wildfire problem people might say that you know they're scared of doing for stripe fire but you know I'm scared what will happen in the next ten years if we don't prescribe fire, let's Kate Wilkin a fire a columnist with the Wildfire Interdisciplinary Research Center at San Jose state she recognizes how awful it's been for many in recent years people who've lost loved ones and homes the fear stress in smoke-filled air drifting hundreds of miles. But in terms of forest health will says California is supposed to burn. So in the state top four, million acres burned earlier this month Wilkin. Thought Wow. We're actually getting into the ballpark how many acres used to bring California just shortly remembers me four, point, four, million and twelve million acres to burn every year contrast. California in the last few years has intentionally burned just over fifty thousand acres on public lands federal and California officials recently signed an agreement to try to boost that significantly to treat about a million acres a year with combined thinning and controlled. Burns but critics say that's nowhere near enough to meet this moment Malcolm North is a research scientist with the US Forest Service. He says a major. To expanding controlled Burns is institutional inertia in these large risk, averse state and federal agencies like the one he works for it's not something in which incremental cautious decisions are going to solve the problem. So you need to have a cultural shift in the public's understanding about the inevitability of fire, but you also need a cultural shift within the agencies to be more supportive of the. USA Fire if historically flawed forest management is half the problem here battling most fire. The other half is the world's warming climate with hotter drier conditions igniting a century of built up fuel says Michael Warren with Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. The problem has kind of turned from this thing that we can manage to a monster and taming that monster through intentional fire war says. is vital yet costly. It's estimated that thinning and prescribed burns can cost up to two thousand dollars per acre coming up with the money to do this at scale has always been a major obstacle we need to stained federal and state financial support. If we're going to have any hope of moving the needle other barriers to doing more intentional burns, include tough environmental rules and liability. Laws and then their safety. The vast majority of these fires are done without harm to people or property, but they're not risk free. For example, a Park Service controlled burn twenty years ago near Los Alamos New Mexico got out of control when high winds picked up some four hundred homes burned the federal nuclear lab. There was threatened withering criticism and congressional hearings followed the plan was flawed. The higher ups rubber-stamped it. The burn boss was not qualified to do fire this big that Los Alamos fire became the Enron of controlled Burns a rare but spectacularly, botched event whose effect is still felt today across federal agencies despite the long bitter fights in Washington over how to manage the nation's forests they're currently several bills in the US Senate would significantly boost federal funding for intentional fires. One of them even has some bipartisan support. Eric. Westervelt NPR news.

California Eric Westervelt Kate Wilkin Wildfire Interdisciplinary Res San Jose State Malcolm North Us Forest Service Wilkin NPR Michael Warren Stanford Woods Institute For T Colorado USA Burns Los Alamos New Mexico
Crews face strong winds while battling California fires

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Crews face strong winds while battling California fires

"In northern California officials today ordered new evacuations as a wild fire continues to burn in the wine country of Napa and Sonoma County's The Glass fire has charred nearly 60,000 acres so far, and fire crews are bracing for the possibility intense winds could spread the blaze more from NPR's Eric Westervelt. Californians have been hit by record wildfires. Nearly four million acres burned so far this year. During a tour of the devastation in wine country, Governor Gavin Newsom looked over the burned ruins of an elementary school in Saint Halina, he said Disasters are becoming painfully familiar where people are exhausted, concerned anxious about their fate and their future. Not just their safety, and so clearly, we have our work cut out for us to deal with not only suppression but prevention strategies. Prevention includes plans to expand managed burns and improve forest management after a century of suppressing fires has created enormous fuel and risk worsened by a warming climate. Eric Westervelt. NPR news federal

Eric Westervelt NPR Governor Gavin Newsom Sonoma County Saint Halina Napa California
Historic Wildfires Devastate West Coast

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:03 min | 2 months ago

Historic Wildfires Devastate West Coast

"Along the West Coast, prompting new evacuation warnings, causing hazardous air quality and straining firefighting resource is across the region. The weather is now helping. But NPR's Eric Westervelt reports of some two dozen people are confirmed dead in the fires and Oregon, Washington and California. Multiple small communities around Oregon's Cascade Mountains have been devastated by fire Governor Kate Brown says dozens of Oregonians are missing in California Nearly 15,000 firefighters are struggling to contain 28 major wildfires across the state. California Governor Gavin Newsom says the blazes show the severe and wide reaching effects of climate change. We're in the midst of a climate emergency. We're in the midst of a climate crisis. We are experiencing weather conditions the likes of which we've never experienced in our lifetime public health officials across parts of the Western U. S or warning residents to stay indoors. Seattle, Portland, Oregon in San Francisco currently have the poorest air quality in the world. Eric Westervelt. NPR NEWS. Newly

Eric Westervelt Oregon California Governor Gavin Newsom Governor Kate Brown Npr News NPR Cascade Mountains West Coast San Francisco Seattle Portland Washington
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will prove to be a breakthrough we can't just have a one night and then be done to go back to where it used to be and just continue to give empty promises sure Swanson has already met with reformers to start talking through what needs to change and how and he's pledged to do that weekly he hopes other departments do something similar we need to reform modern day policing like it's never been done before do we need to have a national registry of police discipline that's a great idea do we need to have an overall advisory committee with the committee for each agency that's a great idea because if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear but George Floyd's death hasn't changed anything substantial about policing yet and whether does will depend on whether actions move beyond the familiar cycle of aspirational reforms better training screening in oversight that have too often failed to stop some cops from humiliating abusing or killing minorities Eric Westervelt NPR news the corona virus pandemic is made it hard for children to just be children's schools playdates field trips now summer camps all in the kind of time out Chelsea fare from Danbury Connecticut is ten years old and she's filling the time by using her imagination I think making a graphic novel I call double doctorate says bubble pop printers and intergalactic hero who uses water fire earth and air have fight because make evil it sounds epochal on its own but Chelsea fair also runs a charity she makes it possible for other youngsters to draw paint and create to every week Chelsea fair puts together dozens of.

Swanson George Floyd Danbury Connecticut Chelsea Eric Westervelt NPR
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 6 months ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sure Johnson then walks with protesters he believes that moment for flint Michigan anyway will prove to be a breakthrough we can't just have a one night and then be done to go back to where it used to be and just continue to give empty promises sure Swanson has already met with reformers to start talking through what needs to change and how and he's pledged to do that weekly he hopes other departments do something similar we need to reform modern day policing like it's never been done before do we need to have a national registry of police discipline that's a great idea do we need to have an overall advisory committee with the committee for each agency that's a great idea because if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear but George Floyd's death hasn't changed anything substantial about policing yet and whether does will depend on whether actions move beyond the familiar cycle of aspirational reforms better training screening in oversight that have too often failed to stop some cops from humiliating abusing or killing minorities Eric Westervelt NPR news the corona virus pandemic is made it hard for children to just be children's schools playdates field trips now summer camps all in the kind of time out Chelsea fare from Danbury Connecticut is ten years old and she's filling the time by using her imagination I think making a graphic novel I call double doctrine says bubble pop princes and intergalactic hero who uses water fire earth and air have fight because make evil it sounds epochal on its own but Chelsea fair also runs a charity she makes it possible for other youngsters to draw paint and create to every week Chelsea fair puts together dozens of art.

Johnson Swanson George Floyd Danbury Connecticut Chelsea Michigan Eric Westervelt NPR
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 6 months ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

"Sure Watson then walks with protesters he believes that moment for flint Michigan anyway will prove to be a breakthrough we can't just have a one night and then be done to go back to where it used to be and just continue to give empty promises sure Swanson has already met with reformers to start talking through what needs to change and how and he's pledged to do that weekly he hopes other departments do something similar we need to reform modern day policing like it's never been done before do we need to have a national registry of police discipline that's a great idea do we need to have an overall advisory committee with the committee for each agency that's a great idea because if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear but George Floyd's death hasn't changed anything substantial about policing yet and whether does will depend on whether actions move beyond the familiar cycle of aspirational reforms better training screening in oversight that have too often failed to stop some cops from humiliating abusing or killing minorities Eric Westervelt NPR news the corona virus pandemic is made it hard for children to just be children's schools playdates field trips now summer camps all in the kind of time out Chelsea fare from Danbury Connecticut is ten years old and she's filling the time by using her imagination I think making a graphic novel I call double doctrine says bubble pop princes an intergalactic hero who uses water fire earth and air have fight because make evil it sounds epochal on its own but Chelsea fair also runs a charity she makes it possible for other youngsters to draw paint and create to every week Chelsea fair puts together dozens of art kitsch and each.

Watson Swanson George Floyd Danbury Connecticut Chelsea Michigan Eric Westervelt NPR
"eric westervelt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:45 min | 7 months ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"In Roseville California restaurant owner quorum Mifsud says he's excited for business to pick up now with dining rooms opening up I think the take out and delivery that's the new norm people are going to stay with it and as well as you're gonna be attracting more business to it so I think we will need to hire more people and put more people to work restaurants that do decide to resume business under phase two have to comply with a number of conditions including screening potential customers at the door the best way to do that sort of screening is still an open question not just for customers but for employees for more I'm joined now by NPR science correspondent Allison Aubrey and national correspondent Eric Westervelt he to both of you hi there good to be here all right Eric let's start with you you are in Roseville which is in plaster county that's one of the counties here in California were dining rooms are re opening what does it look like there right now yeah it was interesting I met this kind of restaurant plows northeast of Sacramento and Roseville there about a dozen restaurants and cafes here and you know some of them and have been you know doing take away only since the shelter in place started March but last night the work one out you know the restaurants in the county can really start to do the sit down welcome you know sit down customers with these restrictions and you know what restaurant owners I talked to said a kind of a buzz one around where they said you know we can start to partially reopen some of those restrictions including a space between tables after the cleaning plan they gonna ask people to to wear masks when not eating or drinking among some other rules and and I caught up with Korda Masud he runs this restaurant to a Mexican restaurant here he his crew were was super busy so frantically trying to pivot from take out only to sit down service as well we.

Mifsud Allison Aubrey Roseville plaster county California Sacramento Korda Masud Roseville California NPR Eric Westervelt
Los Angeles - California governor closes Orange County beaches

Radio Specials

00:56 sec | 7 months ago

Los Angeles - California governor closes Orange County beaches

"California's governor has ordered beaches in one county south of Los Angeles closed until further notice the move comes after some eighty thousand people packed Orange County B. just during a heat wave last weekend as NPR's Eric Westervelt reports governor Gavin Newsom called the images disturbing he's ordered state and local beaches in Orange County closed arguing that large groups frolicking in the sun and surf could set back progress in halting the spread of the corona virus people that are congregating there that weren't practicing physical distancing that may go back to their community outside of Orange County and may not even know that they they contracted the disease and and now they put other people arrest but a hospital system at risk several Orange County elected officials and the Newport beach police chief have strongly pushed back calling the closures are necessary and an affront to local control many California beaches are open but with restrictions allowing walking jogging or swimming but not

California Los Angeles NPR Eric Westervelt Gavin Newsom Orange County Newport Beach
West Coast Governors Announce "Pact" For Reopening Economies

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

West Coast Governors Announce "Pact" For Reopening Economies

"Are forming a western states packed they'll coordinate plans to reopen their states economies amid the corona virus pandemic and peers Eric Westervelt says this is similar to a packed formed by seven eastern states the west coast frameworks as any successful lifting of interventions has to include a system for corona virus testing tracking and isolating each west coast state will have its own state specific plan but the broad framework calls for close cooperation and a pledge to put science and health outcomes not politics at the forefront of any decision the states also called for concerted efforts to prevent outbreaks in nursing homes and to help mitigate in direct health impacts of the pandemic on poor communities governor Newsom says he'll outline specifics of what he called California based thinking on an economic re opening you some says any such effort will be guided by facts evidence and science Eric Westervelt NPR news Berkeley California on

Eric Westervelt California Governor Newsom Berkeley California
West Coast states are readying to reopen economies, together

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 8 months ago

West Coast states are readying to reopen economies, together

"Governors on the west coast say they will work together to coordinate on any plans to eventually re open their states economies amid the corona virus outbreak California governor Gavin Newsom in the governor's of Washington and Oregon are calling their joint approach eight western states packed the move follows a similar initiative announced by six east coast states here's NPR's Eric Westervelt the west coast frameworks as any successful lifting of interventions has to include a system for corona virus testing tracking and isolating each west coast state will have its own state specific plan but the broad framework calls for close cooperation and a pledge to put science and health outcomes not politics at the forefront of any decision the states also called for concerted efforts to prevent outbreaks in nursing homes and to help mitigate in direct health impacts of the pandemic on poor communities governor Newsom says he'll outline specifics of what he called California based thinking on an economic re opening tomorrow you some says any such effort will be guided by facts evidence and

Gavin Newsom Washington NPR Eric Westervelt California Oregon Governor Newsom
Protective gear shortage forcing doctors, nurses to improvise

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 8 months ago

Protective gear shortage forcing doctors, nurses to improvise

"King doctors and nurses fighting the corona virus say they are desperately short on protective gear things like masks so these makeshift donation networks have sprung up here's NPR's Eric Westervelt the urgent pleas for more N. ninety five respirator masks and other gear still pouring in especially from the hardest hit states including New York and California Maria lluvia a clinical nurse at UC Irvine Medical Center says the hospital's mass supply is now under lock and key she and her colleagues are being told to severely limit the use of mass and if they're not soiled to reuse them it makes us feel very unsafe our health is being put in jeopardy the health of our patients are being put in jeopardy our family's health being put in jeopardy a Medical Center spokesman says the policy is in place to conserve their supply of personal protective equipment or PP and in Oakland California a nurse who fears for her job and didn't want her name used told me there just aren't enough masks and there doesn't seem to be any plan she's being told to put her protective gear into a brown paper bag it shifts and and reuse it given this crisis scores of citizen led groups are popping up to collect donated supplies there's get us PP dot org and donate PP dot org and a group of volunteers called masked crusaders they're asking contractors nail salon owners museums anyone to search their closets and storage bins for mass Brooklyn based sculptor Tom Beal wanted to donate fifty surgical masks and some and ninety fives in New York City where some hospitals are close to being overwhelmed he got in touch with masked crusaders soon a nurse at a local hospital called she told him her unit was down to their last mask I brought them to withhold hospital and a midwife came down she was thrilled to receive them the next day an artist friend gave bill four and ninety five just for he went back to the masked crusader site and a New York nurse quickly claim them for her hospital I mean it was palpable you know she drove to me to pick up for math so that'll be something that what they're dealing with but the scale of supplies that may be needed in coming months is enormous in California governor Gavin Newsom says his state is radically ramping up procurement of safety gear from across the country and the globe one billion gloves to procure five hundred million N. ninety five masks some two hundred million shields you get the picture Newsome says now is the time for governors to work closely noting that states are now competing with each other for the same limited medical supplies which could disadvantage smaller states with smaller budgets Chabad Simon Alexander a community organizer New York helped launch masked crusaders she says the volunteer response to this makeshift effort and many others like it is heartening but she says it also underscores fundamental failures of federal and state government policy planning and priorities I'm super inspired by the way that people are stepping up to help each other and I love to see like the beauty and humanity but in reality checks on us we can't neutral ate our way out of systemic failure and it's not sustainable it's just a stop gap Simon Alexander hopes that as these ad hoc efforts grow that maybe the definition of those who need mass also grows there are tons of people doing the work of keeping our city and our society afloat right now so that we can be safe banker janitors garbage pick up and all of the in the grocery store clerks maybe it's not just doctors and nurses she says those other frontline workers may need more protective gear as well Eric Westervelt NPR

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 9 months ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My name is Eric Westervelt reporting on the latest mobile California thanks Eric you bet it six states will hold democratic primary contest tomorrow including Missouri where Joe Biden was this weekend he's trying to stay the front runner what followed by the backbone the backbone of the Democratic Party hello that would defeat Donald Trump restore this sold this nation NPR White House correspondent Franco or don't yes was traveling with the Biden campaign here he is in Kansas city Saturday representative Emanuel cleaver was reminiscing about a turning point in Biden's campaign them the guy shows up by the name of client he's talking about Jim climbed through initial South Carolina congressman whose endorsement set in motion by means eleven state hall of primary victory as a service to them and find him and let him go and the people of South Carolina did the online doing and now Joe is on the go by then stops in Saint Louis and Kansas city where African Americans make up a major voting blocs reflect the importance black voters playing his campaign but Missouri is not South Carolina where black voters made up a majority of the electorate the Midwest state has many different types of democratic voters world white moderates college educated suburbanites and other rural voters who like Bernie Sanders won a revolution to rip things up to start all over again the former vice president is popular with older voters and black voters younger Hispanic voters often prefer the Vermont senator well I actually like Bernese ideas obviously he's very popular among my generation among millennials that's Anthony Jones who attended by then St Louis rally policy wise Jones says he and Sanders see eye to eye Jones says he's ready for a revolution he's just not sure the rest of the country at the end of the day as a Democrat I just want to win I want to get back to normal I wanna get back to where the president's uniting the country not destroying the country not tearing the country apart.

Bernie Sanders St Louis Vermont Saint Louis representative White House correspondent NPR Democratic Party Anthony Jones senator vice president Eric Westervelt South Carolina congressman Jim Emanuel cleaver Kansas city Franco Donald Trump
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:26 min | 9 months ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

"An option for California cities but as NPR's Eric Westervelt reports there's widespread concern and confusion about how that would actually work a cross California attempted shack villages have mushroomed under freeway overpasses and the name was patches of land like this strip of dirt in Oakland that runs between interstate eight eighty railroad tracks and a Burger King there's little clusters and clicks and families that are all up and down the street I needed the SC's works as a chef and now as a homeless activist she got evicted last year she says and now lives in a camper with her two young children this homeless camp is one of many not sanctioned or supported by the city here tents and makeshift shacks are mixed with half a dozen sturdier wooden tiny homes one room sheds donated or built entirely by local residents and businesses it's definitely an upgrade which is what we can tell the city they need to do because this is crazy with all the resources the wealth that we have in the bay area they should not be happening driven mostly by steadily rising rents and home prices Oakland's homeless population shot up forty seven percent in the last two years that's no more than four thousand people living on the streets the city council is still studying and debating what to do about these kinds of unsanctioned camps yes he says it's long past time for talk like in the problem is getting worse so we don't understand why we're having this conversation she's concerned the one hundred and six million dollars the county budgeted for homelessness last year plus millions more in state and federal aid hasn't reached people on the streets she wonders as do many lawmakers and activists across the state where has all the homeless money gone there should be a quart of Heidi's on every account every you can't mention the sanctions because there's no way for people to go until there is affordable permanent housing for everybody these accounts are going to exist and they just need to get over that and accept that and help people the problem is we have many jurisdictions responsible for the problem but no one is actually responsible for much of anything that's Darrell Steinberg the mayor of San Sacramento and co chair of the governor's task force on homelessness he says solutions are too often under cut by a lack of coordination and collaboration across boundaries the homeless problem doesn't recognize city and county borders but it's often being addressed as if it does in the core problem he says there are no benchmarks that cities and counties have to meet and no penalty if they failed to act some jurisdictions are doing the minimal there some jurisdictions they're doing virtually nothing and there is no private there is no incentive there is no legal mandate to change that behavior but it's not clear the governor his task force are on the same page on mandating more shelters affordable housing and mental health and substance abuse programs a constitutional mandate would require legislative and voter approval and if the carrot to communities is more money Steinberg concedes it's not at all clear yet what the stick should be if jurisdictions don't step up so this is the question it should not punish but it should require compliance with that ambiguity leaves homeless advocates worrying a statewide mandate could lead to more sweeps and crackdowns on encampments attorney Angelo Sandoval's with.

NPR Eric Westervelt California
California Wine Makers Examine Climate's Effect On Their Industry

Environment: NPR

04:40 min | 1 year ago

California Wine Makers Examine Climate's Effect On Their Industry

"California produces ninety percent of all the wine made in America but historic wildfires devastating droughts and other extreme weather have many in the business struggling alling with how to adapt to a changing climate as. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports a growing number of vineyard owners in the country's best known wine region. A calling for less talk and some more action on the beautiful heat lamp terraces and elegant tasting rooms of Napa Sonoma. The cabin as these days are often paired with talk of extreme weather and warming earth. It's a romantic and mealey's believes that the wine industry is something that has long term at Annapolis Lark. Mead vineyards head winemaker. Dan Petrosky shows me around the test plots lots. He's preparing three and a half acres of experimental grape varieties from the southern hemisphere and the southern Mediterranean. This research vineyard is focusing on the grape varieties. Heidi's that we believe will be important to Napa Valley or even to the future of California wine as we're thinking about how the climate is changing here. Over the course of the next couple of decades the idea is to find out which groups do better in drought conditions or in an era of colder cold snaps and warmer heatwaves Lark made was founded in eighteen eighteen. Ninety five and Petrosky is not looking to replace its famed Cabernet. But he'll test for resilience and flavor tryouts. You might call it for which grapes will become supporting according actors in the finished wines of near future warmer Napa the test plots he says or part of a broader long term strategy to try to mitigate climate change how we think about irrigation or non-irritating. How we think about keeping the temperature down not only the fruit zone but on the canopies with installing misting systems and shade cloth? So we're we're GONNA be using this as an opportunity to test not only new technologies but also the test the finished product in the absence of federal leadership on climate change a growing number wineries in Napa and Sonoma lark meter trying to reduce their carbon footprints organic farming solar panels composting instead of burning discarded vines and and most wineries in this region are now certified sustainable in the management of their energy water and soil. But I'm not sure that's enough we're dealing with which with a larger global issue of planet civility to curb carbon in neighboring? sonoma's sisters Katie and Julia Jackson Jackson aren't sure it's enough either and we need to stop talking about the problem. We need to actually start implementing and scaling the solutions. Now Julia and Katya part owners was one of the world's biggest wine producers Jackson family wines. They help run. Forty two wineries around the world from California to South Africa. Jackson recently teamed up with with another global wind giant Spain's Torres family wines to create international wineries for climate action sitting at a picnic table overlooking the vines at their La Crema. Emma winery Haiti Jackson says the new groups goal is nothing short of radically decarbonising. The world's wine industry that's an organization that's asking members to to reduce their carbon footprints fifty percent by twenty thirty and by eighty percent by twenty forty five we need concrete significant action immediately and also also for the mid- and long-term to join wineries pledged to meet those ambitious goals and show they currently get at least twenty percent of their energy from onsite. Renewables is like solar and wind and they have to agree to conduct a thorough carbon emissions inventory audited by a third party every year looking at all aspects of production. In through delivery Jackson wine has been measuring its carbon footprint for eleven years. One of several changes they made after an energy audit. They switched to lighter glass bottles cutting their emissions footprint three percent and saving on shipping and production costs are cute so far the new global wind climate group only has six six members change. Come slow in wineland tradition. Not Transformation is often the ethos. It's an industry driven by personality and passion individuals individuals who are fierce competitors sometimes averse to working together. Katie Jackson says that mindset has to evolve. We believe that our intelligence together is quainton be more powerful and more impactful than anyone. Winery trying to figure this out and go alone. There's another challenge. Many small wineries can't afford to invest in climate resilience such as an annual emissions inventory. They're struggling to get the harvest in survive. And maybe spending any extra cash on new generators to adapt to the new normal mull of rolling power blackouts due to the heightened risk of catastrophic wildfires driven in part by climate change. Eric Westervelt N._p._R.. News in California's Napa Valley.

California Dan Petrosky Julia Jackson Jackson Napa Valley Katie Jackson Napa Sonoma Eric Westervelt Annapolis Lark Jackson Napa Haiti Jackson Sonoma NPR America Mead Vineyards Mealey Wineland
2 children among 3 killed in California festival shooting

The Takeaway

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

2 children among 3 killed in California festival shooting

"Police in Gilroy California have identified the gunman in last night's deadly shooting at a food festival is nineteen year old Centeno William Lee can four people including the gunman were killed and more than a dozen others were wounded and peers Eric Westervelt reports police are still looking for a possible second suspect Gilroy police say they believe sand Tino llegan cut through a fence near a creek to get around tight security at the annual garlic festival he then opened fire police say with a semi automatic assault type rifle purchased legally in Nevada earlier this month chief Scott Smith he says three of his officers likely save lives by engaging the gunmen in less than a minute despite the fact that they were out gunned with their handles against a rifle those three officers were able to fatally wound that suspect and at the event and it very quickly the chief says there's no word yet on motive and they're still investigating a possible second suspect the victims include a six year old boy a thirteen year old girl and a man in his

Gilroy California William Lee Eric Westervelt Nevada Scott Smith Gilroy Assault Nineteen Year Thirteen Year Six Year
Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:59 min | 1 year ago

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

"Here's a startling figure. Almost one in four American adults has a criminal record. That's according to federal statistics people charged with or convicted of even minor offenses can face consequences long after they have paid their debts to society, a criminal record can be a barrier to finding a job a home or getting alone in the past two years, though, many states and cities have been passing or expanding laws to help restore rights. And peers Eric westervelt has been looking into this and joins us now hair. Our Rachel can you just remind us of what the extent of the barriers are your lawyers who work in the series. They look you can't underestimate, you know. How much conviction even for a misdemeanor and the vast majority of convictions in America are for misdemeanors can have this ripple effect and relegate someone with a record to kind of permanent second class status as they try to get their life back in order. I mean, take the case of Jay Jordan, Jay served seven years in prison for felony robbery when he was young. He's been out for nearly eight years he completed his probation. He has no offense is not even a traffic ticket. And he told me he still faces almost daily hurdles as he tries to get his life back to normal. You know, I'll try to adopt right with turned down. Tried to volunteer at school with turn down tried to sell insurance with turn down trying to sell us cars with down. So, you know, every single step of the way when I try to better myself, and you know, be able to take care of myself, and my family there, these massive barriers, right? And I'm not alone. He now works for a nonprofit Rachel that advocates for the rights of the formerly incarcerated and really the question. His group is asking is how long should these? Convictions. Be on somebody's record, especially when people have done their time and wanna move on and become good citizens. So there are a lot of states that are trying to change this rate. I mean, my understanding more than twenty states have passed some kind of laws or made changes to lower these barriers. Why is it happening? Now, I think two things Rachel driving. This more people on the right and left agree that mass incarceration and the drug wars just clog the courts and prisons, you know, in his hurt society and the economy one study shows that unemployment among formerly incarcerated is twenty seven percent and even higher for African Americans over thirty percent. Number two. I think the legalization of marijuana is a key driver here. Again, there's this bipartisan sense that it doesn't make sense that people are still paying a big price for something. That's now either legal or decriminalized in many states, and one of the most progressive laws that was passed is in Indiana solidly Republican state Barbara brochures, reporter with our member station W F. Are you in Bloomington? She's part of NPR's criminal Justice collaborative new reporting partnership with some of our member stations, and Barbara looked into how Indianapolis is helping people who want a second chance a stick. Listen to her story. When Indianapolis residents with a criminal record one to turn their lives around many of them end up in the sub basement of the downtown city county, building the long, gray ward or has concrete walls and almost resembles a jail, but people come to this underground room to escape their criminal pass through one of the only open doors is a large quiet room, bold, black letters on the back wall, say don't look back. You're not going that way, a young volunteers helping a man fill out some paperwork, if you don't mind signing right there right there in today or splintering. This is the neighborhood Christian legal clinics. Expunge -ment help desk, they help people file petitions to expunge their records under Indiana's second chance law which legislators passed a few years ago while it's called expunge -ment. It doesn't actually erase arrests or charges. It just hides. Them from public view. So they won't pop up during a background check. That's what kept happening to LaTasha post in before she came here for help. Sometime we get stuck on our past and let our past guide us. She's forty four now, but ran into trouble shortly after she had her first daughter as a team, she racked up a lot of arrests over the next two decades for everything from public intoxication to receiving stolen property, but long after she changed post and says the charges dog term by was asset move from a low income apartment because every year, they do your recertification, and I had like three theft charges and receiving stolen property, which in low income. You can't have that post and says getting her records expunged helped her land a much better job in a hospital after working in home health care for nearly twenty years. She is among thousands of people filing petitions under the second chance law. The process appears pretty simple, you file a petition with the court in for more minor offenses, it must grant the request to seal the record if it meets requirements laid out in the law. A judge has discretion with more serious felonies and victims can give input the prosecutor's office reviews petitions in can object to ceiling records, it helps that Marion county prosecutor Terry curry advocated for the expunge -ment law. If our goal is to have individuals, not re-offend than an Armindo. It's appropriate to limit or remove obstacles that are going to inhibit their ability to become productive members of our community. The process is time consuming and costly there filing fees for every petition. And there are still plenty of people who don't even know expunge -ment is an option. That's why post and tries to tell everyone. She knows about the help desk. Ask it took her a couple of trips down here and forty seven days of waiting before the state sealed her records if select something was lifted off because now I feel like. Conflict like a human. Interesting to hear what a difference. These so-called second chance laws can make in people's lives. If there is as you say, Eric a lot of bipartisan support for these kinds of changes. Why isn't it everywhere? Well, spoke with an attorney who's worked on this issue for nearly thirty years Margaret love, she heads, the collateral consequences resource center, and she put it state legislatures are all reinventing the wheel here and not talking to each other. They're not sort of sharing best practices or studying what programs have the best outcome and defender offices that help people clear their records. They're often, you know, overworked understaffed and underfunded NPR's Eric westervelt. We also heard a report from Barbara brochure of W F you in Bloomington. She's with NPR's criminal Justice reporting collaborative

Eric Westervelt NPR Rachel Indianapolis Indiana Barbara Bloomington Jay Jordan America Prosecutor Marijuana Robbery Public Intoxication Armindo Attorney Margaret Reporter
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

"Gas and electric one of the nation's largest utilities filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection today PG, and he says that's the only way it can handle billions of dollars in potential liabilities from back to back years of wildfires. California officials are still investigating PG and his role in the know in November's campfire that was one of the most destructive wildfires in state history. It killed eighty six people and incinerated communities in and around the northern California town of paradise from paradise NPR's. Eric westervelt reports PG argues, it has no choice, but to file for chapter eleven give him a flood of lawsuits in their stock. Reduced to junk status in a statement today. The utility said bankruptcy will facilitate an orderly fair and expeditious resolution of the liabilities. They continue to arise from recent wildfires. UC Berkeley law. Professor Ken is an expert on corporate. Bankruptcy chapter. Eleven is really the best way to deal. Comprehensively with all the liabilities. They have a ad says a key impetus for the filing in California utilities can be held liable for wildfire damage is if the company sparked the blaze, regardless of whether they were negligent PG need got a rare bit of good news last week when the state's fire agency said in a report that it doesn't think the company's equipment started a massive 2017 blaze in wine country known as the tubs fire which killed twenty two people. But that report isn't the final word and the company still faces scores of lawsuits from twenty seventeen and twenty eight teen including the historic campfire. Yeah. It says the utility has to show Wall Street investors, it's working to put a cap on potential fire damages. It's going to continue to hang over their heads until they address it. So I think I think chapter eleven makes a lotta sense here, but to many fire victims and their many lawyers. It doesn't make sense when pe- Jeannie says oh safety is our most important priority. No, it's not their only. Priority is prophets. Attorney Mike Danko represents. Large group of wildfire victim suing PG, and he he sees bankruptcy. As a PG ploy to get around paying for what he calls, the company's long history of negligence and safety violations. A history of the Danko believes shows PGN is too big and too poorly managed to survive bankruptcy. As is why do we have a four profit company running utility? You have to ask whether that model even works and Dako clients are asking whether they'll get the compensation they're seeking at the end of a complex process that could take up to two years law. Professor out says, given the pecking order of chapter eleven survivors have reason to worry. The bankruptcy process says everyone gets paid fairly in accordance with their priority. But if you're an unsecured creditor light a fire damaged victim. It may mean that what comes out of the bankruptcy process may not be one hundred cents on the dollar in terms of full recovery. State Senator Bill Dodd whose district includes many twenty. Wildfire victim says that new on certainty revictimizes survivors, would.

PG California Mike Danko Professor Senator Bill Dodd Eric westervelt NPR Ken Jeannie Dako Attorney two years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"PG says that's the only way it can handle billions of dollars in potential liabilities from back to back years of wildfires. California officials are still investigating PG and his role in the know in November's campfire that was one of the most destructive wildfires in state history. It killed eighty six people and incinerated communities in and around the northern California town of paradise from paradise NPR's. Eric westervelt reports PG argues, it has no choice, but to file for chapter eleven give the flood of lawsuits and their stock reduced to junk status. In a statement today. The utility said bankruptcy will facilitate an orderly fair and expeditious resolution of the liabilities. They continue to arise from recent wildfires. UC Berkeley law. Professor Ken is an expert on corporate. Bankruptcy chapter. Eleven is really the best way to deal comprehensively with all the liabilities. They. They have a it says a key impetus for the filing in California utilities can be held liable for wildfire damage is if the company sparked the blaze, regardless of whether they were negligent PG, and he got a rare bit of good news last week when the state's fire agency said in a report that it doesn't think the companies acquired started a massive 2017 blaze in wine country known as the tubs fire which killed twenty two people. But that report isn't the final word and the company still faces scores of lawsuits from twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen including the historic campfire. Yeah. It says the utility has to show Wall Street investors, it's working to put a cap on potential fire damages. It's going to continue to hang over their heads until they address it. So I think I think chapter eleven makes a lotta sense here, but to many fire victims and their many lawyers. It doesn't make sense when pe- Jeannie says oh safety is our most important priority. No, it's not their only. Priority is prophets. Attorney Mike Danko represents a large group of wildfire victims suing PG. He he sees bankruptcy as a PG ploy to get around paying for what he calls the company's long history of negligence and safety violations. A history that Danko believes shows PGN is too big and too poorly managed to survive bankruptcy. As is why do we have a four profit company running utility, you have to ask whether that model even works and Dan goes clients are asking whether they'll get the compensation they're seeking at the end of a complex process that could take up to two years law. Professor says given the pecking order of chapter eleven survivors have reason to worry. The bankruptcy process says everyone gets paid fairly in accordance with their priority. But if you're an unsecured creditor of like a fire damaged victim. It may mean that what comes out of the bankruptcy process may not be one hundred cents on the dollar in terms of full recovery. State Senator Bill Dodd whose district includes many 2017 wildfire victim says that new uncertainty. Revictimizes survivors would.

PG Mike Danko California Professor Senator Bill Dodd Eric westervelt NPR Jeannie Ken Dan Attorney two years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eric westervelt reports PG genie's problems have mushroomed since November fire destroyed the northern California town of paradise and killed eighty six people in the states most destructive wildfire. The company faces a flood of lawsuits from fire victims alleging that faulty maintenance of its aging electric system is to blame. It's insurance companies are suing the utility PG stock has been battered and ratings agencies. Have slashed it to junk status by the company's own estimates potential liabilities from combined twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen wildfires could reach thirty billion dollars that's far more than its current assets. And that doesn't account for potential future wildfire liabilities in a state that has seen historic fire damage in back to back years p. Jeannie board chairman Richard Kelly said in a statement that chapter eleven represents the only viable option to address the company's responsibilities to its stakeholders the state legislature could take action in coming weeks to protect the company from two thousand eighteen fire liabilities, but given the raw anger at the utility that may be politically impossible. I certainly don't want to see a another bailout for the fires of twenty eighteen state Senator Jerry hill, a democrat heads, a key utility safety committee. He says he'll work to see that any reorganization protects ratepayers and fire victims. I he'll says if today's announcement is a company tactic to pressure the legislature for a bailout, it won't work PG, ni shareholders and bondholders day invested and sometimes we make bad investments in and I think that we should not be helping or assisting them north giving golden parachutes to CEO's as well. This would be the company's second bankruptcy in two decades view Tila. These two thousand and one reorganization led to a negotiated rate. Rate increase back, then the company painted itself as a victim of deregulation. But since then the company has been convicted of felonies in a deadly gas line explosion. And now faces those potentially crippling wildfire liabilities and safety lawsuits. So many spat with the group the utility reform network says this time is very different. The company's problems are from what she calls PG needs practice of putting profits ahead of safety. That's that PGN is talking about is debt that arises directly from its own, negligence, and liability. It is a longstanding principle of utility law that costumers don't pay for that kind of thing. Sunday night p genie announced that it CEO Gisha Williams was stepping down after barely two years on the job. The company says safety improvement is a top priority, but many customers lawmakers are skeptical..

PG PG genie Richard Kelly Senator Jerry hill CEO Eric westervelt California chairman Gisha Williams thirty billion dollars two decades two years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Like, buddy guy, Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray, Vaughan, and the band Led Zeppelin. Rush died yesterday of complications from a stroke. He suffered more than a decade ago. He was eighty four years old NPR's. Eric westervelt has this appreciation. He wasn't as widely known as BB king buddy guy looked to blues fans and scores of musicians Otis rush was powerful unique and hugely influential. I love. Russia's work in the late nineteen fifties. For Cobra records included the song, double trouble Stevie Ray Vaughan, took for the name of his band, and Eric Clapton covered on many albums. No place to go. Mothership? Call bro. Double concrete.

Stevie Ray Vaughan Otis rush Eric Clapton Eric westervelt Stevie Ray Led Zeppelin NPR Russia eighty four years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Asthma. Hey, Scott, another crazy week. We've got North Korea. Yup, we got Russia midterms, and of course President Trump and what happens whenever there is crazy news at our ups, we pop into the studio and break it down to make sense. So if you see a headline, we've discussed it, it's the NPR politics podcast you're listening to on point. I'm Eric westervelt. We're taking a look at the big news to come this week in Washington and around the world. You can join us. Join the conversation. What are you reading the tea leaves for this week's primaries, the president and the first lady are split over NBA icon LeBron James was the president's tweets against the NBA star. A kind of dog whistle to his base yet again, follow us on Twitter, find us on Facebook at on point radio. We have with us, Lisa Desjardins with the PBS NewsHour Jack Bichon, senior reporter at vox covering global politics and Matt visor deputy Washington bureau, chief for the Boston Globe and Matt finish your thought there. The last caller was complaining that prison Trump is sort of controlling the narrative yet again. In your point, he's the president when he tweets, it's not irrelevant. Yeah. I mean, I think there's there's a Twitter account on on Twitter that that that changes his tweets into official presidential statements. And I think that's one of the better things that you know out there where it looks much more official when when when it's put on White House letterhead as an official statement from the president. And I think that that's something that we need to consider that his, he uses his Twitter feed as as a constant stream of of his thought process. And some people don't like his thought process, you know, and it can be confusing and, and you know, this is frankly a little bit confusing to why he'd returned to this to this narrative around the Russia investigation, which is, you know, which is not a great great narrative for him. And you know his as his lawyers are a little bit nervous that it potentially exposes him legally. To his to his shifting explanations around this meeting or Zach was pointing out, and you know that that that sort of. You know, exposes them to the obstruction of Justice, kind of charges. Listeners wanna weigh in here and Gabe is calling from Cambridge mass, Gabe. What's on your mind? Hey, Eric, yeah. So I look, you know, the last caller, Mike, he's one hundred percent, right? That Trump is controlling the narrative, but he's one hundred percent wrong at this tweet doesn't matter. And the reason it does matter is because Trump is using his tweet as well as sending Giuliani out there to try to say no collusion is is not a crime. He's he's using his tweet to normalize, betraying one's country to hostile foreign power and breaking campaign finance laws. And he's doing this because he knows he's guilty. Muller's gonna show us all, but he wants to set up a situation where even the little be clear as day that he's broken the law and betrayed his country that his supporters will not care. And I want us all to think about what is going to happen then particularly because this lasting. Say, eighty percent of the guns in the world are in America. Thirty percent of America has those guns. Three percent of America has a ton of those guns, and I haven't seen dad on us, but based on the politics, you kind of have to assume that there's a big crossover with the people who have all the guns and the people that voted for Trump and are not gonna believe Muller. Even when he shows that the president is guilty. Thanks for your call. We appreciate it to your larger point on the normalization of breaking campaign finance laws. Lisa Desjardins, Dan doomed people out there that you're hearing on the campaign trail. You know care about campaign finance laws as one of the top issues or they are. They ignoring it and looking at more bread and butter issues on on the trail, both anecdotally and what we know from polling so far. The answer is no, that this is not on Americans priority list as they're thinking about voting this fall, and it doesn't seem like it's on their priority list for the twenty twenty elections either. Now, all of that could very well change when Bob Muller finishes..

president Twitter Bob Muller Eric westervelt Lisa Desjardins Russia America North Korea NPR Giuliani Washington Asthma. NBA Scott Facebook LeBron James Gabe PBS Matt
Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

Weekend Edition Saturday

07:33 min | 2 years ago

Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

"Is weekend addition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The group Nexium says its mission is to quote raise human awareness and. Celebrate what it means to be human based in Albany it's attracted wealthy. Clients over the, years and promised personal and professional development. But federal prosecutors say the group is a criminal enterprise several members, have been charged with sex trafficking, racketeering and other crimes and, this includes the group's, leader Keith Rene and Allison Mack the actress last week four more women were charged and fluting an. Heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune for. More about Nexium we're going to turn to Vanessa Gregorio she's been. Reporting on. The group for the New York Times. Magazine this Gregorios thanks. So much for being with us thanks for having? Me, so what are what are they promise which alluring well Nexium on the face of it is one of these intensive therapy outfits. That offers courses maybe. Last a. Weekend or several days twelve hours. A day very wealthy. People were involved in this rate you. Could spend too Eight hundred three hundred thousand. Dollars on. Their classes no problem they claimed that. They could help people. Overcome childhood trauma, a divorce by integrating? Is what? They, called it those experiences into their lives and they were using a form of hypnosis to help people see their way through these, terrible events in their. Lives and. It worked for a lot of. People by many accounts Yeah and, I mean? It's it's tempting to see if there any illusions? I, guess both, with s and let's say even Scientology do you see any I think this is squarely, in the tradition of on, self help, and certainly there's, a secret side to, it much like. Scientology where we are, now learning that there were some things going on in. This group that were. Extremely unsavory like what according to, the federal, prosecutors in your, own reporting. Well you know it's clear that the, group was demanding fealty not only to the ideas that they had but also to the leader, Keith Ranieri middle aged guy lived in. New York. All his life they called him vanguard and they believed. He was some sort of all being so behind. The scenes there was also, a lot of you know he had many many girlfriends and in the last couple of years he was using some. Of the women in the group to bring other women too His bed with what we think are pretty coercive tactics which, of course of tactic the women claimed to, other women that they could kind of move more quickly down their personal growth path if they joined this women's only international, self help? Group there was a man who is involved in. This, group and, it was the leader heath who knew much of what was going on he was in, at least one case if, not more, those women were, coming to his bed, and he was. Then seducing them additionally, of course the New York Times Brooklyn us that they. Were branded with a. Symbol that looks kind of like, a hieroglyph, indeed they actually, were his. Initials k. and r. and women were, not told that how how does this boorish in reprehensible behavior become sex trafficking sexual The argument that the prosecutors are making is that there, was coercive sacks here that. Some of the women were actually acting or specifically Alison math this actress she was coercing women into having. Sex with him and that she was indeed kind of, a Madam where she was bringing in these women and she was also getting some sort of financial benefit within the group from Keith. Himself to financial reward for sexual favors, financial reward for sexual favors exactly even after these charges, the group still operating well they've. Closed, down all, of their classes you cannot go to them anymore and try to work out your problems but even after the. News, came out of the New York Times about women being branded at least one hundred members stayed with the group they think that they have not Done anything wrong, and they believe that they'll be vindicated. Vanessa Grigory Addis contributing writer for the New York Times Sunday magazine thanks. So much for being with us thank you Scott police across the country are growing concerned, about stoned drivers behind the wheel thirty states and. Washington DC of legalized medical marijuana Nine of those plus the district have legalized recreational pot one California company now says it's made a major breakthrough in creating. What some thought of as a kind, of unicorn a marijuana Breathalyzer NPR's Eric westervelt has our story in, his downtown Oakland office Mike Lynn hold his creation in the palm of his hand device about the size of a large. Mobile phone with a small plastic tube and a slot for. A cartridge this is this, is a disposable cartridge. And there's a whole bunch of science in this in this Partridge but Lynn is not some, pipe-dream Stoner inventor the entrepreneurs also a. Practicing, ER, trauma, doctor in an active swat team medic he's seen. Firsthand sometimes devastating impact of drunk and. Drugged drivers. The CEO of hound labs the scientific device company he founded slips a new, cartridge into the pot Breathalyzer since starts to blow Indicator Barr show whether the machine detects any THC the psychoactive, component in pond tools now, on the market to German marijuana use tests blood saliva or urine. Those devices can take days for. Result and they can't tell whether a person has smoked a half. Hour ago or eight days ago THC dissolves in fat so it can stay in your body up to a month, after us but Dr Lynn says his company's device detects whether someone has smoked, pot in, the last two hours what's considered the peak impairment window it accurately does that he says by measuring the mere presence of THC molecules in parts per trillion in. Your breath and that's in contrast to, alcohol which is parts per thousand THC is something like a billion, times less concentrated than alcohol that's why it hasn't been done before because it really is hard the company hopes to have. The Breathalyzer ready for sale by early next year a handful. Of police departments including Boston, plan to work with. Hound labs to test the device starting this fall for law enforcement there issue Is trying to figure out who's potentially impaired versus hey. Who somebody who smoked maybe yesterday, is not impaired they're interested in it providing objective data for them at the roadside just. Like they have for alcohol but a big problem there's still no. Scientific or legal consensus on what amount of THC equals functional impairment that matters, to the courts only seven, states have set basic legal guidelines as to how much THC in. The system makes you dangerous behind. The wheel Harvest a stylish dispensary in San Francisco's, mission district David downs. Does some market research Roma which is really scrumptious the California bureau chief for the cannabis news site lethally has. His nose in a jar of Indika dominant hybrid buds.

New York Times Marijuana Mike Lynn Scott Simon California NPR Seagram Vanessa Gregorio New York Albany Racketeering Keith Ranieri Keith Rene Allison Mack Boston Vanessa Grigory Addis San Francisco
Texas school shooting: Who is the suspect Dimitrios Pagourtzis?

Morning Edition

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Texas school shooting: Who is the suspect Dimitrios Pagourtzis?

"Congress us in our studios thanks for coming by hank you people who live in santa fe in southeast texas are trying to move forward after the shooting rampage friday at the high school there that left eight students in two teachers dead police say the suspect must seventeen year old student named dimitrios pagor z's has confessed and even though the answer may never satisfy many in this small town outside houston wanna know why he opened fire and peers eric westervelt reports from santa fe texas chad presents is paying respects at santa fe high at the makeshift memorial this becoming all too routine part of the mourning process at schools and towns across america white wooden crosses flowers pictures and cards in the front lawn miss birkin's she was really sweet she put me in a few times when i was i think open class or something the twenty year old graduated from santa fe high last year he knew many of those murdered he stops at chris stones cross the seventeen year old who was among a group of students who tried to block a door short stop the gunman from entering their art class a shotgun blast apparently struck stone in the chest chris here's a joyful kidman that happens he was is a goofball kind of grew up with a shanna right here fisher brzezinski it seems is trying to process the horror in real time and casting for awhi convinced there has to be one for the suspect betrayals pa gorgeous for the kid to do where he just did he know on friday there's a reasoning for it and he got pushed somehow some way i'm not sure why i'm not sure how but everybody has their breaking point in not using it as it skews but there had to be something to push in just like all the others mass shootings that have happened what if turns out there is no explanation he's just sick minded and he needed help and people need to realize that by most accounts there were no glaring signs of trouble the suspected shooter got good grades played football and had no run ins with the law a few social media posts with provocative pins and a t shirt that read born to kill hinted at a darker side police say there is information on his computer and in a journal that may point to a.

Congress Hank Santa Fe Texas Birkin Chris Stones Kidman Houston Eric Westervelt America Chris Fisher Brzezinski Seventeen Year Twenty Year
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Motive or to deeper troubles but they haven't released details there also hints the suspect faced bullying by some students as well as coaches and staff the gunman's father told a greek tv station he believes bullying was behind his sons rampage parent jeremy severance says his son dustin a junior had his own struggles with being bullied his son played football with the suspect and saw him mistreated firsthand he told me about how the coaches used to believe this kid you know that he was bullied a and even the coaches do and i was like what i've had to deal with the school district self you know when he was getting bullied they want to say it's a bully free zone now and it's truly is clearly not the school district issued a statement saying it's looked into claims coaches exhibited bully like behaviors toward the student shooter and determined they were untrue meantime psychologists point out that if the reports of bullying are true that might be a contributing factor but hardly an explanation for mass murder eric westervelt npr news santa fe texas this is npr news if you anita restaurants recommendation for perhaps a date night at check please bay area has you covered with brand new episodes every thursday night see.

jeremy severance murder eric westervelt texas npr
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Told me that from what she saw over the years and i'm quoting here you know he always seemed like such a nice young man that's why we just don't understand it still all you know just a shock to us you know and in school he by all accounts he was a really good student he was engaged he made the honor roll the closest thing already to warning signs you know that we know of were some social media posts before the shooting that included l picture of his trench coat with some pinzon it included an iron cross used by the nazis which the teenager wrote represented bravery and in his now deleted facebook page posted a t shirt that read born to kill police say there is some information on his computer that may point to a motive but they haven't released details on that so these social media posts and some evidence that he may have been bullied are really the only clues here help us understand that has given us a lot of information about his activities and what he was doing in school and yet now this allegation perhaps that bullying somehow came into play what's going on some conflicting information but several current and former students that we've talked with say that was picked on and was given a rough time by school sports coaches as well and we've talked to the suspects attorney the defense attorney says he's investigating whether there was any teacher on student bullying and here's junior dustin severin he played football with dimitrios at santa fe high he's kinda bullied by coaches on people he wasn't talked to alive i didn't see him walking around with any like best friends or anything and i never thought that you just snap in just shoot up the school now audit a school district denies he was bullied by staff they said in a statement they looked into the bullying issue from staff and found the accusations to be baseless bullying if it's true may have been you know one contributing factor but it's not an explanation it's not adequate i mean students are picked on every day and just about every school across america and they don't go out and commit mass murderer over it that's npr's eric westervelt in santa fe texas eric thank you you welcome.

attorney dustin severin football america eric westervelt santa fe npr texas
Gunman who killed Indian man in Kansas bar pleads guilty to federal charges

NPR News Now

01:59 min | 2 years ago

Gunman who killed Indian man in Kansas bar pleads guilty to federal charges

"Live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer communities in southeastern texas are still reeling from friday's deadly rampage at a high school where ten people were killed and thirteen others wounded then perez eric westervelt reports from santa fe taxes new details emerge today about the killings and the law enforcement response galveston county sheriff henry tross at says an armed school resource officer responded to the scene about four minutes after the shooting began he says other officers quickly arrived and police rebel to contain the alleged gunman while police cleared the school unsure if there were other shooters in every door they opened they weren't sure what was on the other side of it but they open those doors continuously time after time until that school was clear that's what you call a hero they didn't run from iran to it the suspect a seventeen year old student is now being held in the galveston county jail without bail and on a suicide watch era westervelt npr news santa fe texas a kansas man who killed an indian immigrant after a bar dispute over his legal status pleaded guilty to federal hate crime and firearm charges embarrass richard gonzales has that story the incident occurred last year in a bar and grill and a lengthy kansas adam puritan approach to indianborn engineers calling them terrorists and demanding that they in his words get out of my country he shot and killed serena voss coochie butler and wounded a luck mata sunny before running away puritan was sentenced to a life term on state murder charges in march now he's also pleaded guilty to federal hate crime and firearm offenses which make him eligible for another life term he will be sentenced on the federal charges in july the department of justice issued a statement calling hate crimes acts of evil and promising to prioritize their zealous prosecution richard gonzales npr news olympic swimmer ariana course smith and her lawyers say.

Smith Department Of Justice Murder Mata Sunny Serena Voss Galveston County Perez Eric Westervelt Jack Speer NPR Washington Butler Kansas Richard Gonzales Galveston County Jail Iran Officer Henry Tross Texas Seventeen Year
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Com ago euro and san francisco may not be promoting flowers in your hair as a cure to homelessness but there's a a new idea being enthusiastically discussed by the san francisco board of supervisors to use public school facilities not just to welcome homeless students that's already happening but to provide accommodations and hot meals for homeless people at public schools because of course the public schools in the city of san francisco were already doing so spectacularly well with so much extra money the school and city leaders are talking about opening a homeless shelter in the gym of kindergarten through eighth grade public school wow this is hillary ronen who is a san francisco supervisor who is spearheading the idea talking with eric westervelt of here and now on npr listen is the homeless problem getting so bad in san francisco that it's come to this opening up a homeless shelter and a gym.

san francisco supervisor eric westervelt hillary npr
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is npr news seven eighteen now and coming up in a little while on forum in the first half hour we're gonna look back at the life and legacy of burning man founder larry harvey at nine thirty manuel pastor professor of american studies and ethnicity at the university of southern california who is the author of state of resistance what california's dizzying descent and remarkable resurgence mean for america's future will be the gas and then we'll hear from journalist and author barbara ehrenreich to round out the program hosted today by queen and kim you can hear it from nine till eleven this morning i'm eric westervelt the purpose of our actions is to establish a strong deterrent against the production spread and use of chemical weapons retired army general jack keane says president trump was right to strike syria but he argues the us needs to do even more against the assad regime the case for deeper syria intervention next time on here and now we'll bring you the here and now program beginning at eleven o'clock this morning here on k q e d we'll get a look at traffic right after a news update from npr at seven nineteen from npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly a string of bombings in afghanistan today has left at least thirty six people dead and dozens wounded isis claims responsibility for two of the bombings in kabul they killed police officers and at least nine journalists a third explosion occurred in kandahar where a nato convoy was targeted that blasts killed at least eleven school children dato soldiers are among the wounded the german government is toning down its retaliatory threats in the event president trump imposes tariffs on us imports of steel and aluminum as npr's psoriasis are haughty nelson reports from berlin trump is expected to announce those tariffs tomorrow uncle makul's economics minister and top german parliament members said he hoped the us will agree to negotiate a new trade deal that might cut some of the european tariffs donald trump is concerned about that's different tone in the one struck yesterday by mackel and her french and british counterparts during a joint phone call earlier the eu threatened to impose tariffs on whiskey and peanut butter among other imports if trump goes ahead with his plants merckel met with trump at the.

npr donald trump nelson psoriasis nato kabul afghanistan dave mattingly assad president eric westervelt university of southern califor eu mackel makul founder german government kandahar washington
"eric westervelt" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wbz i'm robin young i'm eric westervelt you're listening to here and now we're following today's historic meeting between the leaders of north and south korea which came at the end of a busy week of diplomacy at the white house today president trump meets german chancellor angela merkel this is just a one day get together and it stands in stark contrast to the state dinner address to congress during the three day visit by french president emmanuel macron earlier this week our political roundtable is coming right up but first let's bring in psoriasis are haughty nelson npr's berlin correspondent she joins us from the german capital seraya thanks for being here you're welcome germany is europe's largest economy key us ally any frustration in berlin that miracle is not getting anything close to the macro treatment in in washington well it's interesting because i don't think she'd be very comfortable with that i mean she's sort of a no nonsense get to the facts kind of person and it's not like she and mr trump have had any kind of close relationship i mean they didn't talk for about five months until last month when she was just three elected to her newest term so i don't think she's really looking for that but she is in america trying to do damage control because right now you know mr trump doesn't really see germany as a reliable partner damage control in germany you know of course is the economic powerhouse of europe and diplomatic powerhouses well and us tariffs on steel and aluminum portrait scheduled to take affect may i germany isn't happy about that talk to us about miracles case to the president on trade and tariffs will the you get another exemption or not.

mr trump partner germany berlin congress chancellor robin young president america npr washington europe nelson npr psoriasis emmanuel macron angela merkel white house south korea eric westervelt
"eric westervelt" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

41:35 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on Here & Now