34 Burst results for "Eric Westervelt"

Firefighters Battle Wildfires, Fatigue as California Braces for an Extended Fire Season

Environment: NPR

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Firefighters Battle Wildfires, Fatigue as California Braces for an Extended Fire Season

"There's hope for the evacuated residents of south lake. Tahoe who waiting to return to their homes. Firefighters have made progress against a massive kaldor fire. Threatening the california resort town calmer winds and higher humidity have helped their efforts. But with mega-fires the new norm the work of wad line. The work of wildland firefighters is harder and longer than it used to be. Extreme weather fuelled by climate change is putting a strain on them and other emergency workers. Npr's eric westervelt has this report. In a stretch of bone bone-dry pine forest on the edge of south lake. Tahoe crews putting out windblown spot. Fires is hard tedious. Work scraping the ground with hand tools. Just up the road. Helicopters are dropping water on a main edge of the massive kaldor fire as it crackles toward the tahoe basin like most wildland firefighting crews. This one from reno has been jumping from fire to fire with little downtime already. This year reno. Fire has sent screws eight different states. Most of this crew just shifted from the nearby dixie. Fire california's second largest fire on record to help. Defend lake tahoe. Smoke ash heat sleep deprivation battalion chief. Bill erlich says yes to remind his team not to overdo it. You can see some guys get a little fatigued and just remind him. Hey there's enough of us you can take time out you know. Take care of yourself. And we'll take care you too because we gotta pay ourself pacing and avoiding firefighter. Burnout is a nationwide problem. The federal office decides which wildfires get priority says. The us is currently exhausted all national firefighting resources from personnel to equipment. They've been at this level five alert since mid-july so now the pentagon has been tapped to mobilize hundreds of active duty servicemembers as well as aircraft to help fight wildfires. Some states have also activated the national guard critics charge at the old firefighting deployment models and the mutual aid. System are near a breaking point. Exhausted crews resources stretched thin. That's the reality. In the era of climate change fueled mega-fires ad in record drought and the routinization of extreme weather. And you've got a serious problem

South Lake Eric Westervelt Tahoe Tahoe Basin Reno Defend Lake Tahoe Bill Erlich California NPR Federal Office Pentagon National Guard United States
California's Caldor Fire Continues to Burn

Here & Now

02:05 min | 1 year ago

California's Caldor Fire Continues to Burn

"It is another ten stay in northern california near the near nevada. Border firefighters are battling kaldor fire now threatening the biggest city on the shore of lake. Tahoe they cut a break yesterday when winds relaxed a little bit but the fire has burned more than two hundred thousand acres and some fifty thousand people have evacuated. Npr's eric westervelt talked to some firefighters. Defending south lake tahoe. Fix smoke and ash. Enveloped the eerily empty resort area of south lake. Tahoe which is usually bustling. This time of year with summer tourists on the outskirts of the city exhausted fire crews in the christmas valley area. I really the last line of defense. Protecting south lake tahoe. Its number side over there. And then it's burning there that way towards the south talk behind us pretty close in a forested area adjacent to cabins and homes firefighter. Steve barnum and a wildfire strikeforce from southern california are scrambling to stamp out spot fires. These are the dreaded windblown embers that ignite many fires that can easily grow into new blazes. Bardem is working to contain one almost got out of control. It was bernie pretty Pie their thirteen fourteen foot claim lakes and get the ember cast off it it gets grasping the needle going and it goes over to the houses. And that's memorial. They're worried about sparks catching the drought-stricken brush dry pine needles surrounding the homes. Right across the road that can turn this forest fire into a battle to save homes and neighborhoods most of these forests and the tahoe basin have not burned since the nineteen forties. The spot fires they're tackling are not mere nuisances really the biggest threat to south lake. Tahoe right now says firefighter jesse alexander because they can overrun control lines and wreak havoc on any well-planned containment strategy and you have a spot fire basically planning might be go plan b. or plan c. depending on spotify jumped across so you can have every intention of trying to hold the road and if it jumps that road a spot fire now you have to kind of change your overall game plan. If you're not able to pick up that's

Tahoe Eric Westervelt Protecting South Lake Tahoe Steve Barnum South Lake Northern California South Lake Tahoe NPR Nevada Bardem Tahoe Basin Southern California Bernie Jesse Alexander
President Biden Issues Emergency Declaration for Caldor Fire

NPR News Now

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

President Biden Issues Emergency Declaration for Caldor Fire

"President has also issued a federal disaster declaration for the kaldor fire. That's burning in eastern california crews are working to keep the blaze away from the resort city of south lake tahoe. Npr's eric westervelt. Is there during the christmas rally. Just out side of south lake tahoe. You can see the main lead part of the fire coming down this hillside. There's fire about four hundred yards away. Cruiser attacking it from the air relentlessly with helicopters. Here's one coming over right now. Is they're trying to stop this fire from getting into south lake

South Lake Tahoe Eric Westervelt NPR California South Lake
Massive Caldor Fire Closes in on Lake Tahoe Area

Environment: NPR

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Massive Caldor Fire Closes in on Lake Tahoe Area

"Actual speeds are not guaranteed. It's another tense day. In northern california as firefighters struggled to keep the massive kaldor fire from reaching the biggest city on the shore of iconic lake. Tahoe they caught a break. When wins yesterday were not as strong as expected but forecasters are warning. That strong winds are likely well into this evening. Tens of thousands of people have been evacuated and the fire has now burned some two hundred thousand acres. Npr's eric westervelt has the latest from south. Lake tahoe fix smoke and ash. Of enveloped the eerily empty resort area of south lake. Tahoe which is usually bustling. This time of year with summer tourists on the outskirts of the city exhausted fire crews in the christmas valley area. A really the last line of defense protecting south lake tahoe. Its number over there. And then it's burning there. That way towards taller behind pretty close in a forested area adjacent to cabins and homes. Firefighter steve barnum and a wildfire strikeforce from southern california are scrambling to stamp out spot. Fires these are the dreaded wind blown embers that ignite many fires that can easily grow into new blazes. Bardem is working to contain one. That almost got out of control and it was pretty pretty Pie their thirteen. Fourteen foot flame lakes. And then you get the ember cast off it and it gets grass finding gig on and it goes over the houses. And that's memorial. They're worried about sparks catching the drought-stricken brush and dry pine needles surrounding the homes. Right across the road that can turn this forest fire into a battle to save homes and neighborhoods most of these forests and the tahoe basin have not burned since the nineteen forties. The spot fires are tackling are not mere nuisances. They're really the biggest threat to south lake. Tahoe right now says firefighter jesse alexander because they can overrun control lines and wreak havoc on any well-planned containment strategy and you have a spot fire basically your plan

Iconic Lake Tahoe Eric Westervelt Steve Barnum Northern California South Lake Lake Tahoe NPR South Lake Tahoe Bardem Southern California Tahoe Basin Jesse Alexander
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Already extreme wildfire risk across much of the West. Eric Westervelt. NPR NEWS Iran has a new president Ibrahim racy, is said to have won in a landslide in yesterday's election. NPR's Peter Kenyon says Iran has turned to a hardline leader to succeed of pragmatic president Hassan Rouhani. Abraham Racy, is a hardline cleric. He's the head of Iran's judiciary. As a judge, he was sharply criticized in some quarters for his role in the controversial executions of thousands of political prisoners. In the late 19 eighties, He's sometimes referred to as a protege of supreme leader Ayatollah Khamenei. He shares many of his hard line views, and he's made no secret of the fact that he would love to be the next supreme leader of Iran, NPR's Peter Kenyon and Tehran. Yesterday was the first government observance of Juneteenth today, June 19th is the actual anniversary Commemorating the day in 18 65 that enslaved black people in Texas or informed they'd been freed. Sarah why Kim of member Station W. Y P. R reports Baltimore's Reservoir Hill neighborhood is celebrating rows upon rows. A vendors lined the houses in Reservoir Hill. There's live music barbecue produce from local farms and an inflatable, bouncy castle and Monte Brian Event chair of the Reservoir Hill Association. Says this is a chance to uplift her community story. The intellect here is also so rich the professionals here the aspiration, the hope. The achievement here for Brian Freedom is not just the end of slavery. It's about block economic independence and black infrastructure. And it's about tackling racial health disparities, which is why they set up a mobile covid 19 vaccination clinic celebrations across the city continued through Sunday for NPR news. I'm Sarah like him in Baltimore. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Julie Chang. Movie theaters have been hit hard during the pandemic, and now they're navigating re opening safely. The Roxy Theater in San Francisco's Mission District can trace its history back to the early 19 hundreds. And it's a staple for indie film fans in the Bay Area. KQED Mary Franklin Harvin stop by this week, standing next to the popcorn machine in the Roxy's lobby, executive director Lex Sloan talked about the theaters reopening plan. We're not ready to jump back up to full capacity at 100%, so we're going to continue to Just cautiously take steps forward until hopefully by the end of summer. We're back up and running it full capacity with regular show times, even though the theater will be losing money by continuing to operate at limited capacity. Sloan says the comfort of the Roxy staff and patrons is a top priority. She also says it's been rewarding for her to see the excitement from patrons back for the first time. I've been able to witness people making memories in this way that's so powerful that they'll always remember their first time back in the movie theater, Sloan says. The Roxy used them more than 400 days, it was closed.

Eric Westervelt Abraham Racy Lex Sloan Ayatollah Khamenei Texas Sarah Peter Kenyon Sloan NPR Hassan Rouhani Julie Chang Reservoir Hill Association 100% Kim San Francisco Sunday first time Reservoir Hill KQED News yesterday
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For intentional fires. One of them even has some bipartisan support. Eric Westervelt NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. When Koven 19 shutdown theaters across the country, some company started experimenting streaming new plays, doing concerts with Broadway stars. Well, tonight One theater is trying something really new a production with no actors happening within a video game from member Station W. And Jennifer of Anasco reports. A couple months into the pandemic. The New York Theater Workshop had an idea there season was canceled. We were like, Okay, What are we gonna do now? Jeremy Blocker is managing director and, he says. Instead, they gave the money to 27 Theater Orvis and told them to think about what theater could be. Now that we can't squeeze 200 people into a room. What is it? Me and in a virtual space to build community and folks will come back with some crazy ideas. One of those people is playwright Selene Song. She's making an adaptation of Anton Chekhov's drama The Siegel within the videogame Simms for and she's going to stream the whole thing. Live on twitch. People in theater. Our relationship, too, like a live event is sort of this in person that kind of life event, But then, for most of the world in a lot of young people, the idea of something that is live often shows up in the shape of like live stream. Over some of their favorite.

New York Theater Workshop Jeremy Blocker Theater Orvis Selene Song NPR Eric Westervelt Anton Chekhov managing director
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

"Two locations like Hospitals, pharmacies clinics wherever there requested by states. Okay, so moving from temperature to distribution. How are these vaccines going to be allocated to each state? Well, the government says that they'll be providing them to states for free and governors have been asking. Well, How are you going to figure out how much each state gets and this is especially important in those first days and weeks after a vaccine is authorized when there just won't be enough for everyone? Paul Mango, a top official of the Department of Health and Human Services, says that states allocations will depend on the number of people in priority high risk groups. It actually has very little, if anything to do with background population in a state for jurisdiction. It has everything to do with those priorities and the number of absolute persons Better in those priorities. Mingo says that the government is getting head cats right now of how many hospital workers there are by state. How many nursing home residents you know various groups that are at high risk for covert 19. And once the vaccine has authorized the size of those populations in a given state will determine how many vaccines at ST initially gets. You know, different communities have different levels of health care infrastructure, how our state's planning to get vaccines to people that might not have AH, lot of good health care in their communities. Right. I mean the groups that are hard to reach her off in the same groups that have been severely affected by covert 19 and Dr Clean Gil, recently co chair the committee that looked into how to distribute a vaccine fairly. Communities of color. Seniors and others have been disproportionately impacted by this and so making sure that we're working with community based organizations, churches. Faith institutions, Community health centers. States are starting to work with local community leaders and plan for vaccine clinics in those communities, you know, and people's workplaces at local pharmacies, even churches, and Gail says that this work makes it easier for people to get a vaccine and also helps ensure that they actually trust and what one These are such difficult life and death questions who ultimately makes the decision of who gets the vaccine first, and who has to wait for it. Right. The government's recommendations are ultimately going to come from a group of doctors and public health experts would advise the CDC. It's called the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. A C I P and they're meeting this week to talk through the different coping vaccine candidates, but they're not going to make a recommendation till one is authorised by the FDA. When they do issue cover guidelines that will actually kicks throughout the distribution process. The government aims to get the vaccine into people's arms 24 hours after the recommendations are accepted by CDC. NPR's Ping Wong. Thanks a lot. Thanks for having me a historically destructive wildfire season across much of the Western U. S. Has renewed debate over intentional burns. Those managed wildfires would help clear forests and grasslands of dangerous levels of vegetation built up over decades of fire suppression, But experts say we will need to intentionally burned many more acres to get the West's wildfire problem in check. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports in Colorado. Three of the state's five largest wildfires in history have burned this year in California, five of the biggest on record have occurred just since August. Fire Ecologist say that while people right now might not want to hear it, the most effective prevention strategy is to use more fire to fix the region's wildfire problem. Some people might say that you know they're scared of doing prescribed fire. But you know, I'm scared. What will happen in the next 10 years if we don't do prescribed fire? That's Kate Wilking, a fire Ecologist with Wildfire Interdisciplinary Research Center at San Jose State. She recognizes how awful it's been for many in recent years, people who've lost loved ones and homes, the fear, stress and smoke filled air drifting hundreds of miles but in terms of forest health, Wilkins says, California is supposed to burn. So when the state top four million acres burned earlier this month, will can also thought, Wow, we're actually getting into the ballpark have any agers used to burn in California? Historically remember seeing 4.4 million and 12 million acres used to burn every year. By contrast, California in the last few years has intentionally burned just over 50,000 acres on public lands. Federal in California officials recently signed an agreement to try to boost that significantly to treat about a million acres a year with combined thinning and controlled burns. But critics say that's nowhere near enough to meet this moment. Welcome North was a research scientist with the U. S. Forest Service. He says a major obstacle to expanding controlled burns is institutional inertia in these large risk averse state and federal agencies like the one he works for. It's not something in which incremental Cautious decisions are going to solve the problem. So you need to have a cultural shift in the public's understanding about the inevitability of fire. But you also need a cultural shift within the agency has to be more supportive of the use of fire. If historically flawed. Forest management is half the problem here, battling most every fire. The other half is the world's warming climate with hotter, drier conditions, igniting a century of built up fuel. Says Michael Warren, with Stanford's Woods Institute for the environment. The problem has kind of turned from this statement. We can manage to a monster and taming that monster through intentional fire, war says is vital yet costly. It's estimated that thinning and prescribed Burns can cost up to $2000 per acre. Coming up with the money to do this. It's scale has always been a major obstacle. We need sustained federal and state financial support if we're gonna have any hope of moving Neil other barriers to doing more intentional burns include tough environmental rules and liability laws and then their safety. The vast majority. These fires were done without harm to people or property, but they're not risk free. For example of Park Service controlled burn 20 years ago near Los Alamos, New Mexico got out of control. When high winds picked up some for 100 homes burned the federal nuclear lab there was threatened, withering criticism and congressional hearings followed. The plan was flawed. The higher ups rubber stamped it. A burn boss was not qualified to do a fire this big that Los Alamos fire became the Enron of controlled Burns, a rare but spectacularly botched event whose effect is still felt today across federal agencies. Despite the long, bitter fights in Washington over how to manage the nation's for us, they're currently several bills in the U. S. Senate that would significantly boost federal funding for intentional fires. One of them even has some bipartisan support. Eric Westervelt NPR news.

California Burns Eric Westervelt NPR Department of Health and Human CDC Advisory Committee on Immuniza Los Alamos Paul Mango FDA Dr Clean Gil Mingo Wildfire Interdisciplinary Res San Jose State official Washington Gail Senate
What Stops Western States From Intentional Burning As A Way To Prevent Wildfires?

Environment: NPR

04:01 min | 1 year ago

What Stops Western States From Intentional Burning As A Way To Prevent Wildfires?

"A historically destructive wildfire season across much of the western US has renewed debate over intentional burns. Those managed wildfires would help clear forests and grasslands of dangerous levels of vegetation built up over decades of fire suppression. But experts say we will need to intentionally burn many more acres to get the West's wildfire problem check NPR's Eric Westervelt reports in Colorado three of the state's five largest wildfires in history have burned this year in California. Five of the biggest on record have occurred just since August fire colleges say that while people right now might not WanNa hear it. The most effective prevention strategy is to use. More, fire to fix the region's wildfire problem people might say that you know they're scared of doing for stripe fire but you know I'm scared what will happen in the next ten years if we don't prescribe fire, let's Kate Wilkin a fire a columnist with the Wildfire Interdisciplinary Research Center at San Jose state she recognizes how awful it's been for many in recent years people who've lost loved ones and homes the fear stress in smoke-filled air drifting hundreds of miles. But in terms of forest health will says California is supposed to burn. So in the state top four, million acres burned earlier this month Wilkin. Thought Wow. We're actually getting into the ballpark how many acres used to bring California just shortly remembers me four, point, four, million and twelve million acres to burn every year contrast. California in the last few years has intentionally burned just over fifty thousand acres on public lands federal and California officials recently signed an agreement to try to boost that significantly to treat about a million acres a year with combined thinning and controlled. Burns but critics say that's nowhere near enough to meet this moment Malcolm North is a research scientist with the US Forest Service. He says a major. To expanding controlled Burns is institutional inertia in these large risk, averse state and federal agencies like the one he works for it's not something in which incremental cautious decisions are going to solve the problem. So you need to have a cultural shift in the public's understanding about the inevitability of fire, but you also need a cultural shift within the agencies to be more supportive of the. USA Fire if historically flawed forest management is half the problem here battling most fire. The other half is the world's warming climate with hotter drier conditions igniting a century of built up fuel says Michael Warren with Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. The problem has kind of turned from this thing that we can manage to a monster and taming that monster through intentional fire war says. is vital yet costly. It's estimated that thinning and prescribed burns can cost up to two thousand dollars per acre coming up with the money to do this at scale has always been a major obstacle we need to stained federal and state financial support. If we're going to have any hope of moving the needle other barriers to doing more intentional burns, include tough environmental rules and liability. Laws and then their safety. The vast majority of these fires are done without harm to people or property, but they're not risk free. For example, a Park Service controlled burn twenty years ago near Los Alamos New Mexico got out of control when high winds picked up some four hundred homes burned the federal nuclear lab. There was threatened withering criticism and congressional hearings followed the plan was flawed. The higher ups rubber-stamped it. The burn boss was not qualified to do fire this big that Los Alamos fire became the Enron of controlled Burns a rare but spectacularly, botched event whose effect is still felt today across federal agencies despite the long bitter fights in Washington over how to manage the nation's forests they're currently several bills in the US Senate would significantly boost federal funding for intentional fires. One of them even has some bipartisan support. Eric. Westervelt NPR news.

California Eric Westervelt Kate Wilkin Wildfire Interdisciplinary Res San Jose State Malcolm North Us Forest Service Wilkin NPR Michael Warren Stanford Woods Institute For T Colorado USA Burns Los Alamos New Mexico
Crews face strong winds while battling California fires

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Crews face strong winds while battling California fires

"In northern California officials today ordered new evacuations as a wild fire continues to burn in the wine country of Napa and Sonoma County's The Glass fire has charred nearly 60,000 acres so far, and fire crews are bracing for the possibility intense winds could spread the blaze more from NPR's Eric Westervelt. Californians have been hit by record wildfires. Nearly four million acres burned so far this year. During a tour of the devastation in wine country, Governor Gavin Newsom looked over the burned ruins of an elementary school in Saint Halina, he said Disasters are becoming painfully familiar where people are exhausted, concerned anxious about their fate and their future. Not just their safety, and so clearly, we have our work cut out for us to deal with not only suppression but prevention strategies. Prevention includes plans to expand managed burns and improve forest management after a century of suppressing fires has created enormous fuel and risk worsened by a warming climate. Eric Westervelt. NPR news federal

Eric Westervelt NPR Governor Gavin Newsom Sonoma County Saint Halina Napa California
Historic Wildfires Devastate West Coast

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Historic Wildfires Devastate West Coast

"Along the West Coast, prompting new evacuation warnings, causing hazardous air quality and straining firefighting resource is across the region. The weather is now helping. But NPR's Eric Westervelt reports of some two dozen people are confirmed dead in the fires and Oregon, Washington and California. Multiple small communities around Oregon's Cascade Mountains have been devastated by fire Governor Kate Brown says dozens of Oregonians are missing in California Nearly 15,000 firefighters are struggling to contain 28 major wildfires across the state. California Governor Gavin Newsom says the blazes show the severe and wide reaching effects of climate change. We're in the midst of a climate emergency. We're in the midst of a climate crisis. We are experiencing weather conditions the likes of which we've never experienced in our lifetime public health officials across parts of the Western U. S or warning residents to stay indoors. Seattle, Portland, Oregon in San Francisco currently have the poorest air quality in the world. Eric Westervelt. NPR NEWS. Newly

Eric Westervelt Oregon California Governor Gavin Newsom Governor Kate Brown Npr News NPR Cascade Mountains West Coast San Francisco Seattle Portland Washington
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Employees and local communities. And we're gladly work on updating regulations were needed and were appropriate, but it needs to go through a proper well making process. But watchdog groups a voluntary self regulation of a N is hardly enough. And the current head of the U. S. Chemical Safety Board, Catherine Lemos hopes the Beirut debacle renews efforts to improve storage and handling of the chemical here. Recommendations her agency made years ago after the West Texas explosion. We're about preventing catastrophic explosions. This is preventable. We need to really push on it. I believe it's critical. Lemos points out that the U. S still fails to adequately restrict the storage of large amounts of ammonium nitrate near schools, hospitals and homes. Eric Westervelt NPR news Here listening to all things considered on W and Y C coming up. We look at how Indian American voters might react to Senator Kamala Harris, Joe Biden's newly picked running mate. And we look at the state of some school districts in Georgia, where some schools have shut down, and hundreds of students and staff are no quarantining because of the Corona virus. That conversation is coming up next on WX C right after news headlines. It is 79 degrees, so it feels much hotter with humidity and overcast at 7 30 This's WN. On the next Brian Lehrer show.

Catherine Lemos Senator Kamala Harris Brian Lehrer U. S. Chemical Safety Board Eric Westervelt Joe Biden Beirut West Texas NPR Georgia
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will prove to be a breakthrough we can't just have a one night and then be done to go back to where it used to be and just continue to give empty promises sure Swanson has already met with reformers to start talking through what needs to change and how and he's pledged to do that weekly he hopes other departments do something similar we need to reform modern day policing like it's never been done before do we need to have a national registry of police discipline that's a great idea do we need to have an overall advisory committee with the committee for each agency that's a great idea because if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear but George Floyd's death hasn't changed anything substantial about policing yet and whether does will depend on whether actions move beyond the familiar cycle of aspirational reforms better training screening in oversight that have too often failed to stop some cops from humiliating abusing or killing minorities Eric Westervelt NPR news the corona virus pandemic is made it hard for children to just be children's schools playdates field trips now summer camps all in the kind of time out Chelsea fare from Danbury Connecticut is ten years old and she's filling the time by using her imagination I think making a graphic novel I call double doctorate says bubble pop printers and intergalactic hero who uses water fire earth and air have fight because make evil it sounds epochal on its own but Chelsea fair also runs a charity she makes it possible for other youngsters to draw paint and create to every week Chelsea fair puts together dozens of.

Swanson George Floyd Danbury Connecticut Chelsea Eric Westervelt NPR
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sure Johnson then walks with protesters he believes that moment for flint Michigan anyway will prove to be a breakthrough we can't just have a one night and then be done to go back to where it used to be and just continue to give empty promises sure Swanson has already met with reformers to start talking through what needs to change and how and he's pledged to do that weekly he hopes other departments do something similar we need to reform modern day policing like it's never been done before do we need to have a national registry of police discipline that's a great idea do we need to have an overall advisory committee with the committee for each agency that's a great idea because if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear but George Floyd's death hasn't changed anything substantial about policing yet and whether does will depend on whether actions move beyond the familiar cycle of aspirational reforms better training screening in oversight that have too often failed to stop some cops from humiliating abusing or killing minorities Eric Westervelt NPR news the corona virus pandemic is made it hard for children to just be children's schools playdates field trips now summer camps all in the kind of time out Chelsea fare from Danbury Connecticut is ten years old and she's filling the time by using her imagination I think making a graphic novel I call double doctrine says bubble pop princes and intergalactic hero who uses water fire earth and air have fight because make evil it sounds epochal on its own but Chelsea fair also runs a charity she makes it possible for other youngsters to draw paint and create to every week Chelsea fair puts together dozens of art.

Johnson Swanson George Floyd Danbury Connecticut Chelsea Michigan Eric Westervelt NPR
Los Angeles - California governor closes Orange County beaches

Radio Specials

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Los Angeles - California governor closes Orange County beaches

"California's governor has ordered beaches in one county south of Los Angeles closed until further notice the move comes after some eighty thousand people packed Orange County B. just during a heat wave last weekend as NPR's Eric Westervelt reports governor Gavin Newsom called the images disturbing he's ordered state and local beaches in Orange County closed arguing that large groups frolicking in the sun and surf could set back progress in halting the spread of the corona virus people that are congregating there that weren't practicing physical distancing that may go back to their community outside of Orange County and may not even know that they they contracted the disease and and now they put other people arrest but a hospital system at risk several Orange County elected officials and the Newport beach police chief have strongly pushed back calling the closures are necessary and an affront to local control many California beaches are open but with restrictions allowing walking jogging or swimming but not

California Los Angeles NPR Eric Westervelt Gavin Newsom Orange County Newport Beach
West Coast Governors Announce "Pact" For Reopening Economies

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

West Coast Governors Announce "Pact" For Reopening Economies

"Are forming a western states packed they'll coordinate plans to reopen their states economies amid the corona virus pandemic and peers Eric Westervelt says this is similar to a packed formed by seven eastern states the west coast frameworks as any successful lifting of interventions has to include a system for corona virus testing tracking and isolating each west coast state will have its own state specific plan but the broad framework calls for close cooperation and a pledge to put science and health outcomes not politics at the forefront of any decision the states also called for concerted efforts to prevent outbreaks in nursing homes and to help mitigate in direct health impacts of the pandemic on poor communities governor Newsom says he'll outline specifics of what he called California based thinking on an economic re opening you some says any such effort will be guided by facts evidence and science Eric Westervelt NPR news Berkeley California on

Eric Westervelt California Governor Newsom Berkeley California
West Coast states are readying to reopen economies, together

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 2 years ago

West Coast states are readying to reopen economies, together

"Governors on the west coast say they will work together to coordinate on any plans to eventually re open their states economies amid the corona virus outbreak California governor Gavin Newsom in the governor's of Washington and Oregon are calling their joint approach eight western states packed the move follows a similar initiative announced by six east coast states here's NPR's Eric Westervelt the west coast frameworks as any successful lifting of interventions has to include a system for corona virus testing tracking and isolating each west coast state will have its own state specific plan but the broad framework calls for close cooperation and a pledge to put science and health outcomes not politics at the forefront of any decision the states also called for concerted efforts to prevent outbreaks in nursing homes and to help mitigate in direct health impacts of the pandemic on poor communities governor Newsom says he'll outline specifics of what he called California based thinking on an economic re opening tomorrow you some says any such effort will be guided by facts evidence and

Gavin Newsom Washington NPR Eric Westervelt California Oregon Governor Newsom
Protective gear shortage forcing doctors, nurses to improvise

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Protective gear shortage forcing doctors, nurses to improvise

"King doctors and nurses fighting the corona virus say they are desperately short on protective gear things like masks so these makeshift donation networks have sprung up here's NPR's Eric Westervelt the urgent pleas for more N. ninety five respirator masks and other gear still pouring in especially from the hardest hit states including New York and California Maria lluvia a clinical nurse at UC Irvine Medical Center says the hospital's mass supply is now under lock and key she and her colleagues are being told to severely limit the use of mass and if they're not soiled to reuse them it makes us feel very unsafe our health is being put in jeopardy the health of our patients are being put in jeopardy our family's health being put in jeopardy a Medical Center spokesman says the policy is in place to conserve their supply of personal protective equipment or PP and in Oakland California a nurse who fears for her job and didn't want her name used told me there just aren't enough masks and there doesn't seem to be any plan she's being told to put her protective gear into a brown paper bag it shifts and and reuse it given this crisis scores of citizen led groups are popping up to collect donated supplies there's get us PP dot org and donate PP dot org and a group of volunteers called masked crusaders they're asking contractors nail salon owners museums anyone to search their closets and storage bins for mass Brooklyn based sculptor Tom Beal wanted to donate fifty surgical masks and some and ninety fives in New York City where some hospitals are close to being overwhelmed he got in touch with masked crusaders soon a nurse at a local hospital called she told him her unit was down to their last mask I brought them to withhold hospital and a midwife came down she was thrilled to receive them the next day an artist friend gave bill four and ninety five just for he went back to the masked crusader site and a New York nurse quickly claim them for her hospital I mean it was palpable you know she drove to me to pick up for math so that'll be something that what they're dealing with but the scale of supplies that may be needed in coming months is enormous in California governor Gavin Newsom says his state is radically ramping up procurement of safety gear from across the country and the globe one billion gloves to procure five hundred million N. ninety five masks some two hundred million shields you get the picture Newsome says now is the time for governors to work closely noting that states are now competing with each other for the same limited medical supplies which could disadvantage smaller states with smaller budgets Chabad Simon Alexander a community organizer New York helped launch masked crusaders she says the volunteer response to this makeshift effort and many others like it is heartening but she says it also underscores fundamental failures of federal and state government policy planning and priorities I'm super inspired by the way that people are stepping up to help each other and I love to see like the beauty and humanity but in reality checks on us we can't neutral ate our way out of systemic failure and it's not sustainable it's just a stop gap Simon Alexander hopes that as these ad hoc efforts grow that maybe the definition of those who need mass also grows there are tons of people doing the work of keeping our city and our society afloat right now so that we can be safe banker janitors garbage pick up and all of the in the grocery store clerks maybe it's not just doctors and nurses she says those other frontline workers may need more protective gear as well Eric Westervelt NPR

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is next live from NPR news in Washington I'm korva Coleman trading on Wall Street was halted for fifteen minutes last hour almost immediately after the opening bell it has since resumed the Dow lost nearly nineteen hundred points or more than seven percent of the open the other major indices were also down more than seven percent investors are worried about the corona virus and an oil price war suddenly started by Saudi Arabia California governor Gavin Newsom is offering reassurances as the grand princess cruise ship prepares to dock twenty one people aboard have the corona virus appears Eric Westervelt says all passengers will be quarantined once the ship docked U. S. passengers will be sent for testing to at least four quarantine centers on military bases in California Texas and Georgia special charter planes are being organized for hundreds of foreign passengers the massive cruise ship is carrying more than thirty five hundred people from fifty four countries including Debbie Loftis from Germantown Wisconsin she's in the grand princess with her parents we're just very anxious to get back home and get on with our lives we've already been gone for sixteen days we've been on the ship and we're ready to get back on to solid ground passengers requiring acute medical care will come off first in a process that could take up to three days Eric Westervelt NPR news Oakland women in Mexico are planning to stay home today not to go to work school or shop and fears Carrie Kahn reports it's all part of a nationwide strike called to bring attention to the role women play in Mexican society and the high levels of violence they face activists are calling it a day without women and by some estimates millions are expected to take part in the unprecedented protest the call for the strike comes just one day after tens of thousands of women marched in the streets of cities throughout Mexico protesting what they say is an epidemic.

Mexico Oakland Georgia Texas California Coleman NPR Carrie Kahn Washington Wisconsin Debbie Loftis Eric Westervelt Gavin Newsom Saudi Arabia
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My name is Eric Westervelt reporting on the latest mobile California thanks Eric you bet it six states will hold democratic primary contest tomorrow including Missouri where Joe Biden was this weekend he's trying to stay the front runner what followed by the backbone the backbone of the Democratic Party hello that would defeat Donald Trump restore this sold this nation NPR White House correspondent Franco or don't yes was traveling with the Biden campaign here he is in Kansas city Saturday representative Emanuel cleaver was reminiscing about a turning point in Biden's campaign them the guy shows up by the name of client he's talking about Jim climbed through initial South Carolina congressman whose endorsement set in motion by means eleven state hall of primary victory as a service to them and find him and let him go and the people of South Carolina did the online doing and now Joe is on the go by then stops in Saint Louis and Kansas city where African Americans make up a major voting blocs reflect the importance black voters playing his campaign but Missouri is not South Carolina where black voters made up a majority of the electorate the Midwest state has many different types of democratic voters world white moderates college educated suburbanites and other rural voters who like Bernie Sanders won a revolution to rip things up to start all over again the former vice president is popular with older voters and black voters younger Hispanic voters often prefer the Vermont senator well I actually like Bernese ideas obviously he's very popular among my generation among millennials that's Anthony Jones who attended by then St Louis rally policy wise Jones says he and Sanders see eye to eye Jones says he's ready for a revolution he's just not sure the rest of the country at the end of the day as a Democrat I just want to win I want to get back to normal I wanna get back to where the president's uniting the country not destroying the country not tearing the country apart.

Bernie Sanders St Louis Vermont Saint Louis representative White House correspondent NPR Democratic Party Anthony Jones senator vice president Eric Westervelt South Carolina congressman Jim Emanuel cleaver Kansas city Franco Donald Trump
California Wine Makers Examine Climate's Effect On Their Industry

Environment: NPR

04:40 min | 2 years ago

California Wine Makers Examine Climate's Effect On Their Industry

"California produces ninety percent of all the wine made in America but historic wildfires devastating droughts and other extreme weather have many in the business struggling alling with how to adapt to a changing climate as. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports a growing number of vineyard owners in the country's best known wine region. A calling for less talk and some more action on the beautiful heat lamp terraces and elegant tasting rooms of Napa Sonoma. The cabin as these days are often paired with talk of extreme weather and warming earth. It's a romantic and mealey's believes that the wine industry is something that has long term at Annapolis Lark. Mead vineyards head winemaker. Dan Petrosky shows me around the test plots lots. He's preparing three and a half acres of experimental grape varieties from the southern hemisphere and the southern Mediterranean. This research vineyard is focusing on the grape varieties. Heidi's that we believe will be important to Napa Valley or even to the future of California wine as we're thinking about how the climate is changing here. Over the course of the next couple of decades the idea is to find out which groups do better in drought conditions or in an era of colder cold snaps and warmer heatwaves Lark made was founded in eighteen eighteen. Ninety five and Petrosky is not looking to replace its famed Cabernet. But he'll test for resilience and flavor tryouts. You might call it for which grapes will become supporting according actors in the finished wines of near future warmer Napa the test plots he says or part of a broader long term strategy to try to mitigate climate change how we think about irrigation or non-irritating. How we think about keeping the temperature down not only the fruit zone but on the canopies with installing misting systems and shade cloth? So we're we're GONNA be using this as an opportunity to test not only new technologies but also the test the finished product in the absence of federal leadership on climate change a growing number wineries in Napa and Sonoma lark meter trying to reduce their carbon footprints organic farming solar panels composting instead of burning discarded vines and and most wineries in this region are now certified sustainable in the management of their energy water and soil. But I'm not sure that's enough we're dealing with which with a larger global issue of planet civility to curb carbon in neighboring? sonoma's sisters Katie and Julia Jackson Jackson aren't sure it's enough either and we need to stop talking about the problem. We need to actually start implementing and scaling the solutions. Now Julia and Katya part owners was one of the world's biggest wine producers Jackson family wines. They help run. Forty two wineries around the world from California to South Africa. Jackson recently teamed up with with another global wind giant Spain's Torres family wines to create international wineries for climate action sitting at a picnic table overlooking the vines at their La Crema. Emma winery Haiti Jackson says the new groups goal is nothing short of radically decarbonising. The world's wine industry that's an organization that's asking members to to reduce their carbon footprints fifty percent by twenty thirty and by eighty percent by twenty forty five we need concrete significant action immediately and also also for the mid- and long-term to join wineries pledged to meet those ambitious goals and show they currently get at least twenty percent of their energy from onsite. Renewables is like solar and wind and they have to agree to conduct a thorough carbon emissions inventory audited by a third party every year looking at all aspects of production. In through delivery Jackson wine has been measuring its carbon footprint for eleven years. One of several changes they made after an energy audit. They switched to lighter glass bottles cutting their emissions footprint three percent and saving on shipping and production costs are cute so far the new global wind climate group only has six six members change. Come slow in wineland tradition. Not Transformation is often the ethos. It's an industry driven by personality and passion individuals individuals who are fierce competitors sometimes averse to working together. Katie Jackson says that mindset has to evolve. We believe that our intelligence together is quainton be more powerful and more impactful than anyone. Winery trying to figure this out and go alone. There's another challenge. Many small wineries can't afford to invest in climate resilience such as an annual emissions inventory. They're struggling to get the harvest in survive. And maybe spending any extra cash on new generators to adapt to the new normal mull of rolling power blackouts due to the heightened risk of catastrophic wildfires driven in part by climate change. Eric Westervelt N._p._R.. News in California's Napa Valley.

California Dan Petrosky Julia Jackson Jackson Napa Valley Katie Jackson Napa Sonoma Eric Westervelt Annapolis Lark Jackson Napa Haiti Jackson Sonoma NPR America Mead Vineyards Mealey Wineland
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the people who are already in that system but not to the general public it's not clear how many women are traveling out of state for third trimester abortions around one percent of abortions nationally correct twenty one weeks or later in New York that would translate to more than one thousand women Fred mogul W. NYC news a year after flames broke out to paradise California is still trying to come back from a devastating wildfire that killed eighty five just three thousand people and return to a town that was once home to twenty seven thousand many are commuting to school from other cities and towns and that includes almost all of the paradise high school football team the bobcats the team is undefeated and as NPR's Eric Westervelt reports the bobcats have given the fire scarred town a much needed shot of hope paradise is pledging to return to normal but with normal still years away the talents gladly embraced the bobcat extraordinary season at practice defensive players face off in the tackle competition burnt tree stumps dot the edge of the football field at stake in this drill pride and push ups after the fire the team vowed to make a championship run and they delivered the bobcats are ten or no and likely heading to the playoffs they've done behind a juggernaut running game they average more than four hundred rushing yards a game that ranks them third in the state and ninth nationally senior running back Lucas Hartley has almost twelve hundred yards six foot two sophomore Tyler Harrison leads the team with an astonishing well let him tell you one thousand eight hundred thirty seven one thousand hunters in Europe yeah are you buying the alignments for burgers yeah at the end of season Bynum everything anything they want be careful I got that I know the team season this run almost didn't happen all of us were out of our homes we weren't sure we're gonna have school we weren't sure what I was going to have a job there's just so many questions head coach Rick friends in this twenty first season here says just twenty two students showed up for summer training in a donated warehouse in nearby Chico they were all distressed displaced coach brings gather them in a patch of gravel behind that warehouse we didn't even have a football so we said I think Danny our quarterback has one so he won got out of his trunk and started running plays with the kids and had no idea where we're going from there but we were also kinda distraught and kind of still in shock and just wanted to move forward and do something for the kids maybe you'd be easy now to write that feel good screen play football saves town details at eleven.

New York California bobcats NPR Eric Westervelt Lucas Hartley Tyler Harrison Bynum Rick friends Chico football Fred mogul W. NYC paradise high school Europe Danny twelve hundred yards twenty one weeks one percent six foot
2 children among 3 killed in California festival shooting

The Takeaway

00:59 sec | 3 years ago

2 children among 3 killed in California festival shooting

"Police in Gilroy California have identified the gunman in last night's deadly shooting at a food festival is nineteen year old Centeno William Lee can four people including the gunman were killed and more than a dozen others were wounded and peers Eric Westervelt reports police are still looking for a possible second suspect Gilroy police say they believe sand Tino llegan cut through a fence near a creek to get around tight security at the annual garlic festival he then opened fire police say with a semi automatic assault type rifle purchased legally in Nevada earlier this month chief Scott Smith he says three of his officers likely save lives by engaging the gunmen in less than a minute despite the fact that they were out gunned with their handles against a rifle those three officers were able to fatally wound that suspect and at the event and it very quickly the chief says there's no word yet on motive and they're still investigating a possible second suspect the victims include a six year old boy a thirteen year old girl and a man in his

Gilroy California William Lee Eric Westervelt Nevada Scott Smith Gilroy Assault Nineteen Year Thirteen Year Six Year
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ready Eric Westervelt NPR news ridgecrest cal and you're listening to NPR news some Amazon workers in Minnesota planned to stage a six hour work stoppage next week on Monday during the retailer's biggest sales event called prime day and here's a Lena sell your reports that the workers want the company to ease productivity quotas and stop relying on temps about a hundred Amazon warehouse workers in shock at the near Minneapolis are expected to stage a walkout on Monday it'll take place for six hours during Amazon's key sale event called prime day the workers want Amazon to ease the speed requirements for how fast they have to pick sort of pack items that go into Amazon orders the also won the company to stop constantly using temp workers a few corporate employees planned to fly in from Seattle to support the shock of the walk out a note Amazon as one of NPR sponsors in a statement the company called the allegations baseless and touted its benefits and pay of more than sixteen dollars an hour the retailer also said it already converts a lot of times into full time workers Lena so you NPR news executives from Amazon also apple Facebook and Google expected on Capitol Hill next week there to testify before a house Judiciary Committee panel that's pursuing an anti trust investigation of the tax market dominance house homeland security committee holding a hearing today on facial recognition technology that hearing what top homeland security department officials follows a Washington post report showing that at least three states of scanned a driver's license photos for immigration authorities without driver's knowledge or consent the post reported on public documents obtained by the.

Minnesota Minneapolis Amazon Seattle Lena Facebook Google Eric Westervelt NPR apple Judiciary Committee Washington sixteen dollars six hours six hour
Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:59 min | 3 years ago

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

"Here's a startling figure. Almost one in four American adults has a criminal record. That's according to federal statistics people charged with or convicted of even minor offenses can face consequences long after they have paid their debts to society, a criminal record can be a barrier to finding a job a home or getting alone in the past two years, though, many states and cities have been passing or expanding laws to help restore rights. And peers Eric westervelt has been looking into this and joins us now hair. Our Rachel can you just remind us of what the extent of the barriers are your lawyers who work in the series. They look you can't underestimate, you know. How much conviction even for a misdemeanor and the vast majority of convictions in America are for misdemeanors can have this ripple effect and relegate someone with a record to kind of permanent second class status as they try to get their life back in order. I mean, take the case of Jay Jordan, Jay served seven years in prison for felony robbery when he was young. He's been out for nearly eight years he completed his probation. He has no offense is not even a traffic ticket. And he told me he still faces almost daily hurdles as he tries to get his life back to normal. You know, I'll try to adopt right with turned down. Tried to volunteer at school with turn down tried to sell insurance with turn down trying to sell us cars with down. So, you know, every single step of the way when I try to better myself, and you know, be able to take care of myself, and my family there, these massive barriers, right? And I'm not alone. He now works for a nonprofit Rachel that advocates for the rights of the formerly incarcerated and really the question. His group is asking is how long should these? Convictions. Be on somebody's record, especially when people have done their time and wanna move on and become good citizens. So there are a lot of states that are trying to change this rate. I mean, my understanding more than twenty states have passed some kind of laws or made changes to lower these barriers. Why is it happening? Now, I think two things Rachel driving. This more people on the right and left agree that mass incarceration and the drug wars just clog the courts and prisons, you know, in his hurt society and the economy one study shows that unemployment among formerly incarcerated is twenty seven percent and even higher for African Americans over thirty percent. Number two. I think the legalization of marijuana is a key driver here. Again, there's this bipartisan sense that it doesn't make sense that people are still paying a big price for something. That's now either legal or decriminalized in many states, and one of the most progressive laws that was passed is in Indiana solidly Republican state Barbara brochures, reporter with our member station W F. Are you in Bloomington? She's part of NPR's criminal Justice collaborative new reporting partnership with some of our member stations, and Barbara looked into how Indianapolis is helping people who want a second chance a stick. Listen to her story. When Indianapolis residents with a criminal record one to turn their lives around many of them end up in the sub basement of the downtown city county, building the long, gray ward or has concrete walls and almost resembles a jail, but people come to this underground room to escape their criminal pass through one of the only open doors is a large quiet room, bold, black letters on the back wall, say don't look back. You're not going that way, a young volunteers helping a man fill out some paperwork, if you don't mind signing right there right there in today or splintering. This is the neighborhood Christian legal clinics. Expunge -ment help desk, they help people file petitions to expunge their records under Indiana's second chance law which legislators passed a few years ago while it's called expunge -ment. It doesn't actually erase arrests or charges. It just hides. Them from public view. So they won't pop up during a background check. That's what kept happening to LaTasha post in before she came here for help. Sometime we get stuck on our past and let our past guide us. She's forty four now, but ran into trouble shortly after she had her first daughter as a team, she racked up a lot of arrests over the next two decades for everything from public intoxication to receiving stolen property, but long after she changed post and says the charges dog term by was asset move from a low income apartment because every year, they do your recertification, and I had like three theft charges and receiving stolen property, which in low income. You can't have that post and says getting her records expunged helped her land a much better job in a hospital after working in home health care for nearly twenty years. She is among thousands of people filing petitions under the second chance law. The process appears pretty simple, you file a petition with the court in for more minor offenses, it must grant the request to seal the record if it meets requirements laid out in the law. A judge has discretion with more serious felonies and victims can give input the prosecutor's office reviews petitions in can object to ceiling records, it helps that Marion county prosecutor Terry curry advocated for the expunge -ment law. If our goal is to have individuals, not re-offend than an Armindo. It's appropriate to limit or remove obstacles that are going to inhibit their ability to become productive members of our community. The process is time consuming and costly there filing fees for every petition. And there are still plenty of people who don't even know expunge -ment is an option. That's why post and tries to tell everyone. She knows about the help desk. Ask it took her a couple of trips down here and forty seven days of waiting before the state sealed her records if select something was lifted off because now I feel like. Conflict like a human. Interesting to hear what a difference. These so-called second chance laws can make in people's lives. If there is as you say, Eric a lot of bipartisan support for these kinds of changes. Why isn't it everywhere? Well, spoke with an attorney who's worked on this issue for nearly thirty years Margaret love, she heads, the collateral consequences resource center, and she put it state legislatures are all reinventing the wheel here and not talking to each other. They're not sort of sharing best practices or studying what programs have the best outcome and defender offices that help people clear their records. They're often, you know, overworked understaffed and underfunded NPR's Eric westervelt. We also heard a report from Barbara brochure of W F you in Bloomington. She's with NPR's criminal Justice reporting collaborative

Eric Westervelt NPR Rachel Indianapolis Indiana Barbara Bloomington Jay Jordan America Prosecutor Marijuana Robbery Public Intoxication Armindo Attorney Margaret Reporter
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

"Records it felt like something was lifted off because now I feel like. Com felt like a human. Interesting to hear what a difference. These so-called second chance laws can make in people's lives. If there is as you say, Eric a lot of bipartisan support for these kinds of changes. Why isn't it everywhere? Well, spoke with an attorney who's working on this issue for nearly thirty years. Margaret love she heads, the collateral consequences resource center, and as she put a state legislatures are all reinventing the wheel here and not talking to each other. They're not sort of sharing best practices or studying what programs have the best outcome and defender offices that help people clear their records. They're often overworked understaffed and underfunded NPR's Eric westervelt. We also heard a report from Barbara brochure of W F you in Bloomington. She's with NPR's criminal Justice reporting collaborative Eric thanks so much for reading this to us. You're welcome. This is NPR news. And this is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition, the inquiry into potentially election fraud in one US house race continued Monday in North Carolina with a witness testifying that she was paid to collect absentee ballots. Matt. Matched one investigators said which was that. There was a system in place. One hundred twenty five dollars per fifty absentee ballots collected more on the alleged scheme. Mas- coming up on morning edition here on KCRW in the face.

Eric westervelt NPR KCRW fraud Mas Margaret attorney Bloomington North Carolina Barbara Matt One hundred twenty five dollar thirty years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection today PG, and he says that's the only way it can handle billions of dollars in potential liabilities from back to back years of wildfires. California officials are still investigating PG and his role in the note in November's campfire that was one of the most destructive wildfires in state history. It killed eighty six people and incinerated communities in and around the northern California town of paradise from paradise NPR's. Eric westervelt reports PG argues, it has no choice, but to file for chapter eleven give him a flood of lawsuits and their stock. Reduced to junk status. In a statement today. The utility said bankruptcy will facilitate an orderly fair and expeditious resolution of the liabilities. They continue to arise from recent wildfires. UC Berkeley law. Professor Ken is an expert on corporate. Bankruptcy chapter. Eleven is really the best way to deal comprehensively with all the liabilities. They have a ad says a key impetus for the filing in California utilities can be held liable for wildfire damage is if the company sparked the blaze, regardless of whether they were negligent PG got a rare bit of good news last week when the state's fire agency said in a report that it doesn't think the company's equipment started a massive 2017 blaze in wine country known as the tubs fire which killed twenty two people. But that report isn't the final word and the company still faces scores of lawsuits from two thousand seventeen and twenty eighteen including the historic campfire. Yeah. It says the utility has to show Wall Street investors, it's working to put a cap on potential fire damages. It's going to continue to hang over their heads until they address it. So I think I think chapter eleven makes a lotta sense here, but to many fire victims and their many lawyers. It doesn't make sense when PG says oh safety is our most important priority. No, it's not their only. Priority is prophets. Attorney Mike Danko represents a large group of wildfire victims suing PG. He he sees bankruptcy as a PG ploy to get around paying for what he calls the company's long history of negligence and safety violations. A history of the Danko believes shows PGN is too big and too poorly managed to survive bankruptcy. As is why do we have a four profit company running utility? You have to ask whether that model even works and goes clients are asking whether they'll get the compensation they're seeking at the end of a complex process that could take up to two years law. Professor says given the pecking order of chapter eleven survivors have reason to worry. The bankruptcy process says everyone gets paid fairly in accordance with their priority. But if you're an unsecured creditor like a fire damaged victim. It may mean that what comes out of the bankruptcy process may not be one hundred cents on the dollar in terms of full recovery. State Senator Bill Dodd whose district includes many 2017 wildfire victims says that new on certainty. Revictimizes survivors. Fogged.

PG Mike Danko California Professor Senator Bill Dodd Eric westervelt NPR Ken Attorney two years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KCRW

"Gas and electric one of the nation's largest utilities filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection today PG, and he says that's the only way it can handle billions of dollars in potential liabilities from back to back years of wildfires. California officials are still investigating PG and his role in the know in November's campfire that was one of the most destructive wildfires in state history. It killed eighty six people and incinerated communities in and around the northern California town of paradise from paradise NPR's. Eric westervelt reports PG argues, it has no choice, but to file for chapter eleven give him a flood of lawsuits in their stock. Reduced to junk status in a statement today. The utility said bankruptcy will facilitate an orderly fair and expeditious resolution of the liabilities. They continue to arise from recent wildfires. UC Berkeley law. Professor Ken is an expert on corporate. Bankruptcy chapter. Eleven is really the best way to deal. Comprehensively with all the liabilities. They have a ad says a key impetus for the filing in California utilities can be held liable for wildfire damage is if the company sparked the blaze, regardless of whether they were negligent PG need got a rare bit of good news last week when the state's fire agency said in a report that it doesn't think the company's equipment started a massive 2017 blaze in wine country known as the tubs fire which killed twenty two people. But that report isn't the final word and the company still faces scores of lawsuits from twenty seventeen and twenty eight teen including the historic campfire. Yeah. It says the utility has to show Wall Street investors, it's working to put a cap on potential fire damages. It's going to continue to hang over their heads until they address it. So I think I think chapter eleven makes a lotta sense here, but to many fire victims and their many lawyers. It doesn't make sense when pe- Jeannie says oh safety is our most important priority. No, it's not their only. Priority is prophets. Attorney Mike Danko represents. Large group of wildfire victim suing PG, and he he sees bankruptcy. As a PG ploy to get around paying for what he calls, the company's long history of negligence and safety violations. A history of the Danko believes shows PGN is too big and too poorly managed to survive bankruptcy. As is why do we have a four profit company running utility? You have to ask whether that model even works and Dako clients are asking whether they'll get the compensation they're seeking at the end of a complex process that could take up to two years law. Professor out says, given the pecking order of chapter eleven survivors have reason to worry. The bankruptcy process says everyone gets paid fairly in accordance with their priority. But if you're an unsecured creditor light a fire damaged victim. It may mean that what comes out of the bankruptcy process may not be one hundred cents on the dollar in terms of full recovery. State Senator Bill Dodd whose district includes many twenty. Wildfire victim says that new on certainty revictimizes survivors, would.

PG California Mike Danko Professor Senator Bill Dodd Eric westervelt NPR Ken Jeannie Dako Attorney two years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:40 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Will protect the American people from all types of missile attacks from says, the US must be capable of detecting, and destroying any missile launched against it clause three Chicago police officers charged with lying about the killing of LA Kwan McDonald found not guilty and more developments at Michigan State University in the fall out of the lot Larry Nassar controversy after news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. The back and forth continues between President Trump and house. Speaker Nancy Pelosi yesterday Pelosi requested the president postponed his state of the union address as the government remains in partial shutdown citing security concerns today, the White House pulled the plug at the last minute on a trip lotion. Other high ranking lawmakers were about to take off ghanistan in Brussels more from NPR's Susan Davis lawmakers and aides were literally getting on the bus the military and the State Department are the support staff for these trips. Lawmakers were boarding a US air force bus. They were on their way to the airport when the White House released a letter, essentially pulling the plug on the trip and characterized it as a public relations. Visit they essentially canceled the trip the bus turned around it pulled back up to the capital. And they got off the bus spokesperson for Pelosi says, the trip was to express appreciation to US troops, and reaffirmed. The us commitment to NATO President Trump offered his conduct. Balances to the families of the four Americans killed by an ISIS suicide attack this week in Syria of the president did not mention the future of overall US policy there, here's NPR's. Tom Bowman the president made the remarks at the Pentagon before he outlined an increased emphasis on missile defense. I want to take a moment to express my deepest condolences to the families of the brave American heroes who laid down their lives yesterday in selfless service to our nation. These are great people the president immediately pivoted to what he called the security crisis at the Mexican border. Meanwhile, US-backed rebels in Syria vowed to go after ISIS sleeper cells with the help of American airstrikes. US officials say ISIS fighters are slipping back into cleared areas. Tom Bowman NPR news Washington. California's historic move to eliminate cash bail in its court system is now on hold as NPR's. Eric westervelt explains a referendum to overturn the state's abolition of cash bail has. Gathered enough signatures to go on the twenty twenty general election. Ballot. The twenty twenty referendum seeks to overturn a new law, which doesn't take effect until this fall that would eliminate money bail as a condition of pretrial release. Instead judges would have far greater discretion with help of a risk assessment. Computer tool to decide if a defendant is a risk to public safety or is likely to miss a court date supporters of that new loss. Eight eliminates the inherent unfairness of money bail. The ballot effort is spearheaded by the bail industry, which faces extinction in the state under the new law, but the ACLU and other progressive groups also say the bail law is flawed. Critics say it gives too much discretion to judges and relies on an algorithm that's biased against minorities and the poor. Eric westervelt, NPR news, San Francisco stocks ended the session high after some volatility related to published reports the US might be considering rationing back tariffs against China. The Dow closed up one hundred sixty two points, the NASDAQ was up forty nine points. This is. NPR and you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio is celebrating the thirty four thousand units of affordable housing his administration financed or preserved last year. But some advocates including the coalition for the homeless say the mayor's office hasn't done enough, Gotha. Missed digital editor Elizabeth Kim. They basically said that the mayor is crowing about financing this amount of units. But in fact, he's really has an address the ever rising record of homelessness since taking office. The de Blasio administration says it's created nearly twenty thousand affordable housing units for those making below thirty percent of the area. Median income more than sixty thousand New Yorkers live on the streets or in the shelter system. In New Jersey. The legislature has taken the first step towards closing a loophole that allows some political donors to remain anonymous. But as WNYC. Karen rouse reports. Some advocacy groups fear the measure will have a negative impact on their finances. The measure calls for so called dark money groups to reveal the means of backers who give more than ten thousand dollars to influence a campaign a mall Simha is executive director of the ACLU of New Jersey. He says donors may fear. A public backlash if people know they give money to groups that take a stand on divisive political issues. People have the right to free speech and association and the right to donate to organizations that they wished to support and they have the right to do so anonymously. Governor Murphy and Senate president Steve Sweeney have both voiced support for legislation requiring dark money groups to disclose their donors and now for a correction this week WNYC reported that the last span of the tappan Zee bridge have been demolished in a controlled demolition on Tuesday. That was incorrect. It was only the east anchor span of the bridge. That was brought down the west Anchorage. Will be dismantled piece by piece later this year. Tonight snow is likely mainly after ten o'clock, otherwise cloudy, low around twenty nine degrees..

US NPR president WNYC President Trump Nancy Pelosi Eric westervelt Tom Bowman White House Washington ACLU New Jersey Syria Jack Speer State Department Brussels tappan Zee bridge Chicago
"eric westervelt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Eric westervelt reports PG and he's problems have mushroomed since November's fire destroyed the northern California town of paradise and killed eighty six people in the states most destructive wildfire. The company faces a flood of lawsuits from fire victims alleging that faulty maintenance of its aging electric system is to blame. It's insurance companies are suing the utility PG niece stock has been battered and ratings agencies have. Slashed it to junk status by the company's own estimates potential liabilities from combined twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen wildfires could reach thirty billion dollars that's far more than its current assets. And that doesn't account for potential future wildfire liabilities in a state that has seen historic fire damage in back to back years PG and E board chairman Richard Kelly said in a statement that chapter eleven represents the only viable option to address the company's responsibilities to its stakeholders the state legislature could take action in coming weeks to protect the company from two thousand eighteen fire liabilities, but given the raw anger at the utility that may be politically impossible. I certainly don't want to see a bail out for the fires of twenty eighteen state Senator Jerry hill, a democrat heads, a key utility safety committee. He says he'll work to see that any reorganization protects ratepayers and fire victims. I he'll says if today's announcement is a company tactic to pressure the legislature for a bailout, it won't work PG ni share. Holders and bondholders day invested. And sometimes we make that investments. And then I think that we should not be helping or assisting them north giving golden parachutes to CEO's as well. This would be the company's second bankruptcy in two decades. The utilities two thousand and one reorganization led to a negotiated rate increase back, then the company painted itself as a victim of deregulation. But since then the company has been convicted of felonies in a deadly gas line explosion. And now faces those potentially crippling wildfire liabilities and safety lawsuits. So many spat with the group the utility reform network says this time is very different. The company's problems are from what she calls PG. He's practice of putting profits ahead of safety. But that's that PGN is talking about is death that rises directly from its own, negligence, and liability. It is a longstanding principle of utility law. That customers don't pay for that kind of thing. Sunday night p genie announced that it CEO. Oh, Gisha Williams was stepping down after barely two years on the job. The company says safety improvement is a top priority, but many customers.

PG Richard Kelly Senator Jerry hill CEO Eric westervelt California Gisha Williams chairman thirty billion dollars two decades two years
"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio coming up tonight at six thirty tonight at ten o'clock on forum. Casey Gerald's first book is a memoir coming of age story that explores race class religion, sexuality and masculinity. Gerald was on the show this morning to talk about his book. There will be no miracles here. And the myth of the American dream. It'll be on again tonight at ten o'clock here on this is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary, Louise, Kelley and Audie Cornish. California's largest utility could be on the hook for billions of dollars in liability damages from deadly wildfires these last two years. The fires left more than one hundred and thirty people dead wiped out thousands of homes and businesses and destroyed much of the town of paradise Pacific Gas and electric already faces ongoing sanctions following felony convictions for deadly errors and safety violations in its gas division. NPR has learned that utilities parent company has plans to sell off its gas division this spring and use the proceeds to set up a settlement fund for wildfire victims NPR's, Eric westervelt, broke this story, and Eric to start the seems like the company's internal plan to survive. Right. Tell us more about this gas proposal high. Yeah. It is what a company source calls. The company's only major to survive executives have dubbed this gas sale plan and internal strategy project. Falcon and the company sources, including a senior officials involved in the project and planning and backed up by internal documents as well as a former employee showed that the plan has been in the works Audie for more than a year since after the 2017 wine country fires, but. Planning was restarted. Again, intensively were told after November's a deadly campfire under the current plan. He proceeds from the sale would go into a kind of escrow account a settlement fund to pay down billions of dollars in potential claims for these wildfires. Both the two thousand seventeen fires in the campfire which killed at least eighty six people did billions in damage and destroyed most of the town of paradise, but PG any has not been found liable for starting the campfire, right? The investigation is ongoing. What have you learned a strict no cost pinpointed yet? The state is investigating. Cal fire is investigating PGN is fully cooperating. The company did report damage to two transmission lines one just before the fire was reported and another malfunction a half hour later in a nearby area. That's seen as a second possible ignition source and just today. It was announced that several major insurance companies Audie have sued PG blaming the company for the campfire that comes on top. Of at least ten major lawsuits representing hundreds of victims that allege PG and failed to properly maintain inspect and upgrade all of its equipment. One estimate from Citi group said the company could be liable for up to fifteen billion and fire damages from the last two years and the company hopes to get we are told from the sources between ten and fifteen billion for its gas asset. What's the company reaction? We'll spokesman declined to make any executives available to comment on project. Falcon and a statement Andy Castano la- said, quote, PGE doesn't comment on market rumors or speculations. But he added the company is reviewing its structural options to best position accompanied meet customer and operational needs and improve safety and the company today also said it would be searching for new directors for the boards of both its parent company and the utility, and we know this isn't some market rumor as the inside the company source told us, quote, the only play they see now is sever and sell the utility is. Under no legal obligation, though. To talk about its plans to stave off possible. Bankruptcy. At the same time. Does it seem like black of transparency is part of the problem? Well, public watchdog groups are talked with say, it's a big problem. I mean, they want more openness and they want a bigger more substantive focus on safety, not just talk. Remember, this company is already a felon on probation for convictions rated related to this gas explosion as you mentioned in two thousand ten that killed eight people. Here's Michael war on Energie scholar at Stanford. He calls the company's lack of openness extremely disappointing. Especially in the current context where there's a lack of trust and show, many people that have been harmed by PG knees infrastructure, they need to be thinking very hard about how to create safety for Californian rather than how to make money for shareholders. And Audie some lawmakers, and the incoming governor Gavin Newsom are likely very likely to have big questions about any potential gas as they look at the future of PG. That's NPR's. Eric westervelt. Thanks for your reporting Saudi since her two thousand six debut, the Los Angeles based singer composer and multi instrumentalist, Georgia and multo has released seventeen albums. Also, a stack of mix tapes. She's collaborated with mad lib Erykah Badu and blood orange among others. Still mull drove remains mostly unknown outside L A's, thriving progressive music underground reviewer Tom moon, says that she change as word spreads about her latest.

PG Audie Cornish Eric westervelt NPR Casey Gerald Pacific Gas Erykah Badu California Citi group Tom moon Los Angeles Andy Castano la Gavin Newsom PGE Louise Stanford multo
"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"eric westervelt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise, Kelley Audie Cornish. California's largest utility could be on the hook for billions of dollars in liability damages from deadly wildfires. These last two years the fires left more than one hundred and thirty people dead wiped out thousands of homes and businesses and destroyed much of the town of paradise Pacific Gas and electric already faces ongoing sanctions following felony convictions for deadly errors and safety violations in its gas division and PR has learned that utilities parent company has plans to sell off its gas division this spring and use the proceeds to set up a settlement fund for wildfire victims NPR's, Eric westervelt, broke this story, and Eric to start the seems like the company's internal plan to survive. Right. Tell us more about this gas proposal Hyoety. Yeah. It is what a company source calls. The company's only major play to survive executives have dubbed this gas sale plan and internal strategy project. Falcon and the company sources, including a senior. Officials involved in the project and planning and backed up by internal documents as well as a former employee showed that the plan has been in the works already for more than a year since after the 2017 wine country fires, but planning was restarted again intensively were told after November's a deadly campfire and under the current plan. He proceeds from the sale would go into a kind of girl account a settlement fund to pay down billions of dollars in potential claims for these wildfires. Both the two thousand seventeen fires and the campfire which killed at least eighty six people did billions in damage and destroyed most of the town of paradise, but PG any has not been found liable for starting the campfire, right? The investigation is ongoing. What have you learned? That's correct no-cost pinpointed yet. The state is investigating. Cal. Fire's investigating PGN and fully cooperating. The company did report damage to two transmission lines one just before the fire was reported and another malfunction a half hour later. The nearby area. That's seen as a second possible ignition source and just today. It was announced that several major insurance companies already have sued p genie blaming the company for the campfire that comes on top of it least hand major lawsuits representing hundreds of victims that allege PG any failed to properly maintain inspect and upgrade all of its equipment. One estimate from Citi group said the company could be liable for up to fifteen billion and fire damages from the last two years and the company hopes to get we are told from the sources between ten and fifteen billion for its gas asset. What's the company reaction? Well, spokesman declined to make any executives available to comment on project. Falcon in a statement, Andy Castano la- said, quote, PG doesn't comment on market rumors or speculations..

Eric westervelt Pacific Gas Kelley Audie Cornish NPR California Andy Castano la Citi group Mary Louise two years
Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

Weekend Edition Saturday

07:33 min | 4 years ago

Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

"Is weekend addition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The group Nexium says its mission is to quote raise human awareness and. Celebrate what it means to be human based in Albany it's attracted wealthy. Clients over the, years and promised personal and professional development. But federal prosecutors say the group is a criminal enterprise several members, have been charged with sex trafficking, racketeering and other crimes and, this includes the group's, leader Keith Rene and Allison Mack the actress last week four more women were charged and fluting an. Heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune for. More about Nexium we're going to turn to Vanessa Gregorio she's been. Reporting on. The group for the New York Times. Magazine this Gregorios thanks. So much for being with us thanks for having? Me, so what are what are they promise which alluring well Nexium on the face of it is one of these intensive therapy outfits. That offers courses maybe. Last a. Weekend or several days twelve hours. A day very wealthy. People were involved in this rate you. Could spend too Eight hundred three hundred thousand. Dollars on. Their classes no problem they claimed that. They could help people. Overcome childhood trauma, a divorce by integrating? Is what? They, called it those experiences into their lives and they were using a form of hypnosis to help people see their way through these, terrible events in their. Lives and. It worked for a lot of. People by many accounts Yeah and, I mean? It's it's tempting to see if there any illusions? I, guess both, with s and let's say even Scientology do you see any I think this is squarely, in the tradition of on, self help, and certainly there's, a secret side to, it much like. Scientology where we are, now learning that there were some things going on in. This group that were. Extremely unsavory like what according to, the federal, prosecutors in your, own reporting. Well you know it's clear that the, group was demanding fealty not only to the ideas that they had but also to the leader, Keith Ranieri middle aged guy lived in. New York. All his life they called him vanguard and they believed. He was some sort of all being so behind. The scenes there was also, a lot of you know he had many many girlfriends and in the last couple of years he was using some. Of the women in the group to bring other women too His bed with what we think are pretty coercive tactics which, of course of tactic the women claimed to, other women that they could kind of move more quickly down their personal growth path if they joined this women's only international, self help? Group there was a man who is involved in. This, group and, it was the leader heath who knew much of what was going on he was in, at least one case if, not more, those women were, coming to his bed, and he was. Then seducing them additionally, of course the New York Times Brooklyn us that they. Were branded with a. Symbol that looks kind of like, a hieroglyph, indeed they actually, were his. Initials k. and r. and women were, not told that how how does this boorish in reprehensible behavior become sex trafficking sexual The argument that the prosecutors are making is that there, was coercive sacks here that. Some of the women were actually acting or specifically Alison math this actress she was coercing women into having. Sex with him and that she was indeed kind of, a Madam where she was bringing in these women and she was also getting some sort of financial benefit within the group from Keith. Himself to financial reward for sexual favors, financial reward for sexual favors exactly even after these charges, the group still operating well they've. Closed, down all, of their classes you cannot go to them anymore and try to work out your problems but even after the. News, came out of the New York Times about women being branded at least one hundred members stayed with the group they think that they have not Done anything wrong, and they believe that they'll be vindicated. Vanessa Grigory Addis contributing writer for the New York Times Sunday magazine thanks. So much for being with us thank you Scott police across the country are growing concerned, about stoned drivers behind the wheel thirty states and. Washington DC of legalized medical marijuana Nine of those plus the district have legalized recreational pot one California company now says it's made a major breakthrough in creating. What some thought of as a kind, of unicorn a marijuana Breathalyzer NPR's Eric westervelt has our story in, his downtown Oakland office Mike Lynn hold his creation in the palm of his hand device about the size of a large. Mobile phone with a small plastic tube and a slot for. A cartridge this is this, is a disposable cartridge. And there's a whole bunch of science in this in this Partridge but Lynn is not some, pipe-dream Stoner inventor the entrepreneurs also a. Practicing, ER, trauma, doctor in an active swat team medic he's seen. Firsthand sometimes devastating impact of drunk and. Drugged drivers. The CEO of hound labs the scientific device company he founded slips a new, cartridge into the pot Breathalyzer since starts to blow Indicator Barr show whether the machine detects any THC the psychoactive, component in pond tools now, on the market to German marijuana use tests blood saliva or urine. Those devices can take days for. Result and they can't tell whether a person has smoked a half. Hour ago or eight days ago THC dissolves in fat so it can stay in your body up to a month, after us but Dr Lynn says his company's device detects whether someone has smoked, pot in, the last two hours what's considered the peak impairment window it accurately does that he says by measuring the mere presence of THC molecules in parts per trillion in. Your breath and that's in contrast to, alcohol which is parts per thousand THC is something like a billion, times less concentrated than alcohol that's why it hasn't been done before because it really is hard the company hopes to have. The Breathalyzer ready for sale by early next year a handful. Of police departments including Boston, plan to work with. Hound labs to test the device starting this fall for law enforcement there issue Is trying to figure out who's potentially impaired versus hey. Who somebody who smoked maybe yesterday, is not impaired they're interested in it providing objective data for them at the roadside just. Like they have for alcohol but a big problem there's still no. Scientific or legal consensus on what amount of THC equals functional impairment that matters, to the courts only seven, states have set basic legal guidelines as to how much THC in. The system makes you dangerous behind. The wheel Harvest a stylish dispensary in San Francisco's, mission district David downs. Does some market research Roma which is really scrumptious the California bureau chief for the cannabis news site lethally has. His nose in a jar of Indika dominant hybrid buds.

New York Times Marijuana Mike Lynn Scott Simon California NPR Seagram Vanessa Gregorio New York Albany Racketeering Keith Ranieri Keith Rene Allison Mack Boston Vanessa Grigory Addis San Francisco
Texas school shooting: Who is the suspect Dimitrios Pagourtzis?

Morning Edition

02:19 min | 4 years ago

Texas school shooting: Who is the suspect Dimitrios Pagourtzis?

"Congress us in our studios thanks for coming by hank you people who live in santa fe in southeast texas are trying to move forward after the shooting rampage friday at the high school there that left eight students in two teachers dead police say the suspect must seventeen year old student named dimitrios pagor z's has confessed and even though the answer may never satisfy many in this small town outside houston wanna know why he opened fire and peers eric westervelt reports from santa fe texas chad presents is paying respects at santa fe high at the makeshift memorial this becoming all too routine part of the mourning process at schools and towns across america white wooden crosses flowers pictures and cards in the front lawn miss birkin's she was really sweet she put me in a few times when i was i think open class or something the twenty year old graduated from santa fe high last year he knew many of those murdered he stops at chris stones cross the seventeen year old who was among a group of students who tried to block a door short stop the gunman from entering their art class a shotgun blast apparently struck stone in the chest chris here's a joyful kidman that happens he was is a goofball kind of grew up with a shanna right here fisher brzezinski it seems is trying to process the horror in real time and casting for awhi convinced there has to be one for the suspect betrayals pa gorgeous for the kid to do where he just did he know on friday there's a reasoning for it and he got pushed somehow some way i'm not sure why i'm not sure how but everybody has their breaking point in not using it as it skews but there had to be something to push in just like all the others mass shootings that have happened what if turns out there is no explanation he's just sick minded and he needed help and people need to realize that by most accounts there were no glaring signs of trouble the suspected shooter got good grades played football and had no run ins with the law a few social media posts with provocative pins and a t shirt that read born to kill hinted at a darker side police say there is information on his computer and in a journal that may point to a.

Congress Hank Santa Fe Texas Birkin Chris Stones Kidman Houston Eric Westervelt America Chris Fisher Brzezinski Seventeen Year Twenty Year
Gunman who killed Indian man in Kansas bar pleads guilty to federal charges

NPR News Now

01:59 min | 4 years ago

Gunman who killed Indian man in Kansas bar pleads guilty to federal charges

"Live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer communities in southeastern texas are still reeling from friday's deadly rampage at a high school where ten people were killed and thirteen others wounded then perez eric westervelt reports from santa fe taxes new details emerge today about the killings and the law enforcement response galveston county sheriff henry tross at says an armed school resource officer responded to the scene about four minutes after the shooting began he says other officers quickly arrived and police rebel to contain the alleged gunman while police cleared the school unsure if there were other shooters in every door they opened they weren't sure what was on the other side of it but they open those doors continuously time after time until that school was clear that's what you call a hero they didn't run from iran to it the suspect a seventeen year old student is now being held in the galveston county jail without bail and on a suicide watch era westervelt npr news santa fe texas a kansas man who killed an indian immigrant after a bar dispute over his legal status pleaded guilty to federal hate crime and firearm charges embarrass richard gonzales has that story the incident occurred last year in a bar and grill and a lengthy kansas adam puritan approach to indianborn engineers calling them terrorists and demanding that they in his words get out of my country he shot and killed serena voss coochie butler and wounded a luck mata sunny before running away puritan was sentenced to a life term on state murder charges in march now he's also pleaded guilty to federal hate crime and firearm offenses which make him eligible for another life term he will be sentenced on the federal charges in july the department of justice issued a statement calling hate crimes acts of evil and promising to prioritize their zealous prosecution richard gonzales npr news olympic swimmer ariana course smith and her lawyers say.

Smith Department Of Justice Murder Mata Sunny Serena Voss Galveston County Perez Eric Westervelt Jack Speer NPR Washington Butler Kansas Richard Gonzales Galveston County Jail Iran Officer Henry Tross Texas Seventeen Year