17 Burst results for "Eric Webber"

"eric webber" Discussed on SDCBA's Meet and Confer

SDCBA's Meet and Confer

08:26 min | 6 d ago

"eric webber" Discussed on SDCBA's Meet and Confer

"Is eric webber. A lawyer motivational speaker and avid runner higher. Welcome cupboards coats and guy words coach. Tell us a little bit about skywards. While team sky birds. My mom. And i started that and twenty seventeen to give athletes something new something that was better than what the had bad before was Not not really much of any athletic training but what they really needed was individualized coaching strategies in a team environment. The team environment gives positive atmosphere for the athletes and easily is able to pursue one's own goals. And i know that the this individual is really important. It's been kind of the basis for your success as well. Right coming up with ways to help. Individuals succeed absolutely. And it's the same philosophy behind. Why do individualized education programs y practice. Special education law. There's no sustain as one-size-fits-all and that's why they call it individualized education program they. Ap has to be narrowly tailored to the students unique needs. That's really interesting. So can i just back up for just a second. One of my favorite things to talk to lawyers about is niche practices special areas of law and especially areas of law that an attorney practices in that they're passionate about which obviously it sounds like. You are special education law. Tell us about that. When i was when i was really young when i was going through kate twelve myself i had an iky. I went through that process. Does the person autism man. It's rewarding to be able to go back into the iep setting as an attorney who happens to have autism and help other students get their needs. Met and held by the parents understand what their procedure rights are and what the students substantive rights are and to be able to train be parents to be their young loved ones. It's one of the things. I find mazing about attorneys like you and this includes rene and a lot of attorneys that i spoke into an interviewed is that you're a teacher you and and i i mean like you just said it. You said we you know. I like teaching parents on how to be their their children's biggest advocates in. That must make you feel so good. Absolutely it's really funny After the iep meetings. I could be all serious in on top of my david teammates very businesslike but after i peeked meeting The kids i let out Burp here their kids. You get goofy. They must live and to be sure. Iep stands for individual educational program individualized education program. It's under the individuals with disabilities education. Act so what made you decide to go to law. School was it. I want to help other thing. We was in twenty eleven. I was walking off the graduation stage for my master's degree program at issue in public administration. And my mouth auto is going to go to work in the city council office for a friend emerald so i walked off the stage and i looked at my mom and he said mambas else i have to do. And has style bothers disabilities in the context of law. Took a the breath. I m he really money okay. Are we gonna pay for this but just found a way to do it will. Your mom is One of those great parental advocates. To i know that she's been a great support system for you and i've got to meet her at a couple of events back when we're in person before covid and she's just a really super cool lady. Yeah the youngest in the family. I get away with a lot of us. But i'm the baby so gotta love me died a source. Reference died as efforts. I was with you on that awesome. This is incredible to me. You did a master's program and then he went to california western blow-black right. Yeah so what was the law school like for you. Well first year is always the toughest is and that turned out to be true the first year they break you second year. They make you a third year. They have to thank you. That was what. I heard a lot of western but it turned out to be true and students. They were little unsure of me in the beginning because i've autism and a lot of people equate having the disability income accommodations to. Oh get an unfair advantage. But that's just not the case but accommodations are about is helping the person reveal. What the person's through talents with the knowledge is and they also about really quick than i'm pretty smart comedy. Talent derna talent show it on a talent neither california western school of law. So you are smart end funny. Isn't that always a great combination. It is yeah it really is so when you went into law school. Did you have special education law in mind like you said okay. Well i'm gonna go go. Yeah okay. I knew right from the get go. After walking off. That's days avenues on abandoned visibility in special education. So what are your favorite things then about about. I think you mentioned it. You know the it's rewarding and helping the parents but what else do you love about this area of law and see about especially jesus allies self. I also like going the iep meetings. I'm not a big fan of the burchill stuff right now. I am able to pull up some documents on the side on my ipad or on the side of the laptop screen while i'm sitting and looking at the screen and seen everybody's faces that and personnel is found to be more engaging because i could see the person's face and by the language and figure out who needed to finesse and on to get some concessions out of the school district side of the iep team. Really it doesn't have to be adversarial if the parents and the school district can did on the same page with each other. That's so much better than having to go to due process. How do you find the students. And the parents sometimes as word of mouth from past students and parents. And sometimes i just bought into people and networking events such is surfing madonna oceans project a volunteer surf camp for a special needs kids every summer. Yeah just realized the is out there. Gazettes really how stuff happens and are also a speaker as well. You rene mentioned you give a lot of talks. What are the subjects of this toxin. Where do you give those. Do living with autism. I also do writing the right eagles. That's a powerpoint ation. There's taking the lead breakthrough conquest. That's a speech about overcoming fear failure and turn it into lethal success building champions and jason victory and that's a sports speech really mainly as for speeches about it's about the three cs camaraderie confidence and cohesiveness bringing the individuals together as a team and building team morale in order to find success. Find a championship. This because you don't necessarily win title doesn't mean you're not a championship team. Would you gotta have the three cs in order to have the championship three prerequisites in order to get there. It sound like great talks. Eric and i read some interviews. That you've done and i've watched some and it seems like you really speak from the heart whenever you give these talks. I'm really impressed with everything that i've seen you do i am. I'm dying in your future. Looks like what do you want to still accomplish. You've done so much already. Is there still anything on the bucket list that you want to accomplish..

Eric eric webber ipad third year second year first year One emerald one covid twenty seventeen jesus twenty eleven california western rene Burp jason california things school of law
"eric webber" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

06:47 min | 4 months ago

"eric webber" Discussed on FoodStuff

"So quiche started as a staple and rural areas which the simplicity of ingredients kind of reflects. Sheriff you know you've got eggs got a little bit of leftover dairy whatever else in here Icebox need to get rid of right. But it's spread from their becoming popular in the us sometime around the nineteen fifties really trending in the us in the sixties and seventies. Oh yeah kishan. America was a bit more like pike casserole thing than the traditional french quiche. French quiche was thinner compared to the deep dish american variety. Of course americans at at all kinds of stuff to quiche. It was fairly common to find keyshawn restaurant. Menus you could buy slices of quiche typically served with a salad pretty much anywhere you could have key sure brunch for lunch for dinner as a snack. You get the idea. According to jean anderson's the american century cookbook. The most popular recipes of the twentieth century. Despite a handful of cookbooks containing quiche recipes from the nineteen thirties onward quote quiche madness. Descend upon us until the late nineteen seventies and gogo eighties. When chefs outdid themselves dreaming off the wall combos and sylvia love gun wrote in her book fashionable food seven decades of food fads while quiche was both a popular and hardy appetizer. It was also sturdy and could be held for hours. Quiches enduring popularity into the seventies had a great deal to do with the scope. It allowed creative cooks. And speaking of creative cooks julia child helped make quiche more mainstream in the us by including it in her cookbooks which shifts referenced for menu item ideas her version of quiche lorraine did with bacon Just a way. Okay and keith. Grew popular in england around the same time although they call it ham and cheese pie and it also sometimes had a top crest quiche with a top crest bold berry When the kennedys are in the white house their love of french food was well known from rene rodion nineteen sixty seven. The white house chef. Cookbook mr kennedy was very fond of the tiny. He had for lunch. And this cookbook. Included a recipe for quiche lorraine we may have reached peak american quiche in the early nineteen eighties by ninety one. There were these boutique. Quiche restaurants like ms tisch is in l. a. And they were selling pies for up to fifty dollars a pop which is a little bit over one hundred thirty dollars today. Wow yeah according to an article from the time in people magazine their clientele list read like the belair phonebook article and people magazine about mckee's yes. That's pretty excellent. but it couldn't last. The quiche bubble burst. The popularity of quiche took a steep dive in the us and in the uk to a lesser extent in the nineteen eighties for two main reasons. Fear of cholesterol and masculine stereotypes. Bomb okay so this brings us to the weird kind of sexist bitter the episode. So okay there is kind of over saturation of quiches and popular culture. And they're a little bit fussy to make and they were perceived as kind of boozy sorta like the pumpkin spice latte of their time. I guess and so. They wound up seeming on masculine. Yeah to the ridiculous point that in nineteen eighty two book descended upon the. Us called real men. don't eat quiche. It was written by a twenty something year old humorist satirist of kind of a long essay that was published in playboy and then expanded into this book. That would sit on the new york times list for over a year. Wow and kind of long. I wanna read about how it started from an april first nineteen to article in the chicago tribune written by bob green. So you can kind of get a taste of what this was. Rejoice all you american men who are sick of having alan alda held up as your role model racket ball held up as your sports model and quiche held up as your food model. You have a new hero. His name is bruce fierstein. He is an author and his credo is simple and pure real. Men don't eat quiche. Fierstein has set out to define once again to a nation that is somehow forgotten it. What real men are. And what real men do the first salvo of his real men manifesto appears may issue of playboy. And then he goes on to quote your steam. Real men do not have meaningful dialogues. Real men do not find things super real men. Do not wear anything with more than four. Zippers men do not wear bikini underwear real men do not have vanity license plates for things. You won't find in real men's pockets lip balm breath freshener opera tickets and recipes for quiche. A real man would be an airline pilot. a quiche eater would be a travel agent. The real man diet steak hamburger cheeseburger bacon cheeseburger. Pizza burger chili burger ham and swiss on rye spaghetti. Macaroni cheese french fries home fries. Hash browns potato chips pretzels beer imported beer in puerto dark beer corn on the cob orange soda real men will avoid the quiche of death. That's pretty serious stuff. Oh was there a problem. With with like chapstick and breath. Freshener is supposed to have chapped lips and smell terrible and all the ladies the one in case she then. Yeah so that's a lot. This is also I ran across this. And that's one of the reasons. I wanted to quiche. That i mentioned beginning real men. Don't occasion. I was like whoa. I need to look into this so after that there was a follow up from the april twelfth edition of the chicago tribune. He gad's it looks as if the kishi really are about to take over the world. Recently we discussed the real men versus quiche eaters controversy. Now i've come across startling evidence that indicates the kishi becoming a greater force than anyone may have previously imagined. An all too real man caves into quiche. This piece would go into How one eric webber who had previously written a book called how to pick up girls followed it up with a decidedly. Different book called connecting. Okay i think the whole thing was meant to be at least a little. Bit facetious satirical. But i'm not positive that all of the fans of the book got that no. And when i i found this a lot of people took it very seriously. Yeah or not very seriously. But they've agreed with. Yeah yeah they took it on as kind of credo.

kishan keyshawn restaurant us jean anderson american century cookbook rene rodion mr kennedy ms tisch belair phonebook bruce fierstein sylvia Fierstein julia mckee bob green keith chicago tribune white house
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Welcome welcome back to chips with everything. I'm eric webber this week. We're looking at spyware apps or as they're sometimes called stalk aware before before the break we heard from a woman whose partner had used one of these kinds of malware apps to track every move. She made with her smartphone for two years she. I told her story to charlotte g of m._i._t. Technology review charlotte also spoke to experts who explained why this is a tricky problem to solve. We don't know a huge amount about store quite honest with you. It's quite surprising how few studies have been done into it so we don't really under the scale but we know that that we're talking about at least in the hundreds of thousands of people that have have been affected by this charlotte says that despite the lack of information out there security companies are getting active in trying to tackle the problem one company. That's been quite good in series because persky i think they were the first antivirus company to basically say we are going to specifically look christoph cooler and block it on our platform and now most of the security companies seem to have full in line and are doing the same so this is definitely an issue that the things are moving leaving on. I have to say there's no way we can talk about this. Without mentioning a woman called eva gulpur. He works for the electric frontier foundation in the u._s. Because she has basically single. Oh handedly wrestled this issue into the public eye. After a good friend of has experienced this firsthand and i did what any reasonable person would would do when they're catastrophically angry <hes>. Which was i tweeted so. I thought that this was no big deal. I thought that maybe i would hear from like one or two people. Maybe half a dozen people. I was wrong. <hes> so ninety four hundred re tweets later her. I appear to have accidentally started a project and i'm spending all of my time so basically we have. We have to thank for really forcing forcing us to talk about this issue so thank you either in her to follow our developer policies which prohibit among other things apps that <unk> steel dacia secretly monitor users or are otherwise militias while we don't comment on specific apps we remove applications that violate our policies apple had a similar response a spokesperson commented on the app store. We have strict rules against any spyware stalker ops and have worked hard to eliminate these apps apps from making their way to users devices. This is something we take very seriously and if we learned that any apps are spying on users with permission we take swift auction to remove them but experts have suggested that both companies could do more says experts have cooled for is basically for them to have a team which proactively hunts pistol career and this'll to stuff one thing that complicates this though is that you can get things like parental control apps which present is being perhaps for a legitimate purpose but it does mean that you can repurpose these apps for for spying on a partner now now that starts getting bit complicated because your kid potentially even consent to that i mean is that real consent. I don't know but basically this issue can get quite gray very quickly. Say as related to that. There are ways other than these stoke wiretaps of doing this kind of thing so it's part of a larger problem. Can you tell us more about how advances in technology provide abuses with new methods of tracking yeah. Absolutely it's worth pointing out the refuge. The domestic violence charity found that technology analogy plays a role in ninety five percent of all domestic violence cases so this is an issue that is not just coming down the line but we're facing right now it might it'd be some fairly innocuous things like apps which allow you to to share your location which a woman and a man have agreed to do but one of these partners if they're abusive may have severely pressurized. Is that person to do that and use it as a tool of course if control and even more sort of out there when you look at things like the smart home there even and been cases taken to court where partners have locked their other partner out of rooms of the house taking control over the lighting the heating and so you basically have the the potential for someone to create the bit of prison for someone and it's enabled by modern technology. This is what can happen when big tech is used to perpetuate domestic violence ed's but there are people out there with suggestions for how to fix this problem. There was a suggestion from someone. I interviewed from cornell university. He's been studying this that perhaps what we need. Eight is a checklist for developers who are making apps or maintaining existing apps which says how could you be re purposed for abusive purposes so it's not necessarily to say therefore you can't make this up but you need to think. How else could someone use this and potentially building some roadblocks on the way to ensure if this this is using someone's camera. Just make sure that you're telling them that and they know that the tech industry is doing things about this. It's not oblivious anything. Apple and google <unk> actively don't like women and therefore want spy on them. I just think unfortunately too often. It's a blind spot and we need to bring it into people's view. Basically if you think thank you might have malware on your phone. Charlotte has several suggestions for what you can do firstly they should download antivirus software and they should run a scan ideally on all the devices they should make sure that they use a fingerprint or pass code for every device they should regularly review which apps they've downloaded to make sure that they all look legitimate and like something they have actually actually downloaded and finally they should really carefully look at their security a notification settings and it's easy pieces to that you can go into a phone type security and you'll get if there was anything you could say to people who might be going through what you went through right now. What would it be. I'd say just hang in there. People are working on it. There are researchers looking at it. There are people that care <hes> you're not crazy and like said worse case scenario. Just reset your devices to factory settings and a change all your passwords i used to to f._a._a. On everything and definitely be careful what you click on just know that anything that you shared with them can and and will be used against you huge.

partner apple eric webber charlotte cornell university eva gulpur christoph Charlotte f._a._a developer google ninety five percent two years
"eric webber" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Future. Okay. But look at how guns work you pit to neural networks against each other teaching the it to adapt in order to trick the detective, and that kind of matches this idea of bottom up thinking that Leonard is talking about surely isn't totally inconceivable that our computers will the able to create this kind of odd without human beings. If we do get too strong AI, so an AI that is able to make very complex decisions and can equal humans than then. Yes. Of course that that could be possible. So what do we think children is going to be creative should never ask a philosophy graduate request like it all comes down to how we define creativity. And I think it's interesting if you look back at the pitches that I showed you at the star. And I was saying it was this an AA I was at a human in all cases, a human was involved. Right. So we can never say this painting was created entirely by AI. And I wonder if maybe our definition of creativity would be a future in which robot just decides to paint a picture by itself. Like, no one's told it to this is kind of like a discussion. I was having the other day actually about the idea of play and computers that play so computers play chess. I think only really is relevant when we get a computer that chooses to play a game instead of doing what it's supposed to be doing a computer that procrastinates, and it's the same thing here. We weren't have a creative computer until one day. A computer that supposed to be bottling things in a factory decides to go make a sculpture instead or totally -gree of infamy that moment. Over computer being creative will be when it decides to go off and think think I'm going to make art I'm going to decide what my input saw alive going to generate some outputs, an it's maybe not what I'm supposed to be doing at the moment for me. These is our tools to make our web will leave us, Jordan. That's a good question. Why when leave us we lose our jobs. Well, this if you have computers having imaginations doing creative acts, even if they're not really genuinely you know, sort of creative genuine are. It's interesting what that will mean for the jobs market. I mean, if you read any paper that comes out on what I will do for jobs. They always say the save jobs of the creative ones because they is rubbish at that. I don't think that's particularly true. I think there's a lot of things that I will be able to do in the creative realm that will be good enough. And that means and of your job. Yeah. I mean, we done an episode on robot singers and kind of Roble Instagram influences and. That even those kinds of jobs could go a in future will oversee all rebel against the robots are human singers artists back poets, must've it will be brought together by an OB harmonious, and we'll write war poetry outside the robots. Especially with thanks to Leonard Milano and Luba Elliott for making time for us this week links to everything we've talked about here on our website head over to the guardian dot com forward slash podcast. I'm Eric Webber. Annoy me in psalm until next time goodbye. For movement put costs from the guardian. Just go to the guardian dot com slash put costs.

Leonard Milano Eric Webber Roble Instagram Luba Elliott one day
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Future. Okay. But look at how guns work you pit to neural networks against each other teaching the forgery to adapt in order to trick the detective, and that kind of matches this idea of bottom up thinking that Leonard is talking about surely isn't totally inconceivable that impeach computers will be able to create this kind of odd without human beings. If we do get too strong AI an AI that is able to make very complex decisions and can equal humans than then. Yes. Of course that that could be possible. So what do we think children is going to be creative should never ask a philosophy graduate request? Look, it all comes down to how we define creativity. And I think it's interesting if you look back at the pitches that I showed you at the star. And I was saying it was this an AA I was at a human in all cases, a human was involved. Right. So we can never say this painting was created entirely by AI. And I wonder if maybe our definition of creativity would be a future in which a robot just decides to paint a picture by itself. Like, no one's told it to this is kind of like a discussion. I was having the other day actually about the idea of play and computers that play so computers play chess. I think only really is relevant when we get a computer that chooses to play a game instead of doing what it's supposed to be doing a computer that procrastinates, and it's the same thing here. We weren't have a creative computer until one day. A computer that supposed to be bottling things in a factory decides to go make a sculpture instead or totally gre- of infamy that moment. A computer being creative will be when it decides to go off and think think I'm going to make art I'm going to decide what my inputs are aligned to generate some out outputs, an it's maybe not what I'm supposed to be doing at the moment for me. These is our tools to make our web will leave us, Jordan. That's a good question. Why leave us we lose our jobs? Well, this if you have computers having imaginations doing creative acts, even if they're not really genuinely sort of creative genuine are. It's interesting. What that will mean for the jobs market. I mean, if you read any paper that comes out on what I will do for jobs. They always say the save jobs of the creative ones because he is rubbish at that. I don't think that's particularly true. I think there's a lot of things that will be able to do in the creative realm that will be good enough. And that means end of your job. Yeah. I mean, we done an episode on robot singers and kind of Roble Instagram influences and things. That even those kinds of jobs could go in future will oversee all rebel against the robots are human singers and artists backer, poets must've it will be brought together by an OB harmonious, and we'll write war poetry else on the robots. Especially with thanks to Leonard Milano and Luba Elliott for making time for us this week links to everything we've talked about here on our website head over to the guardian dot com forward slash podcast. I'm Eric Webber. Annoy me in sample until next time goodbye. For movement put costs from the guardian. Just go to the guardian dot com slash put costs.

Leonard Milano AI forgery Eric Webber Roble Instagram Luba Elliott one day
"eric webber" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Mytalk dirt alert update, a quick look at what's happening in entertainment. On mytalk guy. Actress Lena Dunham has revealed that she's six months sober after admittedly. Misusing anti anxiety medications. She said of her usage it stopped being I take one when I fly to I take one when I'm awake and said, she had no problem getting the prescription Ferber doctor who had advised her to take it. So she is coming forward with that news this afternoon. You know, I think it's good it. Whenever again, like I always say when people share their experience of finding themselves misusing or overusing or having an abusive relationship with a substance or their whatever their their their thing is I'm happy for that. Absolutely, Kathleen Kennedy. The head of Lucasfilm is basically confirming that the standalone Star Wars Boba fett movie is not going to happen by I'm sorry. That's gonna make a lot of people happy. He has a so journalists Eric Webber spoke with Kennedy, and she confirmed the news to him on Twitter rubber Weber wrote Kathleen Kennedy just confirmed to me that Boba is one hundred percent dead now their focusing their efforts on the Star Wars television series the man to laureate, which will be on the Disney standalone streaming service sometime next year. I mean, are they is this at all concerning anybody about like the interest in the Star Wars franchise, or are they are are. We just seeing that they're trying to focus their efforts and energies. So they don't dilute it. Yes, I think I think because the Hans solo movie that came out earlier this year performed well below expectations. They're like, hey, we can't just put out a movie every six months and expect people to just be excited about. You know, we've talked about this. They've made a push really to sort.

Kathleen Kennedy Lena Dunham Eric Webber Lucasfilm Boba Ferber Twitter Weber Disney six months one hundred percent
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Change at least not popular content. So I've been hoping to fill that niche one of the problems obviously have to contend with is climate change skeptics have you found that there skeptics online as well. Yeah. Honestly hasn't been as much as I expected. So. Basically anytime, you know, we post anything about climate change. Whether it's an article that that makes headlines or. Popular forum online. There's always some skeptics who come. And usually they give sort of the same tired arguments. So it's pretty easy at this point for me to dismiss them. So sometimes if a question comes up in the stream where it's a skeptic. You know, asking a question, I'll just repeat the like one liner that basically dismisses their comment other times. People are a little more combative or just straight up insult me or something. And then I'll just ban them or silence, then from the chat. And I've had a few people who. They're sort of on the border of being skeptics and also deniers and so there I try and entertain them for a little bit. And you know, if if they're honestly curious about the science, I'll explain it. But if they reject the evidence and say, oh, you know, climate scientists tamper with the data, then usually I just I just give up at some point fair enough. What's the larger response into the project? So the the initial response was from mostly the scientific community. So other scientists were really supportive of the project, and I think saw immediately the value that it could have and only recently has sort of the larger gaming community started to appreciate the project. I think so we've been getting a lot more followers in the past week. And I had a stream last night where I played for two hours over the course of those two hours. I got about one hundred new followers, and we had an average of maybe thirty viewers which to me is real exciting because that's basically the size of normal high school or university classroom so already I'm getting a pretty good audience. And it's only growing given the name of the channel it's perhaps unsurprising that unreas- audience currently seems to consist mainly of people with an existing interest in issues around climate change while his reach is expanding wider into the gaming community. I wanted. If on rethought that his approach would be affective in garnering any real attention triggering any real change beyond these circles. So I think the couple of very active. People who who comment. So I have a few people who've actually joined the stream now and they've sort of become partners with the project, but there they are kind of scientists themselves and they're already fairly knowledgeable about the subject. So to them, you know, that might be just marginal gains in terms of knowledge and communication, but I get the sense that most of the other viewers there honestly, pretty anxious about the climate change problem. I mean, I've gotten a lot of questions just in the past week about this new report from the intergovernmental panel on climate change, which sort of had a pretty dire forecast for the next twenty or thirty years, and I think people are honestly a little bit scared, and they want to they want to get, you know, not just comfort, but also. They wanna get the actual facts from an expert. And I think that the climate science community is not obviously acceptable to especially young people who have questions I mean, if someone's from a small town say Kansas, they can't just go up to climate science and asked him the question, but online you can do that. And so I do think that there's a lot of people who really don't know what to make of climate change. They see these scary headlines. They just don't know if it's true or or if we're all going to die or forgive me. Okay. And I feel like honestly most of my viewers fall in that category. What about the the audience that you're able to reach with this is is it limited the scope or 'cause you may be end up speaking to millions. If this goes, well, yeah. So I think that is possible if I play my Cartwright, so one of the things that I'm really interested in doing is partnering up with other video game streamers and some of them are absurdly popular. I mean, they have literally. Millions of daily viewers who watched them every single day. So you might have heard the name ninja who's the most popular fortnight streamer in the world. And at some point I'd like to reach out to him. But also other slightly lesser known streamers. And eventually, I think it'd be really cool to have these basically video game. Celebrities, you know, engaging with me about climate change topics and seeing if we can if we can spread knowledge and also basically the desire for climate action among a wider audience. Do you think you'll be able to reach anyone who can actually do anything about climate change so politicians maybe? Yes. So I think the way that you got to politicians is not by actually having them watch the stream it's by having their constituents watch the stream and pressure them to to act, and I think that's really what I want to get out of this is the public has a lot of power to press people in power to make actions to solve climate change. And right now. It seems like that public perception is is not really there. So that that's really the way that I want to impact the world is by by getting the public really excited about solving climate change and getting those ideas out there to the politicians say with the popularity of fort night at that's obviously inaugural to be made that video games a good medium for reaching a wide audience. What other movements have you seen within the games industry to tackle issues like climate change? So the the one I'm actually most excited right now is so the project started by streaming fortnight for actually moving to also playing this new game called EKO, which is in early access currently, but the game basically the whole point of the game is to solve climate change. So the premise is that you start on this planet with no resources, and you have thirty days before meteor's going to strike the planet, and you have to develop your civilization to shoot down the meteor before it hits you, but you also have to. Balance that with environmental impacts and climate change. So every time you do something like drive your car around the planet, you emit carbon dioxide, and that is going to warm the planet, and you can actually lose the game. If you impact the planet too much. So I think you can really use games to not just start the conversation. But actually teach people things about how the climate system works. And that's that's the that's the direction. I'm most excited about do. You think this game EKO laterally teach people enough to change that behavior? Yeah. I definitely think it could. So one of the really exciting things about the game is that it really has a lot of details built into it. So for example, last night, we just switched over from using coal and wood to power our some of our machines to using a windmill, and you know, their immediate impacts in the game where the air pollution improves. And we just started the game. But there's so much you can do with this. You can. You can even pass laws in the game. So you can actually test out. How a politician proposes a law. You could test that out in the game and see how it impact the civilization. And that's just kind of mind blowing to me that you could really use games like this to to do a lot of good paying devil's advocate. I guess taking a more skeptical view how much do you think? People actually listen to these messages. So it's hard to tell I think that the way I can get feedback is people asking questions and a lot of people after the ask the question and the answer they actually respond, and they'll say thank you for explaining that or, Wow, I've learned a lot today and things like that. So I think that people are actually getting something out of this. And I have to say that when when I first started the project, I was playing fortnight and the conversations were not very high quality. I would get distracted by dying in the game and things like that. But since I've switched to EKO. And now the game really is a slower pace, and it has more to do with climate change. I think people. Get a lot more out of the conversations. And I think we're people are really getting a lot out of out of the stream with recent reports that only a few companies some say a hundred some say fifty are responsible for around seventy percent of the world's greenhouse gas. Emissions. It's clear that in order to mitigate the effects of climate change significant effort is required at the governmental level. But that doesn't mean that individuals have no power, whether that's technologists like Mattie car set, experimenting with solutions, some of the problems we've closed climate scientists like unrig Drake recognizing that some audiences might be better reached in the online communities in which they already like to spend that time. In the face of such a truly global problem. It's up to each of us to use. What particular tools we have? I'd like to thank Mattia non reefa joining us on the show this week. You can watch the Dow fly in action by following the link in the episode description on the guardian website where you can also find out more about unreas- project climate full at night. What game would you like to see a climate scientists try to play and talk over at the same time? Let me know by emailing chips podcast at the guardian dot com. This episode of chips that everything was produced by Eva, Chris rock, I'm Eric Webber. Thanks for listening. The guardian.

Kansas Mattie unrig Drake Eric Webber Eva Chris rock two hours seventy percent thirty years thirty days
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

13:23 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"The the guardian. Current estimates suggest that there are seven point five billion people living on earth and using its resources. Recent reports suggest that if we ought to reduce the negative impacts that humanity has on the planet. We need governments around the world to place environmental issues, high on the political agenda. But alongside politicians people from the world of technology are also stepping in to do what they can to help redress the balance between humanity and the natural world. Green technology, also known as environmental bean technology. Applies environmental sciences the development of technologies that can help mitigate the effects of human activity on the environment. This covers a broad range of technologies from those that monitor and model the natural world and its resources to those that more actively aid parts of the environment. In this highly technological, weld, more and more. Scientists are looking at how to use technology for environmental purposes, physics allows us to skills the rubber down and still be RG efficient. Let's apply. Gatien's like robotic pollination who something we have in our mind from solar powered charging stations. And even entire roads that repentance the batteries in let trick vehicles to robots that swim around rivers lakes, and even the ocean cleaning up waste humans developing increasingly novel ways to tackle the environmental problems we've caused. But I'll be wasting time and money on experimental technology that might not make it past the finish line. And can the use of technology at a grassroots level actually increase awareness and influence those with the power to make a real change. The public has a lot of power to press people in power to make actions to solve climate change. And right now, it seems like that public perception is is not really there. I'm Eric Webber. This is chips with everything recorded the demo effect. So whenever you have to show something to people that come nothing ever works that same week. We have from two scientists hoping to address environmental issues, by harnessing technology in very different ways. My first guest creates machines that at a first glance sound like the kind of nightmare fuel you might find in an episode of the science fiction show, black mirror minister, Medicare Arctic. I'm a postal researcher at the university of technology where we develop thrones of different sizes from small pocket sized drones to large two meter wingspan flying wings, Matty's robots drew attention recently because of their resemblance to flying insects. So I started by asking to what extent he and his team had taken inspiration from the natural world in that design if these miniature drones, so our robots are inspired by flying insects and the basic. Inspiration is that we do not have any propellers on the robot. But we have wings that flap day flip back and forth. And this is what creates a lift force that carries the robot in the air. But the wings the actually can each wink and move independently in different motion patterns like insects do that. And this is what allows the robots toot steer itself. So the robot can rotate around any of its body axis, and then it can fly in any directions. And this is the inspiration comes from from flying. Insects deal like technology office away to improve upon nature, then you can take some ideas from nature, but then make them better or tweak them. So that they worked better. Sometimes that's possible. It's not necessarily making things better. But it's more making them work with say, the pieces that we have at hand us as engineers, basically. So for example, in in when we want to fly insects. They have. Amazing powerful muscles which contract and very very quickly. And with lot of power, but we don't have such muscles. So instead, we have Motors that are spinning and we have to find a way around that. So there are some limits. We have now your Dell fly robot has gone at particular interest. What exactly is it? And why do you think it has got people excited? So it's a flying robot that flies like insights. So basically, just the body central body with four wings extending in two on the right side onto on the left side. And when you see it flying it truly resembles an insects. It is larger it is thirty centimeter in expensive like longer side of the eight four sheet of paper. But the way it flies is really similar to insects. So if you see flying it just resembles Lega flying animal, goodness, I can imagine that some people seeing thirty centimeter insect like robots. Would be quite scared. It's kind of like what insects used to look like the time of the dinosaurs. Definitely there used to be dragonflies or even larger than this. And today also have birds that are of those sizes hummingbirds are bits molar, but they can also hover. So that means hanging the air like our robot. So there are still animals resemble in terms of size. What you St. see the Dow fly having what kinds of problems does it solve. So what is new about the newest fly is that it has no no tail so the control is integrated in swings. And this allows to be very to be very Joe. So we can we can hover at a spot we can fly in any direction, and we can start flying forward in a split of second and reach maximum speed of twenty five kilometers per hour. And this this agility is what is what is so nice about it. Because. First of all, we can fly outdoors in the presence of windows. But also it allowed us to study insects, which have this agility, our it was the first to approach agility while being programmable say, you said that they are able to fly around in the wind, for instance. But how do they deal with other elements of nature rain flu? So currently our robots designed for indoors. So they're just not protecting in any way to rain. But in principle, it is possible to design it's such that it can also fly in wet conditions. But it would mean some extra weight. So that would decrease the flight time and other improvement Yawovi to echoes the battery life right because I've heard that the battery life is quite short. Yes, occurrence, we can fly around five to six minutes when we hover so hanging the air at once part, but it is bit more if we fly forward because that's where the road is more Angie efficient because. It's also gliding through the air. And it gives us some extra list force. And of course, we would like to extend this. We can partly improved by using better batteries that would that should be available in future. But we also looking at the efficiency of the flapping wings, and that comes hand-in-hand with the accusations. If we have actuators, which are more efficient, we can also fly for longer complex robots like Matty's have several limitations to that hardware like size and battery life, but that's software of some incredible opportunities in cooperating perception and real time identification of obstacles to allow the robots to learn in dynamic environment and identify solutions mid flight. I wanted to know more about how robots like the Dow. Fly could be taught to behave. Autonomously? First of all we have to them some sensors such as small cameras that allow them to to see the environment. Around him. Then there are different techniques. How to let's say process this this image to figure out if what we are seeing is an obstacle or if for example, an opening through which we can fly through and that's basically an ongoing research where we're doing right now. How to use the camera images for autonomous flight one of our previous Adelphi robots, which was less H O would carry steroids in system. So actually two cameras that work like human is. So not only can see around yourself. But you can also see this dances or estimate distances of the things you see and with this system. The robot was able to fly around a room or office environment and explored it flying around basically semi randomly. But exploring the whole area say what kinds of things would you use it full? So the robot gonna for example, carry a camera so it can perform tasks like a remote inspection when you need to fly somewhere. To location, which is difficult to reach for human. And the advantage of our robot is apart from its agility. It's it is very lightweight and very safe around human. So it can fly in our natural environment. Unlike robots with propellers spin very fast, and they can cause some harm to us the winks that flap the move back and forth and both bounce of objects in this way flapping wings are much safer. Is it true that you could use this robot though to do the job of insects like bees? So we can do it at the moment. But it is one of the possible applications for future. Of course. There remain many. Let's see challenges to be solved. Our robots are now as I mentioned, quite large. If you would like to replace all the beasts, and we don't want to have these big robots flying around. But. We're thinking of what the applications of such a robot could be and because the physics allows us to scale the rebel down and still be an efficient. Let's say applications like robotic nation is something we have in our minds say assuming that it is theoretically possible to make these robots smaller an autonomous and able to pollinate plants. How far do you think we ought from feature where we have robotic insects pollinating plants. So I think if we would go in this direction, do I I would be to try this out in greenhouses, which is still kind of a let's say environment, which is controlled in terms of wind and elements, and I think it's realistic to say within five to ten years, we could have robust flying there. Wow. And how small you're going to be able to make them? Well, currently we think something like palm sized robots. That's what this itchy. Verbal with current technology. Of course, we would like to go smaller and smaller, but there we're really hitting limits specially in accusation. So as I mentioned, we have Motors that spin, but we would like to have actuators that work more like muscles. So that contract, but so far we don't have a good alternative to an Emo muscles. Do you think that some people might argue that the kind of time and effort and money that you and other teams appending into this kind of thing could be better spent maybe helping to save the insects instead of finding ways to replace them. Yes. We actually think that's the way to go. We should figure out why Intech Tara dying, and we should just try to save them. But of course, our work has also other applications, so the moneyspinner our research is not money that could also go to let's say research of why bees are dying out. We see other. Gatien's for our technology like search and rescue mission after missions after earthquakes were robots would fly around buildings clubs buildings through small cracks in the in the walls and search for survivors, for example, awesome. Do you think that these kinds of mini flying? Drones that you'll making will be prevalent in future. Do you think that future generations will just see as completely normal to have robots flying around? Yes, I think so already. Now, we see that that gets are adapting very quickly to our technology. And I think flying robots will just become a part of our daily lives. Say perhaps one day we'll live in a future in which drones like Dow fly are commonplace monitoring natural environments lacking in greenhouses or maybe even one day spreading tree seeds from the sky to fight deforestation. But in the meantime, how else a scientist Tana saying technology in the hope of making a difference to the environment. Have a politician proposes a law you could test that out in the game and see how it impact the civilization. And that's just kind of mind blowing to me that you could really use games like this to to do a lot of good find out after the break as we join a scientist slash video game player. Trying to fight the big fight from the grassroots level. Today.

Gatien Matty scientist rivers lakes Lega Eric Webber university of technology Dell Medicare Arctic Dow Yawovi Joe researcher
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

09:24 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"The guardian. I, I apologize starting this podcast with the horribly familiar sound alarm clock and OBI associations that entails. Second, listen closer. There's another noise in the background. Can you guess. It's the sound of a mechanized rubber arm slapping a sleeping woman in the face. This is the wake-up machine, a DIY wool mounted robot that works in tandem with the alarm clock to activate the rubber arm whipping around and forcing the sleeper out of bed. The machine was designed and built by the very woman being slapped from sleep in the video that you just heard. My name is smell yet, which is very unintuitive pronunciation of my last name, which spelled g. i. e. RTZ Simone is my guest on today's episode, mostly men for making useless machines, and I run a YouTube channel about them. Simone is a self professed mak- of shitty robots and the wake-up machine is just one of many inventions designed to take a mechanical approach to everyday tasks. Simone, showcases her creations on her own YouTube channel. While she admits that none of her robots are meant to do their job. Well, semaines fascination for technology and electronics have made her a role model for young robot makers worldwide. So what does this Queen of shitty robots make are increasingly robotics reliance society? And does she recognize the possible pitfalls of human robot interactions in her day to day work? It's all about hoping that you're on the robots, good side. One St. start getting smart enough to actually start an uprising. So you just gotta. You gotta start that relationship early on. I'm Eric Webber, and this is chips with everything. I caught up with Simone on a full gear often in London, which for her was a bright and early morning in San Francisco. The first words I'm saying today, so you get fresh off the bed, press how you doing any earlier. Did a did a robot slap your wake this morning? It did. It did not. I woke up or I mean, I have an Amazon echo that kind of slaps we awake. It feels like. Fair enough. Have you always had an interest in making machines or technology modem really not really into, I think I've always I've always liked making things, but it wasn't until I was in my mid twenties that I realized that technology was fun. And what was it that made you want to start designing your own robots? I think it just I had a lot of ideas of projects that I wanted to build, and I was always just looking for somebody else. You could do it for me, and then I realized like, hey, you should just teach yourself how to do it makes way more sons. So it was mostly like I didn't learn about electronics and robotics for the sake of eletronics. Robotics was more like just as a tool to build the ideas that I had. What can you tell us some more about some of the rebels in particular that you've designed? What have you got any favorites? Maybe I dislike all of my machines equally 'cause they're all uncomfortable and cumbersome and generally tend to throw. Things at me. But I think the one that I've done that has been seen the most is the wakeup machine, which is in the long clock that's left me in the face with a rubber arm. And that one's been seen around eighty million times on different platforms, which is a weird kind of internet legacy, but I'll take it. I've also done lipstick robot that puts lipstick all over my face. I've made a drone that cuts hair. I, we just just it's just a general mix of things. Say, e said that the the robots that you make you dislike them equally because they're all cumbersome uncomfortable. Why specifically focus on making those kinds of robots? Is that something to do with maybe relieving the pressure to strive for perfection? Is it maybe like an awful common commentary on the state of technology, or is it just because it's fun thing about building useless machines and wants to just don't work very well kind of came as a way for me to teach myself about robotics because I was, I mean, as a lot of people, I struggle with performance anxiety and his school. I would always speak myself up if I didn't get great grades and stuff like that, and teachers about robotics early Tron IX has a huge room for air. Like it's really easy to fail and misunderstand things and do things the wrong way. So in a way to relieve pressure off of myself for that, I was like, oh, I'm just gonna start out to make things that don't work, and it can made it easier for me to approach it, say, giving you've got this collection of robots that are basically terrible at that job. Do you think it'd be fast people to use that as evidence that we as a society pretty far away from having the kinds of useful robots that we see in science fiction? No, I think just that we have useless example of something doesn't mean that they're useful wants to, I guess I'm just trying to increase the diversity of skill levels within robotics while semaines robots seem comically Nisha in terms of that purpose. This isn't really anything new. Many of our existing robots, a dedicated to a single task. Factories are full of robots that form one part of a production line before being a single action over and over again. We have robots that scan cherry trees to find the best branches to shake the fruit from a roomba vacuums flaws. This technology improves, it seems inevitable that we are heading for a future in which robots will take on more and more of our tasks from driving us to work to taking care of the elderly for some people. This is a Kohl's FANG science, but I wanted if someone is in grossed in the world of robotics Samoa's would feel the same way like personal robotic assistance in the home. Honestly, it's it's a little bit about. I mean, robots are they are what we make them to be, and they can be great and they can be helpful. It can also be really dangerous, but most both intentionally and unintentionally. So it's it's a little bit of both. I mean, whenever you have strong Motors controlled by maybe not super strong brain, I mean, that's I think to be cautious of, is there a particular kind of robotic assistance that you would like to see in future? I mean, I really wish that I had a robot that could both. Q., my floors which we kind of already have, but they could also malt them. I know revolutionary. But the future, we will have them. That's the dream as robots, become a big part of our lives with seeing a lot of emotional attachment to them. You know, this videos of children, hugging things that they think robots. Do you ever feel that kind of connection to the robots that you create? Do you give them pesonalities d feel sorry for them? When they break? I like to me what I've been thinking about is the emotional connection people have when they're a robotics companies should put up videos of them, like kicking over robots to test how they get back up and there's this weird production of emotions on it where, yeah, you feel sorry for it. I don't. I feel like when you make the machine and you kind of know how how it's done. It doesn't. Yeah, you don't really feel sorry for it in the same way. I guess I was gonna make some connection about kids when you make your own kids, you don't feel, but I realized that doesn't make sense at all. Sound like a terrible person. So scrap that city think do you think maybe everyone should get involved in making robotics maybe just for a bit just so that they learn more about how they work. I think everyone who wants to should and we're getting to a point where more and more people are able to because was really interesting happening in electron IX and in making is that the price point is dropping so much. You can get a really powerful raspberry pi computer for like three to five dollars, and at that point lake, so many people can start playing around with it and learning about it. Simone owes career and robotics to another Moton technology. YouTube. She had made a toothbrush helmet a helmet with a motorized on holding a toothbrush that would brush teeth when she wore it for Tuden's show she hoped to make when the pilot wasn't picked up, she uploaded the invention to YouTube. The video now has more than five hundred thousand views and popularity has. Continued to grow in the three since Simone has used channel, show her creations and had journeys in making them. But all that challenges in tying you'll work so closely to social media. You're always to me ten steps ahead people in the comments and make sure that they can't use things in a way that you don't intend them to will find out after the show break. This

RTZ Simone YouTube point lake Eric Webber San Francisco Amazon Samoa Nisha Tuden e London five dollars
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Addressed. In pot. One of the book, one of the chapters contains the question, what does the future hold? So what's the answer is the future of three d. printing utopian or dystopia? I'm not sure that either of those words, but I would say that with every new technology, there are so many good things and so many advantages and I think three depending on different. It's just about, you know, the we have to think about Ambien foreign policy and think about how best we can relate that technology in the future is bright, but we need to regulate three print in a benefit show for all stakeholders. So for consumers for industry and for those who are involved in the technology. So we've not quite reached the point where anyone on earth can three d. print their own home in a matter of days will make their own gun toy or real. But as Danila says, maybe we're just waiting for the three d. printing version of Bill Gates to figure out a way if your I to be able to afford a no printer for the corner of the sitting room. Of course, there are plenty of positive applications for this technology. We just need lawmakers around the well to pick up the pace and come up with a way to protect the public from the potential harm. I'd like to thank professor Billy. We when professor Denise Jimenez for joining me on the show this week, if you have any thoughts or questions on three d. printing, you can drop me a line that chips podcast at the guardian dot com. Chips with everything is produced by Danielle Stevens. I'm Eric Webber. Thanks for listening.

Denise Jimenez Bill Gates professor Eric Webber Danielle Stevens Danila Billy
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"The guardian. So Michaela is a very famous Instagram star who started, I think in twenty sixteen, she grew very popular very quick the and this is the voice of my little sister chain, fourteen years old. And like a lot of people, our age, an avid, Instagram USA. One of the hundreds of accounts she follows is that of Michaela, Susa or Lil Michaela, who sounds like basically your average Instagram star? I says she has Brown hair that goes down to about her shoulders. She has a little colorful and bright makeup on face faces full of freckles. She often was quite fashionable clothes and on her scam page, you can see her sometimes selling those clothes. What kind of things does she do in her? Pictures of them are just her on her and taking selfie saying that she's somewhere or that some with like her. Bula events with friends in the solemn with hutch sitting down at ting stuff with another friend. She's young pretty and fashionable with one point, three million followers and desire to turn that fame into a career in music and June twenty teen. She was named one of time magazine's twenty five most influential people on the internet. There's just one catch. Well, Michaela isn't real. She's a creation of computer generated imagery or CGI. Michaela's virtual nature hasn't stopped her from becoming hugely popular since our inception in two thousand sixteen. She's a tract, it some pretty famous friends and even enemies, some human, some like her. She posts pictures of herself with other celebrities or posing in fashionable outfit. Somewhere in real world i. captions will seem familiar to anyone who regularly uses Instagram, it's hot af who has a pool we can use. I think August might be my month stuff about beyond say in riana, and so on. Every now and then she gets real and talks about feelings. I like that she's very open with her followers in she shares of stuff with them. She talks back to them. She onces the end for moon, and I like that people styles come from her Instagram page as well. Some people want to question whether or not an Instagram influence can really be called. A celebrity gets a bit more complicated when those influences aren't even real people. Hat scenically is very popular pup stop in Japan, and she was a gray top with a short skirt and she has really long blue hair that goes down like really far. And is she real? And now she's a hologram. I'm Eric Webber and this week I'm going to bring you the philosophical question. My little sister chaebol to me, can we really call virtual character a celebrity on the way? We'll find out how a software designed to help musicians get them. Music noticed led to the creation of global superstar and ask, have we become so accustomed to highly edited representations of real life that we no longer even need celebrities to really exist. This is chips with everything. How long did it take you to figure out? So I found it quite easy to work out. She wasn't real once had gone on her pictures. Any Lord is a freelance writer who has written about Michaela in virtual stars have risen to fame as she explains michaela's, Instagram posts are pretty similar to what you might get from any other influence. It's all quite banal. What she's doing. It's not anything you wouldn't see elsewhere mainly just really wild, put together outfits or just hanging out outside shopping malls or buying Renes Moody's at festivals with friends, lots and lots of selfish and cool outfits and things like that. Her pray fall features so stuff like her age and her location, but then also things like black lives matter and links to Audi BT life center and black girls code. You say she's political. I think she's kind of problems ties that idea of being political on the internet because it's really interesting. Well, it's great that she. Puts forward her support for things like black lives aware. Someone like the caught actions might not because they're so where of who follows them nor alienating people. But the fact that she can just hashtag his support and not turn up to protests or donate money or do any of that stuff in the physical world. It's very, like, lackluster, kind of easy way of being political. Michaela writes about the things she cares about on her blog forever nineteen so called because she

Lil Michaela Michaela Instagram Susa time magazine Eric Webber riana Japan USA. Renes Moody Audi BT Brown writer fourteen years
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Current president doubt with the possibility of cyberattacks he got off to a relatively good start in the white house by hiring two people one is his homeland security adviser the other is the white house cyber security advisor who are quite experienced and cyber tomba's domeless security advisor at worked in the bush administration knew the topic well and then from the cyber coordinator he had hired america's top cyber warrior from the national security agency when john bolton came in his mashal security advisor few months ago the first thing he did was oust mr bossert and the second thing he did was eliminated the position of cyber security coordinator most members of congress still think it's fairly cute to say ho i really don't understand the stuff my grandchildren understand that i talked to them but could you imagine in the fifties or sixties apoliticial saying oh i don't really understand this nuclear weapons stuff maybe my kids will understand it that would not be an acceptable view and it tells you that they don't fully understand the nature of the dangers for the past four five years cyber has been the number one threat that the intelligence community is put at the top of its annual threat assessment to the congress and well cyber was missing from it up through two thousand and seven the past few years it's been a head of terrorism it's been a head of nuclear proliferation it's been the number one threat commentators have argued that the 2016 us presidential election proves that democracy as we once knew it is gone and that in essence the us and indeed the whole world is suffering a democracy crisis will we had a a missile line thought in the early days of the internet the more communication we had the more people are on the internet the moral undercut authoritarian governments and he was thinking of the communist party china what we've discovered since is that cyber is also the thorough tarian dream we are learning very quickly that the chinese the russians some nato members that are moving toward greater authoritarian governments they are all using the power of the internet to suppress dissent so we need a complete rethink about the connection between this technology and democracy there is no perfect solution here because we have developed this weapon ourselves we ought to be able to figure out how to control it but we also develop nuclear weapons chemical weapons biological weapons and we don't have perfect solutions to controlling them by any means one first step is to begin to develop some norms about how we will not use his weapons similar to the geneva conventions about things we would not do against civilians the problem is if you went to the american intelligence agencies or the british intelligence agencies and said can we sign on to this new set of norms they probably say all its wait a minute we've had some elections we've had to go in and meddle with we might have a situation where it better unplug a country from the grid then to bomb it and that may be the future future may be that cyber gets built into every single warplane that's already happening in the is states we suspect it's long been the case with russia and china and the technology is so cheap and easy to acquire that it's not as if other countries won't go that way when i wrote my last book the dealt some on this subject six years ago there were a handful of countries that had sophisticated cyber capabilities today the probably between thirty and forty around the world we face rogue regimes terrorist groups and rivals like china and russia that challenge our interests our economy and that is in confronting these horrible dangers we know that weakness is the surest path to conflict and unmatched power is the surest means to our true and great defense i'd like to thank david sign of joining us this week that will be a link to his new book the perfect weapon war sabotage and fair in the cyber age in this week's episode description on the guardian website as a ways i want to hear what you think drop me a line at tits podcast at the guardian dot com i'm eric webber thanks for listening for more great podcasts from the guardian just go to the guardian dot com slash podcasts.

president four five years six years
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"A picture of like gale scott but it was probably like only that far from her crotch really ripe between lex honest news me majorly because of how they were on a snow i knew it was wearing a sore and i was like man i grabbed the phone like held up and i was like even taking pictures my scott what was wrong with you and i was crying in june twenty eighteen the british government signed off on a plan to introduce legislation to ban ups koerting the practice of using a camera on a mobile phone or otherwise to take a photo up a person skirt without their knowledge and therefore without their consent while it seems obvious that a non consensual act like this should be illegal it has taken a campaign and some debate in the houses of parliament to get the government to agree to legislate against it but up skirting isn't the only disturbing act enabled ornamented by advancements in technology anyone who keeps track of current affairs will probably be sick of hearing the words fake news but the concept extends beyond articles written by trolls for suspect publications one way to spread fake news is to manipulate video footage to make it seem as if someone usually a prominent figure has said or done something they never did and of course it didn't take long for people to start using the same method create deep fake pornography the usual targets deep fake pornography celebrities but some fear this could become a common weapon in the existing practice of revenge porn and research is already trying to find ways to fight back as with say many of the topics we've covered on this podcast the question is how do we legislate against technology that is developing more quickly than lawmakers understanding in england and wales we've got a bit of a tendency to be really pedantic in our drafting of legislation to try to narrow it down to very specific circumstances but what happens is then technology changes exploitation changes and the new scenario doesn't fit with the old law and considering how long the legislative process can take is there a technological solution to combat deep fake porn a falsely that will work in this area cotija media frenzy six all were actually playing this i will say you balanced catherine malls game i'm eric webber and this is chips with everything.

gale scott british government england wales eric webber lex
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"Or a remote touch device or something that you may feel that you are interacting much more closely, the person using these remorse systems, but that can create a scenario where you will feel less the need for physically traveling to the person and interacting with them. And that can be bad thing. From a social perspective, technology has two sides of the coin, and we should always make sure that the social and the fun aspect of literally meeting somebody touching hands hugging, and interacting physically them does not go away with the distant technology. Say they exhibition may talked about in the first half remained contact, expose as it says, how creative uses of technology might enhance feelings of connection and tackle isolation, other any ethical risks to trying to use tech to do that kind of thing, or maybe as there are risk that focusing on these more creative. Technologies can distract attention and resources away from other things we should be focusing on when dealing with this kind of thing. So I'm personally believe that technology can be very powerful to enable much more immersive. Experience for for many people. So if you compare the teleconferencing systems of today to the just these patchy phone systems from ten fifteen years ago, we can affect to Lee hold full-fledged interactive meetings with people. That is, that is a good thing. So I definitely don't think that doping that kind of technology is inherently bad. What it should not do is replace the actual physical contact and the physical. The need for meeting people on physical one to one basis. If we use the technology with the right level of restraint in terms of enhancing current capabilities, I think that is a very good thing. What would you like to see technology bring to the practice of carrying for people? So physically getting to a stage where the ratio of carers to people who need the care is becoming completely skewed. So even if we wanted this kind of human touch and human one on one carrying scenario, it may not be physically feasible for that to happen just because the demographics of the way things are going. So one creative. An interesting way of using technology would be to use them for doing all the sort of more mundane routine things in caretaking situation. So it could be beds which cleaned itself or pill dispensing systems, medicine dispensing systems that operate automatically on a routine without having a human. So this would free up detain that care would need for more human social and cognitive level interactions. Potentially these people could provide physical companionship rather than doing the more mundane jobs. Before we sign off this week, let's dive under the sea off the coast of Orkney by Microsoft has just sunk a big white cylinder containing several of its computers. This data center has been submerged in the name of energy efficiency for which the Orkney islands are renowned. The theory is that keeping the data center on the water will prove a cheaper way to keep those computers cool, cutting down on energy costs. Hyperbole. None of them break while that down there. I'd like to thank professor Kerry Jewett of UCLA. I'm professors set. We've agenda of Edinburgh University for joining me this week. Special, thanks to Katherine vaccine. Dale of invisible flock. Taking me on a tool of the remixed contact exhibition. There will be links to the in touch research project led by professor to it and the center for robotics Edinburgh University. In this week's episode description on the guardian website. You'll also find a link to the UC l. festival of culture 2018 which featured the remote contact exhibition alongside events on everything from sex migration to medieval Dokes. I also want to hear from you if you have any questions or suggestions. Topics feature shows drop me a line at chips podcast at the guardian dot com. I'm Eric Webber. Thanks for listening. For more great podcasts from the guardian. Just go to the guardian dot com slash podcasts.

professor Dale Edinburgh University Kerry Jewett Orkney islands Eric Webber Orkney Microsoft Dokes UCLA Lee Katherine ten fifteen years
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

05:16 min | 3 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"The the guardian. We getting more and more used to talking to robots. I'm Siri, you're virtual assistant personal assistance, like the one on your smartphone or in the home, like Amazon echo a growing in popularity and kids love them. A friend of mine has two young sons who regularly call for the echo to play their favorite music will tell them joke, but every now and then she worries about the possible consequences of his sons learning to balk orders at something designed to sound like a human, especially when although you can usually change the settings. Most of these panelists default to a female voice. In last week's episode. We mentioned in our tech fact of the week that Google has introduced a new feature to the Google assistant designed to encourage kids to be more polite and that interactions with their friendly home robot by rewarding them for saying, please by saying things like thanks for asking so nicely at turns out, then the only ones who think kids might need a little encouragement to stop them from abusing machines verbally, or even physically. Children's show abusive behavior like walking its path or dragging, or even kicking the robot for farm. But do we need to be worried about the way that we learned interact with robots? Is that any risk that it'll impact how we interact with other humans? And does that change when companies like Google also trying to make that oughta facial intelligences sound as deceptively human as possible. Agent is not a human being, does not have the capacities, the beliefs, you know, the knowledge, all of that of a human being. And so by speaking with a human voice didn't, it's actually in some senses deception, and it's misleading people into what it is the might be dealing with. I'm John Eric Webber. And this is chips with everything. Children push boundaries. The natural experiment is if something moves or make sounds, they want to see how far it will go how loud it can get, and inevitably what it'll take to break it. Now, scientists from the novel labs in Seoul, South Korea have taken that concept and designed a robot that capitalizes on the natural curiosity of children to teach them to treat it with Kath. It looks like a giant tortoise and its name is Shelly. Hello? Hello? Hi, who are you? Can see my producer Danielle Stevens spoke to one of the minds behind Shelly Hinz in GU. Shelly is a rebel interacting with children while restraining triggers robot abusing behaviors, Shelley as a tortoise, like friendly appearance and touch face, simple versatile interface, which encourages Trajan to interact with the robo spontaneously in involvement such as kindergarten. Why did you and your team decide to build Shelly a redesigned Shelly, mainly for two reasons. Firstly, we want it to make our social robot capable of one too many interaction with children because most current social revolts are only capable of one to one interaction. Also, it is observed that service dribbles are abused by people, especially by children. These behavior hampers the rubles mission as frustrates is social acceptance. Children show abusive behavior on around like walking its path or dragging or even kicking the robot for farm. Thus our robust Shelly is designed to enter was true dren while choosing education propose in terms of refraining robot abusing. Is this not just a case of children being children, you know, with all toys, they kind of have this destructive path or do you think there's something more psychological about why children of us robots there? There are so research is going on about why Trajan abuse Roget's in that researches. They mainly says the reason news city. The first reason is the curiosity. Tell me a little bit of the technology behind Shelley. Hi, did you create? Okay. We carefully designed a Shelly design concepts rebound hole. The previous research has shown that is k. ping abuse situations by the verbal warning is not effective because it turns out it only encourages churches. Curiosity more. Therefore, the rebel should use another mechanism that not only gives negative feedback to triggers abusive behaviors, but also maintain just interest. To the robot. So the turquoise

Shelly Google Shelly design Shelly Hinz Roget Shelley John Eric Webber Siri virtual assistant Seoul Amazon Trajan South Korea Danielle Stevens Kath producer
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"About. I think it's possible to ever get to point where children con surf these kind of platforms on not be at risk of seeing distressing content or such as the way the internet works. So I think in walled gardens, which all you know, as we say, Milton moderated if you like, God it by humans. I think that is possible, but I would regard this little bit like the way that we try and children, you know, in terms of accessing the the white awhile that you might want to start your youngest children out with these very protected environments. But as kids get older, they need to learn how to deal with risks. You can't keep an individual garden, be safe environment until they're eighteen and then say, go deal with the world and expect them to manage it well. So I think, yes, for the youngest children, we win increase in me see and should see very safe environments which are more many human moderated documents in various narrow way. But I think for all children, I'd any will see that unidentified. We should see that. I'd like to thank Dr. Vicki Nash of the Oakland internet institute. Andy borrows the SEC for joining us this week. Before we go. It's time for interesting tech fact of the week. Those you need to monitor the alcohol consumption may one day be able to do so without a Breathalyzer, oh, an invasive blood test researchers at the university of California have created a prototype of tiny sensor implanted under the skin that measures the amount of ethanol in the fluid between your cells designed to draw Power from smart watch. If you have any fun tech facts questions, feedback on the show. And if you have any ideas, cool, digital stories that we should cover infuse Rapids, email us at podcasts at the guardian dot com. I'm Eric Webber. See you next time. Great podcast from the guardian just go to the gaudy dot com. Slash podcasts.

Dr. Vicki Nash Eric Webber Milton Oakland internet institute Andy SEC university of California one day
"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"eric webber" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"See for people who want to shell out revert to reality headset of their own or have access to one three work like I do via arcades are great way for most consumers to try out this still developing tech, especially if you want to play in a group. And it might have made me feel queasy, but I'm still going to get a copy of job simulator for myself. My thanks this week to Matt, Matt and Alexander cerita, forgiving me a tour of that VR arcade and chatting to me about the future of this gaming medium. You can find a link to DNA via in the description for this episode on the guardian website. Thank you for listening. We're going to start adding an interesting tech fact from the week the we thought you'd like to hear about. This week. We look to fashion giant Chanel, MIT technology review reported that chanels six, three D printers can produce fifty thousand Mus Kara brushes day. If you have any interesting tech facts for us questions or feedback on the show or ideas for cool digital stories that we should cover in future episodes, email us at Poku at the guardian dot com. I'm Eric Webber. See you next time. For more great podcasts from the guardian. Just go to the guardian dot com slash podcasts.

Matt MIT technology review Eric Webber Poku Alexander cerita