20 Burst results for "Eric Topol"

"eric topol" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"eric topol" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"You're listening to ted-talks daily. I'm Elise Hugh. All right, let's picture a robot. You're probably imagining it with hard machine like parts, right? Roboticist in Ted fellow, Robert catman is reimagining what's possible for robots to make them softer, more lifelike and more capable of discovering unknown parts of the world. In his talk from Ted 2022, he lays out a vision for machines to take on mesmerizing new forms. Hear from him after the break. Hey, I'm Stephen Johnson. Host of the Ted interview podcast. On this show, we talked to some of the world's most interesting people. On the latest episode, acclaimed physician and author Eric topol reflects on the profound advances in medical science brought on by COVID. You know, a lot of people think that things have failed, the vaccines have failed, or whatever's fail. It's really not. It's the virus. It's just succeeded. So well, it evolving, check out the Ted interview on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Modern engineering focuses on the rotating motors to power almost any machine. It's taking about 200 years for motors to become what they are today. And they are still loud and unnatural in their ways. The constant noise of machines causes problems for living beings everywhere, both in the ocean and also on land. Humans who are constantly exposed to noise can become stressed, depressed, and even develop tinnitus. In contrast, there are no rotating motors in nature. Nature often smoothly clydes swims or wiggles. We found the rattling of richer parts or the loud rubbing of surfaces. I believe we can and should recall our approach to how we make machines. Instead of using Richards or unnatural materials, what if we made biomimetic machines, machines made of soft or living materials that adaptive and safe to use in a variety of everyday tasks. Can you imagine boats or submarines that propelled themselves by moving their tails from side to side just like fish do? So to imitate these natural movements, we have to replace rotating motors and fast spinning propellers with artificial muscles. And they can tell you this, this can be done. Our team of researchers at MIT and ETH Zürich has started to develop less disruptive robots by introducing a new biomimetic way of moving through water. We created a biomimetic robotic fish. Her name is Sophie. She's the first demonstration of a fully untethered soft robot that can explore the ocean without the need for propellers. Sophie pumps water back and forth within a highly deformable tail. Her tail movements imitate the natural swimming motion of real fish. Sophie's natural design allows her to closely monitor aquatic life. No. There's a catch. Sophie's entry hungry and loud. Yes, we successfully managed to build a robot that swims like a fish, but. Sophie required a motor and a pump to properly work. Now, we are replacing that motor and pump, which is noisy and not desired in such a way. We replacing it with silence, artificial muscles. These muscles are called hazels. They directly and efficiently convert electrical energy into muscle contractions. Take a look at this large muscle we made to lift and lower a lack. A stack of flexible sheets contracts and relaxes just like a thigh muscle dust. Let me tell you how this works. So we take laminated sheets to create pouches. We have several of these pouches within a single muscle. We now take a conductive ink and spray coated ink onto these pouches, and then we inject them with oil. After having done this, we have a conductive ink that acts like a flexible electrode that squeezes these liquid filled pouches when a voltage is applied.

Ted Elise Hugh Robert catman Eric topol COVID Sophie Stephen Johnson ETH Zürich ted motors Richards Apple MIT swimming
"eric topol" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"eric topol" Discussed on WBUR

"Lots of comments reaching 50,000 Facebook users. Heber wrote that she's a Muslim, and that she wore a hijab for more than 20 years. She says, I do support women's right to choose, whatever she wants to wear, give people the right of choosing. But kipchumba says there's truly honor and respect for women who put on the hijab. We've witnessed the abuse of women's bodies in the name of advertisement, unfortunately perpetuated by male gender. COVID, is it back? Did it ever go away? This next story popped up in more than 400,000 Facebook feeds this week and got lots of you talking. Well, the BA 5 variant is a significant challenge to us around the world. And it has features like the immune escape infectivity, blocking to some degree our innate immunity. These are real challenges that we're trying to cope with really throughout the world now. BA 5, as you say, is causing big problems in America where you are, give us a sense of the picture there then. Well, it's not a good one at all We have a rise in hospitalizations, about 25% in recent days. It's hard to know about the cases, but our positivity rate is extremely high by one measure, the highest in the pandemic, including the massive surge of omicron, but we have very poor vaccination boosters, second boosters in high risk people. We're 67th ranked in the world of countries for booster shots here. So our immunity wall is not good, and we also are not aggressively pursuing the variant proof vaccines and the nasal vaccines. Is that in part because people feel that, yeah, there might be a lot of COVID around, but I'm probably unlikely these days to die of it. Right, you're wrongly, but is there that feeling out there? Well, there's a feeling that there's no pandemic among a lot of people that are just in denial, you know, just this idea they can wheel it away, which it can't happen. That was doctor Eric topol, the director of the Scripps research translational institute in California. He was talking to newsdays, James copnall, about COVID, complacency. That's people hoping perhaps and wishing that the pandemic has gone away when in reality the virus is still with us and constantly on the move. There are more than 500 comments about this with people debating the threat posed by new types of the omicron strain such as sub variants, BA 5. Jenny writes, it's been said over and over, complacency costs lives. It's shocking how many people are spouting. We just have to live with it, like it's as harmless as a cold. But patty replies bring it on and what happens happens. No more inept vaccines for me. I've had COVID-19, it was no worse than the flu. Also, beginning to rise up in your social media activity and online searches, the marburg virus. It's a highly infectious disease in the same family as

kipchumba Heber Facebook Eric topol Scripps research translational James copnall America California Jenny patty flu
Covid-19 cases continue to rise

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Covid-19 cases continue to rise

"COVID-19 cases continue to rise According to the CDC the daily average number of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is just over 126,000 but Eric topol the director of the Scripps translational science institute says that's a huge undercount The real numbers of new cases is extremely high It could be as high as 7 800,000 or even a million new cases a day right now And that's due to the more contagious BA 5 variant It's causing an increase in hospitalizations And it's lasting longer infectiousness for the average person than prior variants Although he adds immunity from previous COVID-19 cases may help along with vaccines and booster shots I'm Shelley Adler

Eric Topol Scripps Translational Science CDC U.S. Shelley Adler
"eric topol" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:29 min | 7 months ago

"eric topol" Discussed on WCPT 820

"It is the Stephanie Miller show We apologize if having Jody and I here together having people that are right all the time is annoying to you We can't help it right It's hard being the smartest It really really It really really is What if we said so many times Jody COVID's not over COVID's not over Okay By the way so Chris Hayes is off He has COVID Stephen Colbert is off They're not taping Late Show He said he had symptoms again they weren't sure if he still has it He was just James Corden has it And he just talked to lily and Jane last week I'm keeping an eye on that situation Yes yes Kofi says remember when the pro life party wanted to sacrifice the elderly for the economy This is the most pro death party Yes Obviously See I'm just tying it together with COVID Okay Yes one of the doctors I follow said feeling discouraged to see another wave hitting when we had multiple warnings knew it was airborne and we knew how to fix it Now they're holding up funding and they're sure another wave is going to have a full on in the fall and we're not going to have enough vaccine because Republicans in Congress have decided COVID's over right I mean another doctor I follow mask up mask mask mask N95 circa 95s not the cloth or surgical ones outdoors you should be okay indoors with others you need to mask Seriously just get in the habit You don't want to get this again and again Your brain heart lungs kidney pancreas and liver will thank me Oh doctor hotez The doctor that is on TV Do me the doctor doom He said looks like I've tested positive for COVID Moderate symptoms of fatigue headaches sore throat isolating at home doing Zoom meetings I'm grateful to have been vaccinated and boosted which certainly prevented more severe illness just started pax levoy transmission Please be careful Uh oh this one Eric topol says the transmissibility of BA two one two one This is the new one It's extremely high Well beyond omicron BA one and BA two and we are seeing so many vaccinated and boosted people where risk of whose risk avoidance practices have not changed but they're getting infected and sick Please gear up Don't let down And doctor Tom frieden said as COVID continues to spread we all have a responsibility to protect the most vulnerable among us by taking reasonable precautions including masking up in higher risk environments or one community spread is high and staying home when sick Okay.

Jody COVID Stephanie Miller Chris Hayes James Corden Stephen Colbert Jody heart lungs kidney pancreas Kofi hotez fatigue headaches lily Jane Eric topol Congress Tom frieden COVID
Scientists worry virus variant may push up COVID cases in US

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Scientists worry virus variant may push up COVID cases in US

"Some scientists are worried that the latest virus variant may push up covert nineteen cases in the U. S. Dr Eric Topol who's the head of the Scripps research translational institute says it's inevitable we will see a BA to wave here adding the uptick should start in the next few weeks one reason pandemic restrictions have been lifted across the country and many people are taking off their masks and returning to restaurants and theaters right now the CDC shows overall covert nineteen cases have been trending down but they share caused by the highly contagious B. A. two variant is up significantly accounting for thirty five percent of new infections reported last week I'm Shelley Adler

S. Dr Eric Topol Scripps Research Translational U. CDC Shelley Adler
"eric topol" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:41 min | 10 months ago

"eric topol" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"This course and I look forward to welcoming you to be a part of the transgender community. Okay, now back to the show. Yeah, you say what if there was a way to prevent 99% of COVID deaths in 96% hospitalizations, safety was validated in billions of people. It was free and there was an unlimited supply. So fair enough. Fair enough. If we all use them, if we all took the vaccines and boosters, you know, this pandemic would be not very concerning at all, but obviously today we will hit 900,000 confirmed deaths. We have a lot more of actual excess mortality and men's amount of morbidity, which was much of it unnecessary, especially after the vaccines rolled out. Do you see it with any legitimate concerns coming from some of the anti vaccines? Do you ever hear anything where you're like, you know what? That's fair enough. We don't have the full data yet. And so maybe we should keep an open mind about X, Y, Z or anything in particular, you could think of at the top of your head. Well, I don't have well, let's put it this way. After you've given over 10 billion doses for there to be claims about safety concerns or lack of efficacy, it doesn't work. I mean, these are all completely bogus. All right? I do share the anti vaxxers typically are very strong proponents of infection acquired immunity. The buzz term natural. And I actually see that that provides a very important type of immunity, which is complementary to vaccines. And I've argued strongly with the CDC that people who have had a confirmed infection should be recognized as having some immunity. At least equivalent to one dose of vaccine. And that would have reduced the polarization between these groups because you can understand if you gone through COVID, you don't feel that you should be mandated to be getting two shots of a vaccine. So this is why I think this lack of recognition of a large body of data about prior COVID. Natural immunity, to me, it's sickening because basically not only is ignoring the science. But it's also making the divide even more intense than it needs to be. That's really unfortunate. I mean, there's concerns about various side effects that may come obviously the myocarditis. Controversy. And I've been looking into that and if I just do my usual Google scholar search, I don't find many papers that argue that at risk is greater with the vaccine than if you get COVID itself. There's some if you hone in or you double click on very specific age groups among males and maybe the second shot is a higher risk than with the booster. Can you kind of set the record and where is the data on that right now? Because to me, even to me, as a scientist reading all these kinds of papers and reading the debates, it's still a bit confusing. Yeah, you know, it's been used unfortunately as against the safety of vaccines when I don't think that's true. It's unfortunate that in the teen group, not so much in the group under age 12, but in the teen group of 12 to 17, and in young adults mostly males across these ages. That is between 18 and 30 odd. There is an increased risk of vaccine induced myocarditis with mRNA vaccines. It's more with Moderna than Pfizer because of Moderna dose is much higher than that of Pfizer. It's almost a doubling there. It's extremely rare, though. And most of the cases are self limited. However, the point that you're getting at Scott is that the COVID induced myocarditis is much higher incidence, it's still low, but it's much high interest in the vaccine. So there is a risk there. It's in the second dose. It's mainly in males. It's barely shown up in the younger than age 12. That is 5 to 12. There's been 12 documented cases, all of them were self limited. They recovered. And that's among 9 million doses administered to H 5 to 12. Now, that's Pfizer. There hasn't been a Moderna in the 5 to 12 age group. So I understand there's a, I mean, I'm a cardiologist. I have deep respect for myocarditis. I can tell you. So the COVID myocarditis is more common from the infection. It's also more severe and worrisome. We don't understand the mechanism of the myocarditis from the vaccine. Some mRNA vaccines. They don't occur with other vaccines. It's troubling when you don't understand how it occurs, okay? I don't like that. I like to know why it occurs, right? But I would not at all hold back on using the vaccines in the teens because of this low risk very, very low risk side effect. So that's kind of where I'd sum up the data at this point. Thank you. I appreciate you being so reasonable. Doctor topol, it seems to me, and I just wanted to get your take on it that there are some topics that are taboo to even discuss. It seems to be to discuss the risks of over vaccinating young people. It seems like just a taboo topic in general, just even talking about it. I did find a very interesting perspective from doctor Paul offit who said that he did not personally feel young people benefited from boosters that he advised his own son against getting a booster and I respect doctor O Fitz credentials and his background. I just wanted to just have a reasonable conversation with you. Your thoughts about that. Do you think it's reasonable to even discuss and look at different sources of data to allow people to make the decision or not they want to vaccinate especially within certain age groups? Well, I mean, no Paul offered very well. We're Friends. I've interviewed him multiple times. I've been very surprised about his views about adults getting boosters because I think the data there is absolutely unequivocal for reduction of hospitalizations. The teens and younger children, I mean, there's obviously some divide there. It's harder to argue with the children because of their risk being low. However, remember, it's not just vaccinating for prevention of death or hospitalization, which the rates are low. It's also vaccinating because we know vaccines are reducing long COVID, which does occur in children. We also know that with children, we want to avoid secondary attacks to their parents and their network and their grandparents. And also we want to keep schools open. We obviously we missed out on that almost the first year of the pandemic. We sure don't want to keep seeing that happen. So there are good reasons because of the safety to use vaccines in children and teams. In my view, many good reasons. And there are the rare, very, very sick kids across these different age groups. Paul offit has been against boosters from the get go. Oh, a boosters of against all ages. And I have to say that among the various vaccine ologists and experts, he and a few others stand alone. They are not their views are not shared by the majority of experts in the field. I mean, you're obviously open to even discussing it and open to new day that may come out. Do you think it's possible that data could come out someday that shows that it's probably not necessary to boost the booster for certain age groups? Oh, we were just talking about vaccination in young age groups as far as the booster right now. The data that we have is 18 plus. I'm not talking about boosters of children. No, no, an or you could argue the teen story with boosters. If you want to maintain that high level of efficacy because of the waning issue, yes. But I'm not arguing here that boosters need to be given to less than age 16 because we don't have data in that regard. Wonderful. Thank you. Yeah. That was really I was wondering about that. Ivermectin. Okay, Ivermectin. So what confuses me about it?.

Moderna Pfizer myocarditis Paul offit Doctor topol CDC O Fitz Google Scott Paul
"eric topol" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

03:17 min | 10 months ago

"eric topol" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"For Pfizer now done for Moderna, likely will be done for other vaccines. But also, that final approval isn't for all ages, for example. I mean, they're separate amendments have to go in. So currently there's a lot of controversy which is quite understandable regarding this age less than 85 for the Pfizer vaccine, but the original was age 18 plus. I got an EUA that now has a final approval. But you know, we've already seen how EUAs can go off the track. So hydroxychloroquine had to be withdrawn. Convalescent plasma had to be withdrawn. So it's not just about vaccines. I mean, there's been drugs. There's been lots of rapid tests and PCR tests that had to be withdrawn. So EUAs are in a kind of tentative status. So I think it'd be really helpful for you to explain to our listeners a little bit why, as you say, this will go down in history as one of science and medical research is greatest achievements, perhaps the most impressive. I don't know if people really fully have the scope of why this is such an amazing scientific achievement having vaccines at the rapid speed it has. Right, Scott, well, here, I guess, references that it's taken about ten years on average from identification of a pathogen to a successful vaccine. But there are many pathogens where we never had a successful vaccine. Like HIV and malaria and a long list, okay? So the fact that we not only shorten the ten years to less than one year from the identification of SARS CoV-2. And it was successful with a 95% reduction of symptomatic infections. Is unbelievable. And replicated to two different vaccines. So it wasn't just a Kuiper compression of time where acceleration was also the super efficacy. At least to start with, of course, that change over time and with variants. So that is a momentous finding. It obviously builds on about three decades of mRNA efforts that require an amazing amount of perseverance. So it wasn't just a flash in the pants or anything. And you know, obviously it was facilitated by the sequencing of the virus that helped to build a template. And all sorts of major science steps that and large clinical trials that made this possible. So it's the culmination of a huge amount of basic science, clinical science and trials and I think it's extraordinary. And not only that, but these same vaccines that were against the original ancestral strain have held up now two years plus into the pandemic with a third dose given to a very different strain on the crime. Hey everyone, I'm excited to announce that the 8 week online transcend course is back. Become certified in learning the latest science of human potential and learn how to live a more fulfilling, meaningful creative and self actualized life. The core starts march 13th of this year and goes until may 1st..

Pfizer Moderna SARS malaria HIV Scott
"eric topol" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:12 min | 10 months ago

"eric topol" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"They've seen friends or relative either succumb or get very sick. And so they don't want that to happen and they'll listen to anything that has potential believability. But we'll leave ability as one thing. The data and the proof is another. Hey everyone, and welcome to the psychology podcast. As you know, I'm deeply interested in science and current affairs. In the era we are living through right now, I feel it's more important than ever to bring you topical conversations based in science. And that's what we're doing today. And we'll be continuing to do in the coming months. I have been increasingly frustrated by the spread of unsubstantiated information being spread all across the Internet about the pandemic. It's important to recognize that when we're dealing with a very new or rapidly changing phenomenon, like we have been with the pandemic. Even the scientific consensus can easily be wrong because there's not been much time for the rigorous replicability studies to be conducted or even sometimes to accurately measure the proper effect sizes. However, I also believe it's important that we don't create a false equivalency between very fringe ideas that are unsupported by the current evidence base and a scientific consensus that is grounded in rigorous methodology. This is why I sought out the council of doctor Eric topol on today's show, despite being one of the top ten most cited researchers in medicine and being extremely well regarded in his field of cardiology. He has also been a bright light on social media, shining a light on the best available evidence in the pandemic. He thoughtfully considered all my questions and was very careful to make clear what the current evidence base says. Without ruling out alternative possibilities in the future, in light of new evidence. In this episode, we cover a number of hot button issues surrounding the pandemic, including the potential use of Ivermectin to end the pandemic, the potential for increased risk of myocarditis among certain populations after vaccination. And we even discussed the role human psychology and human behavior has played in this pandemic. Ultimately, as you'll see, doctor topol is optimistic about the feature of the pandemic. An outlines things coming down the horizon that should give us hope. But as we discussed, the major problems tend to be human problems. Please leave comments on our YouTube page or on our podcast website. I'd really love to hear your reactions to this episode. So without further ado, I now bring you doctor Eric topol. Hi, thanks. I know you're a busy guy for sure you come and talk to me today. Sure. Yeah, yeah. So do you want to just jump into it? I'm ready. Good, good. Good, good. Well, first of all, I want to really thank you for talking to me today. I decided to do a bit of a PSA for my podcast. So a lot of information being spread all over and I've really appreciated your constant commitment in the public to try to show as much data as you possibly can. So I thought if we could kind of walk through some issues that would be really helpful. Can we start off by can you kind of tell our audience a little bit about you and your main area of specialization? Sure, Scott, I'm an old dog. You know, having been a physician scientist for 30 some years. I actually still practice as a cardiologist, but I also have a lot of grounding in molecular medicine, particularly genomics and digital. And at the beginning of the pandemic, I decided to devote some effort to try to help understand it, to help share what I hope is good information. So I've been staying on that in addition to all the other things I normally do, which is heading up the Scripps research translational institute here in California. Are you running all those tweets yourself? Because how do you have so much time? It's so helpful to us, but everyone comes from me every single one that since I've been on now what 12 years is over 40,000 every single one and that includes whether making graphs or doing analysis reading the articles or preprints. Yeah, that's what I tried to do is process the data. And put it out there and if everybody did that in terms of sharing, what they read, it was interesting. Or worthy, then we always get smarter faster. Do you feel like you're constantly revising your hypotheses in light of new evidence? Like were there any things a couple years ago where you maybe shared some data on Twitter and had some hypotheses, and now you're like, you know what I was wrong or that the data suggests that we need to think about things differently. Oh, sure. I mean, I think we've learned a lot along the way. I mean, one good example was the alpha variant where it looked pretty ferocious in the UK when we first saw it, the concern was it was going to wreak havoc here in the U.S., but fortunately, when it arrived, we were getting going with vaccination at full tilt and in fact, those were the days where we got up to three, four or four and a half million vaccinations a day. So we thwarted it largely. We had a very small bump, which was great. But if you were to look at as I did at the predictions coming from Europe, it looked like it could be a real concern. So, you know, there's a lot of moving parts in the pandemic, no less the virus in our response in human behavior and escape of new variants like omicron. So you can't possibly anticipate all you turned out that Delta and really did play out like alpha look like it was going to. So, you know, it was kind of a forewarning about where we might be headed, but it was a subsequent variant that actually did what was the concern for alpha. Okay, cool. Well, I definitely want to get into all the current and other juicy topics, but I just want to get something out of the way. Now you have no connection or conflicts with big pharma in any way, right? Not at all. In fact, if anything, I've challenged them throughout my career, but I have no relationships with any of the vaccine manufacturers or any of the obvious pharma BioPharma then factors of this pandemic. Yep. Okay, can you explain to our listeners what an emergency use authorization even means? Because you have a lot of people that are skeptical of that. And can you kind of set the record straight and then a little bit or always clarify? Well, I mean, we only had the fighting vaccine get it full authorization and Moderna, you know, just in recent days. So the problem with the emergency use authorization originally back in November 2020, when both of those vaccines and then subsequently others got this EUA designation is that it is, as it implies, it's not a full authorization. It's based on the sense that it's an emergency. And the criteria for such an EUA is may be effective. Three words may be effective. So it turns out that it's a way to basically get something out there, but you do want to eventually get all the data, which is 100,000 plus pages of data to the FDA for a full review, which called a biologic licensing application BLA..

Eric topol topol Scripps research translational myocarditis YouTube Scott California Twitter UK U.S. Europe EUA FDA
"eric topol" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news I mean Martinez and Culver City California And I've got tetro in Washington D.C. There has been a dramatic surge in COVID cases across the country This is primarily from the oma cron variant which according to the CDC now makes up nearly three fourths of all new infections And that means it is now the dominant strain in the U.S. It's making people wonder and worry about things such as it's safe to get together with family and friends over the holidays while in a speech today the president is expected to address that concern NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us now with a preview Good morning Tam Good morning Scott So Tam when the omicron variant first hit our radar right around Thanksgiving The president said it was quote a cause for concern not a cause for panic Now that we are seeing record setting case levels all over should we expect a shift in tone For the vaccinated he's still expected to say that is a cause for concern but not panic that people should feel comfortable celebrating the holidays Wear masks on airplanes is required rapid test if possible But essentially don't cancel Christmas But for the unvaccinated he is going to warn people again in stark terms that they have a big risk of getting severely sick and even dying We are seeing a lot of vaccinated people get this variant There was a case like that in The White House this week What can you tell us about it Yeah a fully vaccinated and boosted mid level staffer flew on Air Force One on Friday They tested negative right before the flight but tested positive on Monday The president has since twice tested and been negative both times But part of what the president is going to do is prepare Americans for the reality of omikron which is highly contagious that they're going to see a lot of cases just like this But if they're vaccinated and boosted they should be okay And he likely won't say this part out loud but The White House is shifting its emphasis to focus on hospitalizations and deaths and not cases so much And at this point in the pandemic they'll say it's March 2020 It's not march 2020 or even December 2020 There are more tools and hundreds of millions of people are vaccinated now even if the numbers aren't as good as they'd like I mean still the way that professional sports and life is shutting down makes a lot of people feel like it is early 2020 You're right that the hospitalizations are not at the same level because of vaccinations but still many hospitals are struggling filling up already This is expected to grow and grow How is The White House going to deal with this critical problem He's going to announce that about a thousand military doctors and nurses will deploy to hospitals as needed There will be ambulances and paramedics sent to hotspots to move people from overcrowded hospitals to ones that have room and fema is going to pre position supplies and ventilators to help with the search Will there be any new restrictions any new lockdowns going into place No lockdowns and no shutdowns other than those that are happening on a spot basis because of COVID cases and the resulting staff shortages And there's going to be an increased emphasis on testing They're going to quickly set up more free testing sites run by the federal government in places like New York where there have been long lines and in January There will be a website set up where you can go and ask for at home tests to be mailed to your home for free The president will announce they are buying half a billion of these tests That's a big increase and a shift And as previously announced you'll be able to buy them on your own and get reimbursed by insurance And Pierre White House correspondent tamariki thanks Tim You're welcome One group of people listening very closely to what the president will say today will be public health and infectious disease experts Yeah that's because with many Americans traveling to and attending holiday gatherings hospitals are bracing for another winter surge NPR health correspondent rob Stein has talked with some of those experts and joins us now Hey rob Good morning So the administration made getting COVID under control the central promise and focus Do public health experts think The White House has been taking the right approach on this You know the administration gets high marks for some things especially rolling out the vaccines quickly but the general feeling I've been getting from public health experts is that The White House is kind of put all of its eggs in one basket the vaccine basket and hasn't done nearly as much as it could and should in other ways Here's how doctor Eric topol at Scripps research describes the administration's response It's highly reactive There's no aggressive boldness proactive features whatsoever And others say that's why there's always kind of this sense that the country keeps getting blindsided by the virus and is constantly playing catch up Given that what are these experts want to hear today from the president This long list of steps that public health experts have been calling on the administration to do for months now So a lot of this may sound familiar and at the top of that list is tests Finally make those fast at home tests really cheap and even free and really easy to get if other countries can do that Why can't the U.S. tests are still way too expensive And they're too hard to find Here's Rick bright He's a federal former federal health official now at the Rockefeller foundation We shouldn't have to win The Hunger Games to get a test in America They should be freely available and they should be in every home so we can use them to know when we're infected now the president is announcing those plans to distribute half a billion tests for free beginning in January and experts say that will help but many say it's still far from enough and may come too late for the surge and testing is becoming increasingly important In part because of the new antiviral drugs that are covering that need to be taken right after someone gets infected I'm also hearing a lot of people say the federal government should authorize those new antiviral drugs fast and dramatically ramp up production of those drugs to make sure there's enough So what else do they want to see I mean obviously those are key things but there's a lot of other factors that could potentially keep this a little better Yeah for sure There's lots of things And many experts say something in the federal government should do is more to improve ventilation inside buildings and should be literally mailing high quality N95 or canon news to everyone's homes Maybe along with some free tests Those cloth masks just won't cut it in the face of a Macron and supper even calling for a national mask mandate at least for a few weeks And also why hasn't the administration finally required vaccination or testing for domestic travel If you have to get tested and vaccinated to fly from London to New York why don't you have.

White House NPR news Culver City California Washington D.C. Tamara Keith Scott So Tam NPR tamariki thanks Tim Martinez CDC rob Stein rob Good America Eric topol Scripps research Air Force federal government fema infectious disease
"eric topol" Discussed on 990 The Answer

990 The Answer

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on 990 The Answer

"Is put Today is the California To his greatest political recall challenge election of his life. Today Joe Biden was Gavin there Newsom last evening, and we're going to go into great is detail put about that. And later to this his hour, greatest political we are challenge joined of his by life U S Senate Joe candidate Biden was J. there D. last Vance evening and we're going to go from into great Ohio detail about that to talk And about later this hour vaccine we mandates are joined and by the kind of new U.S. partnership Senate of corporate candidate corporate JD oligarchy Vance and government from Ohio to try to crush to you. talk But first about I want to start with this vaccine remarkable mandates story. and the kind of From new the partnership Atlantic. of corporate oligarchy This is from the Atlantic, and right? government to try to crush Well, it you says But it's first from MSN, I want to start but they with must this have remarkable re posted story it right. from the Atlantic From the Atlantic. So the Atlantic This is is owned from the Atlantic by Lauren right Pal Jobs Well it or says she's it's from a major MSN investor but they must in have the Atlantic. reposted That's it right Steve Jobs, From the Atlantic widow. So the Atlantic is owned She's worth by 18 laureen to $20 pal jobs where billion. she's a major investor in And the Atlantic she is That's one of the Steve most Jobs influential widow She's people worth 18 on the right. to $20 billion Think of her as female George Soros. And she is one of the She has most $20 influential billion, and she's willing to use it. people She's invested on the right in now Think of this her as the female Emerson George collective Soros next hour. She We has have Alex $20 billion Marlow, who and she's will willing go to into use great it detail She's invested about in Lauren now this Powell jobs amongst The other things, Emerson We're going to kind collective of Co host Next together. hour we have Alex And marlowe who will go into Lauren great detail Powell jobs about laurene Powell jobs amongst other things we're gonna Investing kind of in the Atlantic co host together has always been And About politics, laurene Not about truth. Powell jobs Now the Atlantic investing in has the this Atlantic story, has which always is been the Atlantic being kind about of a Democrat, politics Super not Pac. about truth That Now the Atlantic is one of the most has important this story stories which that is I've seen the Atlantic published being kind of a by Democrat a mainstream super PAC media outlet since That is one the of beginning the most important of stories the Fauci that I've virus. seen published by Which a is mainstream our most reliable pandemic media outlet number is since losing the beginning meaning. of the Fauci virus So it says Which this. is our Some most states, reliable including Arkansas pandemic and Oregon, number recently saw is their losing covid hospitalizations meaning rise. Excuse me. So it says The this higher levels some states than including any prior Arkansas stage organ of the pandemic. recently saw their COVID hospitalizations But how do rise those latter figures excuse really me tell us But what the higher do those levels figures than really at tell any us? prior stage of the pandemic But Last how do winter. those latter figures This magazine really tell us But described what do those hospitalizations figures really tell us as the quote most reliable pandemic number. Last winter While quoting cardiologists, this magazine Eric Topol. described Saying. hospitalizations It's the best indicator as the of where we most are. reliable pandemic And number one hand. The death count While offers quoting finality. cardiologist But there Eric are lagging topol signal and don't saying account it's the for best people indicator who suffer of where illness we are but survived. On one hand the death count But offers now the finality Atlantic says they but were they're a wrong. lagging signal That and hospitalizations don't account for people who is not suffer the best illness way to but actually survived track the severity of the pandemic. But now the Atlantic says Instead, they the Atlantic were wrong says a new that nationwide hospitalizations study of hospitalization is not the records best way to released actually track as a the pre severity print today of the pandemic suggests that the meaning Instead of the this Atlantic gauge can says be a easily new nationwide misinterpreted. study of hospitalization records released as a preprint No, I'm today not. I'm suggests not gonna that sugarcoat the meaning it. This of this This gauge can article be easily really upsets me. misinterpreted For the last 18 No I'm months. not That's right. For I'm the last not going year to sugarcoat and a half. it We've been coming on This this article show traveling really upsets the country me I have given over 350 For the last 18 speeches months that's right in the for last the last year year and and a half. a half we've been coming on this We show have done well over traveling 400 the country I have podcasts. given over 350 We have done hundreds speeches in the of last hours year and a half of commentary. We have done And well we over have said 400 it almost every podcasts single turn a specially We have whenever done hundreds the Fauci Chinese of hours coronavirus of commentary comes up. And we have said at There almost is a difference. every single turn Of especially people whenever that the Fauci Are Chinese dying coronavirus from comes up covid and dying there with is a difference the Chinese coronavirus, we Of have people said. that For 18 are dying months that some from people COVID that go to the hospital and dying Go with because of a the broken Chinese knee. coronavirus We have said And they get tested for positive..

George Soros $20 Steve Jobs Joe Biden Lauren laurene $20 billion Joe Alex Eric Oregon Arkansas 18 Ohio marlowe last evening U S Senate Soros 400 Eric Topol
"eric topol" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Our unique value proposition will be the integration of this real time objective and personal predicted biometric. That we just talked about this. Continuous core body temperature net combining out with an established and engaged community into a platform and empower women to make these decisions so in addition to that biometric wearable saw we have a platform fueled by an app called kandara in qatar and engage social learning community. And it's the data interface for women on their healthcare journey where they can track a variety of both objective and subjective metrics that they can use to help them conceive a child or avoid contraception or track healthcare and. Dr so far has been downloaded about one point. Six million times and is used daily by about one hundred and fifty thousand women it's really a repository for hundreds of millions of points of data that allow us to mind for things like new indications applications and features on a d. personalized way and then we can use that data to create more efficient effective study protocols and then use the symptoms that women track in there for differential diagnosis and so then as we expand our roadmap for biometric devices using the continuous body temperature will simultaneously expand our learning and social community on kandara. So that women have both subjective an educational information to support their house thirties. That's really interesting and so there is this whole community social component. That already is is one point. Six million downloads hundred. Fifty thousand women already engaged on it. So it's something that you guys have been doing for a while an and and what's the response this far. It's exciting to see the response there because women are helping women. They're providing information they're posing questions are answering those questions. They're tracking all kinds of information on on there. They can track things like their symptoms. Their medicines vitamins their lab tests and then with the integration of these biometrics. We can provide insights that are necessary for them to answer their own questions about their own bodies and then on a macro basis to have some data to inform population medicine baba and so to be part of the community. Do you need to buy the device to measure core body temperature. So you don't. Kandara is a standalone app. Right now and we will be integrating that continuous core body temperature is an element in that dot an so you can do either separately but we believe the ultimate power will be the integration on the correlation of the state. Gotcha so that's where the two pieces come together right now. The offerings are are standalone. So so can women choose to get into the core body temperature monitoring platform. They can right now. We're in a limited market release. Okay and just getting market feedback on that kandara As the standalone app platform where they track everything has been available as you can see by the engagement in the numbers and then prayer right now. We've we've wrapped up a couple of clinical trials. We've got a couple of going. Currently and it is available. In limited market release in women who are interested in participating in that Consign up on the kandara website for that an in addition saul. We anticipate using that. Continuous core body temperature device as a wearable in clinical trials to be able to trap continuous core body temperature as a primary secondary endpoint for those trials because that continues core body temperature so indicative of therapeutic response at a number of areas fascinating and so just to to make sure. We're all on saint page. Preah is the measuring device. Correct correct okay. Got it got it. Yeah thanks for the clarification. yeah for sure. And if you wanna learn more about kim dara or or preah as amy mentioned it's on limited release but potentially an opportunity for you to learn go to kinara dot com. That's k. i. N. d. a. r. a. Just a fascinating approach in a very personalized way to address these questions. That that You may be having so amy. Let's spend a little bit of time around some of the results and outcomes. Tell us What you've seen thus far. That's that's help improve outcomes or made business better absolutely so as it relates to our first specific indication of fertility. Our clinical studies showed that this device preah was able to predict the fertile window. Two point six days before traditional ovulation kits. And so what that does styles. It opens up a woman's window to be able to get pregnant and from a macro perspective. I kinda pull out and look at the big picture. And i think how important it is to impact women through empowering them with information because right now so many cases health and wellness decisions are frequently made in a vacuum and although that's getting better a lot of easily accessible consumer information's reflective of full population. It's calculated by a mean of a group of people instead of information it's very specific and personalized based on real time data. For example a lot of times we go to get a diagnostic from our physician. And we go to a lab and we get a single point of time when we do get personalized information and that single point time may not decipher the patterns that are only detectable through continuous measurements. So that is one of the ways that this will make those diagnoses batter. And then we're using those data patterns to inform women of the specifics of their body to enable them to make better decisions as an individual and then providing that in this context of education and community where they can lean on one another to advance their knowledge and feel supported. Example that we've had numerous women report is that after previously having a miscarriage through the tracking of their temperature. And this is not even very high civility temperature. Dave identified a drop in their progesterone just days or weeks after conception and that by taking this information to their doctor. They've gotten the treatment that they need to maintain their pregnancy. Well you know this is such a fresh approach. Amy to a very will could be a very frustrating experience for a lot of women and families and it's it's really exciting to see what the promise here is. What would you say as you guys have gotten to. This point has been one of the biggest setbacks you've experienced an key learning that's made you guys even better. Okay i think right now. We're all living in the middle of this co bid season challenge just as a company. It's been challenges community. I'd almost be remissed by not focusing on that for us. It impacted our suppliers impacted our manufacturing process in our clinical trials and therefore market launch fundraising. Timelines but i think that the key learning saw maybe it's just a reminder is that under pressure is were diamonds or formed and that's the case both on a macro perspective of what's going on in just healthcare as well as for us a premature. We see that remotely delivered. Healthcare is advancing with the support of these digital data technologies. Eric as eric topol. Says you know it's not necessarily the solution to this current crisis but it'll be one of the lasting consequences so for premature cam. We've really during this timeframe. First of all we support that shift to telemedicine but in our process we i had to move our clinical trials to a virtual format and we were set.

Kandara kim dara qatar amy saul Dave Amy eric topol Eric
"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Yesterday there was this fascinating story in the wall street journal. Ketchum idaho has plenty of available jobs but workers can't afford housing now. If you read that headline could leave your eyes. I don't blame you. How could there be such a terrific place to work with nowhere for those workers to live simple when rich people untethered from the office. They don't go to places that have lots of spirit housing capacity. They go too far. more exclusive. locales it's simply can't handle the new onslaught. Whenever i see a story like this when i almost can't leave the building naive today especially considering that many journalists tend to be pretty cynical we know. The pandemic has created a hybrid work environment. Have zoo move travel which means lots of wealthy people can now live far away from where they work and pay any amount of money for a house in the country country certainly more than anyone can in the existing population. The phenomenon catch him. Idaho's playing across virtually every scenic little down in america. The cities are empty out in a horde of rich people descended upon the country. Something nobody could possibly have seen coming. It's almost though there is a rich rush like the gold rush where people have lots of money flocked to a particularly gorgeous area and very strange things start to happen because the local resort based economy and it is resort base. Just can't handle the strain. You know what it reminds me of a trip that we took may have money to the bach in north dakota back during the shale boom decade ago. We wanted to see it firsthand. I make sure that we take a look at the. Mcdonald's is in that area. There was one by the way in the town of williston in the heart of the giant oilfield. We're workers made twenty six dollars an hour because that was the only way that could afford to live in an area where the cost of living skyrocket that mcdonald's could have chosen shutdown rather than pay higher wages. But there was a two businesses justify going out of business however it wasn't a like that originally when the shale boone began they couldn't find any workers whenever you hear a company say that it's that you want us code for. We won't pay people enough to work here that mcdonald's and showed me how you deal with labor shortage created by booming economy offer enough money and you'll find plenty of workers that's the solution and it's going to have to happen in places like catch him idaho. The rich rush is bringing tremendous demand for all sorts of services that the wealthy can't live without. If you want a piece of that business you'll have to pay workers a lot more than you used to. Because the cost of living's places a story that's an unintentional consequence of remote work. We've got a situation where rich people can live in places where they just used to vacation. Now we're in the toughest moment. The moment i observed. When i talked to business owners in the boxing you see they'd seen something similar before there was an oil boom and then went bus not that long before this one. So all the businesses that expanded ended up getting crushed. I think we're seeing this wrenching stories because business owners are afraid to invest in expansion. Only to find that their new patrons have been called back to the office if the hybrid workplace goes away that could end up like the balkan shale region we're former boom towns are now fighting ghost town status but i know how this place out slowly but surely businesses these towns will realize that untethered white collar workers and the ever improving. Zoom economy have created permanent mismatch. It's action with catering to they don't provide these services than someone else will step in and solve the labor problem by doing what by obeying people a lot more like that in thousands north dakota where people may twenty six dollars an hour. The most beautiful parts of the country have tapped to come to grips with the notion that the hybrid workplace is really here to stay and if they wanna make money off their new rich neighbours they're going to have to raise wages when it comes to business. This problem will only take care of itself. I am actually more worried about the public policy. Side people work for local governments. Police fire people teachers. They could be driven out. I think don't get the reasons they need. But as for catch him and all the other vacation spots with lots of job openings and few people to fill them. There's a very simple solution as president. Biden has whispered pay them. Or just like in wilson. North dakota pay more or someone else will do it and make outstanding prophets in the process. Pay them more. I like to say there's always a market summer. And i just feel right here mad money. I'm jim cramer seeing tomorrow. The news was shepard. Smith starts now invest like a pro access. Cnbc's live streams around the globe unparalleled access to cnbc. Experts actionable investor incite and ideas. Start your free trial today at cnbc dot com slash pro..

idaho Ketchum mcdonald the wall street journal north dakota williston Idaho Mcdonald boone america boxing Biden North dakota wilson jim cramer shepard Cnbc Smith cnbc
"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"For having coming up economies reopening the delta variant threatening the pullman recovery continues and the doctor is in just we thought we've probably the pandemic this new covert variant start spreading like wildfire all over the world. We're well to the good shape. In burke with high vaccination as compared to the rest of the world other countries are having hard time. What is japan declaring a state of emergency and spectators for the olympics. Just early morning so we can't take the recovery for granted we needed to stay close to the story and if you want to follow pandemic you have to read everything from dr togo now at the very least follow on twitter please. He just published a piece in the new york times last week that the fda is fully approved the pfizer moderna vaccines which are still being administered under emergency. Use authorization frank. That's crazy so let's consult with dr a fantastic cardiologists founder and director that scripts are transnational science institute an nih funded program for this one individualized medicine and it's written a lot of great books. Dr tobe a welcome back to me of money agreed to be with you again. Jim all right doc. There's some serious stuff we gotta talk about. And i want to start with the idea that this this weren't going down very big last night. Because japan said no spectators new published a tweet just not that long ago about how about in uk. How bad this very really is. It gives us the real skinny on the delta. Very it sounds very bad to me. Well it depends on your perspective. The cases in uk are certainly going up and yes there's hospitalizations and deaths going up with them. But nothing like what has occurred in previous ways there on on the other hand in israel where there's even higher levels of vaccination perhaps even more potent vaccine because of only using fis on return. But they're the the case rise and there delta dominant just like in the uk. Maybe not quite as law. But they're doing very well. The case rises is small and essentially little beyond that. So you know depend on your perspective. But the places that have the most vaccination holding up well and places like indonesia. Russia south africa bangladesh. Many other places that have four vaccination rates are experiencing the worst waves of the entire pandemic. And that's a real problem all right so let's talk about united states. Just now there was snooze about how biogen may not be able to get away with. Its fifty six thousand dollar. We don't even know whether it really works so called stopping of alzheimer's which you and i both know it's not true. Somehow that happened it got right through got right through the fda they. We have millions of people taking a vaccine. That you just said has worked very well under emergency. Use doc if this were just made into a regular approved vaccine could we go to employers and say you can mandate it exactly. So here's amazing thing that you're getting hundreds of millions of people now have taken the amarna vaccines. There's never been an emergency use authorization for a new vaccine in history and so the idea that you could approve alzheimer's drug for anyone with alzheimer's with no data or evidence clinical to support it but not approve these vaccines for full. Use not emergency use. And then what you're getting at is once that occurs the day that occurs so many health systems companies municipalities sky. High schools. Universities are just going to make this requirement. So that's where we can get tens of millions of more people in this country vaccinate which will give a so much more protection against the doubt variant so who in what is supposed to be a progressive. Fda is standing in our way so we might be able to baby single them out and put a little pressure on. Well we do need to put pressure. Which is why i wrote new york times op ed. But there's no word you know there's not even any transparency about what's going on and we do know i think this is important to underscore these applications for full approval didn't just appear suddenly in. May they actually were being -serily given to fda for review because of this pandemic situation so the fda has had seven months do plan inspections to do review of all the data a manufacturing and they haven't said a word about what's going on and that's not acceptable. I can't believe they're not listening to you. You've been such a great authority okay. Well let's deal with another thing. We all have what i regard as anecdotal evidence of breakthrough cases. Nothing empirical though. We also hear that the breakthrough cases do not necessarily to death or even hospitalizations lot. Asymptomatic is it going to be empirical. We soon find out that breaks cases are much bigger than we think. And are those people who get sick or even a symptomatic could they suffer longer term from a long haul. Cova that we don't know about you got a couple of big questions important ones there. We don't really know the story about long kobe. Yuna breakthrough infection. Does this. nothing known. We're hoping of course that it would be a non-issue boat. We couldn't say at this point the breakthrough infections. You know it's still early The people that are going to be prone are going to be more advanced age or have any kind of immuno-compromised and certainly the delta variant is more of a challenge because it just published today in nature. It really got into this. Immune evasiveness of this version of the virus. So breakthroughs take time to show up so far. This country has had incredible track record of for lack of any symptomatic reiter infections. Ninety nine point five percent of the desert of occurred have been an unvaccinated people. So few of any serious infections severe illness has occurred in people vaccinated. But we're just now. Jim getting into the time. When delta is dominant in this country and it is showing up big time in certain states like arkansas missouri with poor vaccination rates and what that does is is people who have been vaccinated. They're not one hundred percent so you know some percent are going to be exposed to those people getting spreading covert. And we're gonna see more breakthrough infections and we'll see what happens thought. I understand that pfizer might be developing a backs. Vaccine booster that would just be for the delta vary. What are you hearing. Well they just filed for an emergency authorization for the third booster dose That's a an application that isn't approved by the fda. The problem with jim is not sufficient data to warrant that. We don't know whether people are going to need a boost your because just because the antibody levels come down the blood people may be cells that are on demand to make. Antibodies later and t. cells. So this might be necessary in people of advanced age or they are immuno-compromised conditions. But still there are no data to support. Why knee for a booster shot. Obviously it's an interest of pfizer but it may not be an interest of most people. Will i sure hope people listen to you. I feel like that. It is downright selfish at this point to not take the vaccine. What do you say one last thing. Why do you say that people who are saying. I'm anti vacs and i don't want to take what he's saying. Well this is the most impressive triumph of bio-medicine in history and to not take advantage of it. Not just for yourselves but for everyone that you connect with in your life is really extraordinary. I mean to have this great progress and not take advantage of it. It said because disinformation out there. Jim is profound. These are lives these are made up fabricated stuff. They've the safety and efficacy of the vaccine are extraordinary unprecedented and we should really take the benefits that they can reap for protecting us. Well doctor thank you so much for coming on. And for your sense as always dr eric. Topol of.

fda dr togo Dr tobe uk alzheimer's drug japan alzheimer pfizer new york times biogen nih olympics Jim bangladesh frank indonesia twitter south africa
"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Year. We got a way of. Ipo's that sorts of just kind of ridiculous levels really tainted the whole group before falling back to earth. Now some of the socks. I think are worth picking it. Oh but you got to be selected and you know what you do it which brings me the posh bar. The online resale marketplace mostly apparel. They came public with a bang. Injin right now the price of forty two good price but then the stock soared more than one hundred and forty percent on. Its first day of trading jumping one hundred one bad since then the stocks come way way down pulling back the thirty nine now. Let's blow its offering price. Could it be enticing. These levels these recent marketplaces have been growing like we. Slavery and posh mark has excellent numbers forty percent plus revenue growth in the latest quarter not to mention positive earnings before interest. Taxes depreciation amortization meaning. It's not easy. Money puzzles got a great ecosystem. Seven million active buyers nearly five million sellers many of whom are awesome. Basically content creators curated in their own works for their customers. Yes you can actually do so much cool stuff on this site this afternoon. We got a chance to speak with postmarks. Posh marx founder chairman and ceo. My niece chandra at the nasdaq stock exchange. I thought it was fascinating. I want you to take a look. I think the world is buzzing about the pandemic wardrobe purrs and i keep hearing poss- parks name when i hear about the perch while we are right in the middle of it because we have millions of people who are using us to ports their closet recycle and buy new things on the platform recycle meaning. This does not end up in a landfill which millennials and all the jen's are just trying to stop absolutely we save millions and millions of clothes from going to the landfill and really finding not just homes but once people that excited to wear these things everything. I'm very it's from posh mark and everything is found a new life on my body. Well did you find it at a posh mark party i did we had. We have amazing parties every evening but people buyers and sellers come together both in the virtual world but also in the physical world and we actually just last month had our first physical event after almost two years a small thirty percent gathering of all vaccinated people which was just amazing to see our community back in that it was. It was amazing so community is very special. People support each other. Our sellers are not only sharing items from their own closets but they spend more than half their time shading items from other people's plots so that promotion of each other and support for each other alive in the party. People were missing each other. They were hugging each other. That were tears of joy. They were connecting shedding tips. And i learned so much about our community people immediately. Say well it. How can you go up against cpap. How can they which is now invites him against real real. This is different model. Which talking about it really. Is we our social model. Where a community based model very loyal buyers and sellers that allows to have very long legs from the beginning we created a very simple partnership with our sellers twenty percent we take eighty percent. They and that has allowed us to not change our commissions for almost ten years now very different than most marketplace of his docking fees are simple simple clean partnership and. That's why sellers us and sort of shoppers. All right well. Let's let's talk about sellers my daughter sometimes. Of course it's dad. Don't bother me. I'm selling things on posh mark. If it's a business but i think it is it is it is people start by selling a few items out of their closet and then slowly discovered their superpower which is selling merchandising this stock to source items. They held my daughter for example. Help some of my wife's friends sell their items. And then this doctor discovered that superpower goes sourcing lifting and then this stock to create these closets people have built with seven figure businesses. What smart so they have people who literally started with their their their garage their their closet and now are making a million dollars billion dollars. Yes we've got. You know someone who started the business she was eighteen. She's forced model a single scarf from our mom. And now she has a pretty large business and bosh bar actually employs people get driven growing economy and opportunistic and empowerment. I know that you are empowerment. But i also have discovered that you lied now. This could be recently but you take a huge step for diversity. Inclusion there is literally on every single sacred close from every single religious group now available very not directly sticks and that was conscious decision diversity inclusion. We started by sort of saying okay. We gotta be filtered when we starting in my co-founder tracy. We looked at it but literally they were buyers and sellers from all different backgrounds. So we started to really encourage that whole thing and recently launched something called style tax. That really allow you to broaden that diversity in too many different directions and merchandise main different direction even stuff that we haven't conceptualized. Yeah all right. So let's talk. Numbers is the as we get vaccinated. You're getting more and more people as the trend line like this. What we certainly are seen real change in what people are buying for example things like bikinis things like jean shorts things which are basically used for going out up eighty to one hundred percent on the platform. Workers are starting to see a uptick. Thirty plus percent on the platform and workout. Clothes are actually seeing downtick as we sort of move from smith sense so we're sort of in a way starting to get people ready if you think about a platform like ours you go out you meet you go on a date you go to a wedding dress that you're meeting is now ready for recycling views for the last year and happy was sitting at home right. That's people are going to go out and just starts to kind of get that what you call this big pandemic brunch since starting to happen but i understand there are people who basically are saying. I am sick of it on vaccinated. I'm going out. I wanted to get rid of everything and start all new but all new meaning all new from posh mark on lou for posh market. It's really in a way it's it's a gigantic burge but your purge is value for someone else what you don't like. I like what i like. What i don't like you like so that's sort of this. Whole gigantic movement is so much better than taking these sloth and throwing them in landfill and sort of discarding them and what bosh mark. We do special. Is we really allow you to curate these items so for example when you're putting an item for sale you're not just like oh. Here's an item for sale. Just stick you cover shot. You can even create a video. We were talking about your video of these. You couldn't say the exactly exactly and so people get carried away and there's sort of these beautiful things in our platform. People don't leave reviews the leave love notes. You get a love note at the end of the process so it's really a much more social much more community oriented platform than anything you've seen but let's say you're just so you're at sea. He watches the show. He's bought deep. Poppy paid a lot of money for it. Why can't you just say okay people. I want community. I want social. I went this duplicate. It isn't that a concern. While i mean i think if if you've been something great people are going to replicate by the way love josh and have a lot of respect for him so absolutely but at the end of the day fundamentally what we built is social and simple for example one of the things we create a day one was something called posh post then you sell an item. You get a shipping label. You don't worry about the size of the item the physicality just ship it. That simplicity requires a pretty big bet to make venue sort of. Have everyone curated item. Just from your closet from other people's that's a big bet you make so all of these. Things are hard to sort of shift a platform in this direction. You gotta believing it you gotta live it and you gotta work it. I signed up. They've got one. I got an hour and free shipping. You're offering great stuff so you might wanna tell people if they sign up the it starts it starts instantly you start to build your community. Start to build shipping. You start to get sellers and really. The great thing is sellers building the community of shoppers and shoppers building. The community sellers. That feasts that stickiness that allows for those long cohorts do develop and if someone wants to get started toward building a million dollar business. What do you suggest. I would suggest starting to get great listings. Update great photos share. Follow people connect and build your own community and build your own dream on posh bar. Well is very very exciting. And i just think that what you've done is remarkable. That's minnie's chandra. He's founder and ceo of posh mark. Thank you sir. Thanks.

Posh marx Ipo chandra jen bosh bosh mark tracy smith Poppy josh posh mark
"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"The time at retail one hundred percent of the time. And you can use go to your favorite place walgreens. Cvs rite aid kroger. You can get better prices and more choice. Our ex and people still think amazon is gonna is gonna win this battle so they decided that. Because i'm tired of people saying not a one walmart okay other than the insulin which was very good. And we have to ask you whether your insolence. The same they've chosen not to compete correct. Other than generics. I mean walmart's been discounting into digital prescriptions for a long time for good or ex existed even and we've been for decades walmart did four in ten list and i was thinking it was like doorbusters where you're gonna put something cheap the but on an ongoing basis again good or will find you lower prices than walmer plus eighty percent of the time ninety percent of time to include the cost of one hundred dollar subscription fees. So it's like you know nothing's going to be the marketplace because we were very close retailers provide the best practices at the place you want to go to and so i just. I'm not concerned about these guys. I backed i'm closer than ever with these guys. Because they all want to drive. Is this twenty million better at using our services. We were remains the old right now. We've never been faster. Rolling on new initiatives. We were just crushing with all these new things like on doctor visits in our own mail order service so i just feel crazy confident and i wish the market would somehow understand that little better next one of the things that bothered me about too. Many singular names out because it may have been the pharmacist themselves but to the forms major chains was that they had it within their ability to know how much good iraq's was was charging and yet they paid me the full full freight which angered me to know in a third pharmacist. I went to and there's three of these right told me. Listen go get the good rx coupon. It'll save you thousands of dollars. I mean the system should be sending people to good rx. Well funny enough. The system actually does one of the greatest strengths that we have a decade of business. Is that doctors and pharmacists. Actually believe in good rx because they want patients to take the drugs they prescribed and they want the patient and not leave the counter frustrated. And it's very off for consumer their interaction their first interaction with cataracts is a pharmacist. Or doctor saying hey you should use this because it can help and it may even be lower than your insurance again. Commercial insurance is not what it used to be. And we're so proud again. Like with veterans gold. We have a thousand drugs for less than ten dollars. The average member six twenty six hundred dollars a year. We just had it right age expelled to so now you have over thirty thousand pharmacies. You can go to so. I think it's important that people understand that we're working. We're working with the business working with the industry. Doctors want this pharmacists. Want this. They want people to take their meds. They're good people and we want to support them in that mission and people don't believe just go in the web. It's number one waited rated website for medical for the last three years. You can just go down at the have them right. There they have the prices you're paying versus the prices you will pay. It's astonishing you have have written. Someone dies every four minutes in the us for not taking prescribed medicine extracted. Twenty or thirty percent of all prescriptions. The us not fill this with price. Not laziness cracked one hundred percent. I mean i can ask any that. They'll tell you that you know when the person standing at the counter and they say it'll be twenty twenty five bucks which base out low to you but for a lot of americans a big bite. They'll just leave it those like forget it. I won't take it and so people need tools. They need to have information and then they need to have the ability just like they do in any other industry to to say. I'm going to go here. Because i can get a better price here. I'm going to use instead of my insurance. You have to be an active consumer and we give you those tools so you can be smart and educated and take control your hair like you would with any other category. You just haven't been able to do it now because it's a big mysterious blackhawks and smart and educated that means vaccine suit. How many millions of people have you been able to help. Convince that may not have been back vaccinated. That it's worth it. Yeah i mean over. Two million people came to sign up. And what we did. Is we track inventory across the entire country every single place. That was doing a vaccine appointments but this was back when it was really hard. There was more demand than supply and literally. I woke up morning. I'm gonna solve because someone's going to solve. This is to be able to get access to prescription to to vaccines. And i'm very very proud of the work we did. I think we had the biggest tracker vaccine appointments. We've found people appointments. We did a a solid thing for for people and this was saving lives stuff. And it's what makes the. Its way i wake up every morning wanting to do and it's my dream product and i'm so excited that we got just ultimately helped me and finally because i think it's terrific the good rx door partner to provide gases nationwide with access to good are. We are all worried about the gig economy people. We all feel that to some degree. They're being shafted. David la anybody freelance. This country fifty three million people. You say are freelance. This is what they need correct. Yeah i mean. We're very often at our company. Were responsible people. Call us up at say help. I have a pain point or members of the pain points. Dr has called us up. Said out we've got all these dashers who can't afford their prescriptions. They can't stay healthy. We need healthy dashers and we said we can help you with this. Good eric's gold is incredible product. That can find you savings on. All your prescriptions. We also by the way just closed usa as well for their members. We're focused on trying to serve not just american consumers but organizations employers. Anyone that basically is finding these pain points and wants to.

walmart Cvs rite kroger amazon cataracts iraq us blackhawks David la Dr eric
"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"I think bond yields the sox could rise tonight. I'm sitting here with good our seo find out how. The company is working to make affordable health care more accessible to economy could more sustainable process shopping. Also make for winning investment. I've got this company. You gotta listen to see a posh mart and one of the top doctors in the. Us is flashing a warning signal when it comes to the fda and the delta vary with the fda do can do to help stay with. Kramer don't miss a second of that money. Follow at jim cramer on twitter. I have a question tweet. Gramer hashtag mad tweets send an email to mad money at cnbc dot com or give us a call at one eight hundred seven four three cnbc. Something head to med money. Dot cnbc dot com. What exchange is now a podcast. I'm brian sullivan. Join me as we hit the biggest money stories from around the world breaking down the risks and rewards of global trade. The news you need to know with real world actionable advice and even a little fun and unique content. You won't get anywhere else like the most random but interesting thing you'll hear all day subscribe to the worldwide exchange podcast today. What.

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"At jim cramer. May i kindly. Employees lightly asked the politicians around the world to cool it and stop doing more harm than good. Maybe do your jobs and protect us from real problems. Maybe support businesses that work and stop attacking them. Maybe stop shaking down winners and go after the bad actors instead on a day where the dow dropped two hundred sixty points as be shed pointed. Six percent nasdaq lost point. Seven two percent and believe me. It was much worse than a day. I put this selloff squarely in the labs of politicians around the world. Because we right now have a failure of global leadership. Nothing let's start with the obvious one the delta kovin variant which we're gonna be here from a later from the outspoken genius. And i mean doctor. Eric topol i here. In america. we are doing a much better. Job of getting people vaccinated the most countries but we screwed up big time when we made the vaccination process voluntary millions of people around the around the world. They've died of covet. Millions have been saved by the vaccines yet now. We have a new strain of the virus spreading like wildfire the parts of the country where people seem to be afraid of needles were politically against the process. I want you to compare that. With one of the great presidents present highs now who mandated that everyone get vaccinated against polio. As soon as we had to work in that seat i was. It wasn't some voluntary thing with the government recognized right to choose to get sick and spread a deadly illness to others. What police in part of that is now refused to botch under any circumstances. By the way we did the exact same thing was smallpox one hundred twenty years ago but today the rules we don't know of companies can force their workers to get vaccinated. We we don't even have the fda board neither pfizer's vaccine modernise have actually been approved. They're just being administered under emergency use authorizations. The fda will prove an alzheimer's drug of incredibly dubious advocacy but a vaccine has been one. Hundreds of millions of people is treated as an experimental exception. Maybe you think this is a technicality. But so many americans don't trust the vaccines and the lack of fifty approval. Sure doesn't help. I challenge the fda to explain themselves and their foolhardy behavior. They are just played off the reservation. Appoint all this out because today so off was all about the delta vary it especially the way governments around the world have dropped the ball containing. I was watching the futures emporium and they were soggy. But they took the real header. When we learned that there would be no spectators allowed at the tokyo olympics. What the heck was the jackie's thinking now. I couldn't understand this decision for wife. Me until i looked up the numbers. I saw that. Only fifteen percent of japan's people thankfully vaccine fifteen one five. I can't believe they would let the olympics go four without seriously preparing for major outbreak. But even now banney spectators seems crazy. I have another idea. Why not just ban. Everyone who's not vaccinated governments about the pr at the people's public china insisting on using its own vaccines even though they only work about this typically in best as well as a flu vaccine maybe eighty percent but some say is closer to fifty percent. Okay fifty percent. That's not enough. Now if they swallow the pride and went with pfizer moderna. There people will be much. They're old they will do that. And now china's economy slowly thanks to a resurgent. covert outbreak. Totally unnecessary yes. They could they could tie up with pfizer or madonna but would hope they do at least go with biotech. The partner of fighter. Now we know governments around the world have handled this fires portland. I think much of the week this year including the decline in treasury yields everyone's et cetera about that has to do with this very to. You should fear. Fear what it'll do to travel fear that it will mutate and break through the vaccine. The that's making investors worry about slowing growth you end up with this negative loop where people swap from stocks to bonds. That's plain and simple. What's happening okay. Believe i've done enough work behind the scenes to know that i'm not saying this eilly. It's not just that the world leaders keep finding new ways to script response to the pandemic though. Some socks are also getting hit. Thanks to hostile government intervention we know the democrats republicans hate each other right. I mean ridiculous. The only thing. They seem to agree on the facebook amazon alphabet. Apple are too powerful and must be broken up punished or something. They went investigate. Big tech sue them penalize them they want to pass laws. The hobbling like kathy bates did james caan and misery. One of stephen king's best. Although some of the scenes are hard watch yesterday after because alphabets being challenged on antitrust grounds for something we need no notices users. I mean come on sometimes. I wonder if the politicians from both parties are aliens. Maybe from mars or some who don't use these services. Hey maybe it's just that they tend to be really old. I'm looking at those ages. They've chosen to go after all these big tech companies that make our lives better and offer us amazing to the extent that. There's a really antitrust case here. Is that the bargains too. Good to the point where they unfairly haba competition but the solution to that. So-called problem is forcing say amazon raise prices. Thanks for nothing. Or how about president biden. Suddenly coming out and downgrading the rail. That's how i see is new. Executive order to combat consolidation allegedly anti-competitive behaviour of the rail industry. This is the first time. I've heard anyone accuse the rails price-gouging i see what else is doing. This is part of a big antitrust. Push but if you wanna be pro environmental president maybe it's not the best idea to attack the reels. They get four miles to the gallon making him our best hope for clean transportation. Maybe by just wants to block..

Eric topol fda jim cramer pfizer pfizer moderna olympics polio alzheimer china america jackie tokyo government flu madonna
"eric topol" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Bodies in the collapse. Condo tower rubble this morning it's up to 32 people dead. More than 110 still missing. Thousands of companies in 17 countries dealing with the cyberattack ran somewhere again. Foxes Rachel Sutherland live at the White House. Dave Casillas says his technology is usually used by small businesses like dense it's office and local restaurants. The chief executive of the company, Fred Nicola, has spoken with Deputy National Security Advisor and Neuberger about the hack, believed to be the work of the same Russia based group that took down the Colonial pipeline and May, South Carolina Republican Congressman Ralph Norman told Fox and Friends first President Biden needs to get tougher on Russia. They're not gonna stop, but with him just asking, so that's that's the most damaging part. Casillas says. The hackers are demanding $70 million Dave Rachel. President Biden will give a COVID update later. A lot of people not getting the vaccine in some areas. Approximately 1000 countings in the United States have vaccination coverage of less than 30%. CDC director Dr Rochelle will end scheme in the surge of migrants coming to the U. S. Mexico is proposing a staggered reopening of border Crossing City by city based on vaccination rates. America's listening to Fox News News radio K L B J I'm Patrick Osborne. This news is brought you by my furniture market dot com In less than a week, people living in public campsites may find themselves on the wrong side of the law if they refused to comply with police. Sunday marks the start of Phase three of the public camping ban and Matt Mackowiak with a group say Boston now says that the council continues to ignore the will of voters. More action will be taken. You cannot win a vote 58 42 then have city leaders ignore it. And so we're not going to stand for it. We're going to give until July 13 to show they're serious about enforcement. If they don't you're going to hear from us, I promise, And Mackowiak has said a lawsuit is not out of the question. Voters reinstated the camping ban more than two months ago. Austin City manager this week will release the proposed city budget for next year. There are a lot of groups who want the city to refund and re staffed the police department, the Greater Austin Crime Commission says as crime is rising in response times are slowing. The council should fund at least two new cadet classes and not unexpectedly drunk drivers kept Austin police pretty busy over the July 4th weekend. Police say 22 drunk drivers were arrested, but fortunately none of the arrests involved intoxication, manslaughter or assault. And only two of the arrest actually involves someone with two or more previous felony D W I s and it will be cooler this afternoon high about 84 degrees. I'm Patrick Osborne connect with us at NewsRadio. Kale BJ dot com Their lives local and they're talking about the stories that matter to you Share your opinions with Mark and Melinda at 51283605 90. Now here are Mark and Melinda 10 03 great to have you with us. Melinda's on vacation, Kenny Romeyer. Is here. How you doing? I'm doing great, Mark. Good morning to you. Good to have you here. Kenny. Alyssa is producing. Thank you for joining us. The Washington Post lead story this morning. Says a growing number of medical experts are urging the FDA to get moving to give full approval to the Pfizer Covid 19 vaccine. It's being administered under emergency approval right now, right? But these experts are saying that's the one thing that's holding us back. Kenny is we have a number of Americans who are hesitant to get vaccinated as long as it's under that emergency authorization, so they're now pushing the FDA to give it full authorization right well and in years past It's taken years for the full approval to come around. I read a Yale study that said the median time frame is about a year. So either way, you look at it Much as they would say, Yeah, let's let's do it. It sounds like it's going to be a while back in May, when Pfizer said, We're ready to move on out of the emergency approval, I was reading estimates that it might take six months to maybe a year for the FDA to go ahead and give it that final approval. Here's Eric Topol. He is director and founder of the Scripts Research Translation Institute. He's quoted by The Washington Post. He says full approval will reduce vaccine hesitancy and make it easier for employers universities in the U. S military to mandate vaccines. Well, that's understandable that you know some of the big employers. We've heard the Pentagon. That's one of the things that's kept them from making it mandatory after this point. And there's been callers into to your program here and others on this station of of those who have said they haven't taken the vaccine because they're waiting for that full authorization. And so I guess that'll be one way to really flush him out one way or the other, And it certainly gives any employer or the military. The legal Air cover to do what what they want to do, which is mandated Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that nearly one third of unvaccinated Americans say they would be more likely to get a shot. Once it gets that full approval from the FDA. That's one third of those who are not vaccinated right now, right? And I'm somewhat skeptical. Given some of the poll data that I've seen, Mark says. There are some And they haven't been vaccinated by now. And they're not going to be. So What's it going to take for them to? Uh, you know, to really go get a shot. I don't know if anything is going to do that. But in some cases, your right. Yes, but some this this might this might, uh Make it such given the Delta Varian, depending on what state you're living in, right? And if it's of if you've got community spread, that's you know, maybe way more than you're comfortable with. Maybe a combination of those things would say, Okay, I'm going to go do it. Let's do a completely unscientific mark and Kenny survey. There we go. We can do that. We like to.

Mark Eric Topol Dave Casillas Kenny Romeyer Dave Rachel Fred Nicola Matt Mackowiak Kaiser Family Foundation Scripts Research Translation I Kenny six months United States Rachel Sutherland 51283605 90 Casillas $70 million 17 countries Greater Austin Crime Commissio Alyssa FDA
"eric topol" Discussed on Museumspodden

Museumspodden

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"eric topol" Discussed on Museumspodden

"The veto under the ceiling with trying to reduce savvy guy is the hunger for nail. We'll be taught would also be stauncher are listening on tier of cheating on that route. The hans gov ankle dotting and lease the one day. I caught up. Tna to let doug that a two thirds of the other over all then. Dan for the city. And i would. The saw mail delivery must not dealing on autobahn would or and before martin's vest who she wants this so yen dare that she she dog on ellen wetter not dog at a t dog beseech hannukah special saw sharon would and again Offered eric topol remould tomb for allah vow dog difficult so before thought. Arlo more temple to him. Months on. morley here are not to say it all down. Okay and some stieg. Ning on t. Doggone the easter huffed no come on their own would to gory or business as usual device today off the holiday just make them more than i in utah continue thorough smith dazzle song beach lomnica. Plus man four rideau would shoot. Get hyman before we call would allow in lan need bustle and would soon ripping out ashim pontiac for enya full. Show on t. Nia dog if you sleep for. I for not fresh air with the bar or current and that will at given us mita border from four in nitny for shining illinois. Knit months carp also start to disarm until talking process and opponent. Dan men were umbrella includes ships button poet. God on elvis version from deborah Needs percent of automotive. I didn instructed. Mesh sheep This sobre waterford for him Hannukah the on Medecin that it shut off the onl- loop Bra What it used to get on meter so Vologda would also via off the mandated a vitamin destig- sheep so that the equal also free manifesto freedoms among scopes bit a lesson. brian For the lossing that can wanted federal goals some Plus tom that you can't smoke. The i'd i honestly gung although i we'll note decimal the shaddad onset and ten Via are photos eliana for static. Mon- scoppetta gifford logged Did shake brits men mad and sending off body congo alum All the young in the house irked on target opposite along. Tiered from indiana bahama. The cheap going on set. There is norman antarctic at ford swat on me. The had thought Ida and some knock i don fling on the heart. Set them that all will die. They'll hold them on sculpture onboard loss foot For nearly a so-called maseko at home for men ordered the space in body. Three till along the three along nova and the one giving snow some Some your promo doctoral provoked or weather. Alerts consequence on levers memo tank melted. Idaho possum part heck lot Hot audio also and stood for should poor for cheap cheap You'll bumping to do spoilt. Sahoma tutor is a gun tatum. Med athens boyd Already deductive without the some months calpe cuddle shape saudi than mostly near ship in the biggest man and sick. Throw mad at austin woman in the room from unscom Also a fight among scope or and ons twitting some some trad miles and miles on guitar work. I am not the fair caught on talented Emptying out of talk on talented and portal ten firms law on the audit by multiple. Talked that mama mama descent. The warm and repeatable accept good to talk to you to allow sick. Don't tell now the for on some pretty popula or there's got to be taught in what else that lever. Paul oughta diawara thought very very you didn't move are committed through divest all the columbine grammar would me other to some forty bhave shift an i give him pilot among is something illusion. Do call our recall to the blue already. Violence bluewater member does in saint louis dinner. I fire now. After this the order got madonna that in atlanta but generally cosc- defense listens out that the hogle photos vis game for the holiday. Care about These for the ring from tim. Notting someone conscious On this other than those a digital tortilla metric on me they worked on man that data emptying a hobby mica fire and the do not all smell so four hundred rounders. You'll be muslim. But i'm sure they are not the for caught and then still stole it either That see the Benson yana automatic. Call for all talk. It has moment did the multiple. Thank you the would afford ashley Against social justice plus get out there. There are muslim seacombe throw unfamiliar. The would dr john. Russell mid Watermelon unbelie humbled heckler. Make kitty this Matra lebron recom- tell bottle meant on show. It gives forgive fault sculpted or.

brian atlanta deborah today martin Idaho morley eric topol Ida john. two thirds Paul oughta diawara forty enya Hannukah ashim pontiac ten firms three tom four hundred rounders
Augmedix is Helping Doctors Focus on Patients with Ian Shakil, Founder

The Voice of Healthcare

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Augmedix is Helping Doctors Focus on Patients with Ian Shakil, Founder

"Tell us what is augmented. Do for those listening We've made these big claims. You said you had a moment. You went enterprise side. What do you do here as they say. An office space. Well we really address. Perhaps the biggest pain points in the lives of doctors all over the country in that is the tragic fact that doctor spend hours every day on the computer on the typing clicking charting not paying attention to the patients in front or doing productive tasks horrible for the doctor horrible for the patient in patient. Experience it really for the health system. In general dad is the problem we exist to solve so weadock. Medics give doctors. Phones that they put on stands orlando urge or google glass or even these days we hop on their telemedicine calls zoom calls in an either of those three modalities. Doctors used us. Use our service. We take natural conversation between doctor and patient and from that livestream we do the documentation. Emr noting ourselves so the doctors able to focus on the patient experience and have having natural organic conversation in the background are services. Structuring filling out epic sterner. Whatever the mars better faster than what a doctor would do on their own. The saves the doctor hours a day makes him really happy and retain increase documentation faster and better better in every respect really You're probably wondering how does that magical outcome happen. it's really Like i like. I like to think the union of Humans and software technology. What's going on is we're live streaming from the device from the phone or from the glass the audio and video tweet tech enabled. Remote scribe literally human thing of them as a guardian angel or a wing man from afar. And they're assisting with the conversation They're listening in seeing as that conversation unfolds on their distilling on summarizing that too structured. Note in the mr better and faster than what the doctor would do. And that scribe is sitting in a specialized scribe cockpit which is full of automation technologies. We've built so a natural language processing note. Builder that is constantly auto expanding auto completing the note very very quickly as the conversation progresses and has been described to invoke speech recognition Models that kick in for parts of the conversation and various other on templates and tools that have the net effect of really deep. Burdening scribe on in allowing them to be a really high quality and really quick You do in fact need a human in the loop to to make a service like this work You know. I i if you try to do this with so-called puree i in pure software. It just won't work Think of it. This way can even order. Dominos pizza on my alexa or book. A delta airlines flight on my google home let alone imagined a doctor-patient conversation with head nods and concerned turning into a note. So people get little asimov in what's possible. I think that you saying that really matters. Because you know when read. And i were visiting with eric. Topol in at scripts havens says he says. Look you're not taking humans out of. We're never going to do that. And it's actually a problem to even think we would finish your thought there and then i want to transition to your contemporary this joining us here and ask you about why he's here. Go ahead well. I mean yeah i mean. I couldn't agree more. I like to say that you know. We're kind of like uber. You have to build uber before. He built uber driverless. Cars can sort of come out of the womb Driverless cars and so our strategy an effort to improve ratios Using technology over time using workflow mastery in huge data in size on which we have

Weadock Union Of Humans And Software T Orlando Google Topol Delta Airlines Eric