5 Burst results for "Eric Sussman"

"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:02 min | 10 months ago

"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

"See me FDA his hands now an advisory committee gave a thumbs up to a corona virus vaccine. Despite some concerns, Theo FDA could authorize emergency use any time now on morning edition from NPR news. Some on the committee. We're concerned about allergic reactions. There's also a question about whether people as young as 16 should get the vaccine. I'm Noel King, and I'm David Greene, a physician who serves on the committee joins us this hour. Also so many Americans are struggling financially is the pandemic wears on. But lawmakers can't reach an agreement. And it looks like no more help before the holidays and contractors rush to build President Trump's border wall, even though his successor is expected to kill the project. It is Friday, December 11th, the actress Teri Guard turns 76. The news is next. Line from NPR news in Corvo Coleman. It's safe to say that the Food and Drug Administration will soon be granting emergency authorization to find her and by on Tech to distribute their covert 19 vaccine. NPR's Joe Palka has more The decision to grant the emergency use authorization is all but inevitable after an advisory committee to the FDA voted in favor of it Thursday. In the joint statement, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn and Peter Marks, director of the FDA Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Said they had informed advisor and buy on Tech that they would quote work rapidly toward finalization and issuance of an emergency use authorization. The statement goes on to say that the agency has notified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Operation Warp speed to be ready to execute their plans for distributing the vaccine. Oh Palka NPR news. Despite news of the vaccine, it will take months for it to be distributed to Americans. Meanwhile, the pandemic is worsening. Johns Hopkins University reports more than 224,000 new virus cases were reported in the U. S Thursday. Nearly 3000 people perished of covert 19. In Georgia. Early voting starts Monday for the state's runoff election for the two U. S. Senate seats. This is set for January. 5th vice president. Pence campaigned on Thursday for the Republican candidates. President elect Joe Biden will go to Atlanta Tuesday to stump for the Democratic candidates. Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler says this is no ordinary runoff election. Whoever wins this race if both Republicans winter, both Democrats when are going to control the U. S Senate, so the stakes are high, millions and millions hundreds of millions of dollars of pouring into this race? Got campaign mailers filling up people's mailboxes, door knocking and we've seen over a million people request an absentee ballot. This is not going to be a typical low turnout race, Stephen Fowler reporting. And inspector general's report says the secretary of Veterans affairs sought to discredit a veteran who made a sexual assault allegation. NPR's Quil Lawrence has more The Via his own inspector general had investigated the sexual assault claim brought forward by Andrea Goldstein, a Navy veteran and congressional staffer. But surveillance cameras at the Washington D. C V. A. We're not functioning and the investigation resulted in no charges. Then Secretary Robert Wilkie accused Goldstein of making unsubstantiated accusations, prompting a second IG investigation into whether Wilkie had tried to discredit her. That investigation found the secretary had tried to smear. Goldstein and his staff tried to plant negative stories of her in the press and failed to address the issue of harassment at that via facility. Wilkie denies all this. But he and his staff did not fully cooperate with the investigation. Quil Lawrence NPR news on Wall Street, The Dow was down 30 points at 29,969. The NASDAQ is down nearly 62 points. You're listening to NPR news. Tornado four. I'm Matt Dillon. With case here. W NEWS. It's no secret that the city of L. A has struggled to build affordable housing. But a case here W investigation has raised big questions about how city officials oversee the funds from the voter approved Proposition A triple H $1.2 billion bond passed to create 7000 new units of permanent supportive housing. One project in Westlake raises a lot of questions. It's a motel that's being converted into housing for homeless veterans. It's supposed to open in March. More than $30 million has been pumped into this renovation so far. And public records show that the development team increased its budget by purchasing the property twice once from the previous owner for $22 million and then from themselves for 30 million on the same day. Some of the funding for this project was based on that $30 million expense. Ah, value that U C. L. A real estate professor Eric Sussman says, doesn't make sense for this building just very, very superficial level..

NPR Food and Drug Administration Andrea Goldstein Robert Wilkie President Teri Guard secretary allergic Centers for Disease Control an FDA Center for Biologics Evalu Lawrence NPR Noel King Stephen Fowler David Greene Senate Joe Palka Johns Hopkins University Georgia Public Broadcasting Commissioner Stephen Hahn
"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

"When the pandemic hit back in March and the economy started to tank badly, You might have thought the housing market would also crash again. That didn't happen. At least it hasn't happened yet. In fact, if you're selling a home in Southern California, this market is for you. In August, the median home price in the region reached a record breaking $600,000. That's up 12% compared to the same time last year. So while it may be a seller's market for single family homes, it's turning into a renter's market for apartments. Rent prices are falling in lll a dramatically the median price for a one bedroom last month was around $2000 a month. That's down 11% from last year. How are both of these things happening at the same time? And what about commercial real estate with a large number of folks No longer needing office space at the moment for some inside Eric Sussman is Professor in accounting and realestate La's Anderson graduate School of Management. Hey, Eric. Hey there, Steve. How are you? I'm all right. It seems like we've got a lot of things going on at the same time if we weren't in the middle of a pandemic induced recession. How the heck is that The home values are breaking records right now in southern California. You know, it's it's a tale of several markets. I often asked how the real estate market is doing and I always heard chuckle because the real estate market is comprised of so many sub markets By and large the market's doing very, very well. If you're a seller As you mentioned in your introduction, you're pretty much a happy camper. The likelihood that you'll have multiple offers on your home if you price it, right? And you'll be experiencing higher prices and you would have a year ago your again you're happy Camper. If your buyer you're finding things fairly sobering, there isn't much inventory inventories sort of record lows. And there's multiple bidders on that sort of sweet spot in terms of pricing. Let's say you know that between say, 507 $100,000, but even upwards the home's upwards of a million dollars. You're seeing multiple bidders and really strong seller's market. You mentioned for for a number of reasons. What one of the reasons Well, I think again there are several. You always have to break down any discussion of markets on demand and supply. So let's talk about the demand side, and the most obvious ones are lower interest rates. The 30 year mortgage rates are in the high twos now. Which is Just mind blowing. I mean, I think if you told people several years ago that they'd be ableto secure a 30 year, home alone in the twos, they would have thought you were nuts, right? So that's really a big one cove. It has had a number of factors on the supply side. People aren't moving. People aren't selling. So they're just staying put. You've got baby boomers with tons of equity in their homes. That are just staying put. Meanwhile, again, the labor market is Not great. I think we will talk about that. But as result, labor mobility is down, so people aren't moving, relocating for you know for new homes, and I think they've just been pent up demand when the virus the pandemic hit and let's say, February March time frame and then in April, people just You know, we're locked up in their homes and stops. You had pent up demand, and I think that's coming home to roost a cz well here, so it's those sort of confluence of factors which are driving the single family market. I mentioned that rent prices are dropping. That is clearly due to the economic downturn. How can both of these things be happening at once? I mean, what? What impact is that? Having on Los Angeles to? Well, I think people have talked about the recovery. We've different letters in the alphabet. Is it going to be a U? R Of the And I think Really? As someone put it very well. It's a K and what that means is sort of the wealthy those with assets. Those with financial assets and and means are doing fairly well. They haven't lost their jobs in the same numbers as those on the other end of the spectrum. Those are your potential home buyers. On the other end of the spectrum, the Randall market where you've got more blue collar folks, and far more significant job losses, and they don't have access or don't own those financial assets they're hurting so I think it's again that that those two factors which are meaning that the markets are moving in different directions, that the single family market is doing well for the reasons we discussed. While the Randall market is really struggling one other issue, I should mention the rental market look. Southern California is generally comprised of smaller buildings. It's one of the large issues we have with housing. In California. Generally, they're small units and in an era of cove it and pandemic. Those units are just sitting there empty. If you find look at studios and singles, which is a large part of our Ah Randall stock. Those rents are falling substantially, and there's not there aren't eating people to rent them because they're just not interested. They want more space understandably. So for a one bedroom or a studio. The numbers air are much lower. If you're looking for a two or three bedroom, forget it that the rent is still too damn high. Well, look, the rent is high across the board. That's been an issue plaguing the entire state and certainly Southern Calif. For for a long time, And you know we could talk for hours about our sort of incompetent housing policy. I don't mind saying it because I really feel that we're just not building enough housing to deal with. The rent issues that we have, So that's across the spectrum. But you're absolutely right. Look that the ones and the singles the bachelor units of small units They're struggling more than the twos and larger units, relatively speaking. But overall rents are still down sharply in the city, and I don't think that's a trend likely to reverse any time soon. You know, One thing that we haven't mentioned Eric is is the looming election in less than a month. I mean, prop 15 is on the ballot here in California. If it's passed, it would require that Commercial and industrial property be tax based on current market value, instead of the purchase price, the original purchase price to increase public school funding. If it passes, Do you think that's gonna have an effect on on the realestate market here? There's there's no doubt in your referring to prop 15 split role. Ballot measure, which would essentially by for Kate between residential homes, which we continue to have sort of the old prop 13. Protection's where commercial property will be reassessed and will be taxed on current values that will have a profound a significant impact on on markets and Business folks in the state because many of those costs in commercial properties whether they're industrial office or retail and of getting passed down to tenants in that brings me to the next question about commercial real estate, which is You know, A lot of folks are spending less time in an office. They're looking to invest less, perhaps in office space or commercial space because a lot of folks are working from home, right? I wonder. You know, what does that mean for the commercial real estate market and is its suffering? Are we going to see fewer office buildings? Fewer fewer square feet of of Of commercial office space. Sure, the commercial office market and in commercial real estate market generally, we think about office we think about retail. We think about industrial. I would be wary of this sort of Attitude that things were never going to go back to the way they were. I always cringe. My hear that. Having said that, however, I do think you were goingto sort of have modified or hybrid work schedules. Maybe instead of people were coming into the office five days a week will come in three or four days a week and the other day or to work from home. That's going to clearly have an impact on office demand the amount of spare footage and we've already got for double digit vacancy rates that say in downtown central business area. I think that that's going to persist for the foreseeable future. But you look by 2023 weaken debate on the future and those prognostications. It will recover. I still think We need to collaborate. We need to work together. And working in isolation from home, you know, is just a poor substitute. And I think we probably all agree with that to some level so much going on Eric Sussman. From Ella's Anderson Graduate School of Management Professor. Thanks for being with us Been a pleasure anytime. Back with Greater Allah on Casey Ar w I'm Steve Check tickets. If your travels include Long Beach, San Pedro, you're fully aware of the crazy amount of construction that's been going on for years. Large thoroughfare that connects the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach..

Eric Sussman California Anderson graduate School of Ma Los Angeles Professor Long Beach Southern California Steve Southern Calif Ella Kate San Pedro
"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:53 min | 1 year ago

"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

"Now with greater Lacombe case. W I'm Steve take us when the pandemic hit back in March and the economy started to tank badly, you might have thought the housing market would also crash again. That didn't happen. At least it hasn't happened yet. In fact, if you're selling a home in Southern California, this market is for you. In August, the median home price in the region reached a record breaking $600,000. That's up 12% compared to the same time last year. So while it may be a seller's market for single family homes, it's turning into a renter's market for apartments. Rent prices are falling in lll a dramatically the median price for a one bedroom last month was around $2000 a month. That's down 11% from last year. How are both of these things happening at the same time? And what about commercial real estate with a large number of folks No longer needing office space at the moment for some inside Eric Sussman is Professor in accounting and realestate lays Anderson graduate School of Management. Hey, Eric. Hey there, Steve. How are you? I'm all right. It seems like we've got a lot of things going on at the same time if we weren't in the middle of a pandemic induced recession. How the heck is that The home values are breaking records right now in southern California. You know, it's it's a tale of several markets. I often asked how the real estate market is doing and I always heard chuckle because the real estate market is comprised of so many sub markets By and large the market's doing very, very well. If you're a seller As you mentioned in your introduction, you're pretty much a happy camper. The likelihood that you'll have multiple offers on your home if you price it, right? And you'll be experiencing higher prices and you would have a year ago your again you're a happy camper. If your buyer you're finding things fairly sobering, there isn't much inventory inventories sort of record lows. And there's multiple bidders on that sort of sweet spot in terms of pricing. Let's say, you know between, say, 507 $100,000, but even upwards the home's upwards of a million dollars, you're seeing multiple bidders and really strong seller's market. You mentioned for a number of reasons. What one of the reasons Well, I think again there are several. You always have to break down any discussion of markets on demand and supply. So let's talk about the demand side, and the most obvious ones are lower interest rates, 30 year mortgage rates or in the high twos now Which is Just mind blowing. I mean, I think if you told people several years ago that they'd be ableto secure a 30 year, home alone in the twos, they would have thought you were nuts, right? So that's really a big one cove. It has had a number of factors on the supply side. People aren't moving. People aren't selling. So they're just staying put. You've got baby boomers with tons of equity in their homes. That are just staying put. Meanwhile, again, the labor market is Not great. I think we will talk about that. But as a result, labor mobility is down. So people aren't moving, relocating for you know for new homes, and I think they've just been pent up demand when the virus the pandemic hit and let's say, February March time frame and then in April, people just You know, we're locked up in their homes and stops. You had pent up demand, and I think that's coming home to roost a cz well here, so it's those sort of confluence of factors which are driving the single family market. I mentioned that rent prices are dropping. That is clearly due to the economic downturn. How can both of these things be happening at once? I mean, what? What impact is that? Having on Los Angeles to? Well, I think people have talked about the recovery. We've different letters in the alphabet. Is it going to be a U? R Of the And I think Really? As someone put it very well. It's a K and what that means is sort of the wealthy those with assets. Those with financial assets and and means are doing fairly well. They haven't lost their jobs in the same numbers as those on the other end of the spectrum. Those are your potential home buyers. On the other end of the spectrum, the Randall market where you've got more blue collar folks, and far more significant job losses, and they don't have access or don't own those financial assets they're hurting so I think it's again that those two factors which are meaning that the markets are moving in different directions, that the single family market is doing well for the reasons we discussed. While the Randall market is really struggling one other issue, I should mention the rental market look. Southern California is generally comprised of smaller buildings. It's one of the large issues we have with housing. In California. Generally, they're small units and in an era of cove it and pandemic. Those units are just sitting there empty. If you find look at studios and singles, which is a large part of our Ah Randall stock. Those rents are falling substantially, and there's not there aren't eating people to rent them because they're just not interested. They want more space understandably. So for a one bedroom or a studio. The numbers air are much lower. If you're looking for a two or three bedroom, forget it that the rent is still too damn high. Well, look, the rent is high across the board. That's been an issue plaguing the entire state and certainly Southern Calif. For for a long time, And you know we could talk for hours about our sort of incompetent housing policy. I don't mind saying it because I really feel that we're just not building enough housing to deal with. The rent issues that we have, So that's across the spectrum. But you're absolutely right. Look that the ones and the singles the bachelor units of small units They're struggling more than the twos and larger units, relatively speaking. But overall rents are still down sharply in the city, and I don't think that's a trend likely to reverse anytime soon. You know, One thing that we haven't mentioned Eric is is the looming election in less than a month. I mean, prop 15 is on the ballot here in California. If it's passed, it would require that Commercial and industrial property be tax based on current market value, instead of the purchase price, the original purchase price to increase public school funding. If it passes, Do you think that's gonna have an effect on the realestate market here? There's there's no doubt in your referring to prop 15 split role. Ballot measure, which would essentially by for Kate between residential homes, which we continue to have sort of the old prop 13. Protection's where commercial property will be reassessed and will be taxed on current values that will have a profound a significant impact on on markets and Business folks in the state because many of those costs in commercial properties whether they're industrial office or retail and of getting passed down to tenants in that brings me to the next question about commercial real estate, which is I know A lot of folks are spending less time in an office. They're looking to invest less, perhaps in office space or commercial space because a lot of folks are working from home, right? I wonder. You know, what does that mean for the commercial real estate market and is its suffering? Are we going to see fewer office buildings? Fewer fewer square feet of of Of commercial office space. Sure, the commercial office market and in commercial real estate market generally, we think about office we think about retail. We think about industrial. I would be wary of this sort of Attitude that it's things were never going to go back to the way they were. I always cringe. My hear that. Having said that, however, I do think we're goingto sort of have modified or hybrid work schedules. Maybe instead of people were coming into the office five days a week will come in three or four days a week and the other day or to work from home. That's going to clearly have an impact on office demand the amount of square footage and we've already got for double digit vacancy rates that say in downtown central business area. I think that that's going to persist for for the foreseeable future, But you look by 2023 weaken debate on the future and those prognostications. It will recover. I still think We need to collaborate. We need to work together and working in isolation from home. You know, it was just a poor substitute, and I think we probably all agree with that to some level so much going on Eric Sussman. From Ella's Anderson Graduate School of Management Professor. Thanks for being with us Been a pleasure anytime..

Eric Sussman California Steve Anderson graduate School of Ma Professor Southern California Lacombe Los Angeles Southern Calif Ella Kate
"eric sussman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"eric sussman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Elsa chang. There is still a lot of head scratching over what happened in the case of Jesse small let he's the actor who is indicted on sixteen felony counts related to allegedly filing a false police report. He said he had been the victim of a racist and homophobic attack. And then yesterday prosecutors in Cook County, Illinois dropped all charges in what they called an alternative prosecution. They noted that small let had done community service and forfeited his ten thousand dollar bond for some reaction. We called former Cook County prosecutor Eric Sussman. I asked him whether he has ever seen anything like this, quite frankly, I haven't seen a reversal bike this by either my former colleagues on the state side or the federal side not without there being some very significant change in the evidence, which according to the state's attorney's office. There hasn't been I wanna talk about this phrase. We keep. Hearing alternative prosecutions what sort of the rationale behind this program. So people can move on with their lives. They don't have charges on their record. So they can get jobs. Exactly, the the rationale behind the program is look people make mistakes reasons in their pass such as if you have a drug addiction, or you're a veteran who has suffered with PTSD those types of issues the way, those work is okay, we will after a certain period of time agreed to drop the charges in exchange. You will do community service. You will go to a drug treatment program. You will do these types of things assuming you do what you're supposed to do. Then we will drop the charges with the prosecution is calling this in terms of an alternative prosecution is not something that was ever envisioned by the legislators when they designed these types of programs or by the courts, it seems like the prosecutors are. Trying to put a round peg in a square hole here by calling this alternative prosecution rather than calling it what it is. Which is we're not comfortable going forward in airing this case in the public now small let has been speaking out. He is denying that he had done anything wrong. He in fact, he said I'm quoting here. I have been truthful and consistent on every single level since day one and his lawyers chiming in and saying look, this is a guy who's a victim. Who was then vilified do you usually see people who receive alternative prosecutions show some contrition some remorse as a prosecutor. You would look for acceptance of responsibility by the prosecutor in a judge would expect that that's why this is not an alternative prosecution. Prosecutors do not just drop charges and allow someone to go out there and say I did nothing wrong. And I was in essence wrongfully charged and on the flip side. I think it's important. To note, the state's attorney's office is out there saying, oh, no. He did do something wrong. We do have evidence. And quite frankly, they need to stop saying that it's improper for them to be saying that at this point about someone that they have dropped the charges against. So it seems like contradictory. Things are happening. Yes. When I was in the Cook County state's attorney's office there were situations where we dropped prosecutions, despite the fact that we believed that someone was guilty. We did those generally under a circumstance where a witness had recanted or evidence that once was available to us is no longer available to us, and what we would say in those circumstances is we do not have sufficient evidence to be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that this person committed the crime that again is not what the prosecutors are seeing here what they're saying. Here is we have the evidence. Jesse smollet is guilty. But for reasons that we do not want to share with the public. We're dropping the case. Eric sussman. Former first assistant state's attorney for Cook County, Illinois, he's now a partner at the law firm Reed Smith, thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks salsa. We have reached out to the Cook County state's attorney's office and are waiting to hear back. President Trump says he's going to make the GOP the party of healthcare. But he's told his Justice department to support illegal effort to cancel the Affordable Care Act known as a Bama care. This is a reversal from the administration's previous position to let the popular parts of the law stand, for instance, the law barring insurers from charging people more for pre existing conditions. The threat to ObamaCare was a winning campaign issue for House Democrats, and it's been a source of frustration for Republicans have tried and failed to repeal. It many times to talk more about this. We have Representative Tom Reid of New York. He's a Republican co-chair of the house problem solvers caucus, welcome to all things considered. That's great to be with you for having me on. So just so everyone's clear about what we're talking about. The administration is backing a lower court ruling that says the ObamaCare system should be. Wiped out because the tax plan that you all pass last year took away the penalty for not having health insurance. And if the supreme court rules that ObamaCare is out we will have a plan that's far better than ObamaCare. So as this makes its way through the courts does the party have any kind of alternative to right now. Well, you know, I believe we do in the sense of our our solutions being based on bring a market pressure to bear into the healthcare arena to drive these costs down. However with the votes, right? Is that's been the problem definitely can repeal it. You just can't seem to come up with an alternative. And that's exactly the issue. And that's one of the reasons I I disagree with the position of repealing the entire law through the judicial system to the court system. I I'm a Republican who believes that you know, what we should do is proactively address the problems of healthcare and lead the provisions that we agree with the pre existing condition protection, for example, allow that to remain as the laws land and move forward. And I think that's going to be the case, regardless of what happens in the court system. You've called this a poor political move. I did not only substantively does it put millions of Americans in harm's way. If the court agrees with the Justice, permanent, the whole law needs to be ruled unconstitutional, I think politically to not have a concrete proposal. No concrete plan on the reply. Side that we could roll out with the votes with democrat Republican support to get to the president's signed into law is risky puts a lot of people are rightfully so and then anxious position and politically that causes us to be a. A weaker position in my political opinion. Now, that's just my opinion. But you know, that's why I disagree with this both on political and substantive basis. You said anxious position. Do you feel that Republicans won't be known as the party of healthcare? Right. That the somehow be the party against healthcare. I think we're going to be a party that's going to offer solutions. And I just hope that what we can do is. We have that debate is bring Democrats to the table that want to be practical that want to actually solve this problem of healthcare costs ever creasing lover hate the Affordable Care Act. It does not doing what they promised. They would do and that's spring healthcare costs down, and what we should be doing this Republicans and Democrats finding ways to lower drug prices for folks seniors in particular, lower access cost to healthcare overall and show these benefits in patients pocket as opposed to negotiated between the carriers and administrators so far the problem. Solvers caucus has not solved any problems, right? I think there's been one major piece of legislation guys have sponsored related to opioid abuse. Which was fairly popular. I mean, what's your sponsor the criticism that this group gives the appearance of compromise? But doesn't have action especially on an issue like healthcare a fundamentally I fundamentally. Vigorously disagree with your assessment. We haven't solved any problems. That's just false. What we have done is. We got prison reform criminal Justice reform. We were the voice in the house. They got that through the house Senate into the president's desk signed into law. We have changed the house rules is the problem solvers caucus members so uniting together to empower members to bring legislation to the floor changing the rules of the house of representatives is generational institutional reform that the magnitude of that impact cannot be discounted. So we are we are moving forward with solutions many issues, and we're not we're we're I wanted to tell you, you know, we're not looking to solve the issues with our proposals one way or the highway. It's our way or the highway. We take input we tried to influence the agenda in a positive way. And if a piece of it gets to the finish line war good with that too. It's not all about our ideas is about solving problems with people back home. That's Tom Reid of New York. Republican congressman thank you for speaking. With us. All right. Thanks for having me on India announced today that it has successfully tested a satellite killing weapon. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on the test. And what it could mean for the region. Indian prime minister Narendra Modi announced the test at a national address pot up the arch up on our nam unthreatened. He says that India now stands tall as a space power VIP hindering as a political scientists to not he says the test apparently used an Indian made missile to strike an Indian made satellite. They launch a missile from their missile test site and intercepted the satellite, which was in orbit at three hundred kilometers in space three hundred kilometers or one hundred eighty six miles is actually a relatively low orbit. No pun intended is relatively low hanging fruit in terms of a kill. But you know, it is it's only the fourth country that's demonstrated capabilities. The other three are China Russia and the United States Brian Weeden with the secure. World foundation. He says there's an anti-satellite arms race happening right now. And there are no arms control treaties to stop it organizations. Like the UN regularly talk about limiting weapons in space. But there really hasn't been any serious discussion about dealing with ground based anti satellite weapons. Weeden says the main danger is debris that can be created by hitting a satellite a two thousand seven test by China's speed thousands of fragments into orbit many are still up there. So the concern would be that if there's a future conflict between US China US, Russia, India and China or India Pakistan that these weapons might be used and lower Thorpe, it might become filled with deadly shrapnel could knock out other non-military satellites VIP Narang says he sees another purpose behind India's test today to strike the satellite. The Indian military used to. Missile designed to intercept other missiles hitting a satellite is similar to striking an incoming warheads. So the tests may actually be about missile defense. If that's the case, then it's also designed to send a message. They'll say it's directed towards any other country, but this is clearly relevant.

prosecutor Cook County attorney India Jesse smollet Eric Sussman Representative Tom Reid Illinois China Audie Cornish New York NPR president Elsa chang US PTSD Brian Weeden UN
"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:22 min | 2 years ago

"eric sussman" Discussed on KCRW

"It's kind of a high tech version of those signs you see on telephone poles and billboards that say we buy ugly houses this week red fin announced it has officially expanded. Its I buying site into the city. A spokeswoman says they'll focus on newer single family homes that cost less than nine hundred thousand dollars most likely in the San Fernando Valley. This might sound scary. If you're a regular homebuyer trying to compete by UCLA real estate professor Eric Sussman says, it's unlikely this will impact the market as a whole real estate is so expensive in LA. Right now assessment says companies like red fin will probably only be able to do this with a small number of homes KCRW's, Anna, Scott quick freeway. Check Tarzana west one wanna Tampa a wreck in the left lane there. It's eight oh seven this is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. It is day. Twenty one of the partial federal government shutdown, and there is no compromise in sight. President Trump still wants five point seven billion dollars for a border wall. Democrats refused to fund it at all caught in the middle. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers who are not getting a paycheck today because congress and the president can't find a way to reopen the government so far most Republicans in congress are sticking by the president, including our next guest. Congressman Gary Palmer of Alabama. He chairs the policy committee for House Republicans congressman thanks so much for joining us this morning. Nice. Both sides have to give in any kind of compromise deal. You're republicans. I'm going to ask you about your party. And where you see that give where should the Republicans and the president be willing to compromise to end the shutdown. Well, I I think you might could compromise on the amount of money that's needed. Although I think the five point seven billion dollars is. At least that much is needed. And it's not just I think there's some misunderstanding out there about what we're trying to do. It's not just it's not about a wall. It's about border security part of it includes fencing, however, whatever the form that might be. But almost a billion of it is for humanitarian aid is to provide more bids. It's provide more medical care and relief for those folks who are trying to get across the border that that need our help. And I don't think that message gets out very well. And and and that's on us. I think that that we're not communicating is well about what all we're trying to with with the funding. The president has said that if he can't get congress and Democrats to give him that five point seven billion dollars that he will declare a national emergency to end. What is really a a political battled? Do you think that's a good idea? Well, I think. What's going on at the border is an emergency. And we've been talking about this Democrats have talked about it the humanitarian disaster. I mean, just of this has been ongoing for really ever since I've been in congress when all those children start showing up that was happening during the Obama administration. It I I do think it is it has devolved into a political battle. And and I realize I'm Republicans it's gonna sound partisan. But when you sit down in a room to try to talk through things and try to resolve a problem, you have to have both sides willing to to engage in that discussion. And and that's not happening with the other side of the aisle. And I can tell you Rachel that their people on the outside of the aisle that want to see this resolved because they realized that people are suffering. I mean, it's been Democrats and Republicans have agreed that something needs to be done at the border. I think where the problem lies is in. The fact that people aren't dealing with the same facts, right? You hear Sarah Sanders. Talk about thousands of people who are connected to terrorism coming across that southern border. And and that's just not true. I mean, data from customs and border protection proves otherwise that it's the number is closer to between six and twelve. Well, it doesn't matter what the number is in the sense. What they've what we know is that there were at least three thousand people whose travel patterns warranted special attention, and those were all at the southern border. But when you talk about it's only six or twelve that came across the southern border is only nineteen that took down the world trade towers. I mean, I don't think we ought to get caught up in how many I if only one carried out an attack that killed hundreds or thousands of people that's one too many in and it. You get you get lost in in in those things. I think what we've got to talk about is go back and look what we did in two thousand six with the secure fence act. We we authorize funding for seven hundred over seven hundred miles. We built about six hundred something miles of that, particularly in Yuma and Tucson border crossings illegal crossings are down ninety five percent. And you it works. Go ahead. I if I may going back to what I'm saying, it's not just about fencing. It's also about humanitarian aid it's about more border patrol agents. It's about more technology being used in particularly for interdicting drugs. Right. But even the department of homeland security says just over four hundred thousand people a legally entered the US in twenty eighteen that is down from one point six million in the year two thousand so you talked about being a crisis itself. Down. It's up from four the last five years. So again, when you get into numbers, your baseline is two thousand, but when you say that the border illegal border crossings are up. They are up from for the last five years congressman Gary Palmer, a Republican of Alabama. We appreciate your time. This morning, sir. Thanks for coming in. Thanks, rachel. Alright. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Was listening into that conversation. And she joins me now. Hi, sue. Hey, rachel. What did you hear in that conversation? You know, one thing that's so complicated about this debate. Is that lawmakers in the two parties seem to be operating off of a different set of facts and figures to back up their arguments. There's certainly some dispute over who is crossing the border illegally whether they're coming here earlier, whether they're seeking asylum, which is something that Democrats will often point to which is legal which is legal to do at the border and also some confusion about the money. He did talk about the five point seven billion dollars. We should clarify a point that the. President is asking for five point seven billion dollars strictly for the wall. That money goes to nothing else, but they have increased their ask in recent days for another billion dollars that would address things like detention beds, more immigration judges and more border patrol agents. All right. So thank you for that clarification. And it is interesting, though, how Republicans are trying to frame this now as as a humanitarian crisis, quote, unquote, that is that is a different kind of messaging than we've seen, and it may be tough. You know, the president won his presidency where he believes he did on this tough immigration message. I'm not sure people were shouting build the wall at his campaign rallies because they saw it as a humanitarian message NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. So there is one remaining open seat in the US house of representatives. It was left empty because of an ongoing investigation into potential election fraud in North Carolina's ninth district, Republican Mark Harris is leading that race and NPR's miles parks has this profile of a boisterous pastor who's been trying to break into North Carolina politics for the past half decade before Mark Harris, the center of an election that just won't end. He still on a stage three years ago in Charleston, South Carolina. This the light of mine. Go ahead and get your lights up. Come on come on. Let's sing together. This the light of my and I'm gonna let it shine. This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine. This was there encouraging Christian leaders to run for higher office at that point Harissa just run and lost in two thousand fourteen primary race for US Senate seat been pastor at First Baptist Church in Charlotte for the previous decade often. Blending the spiritual with the political hide it under a bushel. Oh,.

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