34 Burst results for "Eric Schmidt"

Create Killer Content that Gets Bums on Seats, with Ben Lifton

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

08:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Create Killer Content that Gets Bums on Seats, with Ben Lifton

"Me just start off this conversation because content kind of sounds obvious to a lot of us an yet content. Yeah craft content. What what we talk about. Because some people have no idea when we say christ great content. Greg i we are united way creating tapped your platform for you communicate to your community with. That's basically will comes in. Its continues anything that you create as a professional as a film This as as stein's wherever you are you're creating content to communicate to your community and your fun on social media or google mail on emails for example side. It could be images videos. Podcasts britain articles. your santeria. The actual design of the interior not crabbie's contact like it needs content in. It's not just an empty talks so everything is contact when when you start to realize the opportunities round creating amazing content for your brown's the a just an obstacle endless linnet basically you do see. Sometimes people will. I've heard he said. I dunno what content to create content in everything. We do wherever you know. We took in your bums on seats getting into e. You've got to really identify what it. What is your message. I guess before you go out that we content then exactly and then is making sure that when you off when you do your take. For example wind duty professionals suspecion always asks. Are you communicating to consumers to a client or you communications heritage easy prize. Mary very very very different. And that defines which direction you go in. I guess we've where you can guy. We content pretty much. I think that that is very slight roots. And any any topic. Eric schmidt come to everyone can create content but the the difficult thing is creating engaging content that fox conversation stocks an immersion the Get stop following for example on your social media to ditch that current stars and movie to begin with you. i'm not takes time and be creativity to content create and it was. It takes a lot of of dedication to 'cause it's not nice success in your to create engaging like binge while the context. I'm gonna like this conversation lot today. This row vice straight or they send you know from from a personal point of view that were heckled live and we kind of always been narrow on social but it has been learning process for me. And i know what i'm getting riot times and sometimes eats i think when i talked to experts like yourself bent on this subject. The one thing that probably you would say it is planning content rather than just winging it is not acceptable because there are days where missing. I haven't got a plan. But i think that kind of works. He sent on my phone. I'm ready to go with them. What's your take on that. That's where you're just explaining that all of the fact that your sometimes gang an idea when you find the having debt and that's because you become confident as a content creates because you can see. I do not asking what that would have been appointed some somewhere Walk on our way back to my to we. Brilliant as the keys so pathak plan prevents historical phones. I not enough. Why that's going to quote in. What am i Contented planned posts fix the six page. I love that. It's so good. Isn't that nineteen i really. I really do agree with it. Because i'm a big believer. I've always been a big believer in quality over quantity announced monday night will wayside saharan easy prizes. Like i said harry shovel contact with a completely different game when you uranium content on your account a piece of content out on on instagram Outtakes will convince without How as a e mail in my knees western current client base dugout. He's content out. Use your town and you start to walk out okay. What makes different communities. What means different positive community pick. I'm creating content for example. May i know the higher level creativity really while Migrate my rails ions It's a it's a little bit more like a monument pledged events stuff. I do my Grid rails Occurring yards rtd based ash whereas some my stories behind saints which genuinely believe. Anyway that's interesting so again you approach in is interesting here because y- y seeing that story says grit and grit tends to be the polish side. An against the stories is a bit more rule risk. It's kinda now it's there. It's exactly right yeah. I think that there is why tend suggest haraguchi price just to get into the rhythm of being big. That confidence is to break down a little bit to think i can't. Instagram is a multi multi multi platforms multiple english Multiple stories with john muslim rule behind the scenes. As i say shove him personality all hyphen sire iranian stories tall enough. I'm not stories Avenue grid at ways thought is an i. I like to see people think of as you pull failure. United saying you a model in you're going costing costing your costing for shades and you. You're you're not so. Instagram grid is and to give the analogy of you should is wayne greatest hits ooh knifings Real love. it is already a love you put in that nightmare anyway. I found her a very hot lady. Right she's got she skinny. Hey look we often see. Minks ask rails as on new video platform fence around and just like rails tiktok his. The video only on youtube is longer for com temperatures. Your your suggestion the Long contact united education based skills based like breaking things down pace content similar to itt bay side when you thought to break down just to summarize it it stories. The song will personality grid His satirical finding brielle's as transmissions speedier video. vcr tiktok video video. Youtube long contents are actually adding real violent with with education usually and then emails while unit. That's that's more of us. Breeding community these peak where he would have signed up to rating. They might already in existing client in our notch about your funnels. Isn't it a

Stein Harry Shovel Eric Schmidt Greg Britain Pathak Brown Haraguchi Google FOX Mary John Muslim Instagram Saints Tiktok Long Contact United Education Wayne Youtube United Brielle
Amazon's Bezos To Hand Over The CEO Reins To Andy Jassy

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Amazon's Bezos To Hand Over The CEO Reins To Andy Jassy

"Jeff bezos is stepping back. Twenty seven years ago. He founded a company called amazon which proposed then to become a bookstore on the internet than wild idea. Was that you would shop for books without actually going somewhere to look for them. It was so new. That news articles had to explain how this giant bomb for would even work of course amazon sales just about everything now and this summer as will transition to executive chairman to focus on. The long-term amazon is an npr sponsor which we cover like any other company and npr. Business correspondent. alina saliou because here to do just that good morning good morning. Were you surprised by this decision i was. We're in the middle of a pandemic. it's not a thing you expect to hear in this moment basis. Less to say how. It's always day. One at amazon says line meaning always act like a startup and we were joking yesterday with a colleague like ten. We say. now it's date to amazon in many ways. Basil's has already been axing kind of like an executive chairman kinda less running shop day today. More thinking big visionary thoughts years into the future. He says he wants to do more with all his other. Major investments like the space company blue origin. Which is his huge obsession unless the washington post which he some philanthropy all that said it is definitely an end of an era. He is the avatar for one of the most powerful corporations of our generation. It's worth nearly two. Trillion dollars founders. Tend to eventually move on microsoft. Google happened to them. I guess now that leaves mark zuckerberg is the elder statesman of big tech at age. Thirty six and then. There's andy jesse who takes over as ceo. Where does he fit. He is one of businesses longest serving and trusted lieutenants. He was the person who shaped and shepherded amazon's sprawling cloud computing business. It's a group that i saw one analyst call amazon's cash printing division because it is amazon's biggest profit center and other thing about jesse's that he's actually known to be really he's waited on black lives matter for example he's pretty free-wheeling public speaker. Business over the years has become more elusive as a public speaker. So we will be interesting to see if jesse style changes as he become. Ceo especially as he faces scrutiny over amazon's treatment of workers new labor organizing efforts federal antitrust investigations any clues as to where jesse wants to take the company not yet. Lots of reading of tea leaves happening as we speak. He's been there for a long time up. He's the internet infrastructure guy cloud computing guy. What will this mean for the retail side of the business business. How will he approach it but remember that business is still the biggest shareholder amazon. He's that's big power yesterday. Chief financial officer. Brian huskey told reporters basis. We'll stay pretty involved. Jeff is is really not going anywhere. it's more restructuring of. Who's doing what i'm imagining. This abid like you know a principal stepping in the back of the classroom. Saying i see it as you were looking for teachers not really here but their presence limbs pretty larch you'll still be a big force in the company. Any idea what else he might do. Well my biggest question is actually. Whether we'll hear more from him in the coming days will he become more outspoken. Outside of the ceo corporate role. I'm thinking like former. Google ceo eric schmidt of or microsoft founder bill gates basis mentions his charity funds. So far he's not been seen as a major philanthropist. So we'll see if that changes what he is known for his interest in hollywood circles as he going to show up in a movie. You know a joke. But he is one of the world's wealthiest people and it is hard to imagine. Jeff bezos fading into the ether when you have billions of dollars people do get interested in what you have to say. Elise thank so much thank

Amazon Alina Saliou NPR Jeff Bezos Andy Jesse Jesse Mark Zuckerberg Basil Washington Post Brian Huskey Microsoft Google Jeff Eric Schmidt Bill Gates Hollywood Elise
17 states tell Supreme Court they support Texas bid to reverse Biden win

The Other Side of Midnight

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

17 states tell Supreme Court they support Texas bid to reverse Biden win

"States have now joined the Texas lawsuit before the U. S. Supreme Court trying to block the election results from Georgia, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin under the equal protection Clause of the Constitution. Mississippi's attorney General Eric Schmidt's telling Fox is the story with Martha MacCallum the transition, saying Presidents important that every legal vote is counted in every illegal vote is not counted. And if we don't do that, if we You know aggregate that responsibility. We disenfranchised millions of voters, including voters in Missouri, including voters in Texas and other places, Attorney General Schmidt says free and fair elections are the cornerstone of the republic.

U. S. Supreme Court Martha Maccallum Eric Schmidt Texas Pennsylvania Georgia Wisconsin Michigan Mississippi FOX Attorney General Schmidt Missouri
A potential bureaucratic dispute could slow down the birth of 5G internet

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:19 min | 4 months ago

A potential bureaucratic dispute could slow down the birth of 5G internet

"The US needs a five G. Network that much everyone agrees on. This is the network that would allow things like fully self-driving cars Internet. That's a hundred times faster. But it turns out. There are a couple big questions not fully resolved in Washington I who should build and operate parts of this network and second who's responsible for giving up the airwaves that it would run on. We point this out because the FCC's looking at auctioning off some of the government owned electromagnetic spectrum. So companies can use it for five G. and at the same time. The Department of Defense is looking at leasing out some of that same spectrum. So I asked Craig Moffett analysts for telecom and media research for Muffin Nathanson. Who is in charge here? That's the sixty four thousand dollar question. Historically, the FCC has always been in charge of spectrum at least for commercial purposes. What's been proposed here is unusual in that the Department of Defense is suggesting something that is a bit of a hybrid, build their own network that they would then make available through some mechanism to commercial carriers, and that starts to crossover fairly clearly into the commercial sphere. Will this all sounds frankly dysfunctional. You have two major government agencies not on the same page over how to govern a piece of technological real estate. What are the consequences of this situation yet look dysfunctional doesn't begin to capture. It seemed fairly clear that the dod didn't know what the FCC was doing that the FCC. Didn't know what the DOD was doing and that parts of the dod didn't know what other parts of the Dod we're doing. Dysfunctional. Is being polite. It is a mess. There is this on again off again conversation over whether the US needs a national five G. Network run by the government or a private sector driven network, which is where we've been going how does this dispute over spectrum and you know who can Lisa rock it out fit into that conversation? Well I it's very much part and parcel of the same discussion. The idea that we should have a nationally coordinated response rather than a commercially driven response. I reared its head in the beginning of twenty eighteen and it was soundly repudiated by everybody in in government within a matter of days after it went public and it went underground and then came back again and then it was repudiated by everybody and went underground. And came back again and it keeps coming back. It's sort of this Zombie that can't be killed. This country has committed. I think fairly clearly since one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, and the break-up of the bell system that we're going to pursue a private enterprise approach to telecom rather than a government regulated monopoly approach, and you can see a tremendous amount of tension ideologically among different parts of the government about whether that's appropriate. Is there any merit to the idea of a national five G. Network just because? It just sounds maybe more efficient than having a bunch of private companies build their own separate versions. Yeah. There are two arguments here. The the first one is time to market and at its very core, the motivation for government intervention and the motivation of certain participants and names that have been attached to this concept like Eric. Schmidt, the former chairman and CEO of Google, for example, is this belief that the US is moving too slowly and that China is taking the lead and that has two consequences. One that there will be a more robust equipment ecosystem were or supply chain. That evolves around the Chinese five G. Network, and therefore, there will be critical infrastructure that we simply can't produce in the Western Hemisphere. So so that's part one part two is this view that if we don't move fast enough, then China will start to develop the economic ecosystem that rides on top of five G., all the applications that will emerge that we can imagine yet but out of four g came companies like Uber and facebook arguably really grew into what it is today because of four g and so so all the innovation that comes on top of a platform like this. is feared to becoming too slowly because the US may fall behind China in developing our five G. Network. That's separate and apart from the question of just is it economically sensible to have three or potentially four different companies building five G. networks instead of having one national platform that then everybody shares or at least chairs some part of and buys capacity from. So let's say that this conflict between UFC indeed doesn't resolve and this big midsection of spectrum disease just stays locked up, is it still going to be possible for you know verizon or whoever to buy five g service to all of us? The short answer is, yes. There are other solutions besides this particular block of spectrum. So. Most of the world, it started down the path of mid band spectrum before the US. The US started with a very much a focus on very very high frequency spectrum and his head to course correct perhaps later than than one would have liked but they have they have now if not fully caught up at least closed the gap to some degree, and there is a very large auction of mid band spectrum coming in December called the c-band auction that the carriers have been planning around for at least two years and and by all accounts. Is Spectrum very similar to the spectrum that the DOD would theoretically be using and and there's quite a bit of it. So I think right now that you would have to say that the carriers view see band as the

United States G. Network FCC DOD Department Of Defense China Washington Craig Moffett Muffin Nathanson UFC Chairman And Ceo Verizon Western Hemisphere Eric Facebook Google
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

05:20 min | 4 months ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Kickass News

"I'm Ben Mathis. Welcome to kick ASS News Bill Campbell might be the most important football coach. You've never heard of he spent a dozen years of his life coaching, the Boston College Eagles and the Columbia Lions through one disappointing season. After another, he never won a bowl championship and he's not enshrined alongside Bobby Boden and Bear Bryant in the College Football Hall of fame. But after retiring from football, he took the lessons he learned on the field and moved to silicon valley where he achieved a stunning track record of success as a different kind. Of coach playing an instrumental role in the growth of companies such as intuit Google, and apple, and mentoring many of the tech industry's greatest visionaries including Jeff Bezos Mark Andriessen. Larry Page Sergey Brin Sheryl Sandberg Steve. Jobs and Eric Schmidt Eric Schmidt Matt with Bill Campbell every week for fifteen years while he was chairman and CEO. Google and then executive chairman of Google Parent Company Alphabet and now he's distilled some of Campbell's most important lessons into a new book titled Trillion. Dollar coach the leadership playbook Silicon Valley's Bill Campbell and on today's podcast Eric. Reveals how he initially reacted when venture capitalist John Door told the newly minted. CEO. That he needed a coach how coach Campbell helped shape the relationship between Eric and Google Founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page why Campbell initially refused Eric's invitation to join Google's board of directors and how he talked eric out of resigning his Google CEO way back in two thousand four. Eric says Campbell wasn't just another executive coach. He coached the whole team and discusses the importance of trust and even love to a team success and ultimately the company's bottom line he. Shares some of Campbell's secrets for handling difficult personalities or the labral genius as he liked to call them and shed some light on. Campbell's longtime friendship with one of those abberant genius Apple's Steve Jobs. Then Eric opens up about his decision to step down as chairman of alphabet and twenty seventeen and his next big bet on the positive potential of artificial intelligence plus why starting off a meeting with a little polite chit-chat isn't a waste of time and the power of hugs in the work place coming up with Eric Schmidt in just a moment. Eric.

chairman and CEO Eric Schmidt Google Larry Page Sergey Brin Sheryl College Football Hall of fame Bear Bryant Ben Mathis apple Sergey Brin Jeff Bezos Mark Andriessen executive chairman Steve Jobs CEO silicon valley chairman football Boston College Eagles Bobby Boden John Door
"eric schmidt" Discussed on No Stupid Questions

No Stupid Questions

10:41 min | 5 months ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on No Stupid Questions

"Have an understanding of the world that may not be very universal. So you may come up with solutions that you think are optimal that a lot of people may disagree with. On Dr Dos who wrote winners take all the elite charade of changing the world is the book you're talking about there's a similar ish book by Robert. Riche who is Stanford political scientists called just giving why philanthropy is failing democracy and how we can do better we interviewed reach for freakonomics radio episode called thinking is expensive who's supposed to pay for it, and we were exploring in particular the use of philanthropy to influence intellectual institutions, universities, and think tanks and so on and I guess the critique is that it just perpetuates inequality because essentially this is just like yet another way for the powerful to. Keep making the decisions is that the? Sure if that necessarily perpetuates inequality but the way riche talks about it is that you convert private assets into public influence. So subverts in a way the democratic process rate you could argue that it works against what we think of as representative democracy. I do think that some would argue that it's colonial that you'll never get out under the shadow of the person who has power. Even if there are benevolent is just I can't figure out how to get to that more democratic populist ideal. I really can't read that. Book I kept getting distracted by the question of consider the alternative. Do you want the billionaires ought to give away money to education and health I? Guess you could say that there should be a taxation system such that we don't have that kind of well but that's a totally different and not likely possibility. In the short term I did just see some preliminary research I won't get into it because it's not ready for primetime yet, but it's by someone who works in this realm and is very, very good and. His research shows that we think of America as an incredibly charitable country, easily the most philanthropic history of the universe never before has. Any group of people on average given away such a large share of their overall wealth or GDP, and you can say there are perhaps moral reasons or perhaps reputational reasons and there are incentives. There is a tax structure that encourages it and then their incentives like putting your name on a building and things like that. But he did an analysis of sort of never been done before to look at the difference between the very rich and the very, very, very, very, very very. Rich and then the rich, and then the non rich and found that if you subtract the very, very, very, very, very rich, then we're not really charitable. Oh really. So it's being driven by a very small number of very, very, very, very rich and very, very, very, very philanthropic individuals. You could also say they could give it to the government instead of having a foundation, but there's a lot of good reason to think that the innovation and creativity is going to come from. Outside of the government, what's often called the third sector, the nonprofit sector. So I don't really think philanthropist giving all their money just to the government directly is a great alternative. I think. We should point out that look you work for an institution that is really dependent on this kind of giving and it's a wonderful Mubarak to a system. That we really enjoy. But my question is, what is the countervailing force that may create especially of as I said, absolving individuals or institutions like universities, but particularly government. From doing a better job of what they should be doing rather than relying on billionaire charity to come in and fix problems at the development of better systems would prevent and I realized that it's large and complicated, and in fact, many of these philanthropists are addressing building better system. So I don't mean to be ungenerous to that. My concern is less about moral hazard and more about just sub optimally. Like maybe there are better versus worse ways of giving away those billions they're legitimately different concerns and there are a lot of people who think, no I'm not going to go to anyone today because didn't I hear that Eric Schmidt is giving away his money to education. It don't really see that happening anybody who's thinking about going to tutor someone is not in the population that I would be most concerned. I think this is probably close to fictional, but let me just give it a specific example. So one thing that the Gates Foundation for instance, but a lot of other donors other foundations do is focus on disease especially globally because diseases often fatal. Disease. Something that requires a lot of resources and a lot of coordination. All of this sounds like something that governments should typically do the governments have gotten less and less involved in this, and then if a big player like the gates foundation comes in and says, Oh boy malaria man that is low hanging fruit if we could learn to either zap mosquitoes who are causing the trouble or just get rid of all the female mosquitoes or better nets, etcetera etcetera etcetera that would save lots and lots. Of lives isn't that great? So then if you are government susceptible to a lot of malaria, what does that make you do? Does that make you back off? Maybe maybe not what if you're thinking about something like a global pandemic if you know there are foundations out there that are trying to coordinate response and research to things like a pandemic does that mean that you take your foot off the gas and you don't use your CDC in hhs to pursue those goals which used to be front of mind. That's what I'm talking about. The idea that inadvertently this philanthropy, the G- item in our own, which has like forget how to use them at. We can't navigate anywhere anymore because that's skills atrophied. So that's the kind of crowd out or moral hazard that you're worried about. Yes. I don't know that there's any evidence that that's true. It's certainly theoretically possible. The argument is often made that there's so much more innovation and flexibility outside of the bureaucracy of governments like some of the things that bill. Gates is very, very clever. Scientists are going to do might have been better than if just the US government or any other government were in charge. Here's my intuition that if you're on a company like Microsoft or Google, you have learned how to learn you have learned how to like hire people who are smarter than you. You have learned to create a feedback cycle to measure your outcomes and your process. So I don't WanNa be all pollyanna about all this and I think there are some legitimate criticisms. Warnings about this whole endeavor. But I liked that we have a big nonprofit sector and that these outliers are not only giving their money way but they're so actively involved I can't think of a counterfactual. But I'd be welcome to hear other people's that's dramatically superior to that, and the worst thing about being a billionaire who works really hard to think about the best way to use your money is that you have people like me challenging the very notion when it's plainly the right minded thing to do. So to those billionaires listening I, do want to apologize for the letter of the argument but I hope you'll appreciate that the spirit of the argument is well founded. Well if there is looking a gift horse in the mouth, then my guess is that it's not the first time that these very wealthy and powerful people have been criticized and I'm guessing that they'll be just fine. Additionally for the record postscript Eric Schmidt I. Don't really think you're evil. No stupid questions is part of the freakonomics radio network, which also includes freakonomics radio and people mostly admire this episode was produced by me Rebecca Douglas, and now here's a fact check of today's conversations. Eric Schmidt says that rise has the ability to reach young people all over the world because quote, they all have mobile phones. Now, this is clearly an exaggeration according to a twenty nineteen publication from the. Pew Research Center on Internet and technology. A median of seventy. Six percent of people surveyed across eighteen advanced economies have smartphones an immediate of forty five percent of people in emerging countries. Ownership is lowest in India were only twenty four percent report having a smartphone. What's more hugh only shares data for adult phone owners. Commonsense suggests that the numbers would be lower the teenage demographic that rise is attempting to reach. Later, Angela asserts that the personal wealth of the most influential philanthropists is greater than the endowment of most if not. All American universities according to his Forbes Profile Eric Schmidt's net worth is fourteen point, six, billion dollars, which is certainly greater than the average university endowment of one point, four billion dollars, but comparable to most ivy league schools in fast. Schmitz. Net Worth is roughly equivalent to the endowment of Angeles employer the University of Pennsylvania. However, the endowment of Angela's Alma Mater Pervert University which is the largest in the country at nearly forty one billion dollars pales in comparison to the one hundred fifteen, billion dollar net worth of Mega Philanthropist Bill Gates. That's it for the fact check. No stupid questions is produced by freakonomics radio and Stitcher our staff includes Alison Craig Low Greg Repin James Foster, and Bren Wallace. Thanks also to our intern Emmett Tyrrell for help with this episode, our theme song is and she was by talking heads special thanks to David Byrne and Warner Chappell Music. If you'd like to listen to our show ad free subscribed stitcher premium, you can also follow us on twitter at Ns. Q. Underscore show and on facebook at an askew show. If you have a question for a future episode, please share it with NS Q at freakonomics dot com, and if you heard Stephen Are Angela discusses study a book or an expert that you'd like to learn more about you can check out freakonomics dot com slash q where we lead to all of the major references that you heard about here today. Thanks for listening. I've never had ten billion dollars. I've never had three billion. I've never had one billion. Because let's keep going with this. Yeah..

Eric Schmidt Bill Gates Riche Gates Foundation Angela malaria US government representative Dr Dos facebook Stanford Robert Stephen America Pew Research Center Mubarak Emmett Tyrrell hhs University of Pennsylvania
"eric schmidt" Discussed on No Stupid Questions

No Stupid Questions

06:35 min | 5 months ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on No Stupid Questions

"A sufficient predictor of what we're looking for I. Think it's very rare to have somebody who has as talented as Michael Jordan who is willing to work as hard as a Michael Jordan. In fact, these seemed to be substitute goods and I've long pondered. Why is it? that the most talented person on the field doesn't work the hardest because in some ways, the rational thing is like look if you're getting a lot of return on investment in your effort, if that's what talent is shooting, you stay longer but I think actually people are satisfied saying they're reaching some threshold could be a high threshold but once they reset threshold, they sort of pullback in their effort what are your intuitions about what's going on and why it's so rare I'll give you counterexample the Olympics. So the fact of the matter is that because the Olympics is episodic and it's a relatively rare event. People work incredibly hard for the Olympics in which they're competing the level of motivation that is required superhuman at the end of the day they have great gifts. But their ability to that level of focus that continuously is really extraordinary. Well. I'll tell you that looking for people who are not satisfied. When it comes to their chievements who are never going to be much higher than a six or seven in terms of how satisfied they are at their work is not on your list explicitly but I think there's a there there. Eric. If people who are listening to this conversation to learn more about what you're up to, where should they go? But we had the idea of doing podcast what a surprise that idea. We called it reimagined. And the idea is to talk about the world post covid. And in particular, what are we going to do differently now, we managed to get ourselves into this mess. We've had quite a few interesting guests, Scott Gottlieb Solan Burger experts on development economics, and these sorts of things. There's a website reimagined pod dot com, but you know how to find partners. If they've found this podcast they can certainly find yours. Still to come on no stupid questions, San Angelo wonder whether it's dangerous that our planet has come to rely on the charity of billionaires like Eric Schmidt the worst thing about being a billionaire who works really hard to think about the best way to use your money is that you have people like me challenging the very notion. New. Stupid. Questions is sponsored by Byu radio. Top of mind with Julie Rose is a to our current events radio program from Byu Radio Award winning journalist and host Julie Rose focuses on current events and covers a wide array of topics including science and health law politics, technology history, and more on top of mind Julie. Rose wastes no time getting to the heart of the issue to get you the. Facts from experts while trusting listeners abilities to hear a range of ideas and opinions and form their own conclusions. Some recent questions asked on top of mind include how close are we to a covert nineteen vaccine? Why do we play so much value in the idea of natural products and how do we fix the US Postal? Service. Listen to top of mind with Julie Rose Wherever you get your podcasts. So, Angela, we just heard you speak with Eric Schmidt about trying to identify and promote talent from populations often goes totally ignored. I would like to ask you a broader question about the mission of Eric Schmidt and could a large handful of other people like him who are doing interesting and aggressive philanthropy billionaire philanthropy is that what you're curious? Yeah. He's got real ideas about one of the problems and maybe even what are the solutions I think you can be a billionaire philanthropist and do a more passive version of philanthropy and let me just say far be it from me or anyone. To cast a spurs on the idea of billionaires giving away their money although you know after your third yeah, I mean, what are you going to buy? A fourth yet here's my question. I do wonder if our societal reliance on billionaire philanthropy to quote fix education and environmental problems and so many other things I do wonder if it's problematic I wonder if there's sort of moral hazard where Millions and millions maybe billions of individuals can abdicate responsibility and also it excuses governments from doing what they're supposed to be doing in the first place. So to boil ran into a question, is Eric Schmidt an evil person. So is Eric. Schmidt. Specifically, by giving away his personal fortune is doing more harm than good inadvertently. Yeah. Again, I don't mean to appreciate the actuality what he and other people like him are trying to do, but it does create a situation where a handful of people who happened to be lucky enough to have all the balls lineup and they hit the triple quadruple gazillion jackpot. Is it a good idea for them to have? So much leverage in deciding how to tackle social problems, public policy and so on. So I, think we should argue both sides and then maybe we can come to some decision on this. As you know, income inequality has increased. We have this skewed distribution where there are super super wealthy people relative to the rest of us in ways it just didn't happen in human civilization. There are those who argued that the gilded age robber. Baron era may have been pretty close but your point is taken in recent decades in most places and most economies inequality is generally increase. Yes. The personal wealth of some of these individuals like larger than most if not all American universities, it's not a small thing to say that these people are giving away their personal wealth because the numbers are so big. So then when you look over at that scientists and Hey, these people. Want. To, give. TO EDUCATION THEY WANNA give to public health they want to fund research on the plus side giving away what they have is got to be a good thing. All things being equal. You could also argue on the plus side if you are independently extremely extremely extremely wealthy, then you are responding to your own set of incentives and cues and your theoretically not under pressure from any special interest group et cetera right. On the plus.

Eric Schmidt Julie Rose Olympics Michael Jordan Byu San Angelo US Scott Gottlieb Angela Solan Burger
St. Louis Couple Who Waved Guns at Protesters Face Charges

Rush Limbaugh

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

St. Louis Couple Who Waved Guns at Protesters Face Charges

"Are wanted parents to start enrolling tomorrow. A ST Louis couple charged with crimes for standing outside their home with weapons drawn as protesters approach their home might have their case dismissed if state officials get their way, the prosecutor in ST Louis says Mark and Patricia McCloskey committed crimes by standing outside their homes, guns out. After a protest, Ma broke through neighborhood gates and March down private streets. She's charging the couple, but Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmidt will seek the case's dismissal. If you have a high profile prosecution like this, it could have a chilling effect on other citizens exercising again their fundamental rights of

Patricia Mccloskey Eric Schmidt Louis Prosecutor Missouri MA Attorney Mark
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

11:36 min | 10 months ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Until this gets resolved which is a long time and these little teams will organize in virtual pods and the work it out so employers will have to give employees some kind of flexibility if the answer is that employers are going to be forced to come to work in order to do their job at a genuine fear of of infection significant health problems. It's going to be a tough time. What do you make of the way you think? The world of technology is going to be viewed. When this is all over you know going into this pandemic there was what was called the tech lash the backlash against technology. And now it's so clear that we are as reliant as ever on Amazon and Google and so many other technology companies some of that nape play in their favor but you're also seeing lots of criticism and critique still of Amazon for example. Well any big company is going to be criticized and the fact that matter is try to imagine your experience in this pandemic without these tech companies. So let's give them a little bit of credit. Most of them are relatively. Inexpensive of people are now relying on them in a way used to be that the Internet was optional. Right that you of live with it or live without it now. You really need it to get through the day you need food. You need for information you need for employment one of the goals that we have to make sure that everybody has access to that. So for example if you look at overall in New York state there's a real disparity of access to these things. You can't participate in the economy without a digital connection. Now used to be that you could. And by the way one of the things that the government should be doing as they think about how to deal with stimulus as they need to be doing a significant infrastructure bill and that infrastructure bill in needs to include access to technology of one kind and other communications around the country. This is remains a problem especially in rural areas. And it really is a disadvantage. As a country we want equal opportunity for everybody and the fact that matter is that you need a broadband connection in order to participate. Think about kids that are being schooled from home for. The home has no access to cellular no access to broadband literally. The parents are sitting there reading textbooks. Right which maybe not even afford. It's really a problem. We need to address that. We need to address that quickly. Eric Geopolitical question a one of your roles at Google. You spend a lot of time traveling. The world dealing with countries like China and making some very difficult decisions in the process. When you look at. What's taking place now the posture that our administrations taking towards China? What do you think the appropriate end goal or end result should be given? What'S HAPP? What's happening here so you would think that when we had one common enemy around the world one common enemy literally this virus. That's that's killing. Millions of people. All around the world we would unite but instead we have decoupled and the cost of the decoupling is quite high now. Some of the decoupling will make sense. We're going to have more resilient supply chains to have more manufacturing in the United States. That's all good but the tensions are not good. All of these countries have huge military. They have all sorts of ways where they play to their domestic politics and they can do negative things. It gets really important that we understand that as you decouple from China and they are perfectly capable of building. They're only ships in their own software. They're not coming back and that hurts us. We are stronger globally when we have a common information platform when we communicate with each other. The net of this is we need more communication not less less positioning against Moore and figure out ways to a break. We're never going to be great friends. But we can collaborate on common problems such as the pandemic. But how do we do that? If we don't trust them well you can. You can In business you have all sorts of examples of people who've been able to work together without trusting the other company. Why can't we do that? At a nation state level all you have to do is basically how diplomats who can sit there and argue through this it is in America's interest that American platforms in particular all computer platforms in networking platform. Spread globally. It makes no sense to block that it makes everything so the way I think of it as when we compete. We WanNA win. I strongly believe that American technology can win against all of the other challenges around the world. Because we're so good at this so we need to get on a footing where we try to get these countries including China to use our platforms. Not The opposite Eric Schmidt. It's always good to see. We appreciate you joining us this morning. Thanks and good luck helping the state of New York and the rest of us will try to figure out what comes next. Thank you again. Thank you all next on Swath pod. How the covert nineteen pandemic will impact women differently in the long run. Cnbc contributor Joanne. Lipman the reason that we've made so many games is because there was such a tight labor market and their unemployment rate was so low and wanted to have a high unemployment rate. A lot of these diversity efforts. Just go out the window. We'll be right back. This is Squawk Pied. Here's thank you quick. The economic fallout of the pandemic has hit women disproportionately hard CNBC contributor. Joanne Lipman Writing Today. That the pandemic may cause a she session and that could impact diversity in the workplace for years to come. Let's bring in Joanne. Lipman is distinguished fellow for journalism at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. She's also a CNBC contributor and Joanna's great to see good morning greatest becky. Thanks for having me. This is not just a theory is borne out by the numbers. Women were fifty five percent of the people who were laid off since this all began right. That's right and it's not only women as a whole if you look at the different groups of workers different age cohorts. There's an especially huge differential between men and women at the youngest ages from twenty to twenty four at the older ages over fifty women of color. Also it's a huge issue and a big piece of it is that women are over represented in the industries that have been hit the hardest and we're talking about things like hospitality and travel and restaurants in child care and they also make up more than sixty percent of the lowest wage earners and then. There's this added wrinkle Becky that that I think you know well I know well. Which is that women actually does fall on women disproportionately at home during this time period. The home schooling the cooking and housework etc the childcare and these are all issues that might concern. I will tell you having worked in this area for a couple of years now is that these losses will be sustained and there's actually there was a white paper that came out recently That came to the same conclusion that these losses will be persistent. And they're not gonNA come back the reason being that the reason that we have seen gains from women and by the way. I think you know this that earlier this year women had for the first time were the majority of the workforce the problem. Is that what we see? Is that the reason that we've made so many gains is because there was such a tight labor market and the unemployment rate was so low at once. You have a high unemployment rate a lot of these diversity efforts. Just go out the window Joanne. That I think you're right that these losses could be permanent particularly because of the industries that were hit so hard in the situation. But you've got some thoughts about how we might be able to fix some of that. We were talking earlier this morning that if the schools don't open backup it makes it really difficult for a lot of parents to go back to work and that includes of course a lot of women working moms. What what could we potentially do on that front to try? Yeah there's quite a few things that we can do. We have to act now so for for example. We talked about the schools. What we're not talking about so much is daycare and as anybody knows who's at home right now with their preschoolers if you don't have daycare you cannot go back to work and you were talking earlier about. Tesla where Elon. Musk said if you choose not to come back you don't get unemployment benefits. Well there are a lot of parents and mothers in particular. There's more than eleven million single parents. They're the majority of whom are women if they don't have childcare they can't go out so. I think we need to look at when we're looking at these federal stimulus programs. We have to look more carefully at childcare. Can we support childcare and over the long term? Is this something that we need to think about. Federal Funding or federally federal. The way that we do for public schools We also need to think about things like paid leave paid family. Leave obviously is something. That's been percolating for a long time. I think we see now more than ever how important that is paid sick leave. I mean paid family. Leave is something that every other industrialized country in the world has except for the United States. I also would love to see some guard. Rails put around how we invest in companies so Goldman Sachs. We know took this very baby. Step a last year that they got a lot of attention for that. They're not gonNA take your company public unless you have one woman on your board. But why don't we extend that why you know? Let's let's have some other of why not? We're not going to invest in your company unless you actually have equitable pay for example Unless you have equitable family leave for example. I mean the fact is we're not going to get this economy back on track if we sort of ignore half of the Working Population Joanne policy question. And I'm usually very sympathetic to your calls in this in this fight in this particular instance. I think you said it. Because of the way the industries that were most impacted. I think this is ramification west of the implicit bias. That's in the system though I don't I don't want to just there isn't you. Go back and look at the financial crisis of two thousand eight by the way it. Disproportionately hurt hurt men. Oddly enough for four for whatever reason the question I would ask you is. We can do all the things you're talking about but that doesn't necessarily change the dynamic in these particular industries in these industries. You WanNa Change. The mix of gender is out. Is that one of the things you're saying the other piece of this. You look at people who have college educations don't have college educations and that's where the true mass gap is in terms of Who's being who's been hurt by this right Andrew? You're making fantastic points which I completely agree with. I think the issue is at this point. We're really actually not paying attention to the very basics before you can even get to what you're talking about which is sort of making more equitable Professional sort of a situation. We have to actually make we have to allow women to be able to go back to work Joanna's great to see you. Thanks for your time today. Thank your squawk pod will be right back. That's the show for today. Thank you for listening to this. Podcast squad Fox is hosted by Joe Kernan Becky quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin tune in weekday mornings on. Cnbc at six am eastern tweet us at Squawk CNBC and subscribe to quantify. Wherever you get your podcasts. We'll be here tomorrow..

Joanne Lipman Cnbc China Google New York United States Joanna Joe Kernan Becky Amazon Squawk CNBC Andrew Ross Sorkin Eric Schmidt Squawk Pied Eric Geopolitical Swath pod Goldman Sachs
"eric schmidt" Discussed on The 3:59

The 3:59

07:53 min | 10 months ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on The 3:59

"Eric. Schmidt led the transformation of Google into the tech behemoth. That it is today but he and Google parted ways. I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with me. Is Google Puerto Rich? Never who broke the story on Schmidt leaving his adviser role to back in February? Thanks for joining us. Rich having so let's step back and catch people up on Schmidt since he has been sort of out of the Google for a while. He had served a google for nearly two decades but had more of a role recently right. Could you run US through that? Yes yes oh definitely in the in the past few years. His role had been very diminished. So the time line goes he. He stepped in a CEO in two thousand one And he served in that role for a decade until two thousand eleven before he handed the reins back to alert. Larry Page He stepped he moved. He left an operational role in twenty seventeen when he said he was stepping down from Executive Chairman and then finally left the board completely in two thousand nineteen so he had been gone from the the everyday picture for a while. Okay and he was playing most in advisory role correct. He was yeah but but my story is at. He left that role quietly in in February. What do you think he's he's left? Why now they're a couple things steady You know there have been at. Google of next generation of leaders have kind of stepped up to run a company. There's Sinndar shy. Who Runs Google and Alphabet it's parent company and Ruth Poor at WHO's Their chief financial officer who is kind of taken that that number two role And so you know there might not be the need for for someone like him There's also what's really interesting. He's been stepping up his his game in Government Projects Smith has lately. He's been kind of A. I mean he's disturbed some controversy for that red. Yeah Yeah so last week. New Governor Andrew. Cuomo said that Schmidt would be helping out with I think the word that they used his reimagining New York's tech infrastructure During the pandemic nafter telehealth and how offices are managed things like that and that has rubbed some folks the wrong way or or. What was the reaction to that to to? Schmidt's stepping up his role outside of Google instant. Some backlash especially from folks who are kind of questioning. What should the role of big tech in the public sector? You know given his ties legal He's he's Smith has also been more active in the the defense community so he he's onto boards that kind of advise the US government on a and and things like that for for For the military and there's been some strategy there about that Schmitz roll and end maybe pushing Google's financial interests before before anything else. So there's there's kind of a lot of controversy Swirling around him and you know things that he's been doing lately and he made some comments recently about big tech that has trauma Floats right yeah. Yes so he was on a discussion. A couple of weeks ago. with the Economic Club of New York and he said that Americans should really be grateful for for big tech right now. He cited Amazon as you know one of the things. We're like look how helpful this company is. They're they're giving you deliver you stuff during this. This is so we should be grateful that that that big tech was able to get this funding and can help you now. Which is kind of RUB people the wrong way given kind of the backlash tickets had over the last couple of years. Yeah absolutely. It's I feel like it's very blade. Runner asks for like a like a Sifi. Still being s like you should all be grateful to your big tech overlords like. That's that's sort of the I know that's not what he meant. But I feel like that's what folks are taking the sizes like because he's got. These are most likely will emerge this crisis stronger than ever right. More folks are dependent on these services than ever before. Yeah including Google. I mean Youtube. Usage has has surged. And you know they're dealing with issues as well with with misinformation about about cove nineteen hundred platform. So yeah it looks like depend on kind of making. They take stronger. So it's not all controversy. Do WanNa look back at some of legacy that Schmidt left at Google. What did he bring to the company so he was originally brought in as the term that people use a lot is adult supervision for Larry Page and Sergey Brin the founders Because they started it as as Grad school students and he was kind of the person who's GonNa come in and you whip Google into shape as as a big company And he did that. He was very successful in that he led the companies IPO in two thousand four And under him. Google really left it Expand beyond its roots as a search company and they went into mobile devices. They went into on video until he really expanded the scope in a company. And now it's it's obviously it's one of the biggest players in the world. It pretty much has hands in just about every aspect of our lives. Now Right Yeah. I mean that's the big reason. They restructured itself as alphabet. Which is the you know. It's it's in the weeds. But it's the parent company that runs Google but it basically allows them to just kind of go into different sectors that you would imagine goodwill being in and give them an operational structure to do that. So that includes like driverless cars and Health Tech and things like that. You talked a bit about the management shake-up Send Upper Chai is now the the CEO of Bechtel's parent company Just curious if you know things have changed directions change or you know what about the corporate culture has changed with sort of this new influx of managers relative to Schmidt's or the older guard. Yeah I think the big thing that changed its is is just the sheer size of the company alphabet has a more than hundred twenty thousand people around the world Which is a far cry from like you know the the garage startup that we think Linda when when we think of when Google I was handed. So that just means it's you know. It's less free wheeling. More BUTTONED UP. Google used to be famous for these these. Tgif meetings These hand company meetings where they just kind of. Hash everything out. But those have become less frequent. And a lot more tight-lipped let me say you'd say that it's A. It's a bit of a safer more conservative company at this point definitely safer definitely more a traditional company. Well that's a wrap check out rich story DOT COM. If you have any questions was foist mail at eight. Six two two zero five seven one three for the daily charge on Roger Chang. Thanks for listening to this week. A while podcast has appeared the official Comic Book Dot Com. We are talking about massive and I mean enormous gigantic Max plus years that are coming out of Japan that are also very expensive. Also if you're trading card game player you're not GonNa miss this episode because we break down the newest expansion pack with the biggest and best cards that you are going to want to get your hands on. We'll catch you there..

Google Eric. Schmidt Roger Chang US Larry Page Smith CEO Economic Club of New York Governor Andrew Amazon Executive Chairman Sifi chief financial officer Japan official Ruth Poor Cuomo Upper Chai New York
Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus

Morning Edition

03:43 min | 11 months ago

Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus

"Greene the state of Missouri is doing something unprecedented it is suing China over covert nineteen the suit claims that China concealed the corona virus which led to deaths and economic losses in Missouri we should say the state of Mississippi appears to be getting ready to file a similar lawsuit but states typically don't sue foreign countries Frank Morris of member station KCUR joins me to talk about the possible motivation behind this long shot litigation hi there Frank Hey David I see have Eric Schmidt the Republican Attorney General of Missouri filing this lawsuit start by walking us through what they're alleging China did here bush is laying the entire blame for the pandemic every bit of the death the financial pains caused in misery squarely on China he says that at the onset of the virus December and January China destroyed medical research interested whistle blowers and it allowed thousands of people to leave Wuhan after it was clear that a highly infectious disease it broken out there Chinese authorities engaged in a campaign of deceit that directly led to this virus spreading around the globe in Missouri is not immune to that all right so it sounds like a lawyer who sounds angry and is laying out a case but I mean what's the law here can a state like Missouri just sued China not normally turn Ginsburg allow professor at the university of Chicago says the case raises a huge jurisdictional issue Robert Munich that's the word that we use for the principle that states can't be sued in each other's courts governments cannot be sued in courts of other governments the real the statue here is the foreign sovereign immunities act and does have exceptions so Schmidt isn't just suing Chinese also suing three Chinese government agencies province city of Wuhan lab science agency and the Communist Party and that's where some of the exceptions to the foreign sovereign immunities act come in there's one for commercial activity Schmidt says the labs were engaged in some kind of commerce there's another exemption for non state actors like the Communist Party but even if the last two clears the sovereign immunity hurdle there are others Missouri would have to prove that what happened in China at the onset of the pandemic directly cause pain and suffering in Missouri and even if the case gets past all that and wins there's no clear way for Missouri to extract money from say a lab in China or the Communist Party well then what do we think might be the real motivation here politics critics say it Liz Schmidt an elected official do something about the pandemic it also fits neatly with Republican efforts in the Senate to strip some of China's sovereign immunity protections and also keep the focus on China and its culpability for the pandemic and keeps the attention off what critics would say we're trump administration missteps that worsen the outbreak here downplaying the virus the sluggish rollout of testings bocce allocation of medical equipment shouldn't Kuttner at the university of California Hastings college of law is a former state department lawyer she says that there will be a reckoning for China's role in the pandemic that US courts are not the place and now is not the time are we going to engage in a blame game now while the command and it could still reach one or are we going to focus on our domestic respond and they did turn things are when people are back to work and not having to wake up every morning wondering if they're going to catch a potentially fatal disease as of the latest update here in Missouri we're up to six thousand one hundred and thirty seven code nineteen cases and two hundred and eight

Greene Missouri China
Missouri files lawsuit against Chinese government over coronavirus

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

Missouri files lawsuit against Chinese government over coronavirus

"Missouri becoming the first state to sue China over its handling of the outbreak state Attorney General Eric Schmidt says it's about holding the Chinese government accountable this lawsuit in reason why I think it's so important and we hope that other states might follow suit is really about getting to the truth and the more we learn the more disturbing it is private class action lawsuits seeking trillions of dollars have also been filed in several

Missouri China Attorney General Eric Schmidt Chinese Government
Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus handling

Rush Limbaugh

00:35 sec | 11 months ago

Coronavirus: Missouri sues Chinese government over virus handling

"Secretary of state Mike Pompeii taking aim at China today accusing the country of concealing the true nature of the corona virus outbreak censor those who tried to warn the world in order to halt to testing of new samples and it destroyed existing samples also pointed a finger at China Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmidt was deploying the point is squarely in our lawsuit first the country brought by Stephen I'm proud of that a six to hold them accountable I feel like as a street sweeper you officer moral obligation to do this some legal experts say Missouri cannot sue a another sovereign

Mike Pompeii China Eric Schmidt Missouri China Missouri Attorney Stephen I Officer
Missouri files lawsuit against China over coronavirus

Rush Limbaugh

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Missouri files lawsuit against China over coronavirus

"Missouri's Attorney General Eric Schmidt defending the state's lawsuit against China this lawsuit in reason why I think it's so important and we hope that other states might follow suit is really about getting to the truth is and the more we learn the more disturbing it is and it's about holding the Chinese government account which is why we feel so strongly brought that case in federal court yesterday Missouri is the first state to see China over its handling of the initial outbreak but there's been a string of private class action suits around the country speaking trillions of dollars all of them in doubt though under current law which offers

Missouri Eric Schmidt China Attorney Chinese Government
In a first, Missouri sues China over coronavirus economic losses

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 11 months ago

In a first, Missouri sues China over coronavirus economic losses

"The state of Missouri has sued China's government claiming China is responsible for the enormous death suffering and economic losses across the world including in Missouri Republican Attorney General Eric Schmidt in a written statement said the Chinese government lied about the dangers of the virus and didn't do enough to slow its spread now it's unclear whether that lawsuit will have much if any impact U. S. law generally prohibits lawsuits against other countries with few exceptions China calls the lawsuit

Missouri China Eric Schmidt Chinese Government Attorney
"Your Next Big Idea" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"Your Next Big Idea" Week

"This week's theme is your next big idea. The curator is Daniel Brooks. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says hi. My Name's Daniel Brooks nine. The host of the unlocking creativity podcast theme. I've chosen is. You're next big idea. The reason I've chosen this is quite simply running away from changing our whole lives. These podcasts are going to help inspire you to go in and discover yours. Here are the PODCASTS and episodes chosen by Daniel. Monday's episode comes from the Tim. Ferriss show and is called Eric Schmidt lessons from trillion dollar coach. It's one hundred and four minutes. Long Eric. Schmidt is a technical advisor and board member to Alphabet Inc where he advises its leaders on technology business and policy issues. Eric joined Google in two thousand one and helped grow the company from a Silicon Valley startup to a global leader. In Technology. Tuesday's episode comes from design matters with Debbie millman and is called Lisa Khandan. It's thirty six minutes long in this episode. A conversation with artist and illustrator. Liikanen about getting started creatively. Wednesday's episode comes from creative. Boom ranking on big regrets being different and discovering life begins at fifty. It's fifty eight minutes long. Rankin is the British photographer publisher and film director renowned for his portraits of Bowie and Bjork and for being co founder of dazed and confused. We chatted to the fearless man behind the lens about his career. And we're surprised to hear him open up about his childhood. His father his regrets and mistakes. This is an honest delve into the heart and mind of one of the biggest names. In photography Thursday's episode comes from Happy Place and is called. Joe Wicks it's forty nine minutes long in this episode. The body coach himself turns up at ferns door to discuss being a father of two meeting. Your work goals and being named Gq worst-dressed of the year Friday's episode comes from unlocking creativity. And is called. Darren Brown the creative mind. It sixty two minutes long about this podcast. Daniel says creativity is the power that allows us to imagine a world. That isn't our world yet to consider what doesn't yet exist and make it exist. Welcome to the PODCAST. That will help you make that happen. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Daniel. For this week's the your next big idea. Listen in and let us know what you think you can find these episodes and listen to them as a playlist on Pod chaser just had to pod Chaser DOT COM and type in your next big idea into the search bar and the playlists will be right there for your enjoyment joined the discussion of this week's theme by using the Hashtag creativity. This is usually the section of the show where we bring you podcast news since the news is so filled with corona virus and Kobe nineteen lately. There's honestly not that much podcast industry news instead skype. Pillsbury who writes inside podcasting the newsletter? We usually read our stories from is asking for your participation she writes. I'm determined to keep this community connected so while we live through this bizarre moment in history. I'll publish reader submitted issues of the newsletter. I need your help to get this done. Please send me any or all of the following one episodes or podcast that have brought you. Joy provided relief over the past. Few weeks sky will share them in her newsletter and may eventually start a Google spreadsheet where people can add browse information at their leisure. Please include a link to the show and explain why it has been helpful to you during this time two stories about how the pandemic has impacted or not your work as a creator. Feel free to mention your show in the context of your story. Three stories about how the corona virus has impacted your ability to listen to podcasts or your interest in them four requests for help with your podcast need an editor a guest. Anything else. Five any ideas you have for future reader submitted issue you can send sky any and all of your suggestions return on twitter at sky. Pillsbury that's S. K. Y. E. P. L. L. S. B. U. R. Y. You can also reach her by email at sky at inside dot com. We'll be back next week with podcast. News and PODCASTS. That are keeping US happy during the Super Weird time.

Daniel Brooks Eric Schmidt Pillsbury Google United States Debbie Millman Darren Brown Happy Place Twitter Gq Worst-Dressed Joe Wicks Ferriss Editor Skype Kobe Rankin Lisa Khandan Alphabet Inc Advisor
"eric schmidt" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Look one hundred dollars show better business lessons you can count on everyday with our daily tentativeness lessons for the real world I'm your host your coach Teacher Omar here with you a book that I've read that has greatly influenced me as an entrepreneur share with you it's takeaways insights and why you should read it to today's must read is the trillion Dr Coach by Eric Schmidt if you don't know Eric Schmidt is the CEO of Google but this book is not about Google or hurt Schmidt it's about a man I'm Bill Camp Bill Campbell was a former American football coach turned business coach for some of the best business minds in the world what kind of minds well the book is called trillion dollar coach for reason he's helped the leaders of businesses worth more than a trillion dollars not only has coached Eric Schmidt who's the CEO of Google but also the fan founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin also guy named Steve Jobs from apple he also coach Brad Smith from intuit Jeff Bezos from Amazon John Donahue from Ebay Mercer Mayer and Yahoo Dick Costello from twitter and Cheryl Sandberg at facebook so Bill Campbell is the go-to Guy everybody goes to for advice for coaching when it comes to business excellence and leadership and this was great because shared all the insights on leadership on management that Bill Campbell pass onto many of these people this episode this mystery is GonNa be a little bit different from other must-reads I'll explain in detail but I want to give you the general takeaway from this book and really focus on that there's a lot of great insights tips but ought to save that for you when you read the book on TV the juice I wanna give you really the impact it made on me so let's get into it let's get down to business.

Jeff Bezos Yahoo football facebook Cheryl Sandberg twitter Dick Costello Ebay Mercer Mayer John Donahue Teacher Omar Brad Smith apple Steve Jobs Sergey Brin Larry Page Bill Campbell Google CEO Eric Schmidt
Missouri investigation: 12 ex-clergy could face prosecution

Rush Limbaugh

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Missouri investigation: 12 ex-clergy could face prosecution

"Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmidt is referring twelve former clergy for potential criminal prosecution after his office completed a thirteen month investigation of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church Schmidt said the twelve referrals are the most by any state Attorney General since the Pennsylvania report investigators found one hundred sixty three priests are clergy members accused of sexual abuse or misconduct against minors eighty three have since died of the eighty still alive the statute of limitations has run out on forty six of the

Eric Schmidt Missouri Attorney Catholic Church Pennsylvania Report Thirteen Month
Dana Perino on Developing Her Own Voice

The Strategerist

12:48 min | 1 year ago

Dana Perino on Developing Her Own Voice

"After spending seven years in the Bush administration rising to press secretary Dana Perino had become comfortable speaking speaking on behalf of others including the forty third president but she transitioned into roles on Fox News after the White House Dana develop her own voice who cared what I thought I could tell you what President Bush thought and why he thought that are how we got to that decision and I was very comfortable in that role on the first episode of Season Season Two of the strategic wrist Dana Talks about how she always remembers to focus on the good news how she deals with social media trolls and how her career in country music is progressing. I'm Andrew Kaufman and this strategic presented by the George Bush Institute what happens when you cross the forty third president late night sketch comedy and compelling conversation. The strategic has a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by the now and embraced by the George Bush administration station we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations and we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We're joined for today's episode by Dana Perino former White House press secretary and now Fox News Co host the five host of the daily briefing Dana Perino podcast co host of I'll tell you what she's a bestselling author so you're pretty busy. Thank you for taking the the time to do this. This honored to be here. I I love coming here to the Bush Center. It's whenever you step in that front door. It's like wow this place is beautiful. Thank you for saying that and doing such great work thank Q. and our co host is Hannah Avni your friend and VP of external affairs. She's back again Hannah. Thank you for doing it again. Thank you for having me again Andrew so Dana you so you recently you're now we're recording artist as well. Gaza May dierks dirks a Dirks Bentley superfan right. I yeah superfan Fan. Also I get to call him a friend now to happens if you stock long enough so. Do you think he's going to invite you to be on a song the backup side when you have a number one song in the world. It's kind of like you. I don't need to really do it again. I don't think but it's pretty funny when I worked at the White House. Well let me go way back when I I was in college and I thought I wanted to go into media back then if you wanted to get into TV you had to start in radio and I didn't want to have to do my radio experience after right graduated so I got a job part time job as a country music. Dj working overnight and Pueblo Colorado and I ah I didn't really I had grown up in the West but I had really listen to country music when I was a teenager I didn't really do that so I was completely out of it I I I introduced the first night a song by Tracy Lawrence and I said and here she is with their new Song Tracy Lawrence and then of course raises Lawrence's a man uh-huh tricky. I we have to do so fast forward and during the years at the White House. I don't think I listen to any music back at all. I didn't even have an IPOD when we left. That was the technology at the time I had nothing I listen to. NPR or whatever else was happening rush limbaugh or something so Kakitumba on the news and so when I left the White House or when we all left the White House I got an ipod I guess it was and I used to travel back and forth to to New York a lot and I just started downloading country music and Dirk Bentley Song Come. A little closer was out at the time China so that's how we became a fan. Would you like to sing a little bit of but I do have the worst voice but the other thing you're talking about is I don't I'm blessed with having lots of ideas and not a lot of time to execute however so in two thousand sixteen the five went on a bus trip to go conventions. RNC Indian say and at one point in the back of the bus Greg Gut failed and I were sitting there and he was making me laugh so hard because he was just making up nonsense country songs about the five about Fox News about everything and he just had me giggling so much and I said we should should go to Nashville and record a song about the five and record it with a real recording artists and then release it for charity so three years later it came true. We have a wonderful executive producer of the five called Megan Albano. She figured it out we teamed up John Rich from big and rich who is a wonderful person big fan of forty three's as well and we went to Nashville and in one take he's saying the song that we sang the backup part. It's called Oh shut up about politics and it's not about shutting any particular person up. It was just about how politics has entered into everything sports music music theater technology. Everything's just too much and so we have a song called shut up about politics. We released it and within two hours it was number one on the country charts and then and that whole weekend it was number one in the world bigger than Lady Gaga Justin Bieber it was astounding. It's amazing it was amazing and all the proceeds go to folds of honor so we're pretty proud of it. Ninety nine cents you can download it on full. Honor does great work. We've done incredible work. We're familiar with there were pretty well and they're just such great such a great organization. That was pretty fun fun. I have a question for you off of that. Though I mean you're right politics is in absolutely everything you cannot get away from it and we talk about that a lot too. I mean even when you're going through Instagram instagram stories. It's just permeates every bit of it. It's in your life obviously multiple times a day. How do you get away from politics and focus on the thing? I feel a little a lot better than I did even from a few years ago because I've really embodied this idea that politics is what I do. It is not who I am and I have carved off my weekends and my evenings when I'm not working but but I don't go to dinner to talk about politics with people unless I agree with them now. That's GonNa sound like Oh that's not very fair and balanced view but I argue all day long and so in my personal life I pretty much. Don't I have a rule that I wrote about in the in the Jasper book which is no politics at the dog park. You're that's a safe place for me and if and even people that WanNa talk to me about politics at the Dog Park Mike Sorry I don't talk politics at the dog park. I have a policy and then laugh about it and they move on and I also carry a lot less about social media than I did. In Two thousand sixteen. I was really attacked by the Russians. Even though I didn't know as Russians at the time I remember actually coming here to the Bush Center right before the two thousand sixteen election. I can't remember what I was doing and AH chance to see President Bush and he's how you doing and I told him I had the worst professional summer of my life you know being attack and I was really kind of in the fetal position under my desk and even like my husband would say how can I help you. There's there's nothing you can do and it gave me a big appreciation for what parents are going through when their children are consumed assumed with their phone because you don't know what's being said and it's so demoralizing I was a grown woman. I've been the White House press secretary. How could this affect me so much and and I remember President Bush saying? Why didn't you call me like a really imagine if I had called President Bush and said Sir people are being really mean to me on twitter he would have said get off twitter on it solved this one's easy and actually it is easy so once you step away from from it or somebody gave me a tip to only have mentioned from people that you follow and Eric Schmidt of Google actually pulled me aside at one point in two thousand seventeen as I was explaining what it was like to be one of the people that was targeted by these Russian boots but I didn't know they were rushing at the time I just said it's overwhelming and he pulled me aside Dana? These are not real people and you explain to me how the whole system worked in Saint Petersburg and I don't know that just gave me an ability to say it doesn't matter. It just doesn't matter no so I it's weird to say that as much as politics permeating everything for me. It's probably less a part of my life than in the previous elections that I've covered for Fox. Was it similar to how you regrouped. After you left the White House taking a breath stepping away from it no not really I mean I remember the day that we'd left Andrews Air Force Base and Peter and I left to go on the trip to Africa. I leaned my head back against is the seat and I said nothing I do for the rest of my life will ever be that important or that hard and it's really true when I make a comment now. I'm not gotTA START A war. I also have a great appreciation for what public servants go through and I want to support deport them. No matter what party they're from if you're willing to put your self out there and run for office and try to do the right thing I try to be supportive. Okay talk to us about mercyships touch. You talked about a little bit when you left the West so interesting about mercy ships. There's actually a Bush connection there too okay so obviously President Bush and Mrs Bush were amazing leaders. When it came to Africa I I got to go to Africa with them? In February of two thousand eight and in typical forty-three fashion we did five countries in seven days. I got my first migraine. I couldn't even go to the Kigali event because I had to stay on the plane and two liters of fluid into my arm and so I didn't get to go to the and and I've been sad about not making it to Rwanda ever since given the statistics about pep far so many times at the podium that I thought I understood Africa and then I was just totally blown away when I went there and I came back and I said Peter we need to go for six months after the White House and he said how about six weeks so we did six weeks compromise and yeah so we did a pet farsight that's on in Fishhook South Africa and Peter and I just had this confusing time and that did help us reset our priorities and our hearts and to reconnect as a couple as well because we're so blessed here in America and you can get caught up in what about me. What am I gonNa do to the White House and just being able to have a bigger world view? After I left was great great fast forward mercy ships asked me through my speakers bureau if I would come to Dallas and moderate a conversation between the president and Mrs Bush in front of their dinner group so I said well sure that sounds great so peter and I were coming down here now prior to that I had join the one campaigns women advisory board and I had gone to several countries with them. I had also been on the Broadcasting Board of Governors under President Obama and I'd gone to Africa on behalf of of that organization as well trying to increase the amount of content of for women in particular and Africa because we found that men will definitely listen to the radio for news in sports but women will listen if it's about health and their kids so anyway it's just little bit of an effort to do that so at the dinner right before the Q. One eight with the president and Mrs Bush. I'm sitting there and somebody says well. Why did you get interested in Africa so I'm telling him than soul story that I'm telling you and then I I said just a few months ago I got to go to Sierra Leone and I went to this place called the Aberdeen Clinic and it was started by Scottish heiress us and it's so amazing they were doing fistula surgeries there and the day I was there? They were teaching the women there how to count to ten and the lady next to me said Oh she's not a Scottish heiress. Her name is Ann Gloag and she's sitting right behind you. This is a self made businesswoman in Scotland who was a burn unit nurse for twenty years but then she and her brothers started a bussing service in the UK when Margaret Thatcher deregulated the transportation sector and they became very successful and as the company expanded she took Africa and and when she got there she said this will never do so she started doing all of this philanthropy there and that's how I ended up talking to her and I said to Peter we have to go see mercy mercy ships for ourselves so that's how we got involved and it's a surgical hospital ship they do the West Coast of Africa that night they were kicking off a capital campaign for a brand new ship because they I usually retrofit and old ship and

President Bush White House Dana Perino President Trump Bush Center Africa White House Dana Fox News Peter Press Secretary Andrew Kaufman George Bush Institute West Tracy Lawrence Hannah Avni Migraine
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Material

Material

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Material

"When these talks about again 's of. Executives super senior executives who were guilty of sexual improprieties were quietly shown, not the back door, but the side door, maybe and here's twelve million dollars in severance shareholders, sued and January of this year. This I that that's I can't believe that you that senior executives or simply rubber-stamping your way through this. And that is actually putting lots and lots of pressure on Google as a matter of fact to board members have resigned now including Eric Schmidt. Who was we again, if we say the two thousand one was the time when Google became a company became Google that that's Eric Schmidt came aboard the the signature day in any startup when it's doing well enough that investors say okay now, we need to bring in a grownup to be your CEO and to run your company and Eric Schmidt was. One of those grownups, but he's one of two CEO's that announced that it was announced that they he would not be seeking re election to the board directors, and so he's going to reduce his role to like a technical advisory role in both alphabet in and Google. And so he's out as of June. He wasn't pushed out because of these scandals. But it's very very well known that there is a lot of pressure being put on the most senior levels of management that you've got to show that you're actually addressing this problem. Interesting. The this is kind of maybe a divergent, but interesting the that they announced one of the replacement alphabet announced one of the replacements who is a CEO CFO of a biopharmaceuticals company will not be joining the board which shows you something about the direction one of the directions that the company wants to be headed. And but hopefully this person will start in. Fisting that this is not a PR problem. This is an institutional problem. And it will mean that we will not be getting the best people. And we do get the best people. We will not be getting the best work from them. And if nothing else we don't want to be ashamed of the environment that we're creating. What I feel like. Breath. We're gonna do a quick ad. And then after the ad were going to report on some lighter notes. Exactly this episode material is brought to you by express VPN confession time, we all think we're immune to cybercrime. It's hard to imagine. Someone trying to get hold of your information. But here's the bad news, stealing data from people like you and me using public wifi is a very easy way for bad guys to make money. So if you leave your internet connection on encrypted your passwords and credit card numbers could be vulnerable. But there's some that you can do to protect yourself from cybercriminals start using.

Eric Schmidt Google CEO CFO CEO twelve million dollars
"eric schmidt" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on This Week In Google

"So it's perfect for a big open space. I wouldn't put it like by my bedside table. Sounds like you have a hibachi next to the couch. I haven't open floor plan. Jeff. That. Eric Schmidt tweets yesterday after third eighteen years of board meetings and following coach Bill Campbell's legacy coach was legendary at apple early board members with and helping the next generation of talent to serve thanks to Larry Sergey and all my be OD border director colleagues onward for me as a technical advisor to coach alphabet and Google businesses tech, plus DIB and S C A I Schmidt futures teaching and more. So that's kind of retirement. I would guess. Yeah. But don't forget he was a coach Larry Sergei. So he's got a lot of coaching experience. Yeah. He was adult supervision. And as Robert Robin Washington has been appointed to the board of directors old enough to remember when Eric Schmidt putting his mouth was worse than Mark Zuckerberg putting his mouth, oh legendary. But then, but but now as seems so tame. Diane green also leaving the board. She was CEO Google cloud. She she still there. Yes. Even though Thomas Korean is there. She left Google cloud January twenty nineteen. Oh, so she's still not at okay stayed there. She is now a CFO at Juliet sciences Biopharm. And joining the yeah. Robin L Washington. Recognize business leader, I recognize you with extensive experience across finance and operations, and she'll serve on alphabets leadership development and compensation committee. Okay. So independent compensation committee..

Larry Sergey Eric Schmidt Diane green Robin L Washington Robert Robin Washington Google CFO Juliet sciences Biopharm Bill Campbell Mark Zuckerberg Jeff apple Thomas Korean advisor director eighteen years
Former Google executive Eric Schmidt to leave board

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Former Google executive Eric Schmidt to leave board

"In the tech space, Google's former CEO Eric Schmidt stepping down from the board of Google's parent. Alphabet out. Abets current board chair John Hennessy says in a statement that Schmidt has made an extraordinary contribution to Google and alphabet CEO. Alphabet is also appointing Robin Washington as director Washington is chief financial officer at

Google Eric Schmidt CEO Robin Washington John Hennessy Chief Financial Officer Director
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Kickass News

"The newly minted CEO that he needed a coach how coach Campbell helped shape the relationship between Eric and Google founders Sergey Brin, Larry page. Why Campbell initially refused. Eric's invitation to join Google's board of directors and how he talked Eric out of resigning his Google CEO way back in two thousand four Eric says Campbell wasn't just another executive coach he coached the whole team and discusses the importance of trust and even love to a team success. And ultimately the company's bottom line. He shares some of Campbell's secrets for handling difficult personalities or the abberant genius as he liked to call them and shed some light. Light on Campbell's longtime friendship with one of those abberant geniuses. Apple's Steve Jobs, then Eric opens up about his decision to step down as chairman of alphabet and twenty seventeen and his next big bet on the positive potential of artificial intelligence less. Why starting off a meeting with a little polite chit-chat isn't a waste of time and the power of hugs in the workplace coming up with Eric Schmidt in just a moment. Eric Schmidt served as Google CEO. And chairman from two thousand one until two thousand eleven Google executive chairman from twenty eleven to twenty fifteen and then as executive chairman at Google's newly formed parent company alphabet from twenty fifteen to two thousand eighteen now he's retained with Google senior VP Jonathan Rosenberg and Google director of communications Allen eagle to write a book about the man. Without whom he says, Google wouldn't be the company. It is today. The book is called trillion dollar coach the leadership playbook of silicon valley's Bill Campbell, Eric. Thanks for joining me. Well, thank you very much bad. I'm really looking forward to this. Well, Eric Bill Campbell may very well. Be the most influential person in Silicon Valley that people outside the valley have never heard of a who are some of the people in companies that he coached a success..

Bill Campbell Google Eric Eric Schmidt Eric Bill Campbell CEO chairman executive chairman Sergey Brin Larry page Jonathan Rosenberg Apple Steve Jobs senior VP communications Allen eagle director trillion dollar
"eric schmidt" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Hello to you at Eric Schmidt on Twitter Lincoln, they could find you quite easily and also on Facebook. Eric Schmidt seventy six and I'll include links to everything we've discussed in the show notes. Do you have any last words? Parting comments recommendations for anything you would like to say before we. Rep which emits been an incredible privilege to be on on this show. When I think of the way, you've communicated the ideas and the principles you you've established Bill would love you. Because of what you stand for. What's interesting about our book on Bill is that Jonathan Allen? And I started this book just as a thank you to someone who had been our coach and mentor and how huge impact, but what we discovered was that there was essentially, no literature on how to coach teams and business. There was no there were no facts there. No analogies. It was no way of touching about it. So what we discovered is. That the principles that he taught write us directly are the universal principles of managing teams right from football to business and everyone needs a coach. Yep. This is very very true. I didn't actually get a coach in this capacity 'til maybe two years ago, and certainly for people listening, even if you have a small organization, even if you are your organization as a single person to work with contractors, for instance, having a coach even to simply hold you accountable. And and force you to clarify your thinking is of is. So leveraged invaluable. I'm just thrilled that that you guys have put this book out. So thank you again. I really appreciate you taking the time not only to put together the book, but also to share some of your lessons learned in this conversation. Okay. Well, thank you very much, Tim. I appreciate it into everybody listening. You can find links to everything in the show notes as per usual at Tim up, log Ford slash podcast. And until next time. Thank you for this. Hey, guys. This is Tim against a few more things before you take off number one this five bullet Friday. Do you want to get a short Email from me, would you? Enjoy getting short Email for me every Friday that provides a little morsel of fun before the weekend and five Fridays. Very short Email where I share the coolest things I've found that I've been pondering over the week that could include favorite new albums that I've discovered could include gizmos and gadgets and all sorts of weird shit that somehow dug up in the the world of the Terek as I do it could include favorite articles that red and that I've shared with my close friends, for instance, and it's very short. It's just a little tiny bite of goodness before you head off for the weekend. So if you want to receive that check it out, just go to four hour, workweek dot com. That's four hour workweek dot com all spelled out and just drop in your Email, and you'll get the very next one. And if you. Sign up. I hope you enjoyed..

Tim Eric Schmidt Bill Facebook Twitter Jonathan Allen Ford four hour two years
"eric schmidt" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The age of surveillance capitalism. The fight for a human future at the new frontier of power. It's just out today, by the way, and professors Zubov wanna come back to hearing you tell us more about what you call the imperatives of surveillance capitalism. But I also just want to play a little bit of tape here to get the voice of, you know, those people making decisions in the tech world because for example in two thousand ten then Google CEO, Eric Schmidt, talked a little bit about how the company approaches searches in. And he said this. We don't need you type it all. We know where you are with your permission. We know where you've been with your permission. We can more or less guess what you're thinking about. Now is that over the line? Right over the line vote. Okay. Well, we so maybe our guesses won't be very good. Maybe we'll limit though, you see what I'm saying. So we'll try to find that that line to try to help you understand more about the world around you. That's then Google CEO, Eric Schmidt in two thousand ten and Shoshana Z buff. You hear him there? Repeated say with your permission with your permission. We're trying to find that line. But then it's also the part where he says we're just trying to help you understand more about the world around you. I mean, how does that comport with what you are telling us about what you see as the impair imperatives as you're saying of what surveillance capital capitalism actually is. Well, okay. There are a thousand answers to that question. But let's start with this. First of all, let's be clear. We we approached the internet and the wonders of the digital world seeking empowerment seeking the democratization of knowledge seeking a whole range of freedom from the frustrations imposed upon us by real world institutions, and there is no question in my mind that digital digital technologies. Offer us these tremendous gifts these great great riches, the argument, I make is that twenty-first-century citizens should not pay for those privileges with the the situation that we're in now, which is having been relegated to the status of free raw material for a new regime of capitalism that is oriented toward business cuss. Numbers that takes us from being subjects as we were in the original vision of telemedicine to being objects as we are in today's vision. So the first thing is how do we rescue that those capabilities of the digital that allow us to know one another that allow us to know about the world that allow us to democratize knowledge and information, how do we rescue that for a different kind of future where we are not paying the price in the forms of these massive asymmetries of knowledge, and therefore power that the surveillance capitalists have amassed at our expense and at the expense of democracy. So are you sorry to jump in here? But are you foreseeing a kind of new totalitarianism? Well, you know, you ask you ask a good question there Magna because I think the easiest thing in the world is for us to look at all this and sale, and you know, big brother is back and digital totalitarianism and so forth. And you know, I I've I've always celebrated the folks who are using their critical thinking to to have these perceptions. But I think there's there's a real difference between what's happening to us now. And what the the ghastly horrors that we saw mid twentieth century in the form of totalitarianism, so totalitarianism as as many of our listeners know was a a murderous ideology and it worked through violence and terror and quite literally as we know murder in order to control and subdued. Populations. And it wanted to dominate people from the inside out Stalin's famous phrase, the engineering of the soul. What we're seeing? Now is a new kind of power this power works through the medium of this massive digital architecture that increasingly surrounds us, and it does not want to harm us. It doesn't want to hurt our bodies, or you know, cause us to bleed it doesn't want to deal with our our our our, sweat and our pain. It doesn't want to torture us or kill us. But it is very happy to extract the data that leaches from the pain that we may be experiencing just at it is as it is equally. Happy to extract the data that leaches from our joy and happiness professors who magistrate. But you for second because he said something that's really provoked. A question me..

Eric Schmidt Google CEO Stalin Zubov wan murder Shoshana Z
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Venture Stories

"I have a few questions about what I call. The erection it production function that now you've been productive. I very simple. What would you describe as your greatest talent in business? I'm a systemic thinker. And I like people, and I like to think about how people behave. So the key thing in leadership is organizing how do you get people to to do things? So my father taught me that the best way to get people to do stuff is to have it be their idea. So if you can find a way that your idea is also their idea, then you can go back to working on the people who's idea, you don't agree with. And so the ideal manager doesn't ever have to do anything because all the people who they work with our cell functioning self organizing. It's so obvious what they should do. And they love it so much. They never have any problems solve all their problems. Of course, that's not how it really works. But if you can't motivate people around that. Then you're not really giving them an opportunity to be successful. What's your media diet? And how do you consume it will for longtime? I read real newspapers nowadays, I use the various news aggregates to read the news on live various phones, which I do is sub optimal. But that's sort of my reality is a person who's a lot around a lot. I think the reality is that for you should read multiple stuff and second. I'm careful now to look at the source of information is it so easy for people to mislead you and look like they're legit. But in fact, they're not and is there an underrated media source that you would direct our attention to the economist. The economists now named after you. Father Wilson Schmidt. Let's say I'm a young person. And I'm coming up in the tech world. And I say to you. I'd like to be the next Eric Schmidt. They cannot obviously copy your career or follow. It exactly the same footsteps, but they want to be next generation analog of what you've done what advice would you give to that person? Well, as it goes back to the question of luck. So I was lucky because I had good taste in friends, and they helped me out. So the most skill not luck. Okay. I'll let you define that. So, but but basically the best things in your life will come from the people that you hang out with. And I mean, the people that you love to work with and the people with whom you have passionate talks all night about and that kind of stuff, and if you can find those people sign yourself up on their ship that is worked incredibly well for me. I had the benefit of being early in the computer industry. So that's like super lock. But my real. Opportunities. I look at each of these stages. I was picked early I work with smart people. People took a risk on me. And I learned and I want to make sure that that you all hear that. So today win as onto preneurs. Remember that the quality of the people that you work with able you hire people on your board and so forth will determine awful lot of your outcome. In the media. There's this fascination with founders, and how brilliant they are. But corporate success is a team sport. Right. And as much as we love and identify our founders, it is the people who work for them everyday who worked the sixteen hours a day, and they did. So because they love the founders they love the vision of the company and they cared a great deal about that. And then when they went home to see their families exhausted. They said I was proud to to work, and I was proud to do this. Right. Those are the people you want to associate with those are the people that will change the world. Eric schmidt. Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you. Please hit us up at village. Global dot BC slash at work catalyst.

Eric Schmidt Father Wilson Schmidt sixteen hours
How Google Protected Andy Rubin, the 'Father of Android'

Slate's If Then

04:02 min | 2 years ago

How Google Protected Andy Rubin, the 'Father of Android'

"Big investigation. The headline was how Google protected Andy Rubin, the father of Android. It was actually not just about any Ruben but about three Google executives who had been credibly accused of sexual misconduct, and in all three cases, Google protected them in various ways, they they kept the Clintons client, and in the case of Mr. Rubin who was very highly placed executive at the company, not only did they keep it, quiet. But when they found that an employee had made a credible accusation that he had coerced her into forming oral sex in a hotel room. They gave him a hero's. Farewell. According to the times, they paid him ninety million dollar exit package and said nothing about the real reason he was leaving the company. This was a big and disturbing expose about. The company's motto was once don't be evil. Apl you reported. I believe. Exclusively inflate the other day that that one of these people still works for Google. Yeah. I learned from sources in publish this last night that Richard Duval who is a director at X, which is a sister company to Google under alphabet. It's kind of experimental projects moon, shoot lab of the company. He had a told an employees or not employees, but rather candidate during a job interview that his poly-amorous later before she had found out if she thought the job invited to her to say hi at burning man, she went to burning man's at high 'cause she was planning on going anyway to some extent perhaps said hi to him still waiting near back on the job. He then asked her to take off her shirt. So he could give her a massage. She was young engineer. She ended up not getting the job when she reported this to Google few years later couple years later, they asked her not to say anything said that sounds credible. What she said. And I found out that has a Friday at least he was still working at the. Company, and you know, he had continued to work at the company, we know even after this was reported. I just can't even imagine if I was applying for a job at newspaper magazine that I really wanted and the editor I saw later at a party then asked me to take my shirt off while I was still waiting to hear back from the job. Like what I would do is just terrifying. So what I heard from sources there is there is a sense that the company kind of shelters people who act in this way, particularly men who act kind of a harassing way towards women. One source told me, there's an increasing sense that Larry Sarah guy, who are co founders of Google may be the problem. The source continued I don't think they're abusers. But they sheltered them. They clearly think there's some amount of value. They're getting out of these men that outweighs the women they're preying on. This is also in response to the fact that Sarah, gay Brin has had a very public affair with a. Really? At Google is working on Google glass of years ago, and and Eric Schmidt. It was reported in the times once retained mistress this is a quote to work as a company consultant. So there's a sense that this is just a deep problem that goes kind of runs through the company all the way to the very top the Google DARPA Thais shared on Thursday with the companies vice president of people operations Elaine now that do go had fired forty eight people in the past two years, thirteen of whom were senior managers for sexual harassment. So that's like twenty four people a year in the past two years. I mean, Google's company, but that seems like a lot. Yeah. And there was a planned walkout by some Google employees. I think yeah. So, you know, people at the company, which that's clear that is the second most valuable company in the world are definitely willing over the New York Times report and health. Goal handles credible claims that come in from women who work there definitely heard rumblings that this was in the culture of Google

Google Andy Rubin Engineer Richard Duval Larry Sarah Guy Clintons New York Times Ruben Executive Eric Schmidt Newspaper Magazine Vice President Director Consultant Editor Harassment Elaine Brin Two Years
"eric schmidt" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Former CEO Eric Schmidt and current CEO. Dr Pietsch our are making the rounds. Trying to explain away that companies quest to enter the Asian market enforce namely in China, but China doesn't dig free speech too, much and Google seems all too willing to one day soon. Roll out of products that will allow them to stifle free thinkers in that country. If Google doesn't bend Chinese tech companies fast growing very good at what they do. Most certainly will. And that's where the dissent among many, Google employees comes. In. What's that cute phrase? They used to have don't do evil they removed that from their corporate ethos back in the spring right about the time it came to the fore that they were prostituting themselves to the communist party in China, unfettered capitalism is a problem. Theodore Roosevelt knew that. But as companies like Google and others learn to be even more adept at playing both sides left, and right democrat, and Republican congress has clearly not been of a mind to keep any of the virtue of our mission as Americans when it comes to business. That's where the power of the executive branch could come in Schmidt said recently, he sees to internet's a bifurcation between a western and eastern one one that allows for all information to be traded the other which house to controllers that keep their people underfoot. We'll do we'll chase more dollars or UN or will it find a soul? If it doesn't Trump should take hammer to anvil to Google and do what they won't even if that means leaving money on the table. Find out more about Dan's life on Facebook, search at French and friends. Welcome back. Now, here's some more unconventional wisdom to set you free from the men on a mission to retire America. One person at a time. Radio show with me here today is.

Google Eric Schmidt China CEO Dr Pietsch Theodore Roosevelt communist party America UN Facebook congress executive Dan French one day
Eric Schmidt, ex-Google CEO, sees US, China internet split

Phil Valentine

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Eric Schmidt, ex-Google CEO, sees US, China internet split

"The New York Times reporter wrote this rod Rosenstein, bombshell says he stands by it. And this wasn't a flippant remark. He says Adam Goldman referring to rod Rosenstein saying that he was going to syrup. Tissues taped the president and then tried to evoke the twenty fifth amendment to get him out of the

Rod Rosenstein Adam Goldman The New York Times Reporter President Trump Twenty Fifth
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Unchained

"And it's similar to when I first discovered how young to crew goes, I could not believe it. He was recently on the show. So Tillis your background and how you got a crypto. So I got into the crypt. So I used to be a student at Stanford, and I was studying computer science and it was like twenty fifteen. And I took a class I was sitting in on this talk that Eric Schmidt from Google had given. And this is really at the peak of like of like blockchain, not bitcoin stuff. And at one point, somebody in the audience asked Eric Schmidt about like bitcoin and you know, he basically give the blockchain bitcoin spiel bitcoins interesting. But like the technology binded is like, super, super interesting. And so I kind of came away from that being like, oh, like blockchain, like what does that mean and low and behold in the fall of two thousand fifteen twenty fifteen and twenty sixteen. So I'm getting mixed up anyways in the fall. Wall of what was then my junior year, I took a classes Stanford called bitcoin and crypto currencies, and it was the first time that it was taught, and I just totally fell in love with this base and just like just completely just thought that this is like the most exciting thing happening technology ended up meeting Fred from coin base because he came in and gave a talk at that class and kind of as a result ended up working coin base for a while as an engineer, kind of as I was finishing up school, and then on the side started working on Dharma. And as soon as I graduated kind of turn that into a full-time profession. And how did you come up with the idea Dharma? So when I was a coin base, I was pretty struck by the fact that just sits on Seoul, much crypto assets. Like then for the most part, they're just entirely stagnant like it's not like when you put your money in a Bank account, it's accruing interest for you. Because the Bank is presumably lending that money out to other people. Whereas if you put your kind of bitcoin and base, it's just kind of sitting there riding the waves of the bitcoin market. So you know, in my head, I was like, wow, you have borderless currency, like how cool would it be if we had like a borderless Bank turns out that's really hard for a centralized coin base to do because there's just like nine, Jillian, different regulatory issues that they have to be concerned with. And this is not their number one priority, but this had kind of the idea of like, wow, we have a decentralized Boorda's currency. What if we had like a decentralized borderless credit market? And so I kind of started tinkering with that idea there and it's vault into what it is today and why the name Dharma. Like I, I am a former yoga teacher and interested meditations. That's Buddhist where it was like, what does that have to do with anything? I mean, it really depends on how how you cut it as both a Hindu Buddhist concept. But so the reason why chose. Chosen named Dharma. So I'm like deeply fascinated with Indian culture of spend a good amount of time living there. And and I think like Dharma's this concept that doesn't really have like a single English word for it. But at least in Hindu culture generally refers to like acting in accordance with one's like obligations and duties. And I thought that that was sort of fitting to the concept of what a debt is in debt is basically like an obligation. And so if we're talking about creating a universal comprehensive system for settling these obligations, I thought that Dharma would essentially be kind of a fitting title just saying, I like it. I actually want to go back to Stanford Natia and just ask one question and you kind of mentioned, sort of like what the atmosphere was around, like blockchain versus bitcoin back in two thousand fifteen. Yeah. Just curious. How did the attitude around bitcoin and crypto change within Stanford during the years you were there?.

Dharma Eric Schmidt Stanford Stanford Natia Tillis Seoul Google Fred Jillian Boorda engineer
Eric Schmidt on AI: 'Trust me, these Chinese people are good'

Leo Laporte

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Eric Schmidt on AI: 'Trust me, these Chinese people are good'

"I, thought this was kind of interesting because, we often think of the, internet, as, well an, American invention and and. While we, don't own it I think we just assume well we you know we dominated. The case in fact there's more people online China than there are in the rest of the world China. Is Is has billions

China Google United States President Trump Facebook Apple Chinese Government Eric Schmidt Sergei Brin Shenzhen Cyprus Leah Soviet Union LEO Twitter Larry Chairman Reporter
"eric schmidt" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on 600 WREC

"I mean you know i said this to ray kurzweil at one point nor or no who is the head of google eric schmidt eric schmidt and i said at what point does google have the analysis running on me if i'm a competitor of google i'm working on something that your algorithms don't snag me and you either gobble me up or you steer me in the wrong direction because google doesn't do evil all right okay is that why i mean isn't that why facebook just bought that one company i think it's an israeli company that could go in i don't remember what it was supposed to do but one of the things that it did do is it saw which applications and which yeah which apps were starting to take off really early and facebook came in and they just gobbled that company up because they wanted that they wanted to see that's that's exactly what he asked about google right what's going to stop you from seeing where i'm headed and of course nothing nothing nothing's going to stop right except unless the owner of the up and coming company doesn't choose to sell but can the owner of the up and coming company afford to best google probably not probably not probably not i mean i just don't for the first time in my life i've i've always mocked the idea of you know you see blade runner and you're like then they're like well the company won't like this oh stop it you know what i mean we've got companies that size though now we do we do and at what point do the american people say who's controlling who you know what i mean is the government really providing oversight and can the government even tell google no at this point i mean think of the information that google would have if they would choose to use it on anybody in congress all they have to do is just tweak the algorithm to see all they'd have to tweak the algorithm to change the news feeds and their searches for the people in washington i mean right and it could it could totally change their outlook on things i mean it's really it's it's becoming a very different world and i don't think people have caught up with that by any stretch on the other other end of the spectrum we were talking about netflixing blockbusters as competitors just to give you an idea of who won that war yuck buster right yesterday it was it was announced the last two blockbusters in alaska are closing and that leaves a total of one in the united states of america now how's it still in business i i don't know what's in the band or in bend oregon is their last remaining store in the united states isn't that something is just really feel end that still going to video store have you heard of the internet from band what is happening there.

eric schmidt ray kurzweil
"eric schmidt" Discussed on Tech News Today

Tech News Today

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on Tech News Today

"Eric schmidt off from any discussion of project maven or the cloud pursuit not even though his on defense innovation board he actually is on a board that advises and consults the pentagon about what sort of tech it should by and he told me this week in order to avoid any even the semblance even the pretense of a conflict of interest they made a decision incredibly early on to seal him in his role at the defense department from his role at google if there's ever any overlap between the two of them so the to make that decision so early on to take your number one pentagon guy the guy that actually tells the secretary of defense what tech to buy and make sure that he can't receive any news any emails any messages any internal communications related to your massive cloud bid or this weird project where your company is partnering with the air force that shows how serious they were early on so in months ahead here's what's going to happen google and also a bunch of other industry players around silicon valley are going to come up with a set of principles that they say it's going to help them to understand what they're at the requirements are when they work with the pentagon they're going to that's going to be very transparent to the pentagon the pentagon sense of that and then they'll know what they can ask who to do so the arrival of those principles which we learned about i and now we know is going to pull employed different characters around silicon valley not just google very much led by google that's the next step here where everybody draft some rules and hopefully the folks that google that you know the actually writing this stuff like the principles but we don't know yet we haven't seen them that's what happens next and that's going to guide this relationship going forward and then google will probably feel more comfortable to start talking about this stuff but you know that's the thing there's it seems difficult for me to imagine.

Eric schmidt pentagon secretary google
"eric schmidt" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"eric schmidt" Discussed on The Rusty Humphries Rebellion

"Or something here stinks to me what they're trying to cover up is the czanka very in fact this came out today two or three major articles and operatives from the obama administration said that zuckerberg eric schmidt from google all the social media were in the bag for hillary clinton yeah and if anybody got the benefit of their data eric schmidt was actually the chief outside consultant in hillary clinton's data operation to micro target voters and i'm sure she got the benefit of all google's information i google ships that to the ci and the nsa which funded google started out you know you google desk cia and they're using the information to a profile i'm sure all the telephone calls cell phone calls text messages e mail messages they're collecting on american citizens and we know this america's noted and and and also from julian assange and the point is the all these social media companies a hard left they're all the typical hate left ideological hillary clinton camp that we're not working with donald trump but we're working steadily with the democrats i think this is gonna prompt an internet bill of rights it's going to mean the tom trump audibility is going to have to get a hold of the social media and bring them to the ftc but you know when you read my book and you see these networks in killing the deep state and i document how this deep state apparatus justice department irs cia mainstream media have worked together to keep from the american people a message that is america first or that we need to restore the constitution donald trump's messages they demonizing him.

obama administration eric schmidt google consultant hillary clinton cia america julian assange donald trump ftc zuckerberg tom trump irs