17 Burst results for "Eric Kavanagh"

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

14:10 min | 7 months ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Ladies and gentlemen hello and welcome back once again the longest running show in the world about data they are radio yes indeed folks yours truly Eric Kavanagh here I am so excited today to be launching a special series here in T. and radio now in its thirteenth year it's called the strategic C. D. O. of course that stands for chief data officer really one of the most influential roles out there in the world of information management these days and I could tell you folks was about five years ago on it the radio episode about the whole concept of the CEO that I changed my mind because going into that show I thought to myself do we really need another C. level executive don't we have enough already we've got a chief information officer with the chip technology officer around that time we started hearing about chief strategy officers and I thought do we really need a C. D. O. and my thinking going in was not what I think it's going to muddy the waters by the time that our was done I'd changed my mind I realized that we do need a chief data officer to really be that strategic advisor around leveraging the power of data and I believe you want the studio to be a very proactive strategic thinker someone who really looks to the business looks to the data assets that are available to that business and find creative ways to create new interesting programs to drive business value as opposed to a more reactive role where you're worried more about GDPR for example the general data protection regulation these different compliance initiatives and regulations yes those need to be managed they need to be addressed but you don't want to be in a defensive posture at least that's my opinion well thanks to our friends at Informatica we came up with this great idea of the strategic CDL and folks I'm so so very excited to have a couple excellent resources on the line today three as a matter of fact we'll be here from Canada Shaq and Allen you from the lane Crawford Joyce group calling it all the way from Hong Kong and to test drive from Informatica is on the line as well tell us what your what's going on and what the whole purpose of this series is to evangelize the role of the chief data officer at the help our audience better understand what this will means and how it can play a significant really powerful role in organizations today in the information economy so with that let me bring in our first guest Kenneth shak alongside Ellen you dialing in from Hong Kong Kenneth welcome to the show you are the leader of the data science team over there at lane Crawford Joyce group and you're doing such fascinating work tell me very quickly about your vision as a C. D. O. and these four pillars that you talk about data management analytics training and education are indeed tells a bit about yourself and what your group is doing with data science thanks Terry thanks for having us yes beta lapse is Saturday at separately at a group level I'm very different from all the rest of the business units and the reason for doing that is to be the center of excellence happening very very clear mandate which is to understand and fully leverage the assets that that and the banner that dictated spring to us message sent he is currently consists of four core pillars the first Wednesday management and analytics their training and education and four six research and development speaking of data management is really about going all the way to alter this is Janice all possible sources looking at what kind of papers that they're writing on what topic so they're tracking their data and then to find all this data and then Allen who is in charge of the total do on data management is being in charge of data ingestion and transforming data and you're very clean data set and then that can be used and shared by the data scientist and as far as the business units very easily so that's the big mansions of course having as you said the defensive side which is the data security data governance does a very important thing in a recession here we can focus on the offensive side as well so the second which is more like the offenses side which is analytics we try to understand all the business processes understand use cases we mapped about into the use cases power Tyson I understand which one users with find useful and then provide analytics services to our business in Mister data visualization machine learning artificial intelligence modeling so that's that's the number that is part seven of the third one is that training and education as we spoke earlier actually the reason why we call it training and education but not change management is because we don't want them to do that they are being changed it's more like good thing us giving them knowledge and as long as we're learning from that so this is not always a lot of people D. your business users are our best data scientists not your own data sciences state know their own business process so that's very important the host training we education through projects so that's the transportation last but not least which is the focus of this year's that research and development keep trying and experimenting different new products armed with data machine learning artificial intelligence and eventually is really trying to create balance for this is yeah and I really love the way you focus on the business process so I think a lot of times when people think about data science they think about the ivory tower and very smart people are examining the data finding interesting patterns and that's all great but there's no value to the business until the business process is improved either streamlined or really enriched with data and analytics and insight and that's a key component to your success rate is really working with the business to understand what does that process look like and then working with the data teams to understand how data can enrich and optimize those business processes right can yeah so I think the reason why we started from the business processes because when I when we started this I heard a lot of standard cases are most updated teamwork the science team so basically all the business units look down on the team and fear that whatever this team is building is not helping us so why do we need a next best actions for insurance when when we can't even recommend anything based on regulations for example right so there's certain business reviews that the business cannot violate order is part of the business process Dante data scientist or data team completely ignore or they're not aware of it your dad must be someone bridging that gap so the reason that's the reason why we also did a business process in your ears understanding or the possibilities to transform business process with data that is not only to identify use cases some analysts point of view from data management point of view this also to understand where those things are sitting in he is not necessarily one person or the technology team is aware of all the data sources you would be very surprised so yes some this is units maintain their own Justin's which better technology out of wireless so I would say those interviews is just very useful not only for understanding business process for use cases but also as well as finding where the data is and how can we integrate find all possible ways to capture yeah that that makes a lot of sense and maybe I'll bring into trash guy from Informatica here to kind of comment on this stuff because detached I'm really impressed by Kenneth hold vision hearing how he works with Ellen to talk to the business to understand those business processes and be very strategic and if even refer to dark data which is something that Alan is very good at digging out and that just refers to information in excel spreadsheets are written down somewhere they had knowledge of the business person and I really connecting the data science team with these business professionals they they communicate that were trying to help you were enabling you to leverage this tremendous power of information and I think that's just fascinating stuff what do you think you touch I completely agree frankly you know the point of view if data is going to be the foundation of what organizations innovate on if it's going to be highly strategic then we can't have data being dark we need data to be understood we need to understand the business process sees that rely on that data and how organisations therefore are relying on that data and once we have that understanding we can understand is it important for an organization or not important is it a word document that of critical data elements that and key performance indicators of the business relies on or is it the you know an employee's favorite hi polo the all important elements in understanding business relevance of data and once you have a business relevance of data you can formulate a data strategy and you can then execute on a data manager data management strategy to support that data strategy so completely agree yeah and I can have one of the other really really clever things you made appeared clear to me when we were talking it is how you focus on a quick went right so you can't miss the organization you focused on a quick win and therefore you were able to demonstrate for example the speed that you're able to deliver insights updated to the business team and when the other departments see that success story they get excited and then they work with you right then it becomes much more collaborative things and it's not so much of a of a concern of the business has but the eyes open the people get excited and then really good things happen right can yes so the very first case that we need is to optimize demarcation and to be honest like a lot of the processes or a lot of the programs that the business is running is based on routes so we apply machine learning and gear and a capacity model and product H. and M. this is about thirty percent in terms of engagement so that is a very big win and I'm not just a when in terms of business value and I think it's more about big man in terms of culture change wins in terms of showing people what they can do and then just celebrated across the whole company about this is escapes so people would start thinking about so what can I actually do it data in my department so that's also why part of the training and education I don't want a training session this about design thinking so how can they actually think about what data would be useful or their processes and hopefully at this time you success cases are are building up so restaurants so they can see that as a baseline how do you can do the same thing and departments yeah that's this is really good stuff and your energizing people writing you energize people with ideas just the way data can enrich and energize these business processes or throw it back over to you just have to comment on this because I'm guessing you see this kind of thing every day right Informatica is known as the the data provisioning company the data access company this is something you folks have been working on for decades and it's really coming to fruition these days in part thanks to folks like Kenneth Allen of course but in part because we have this confluence of technologies now where once you have critical masses of data in place and their clients want to get the business working with you then you can start applying some of these machine learning algorithms artificial intelligence to really optimize the business and and frankly just in time right because of a global competition but be major disruptive events like this whole open nineteen they were all dealing with so the point is we're we're really at this amazing inflection point in the whole evolution of information management I'm just I'm really excited about it and I'm really fascinated by what folks can do you see a lot of the stuff right to touch yes consistently you know where we have the privilege of being at the center of the confluence of major trends around data driven innovation how organizations are transforming themselves to be made a more data driven and in doing so innovating delivering new products and services are based on data and insights as well as introducing efficiencies introducing operational excellence outcomes again driven by data insights foundational to all of that is really trusting your data understanding what data you have.

Eric Kavanagh
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:05 min | 7 months ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Your host Eric Kavanagh all right folks welcome back welcome back once again that the am radio talk at all about information are you on track is your organization on track some of the more a lot of crazy stories going on I can tell you that I've certainly seen some crazy story so far Diane what are some of the things that you've seen with your clients well one of the more interesting ones was that when the the the first lockdown happened and sharing our the orders about who could be open and who could buy who spoke with a central business every business in the United States you're not making a practice by by that in the coming whether you can you can you might even stay in business at all right and so the department of commerce you're going to get email and I just a little bit they were giving tens of thousands of emails a day and then an hour and desert email servers crashed right so if you could be able one to get a ruling on it how can I be considered offensive because I was there when they were literally millions of businesses out there we're struggling you are you are you know what they need to do that they need to like lay everybody off so they can survive right bring everybody back on the number so what with the department of commerce could even get connected to them with their email servers were complete we are learning so at the end of a doing without putting out a new category of software called work coordination platforms and they are why your business together if you structured collaboration around given email prospects or whatever hi and thank you I made the department members either the front page yes this warm thank hello your what your issue as right and that can be dispatched to the right people immediately inside the department of commerce makers are handling it so what mapping are basically being cut off from from what people have it mostly helps you to come back for that was a great story I'm really I tended to gamble Powell a very big bureaucratic organization could turn on a dime in a way that you wouldn't expect them to using new technology to get out of work or call I know it's going to hold for a lot of what kind of job Jim right out there one time I lost into Daniel's hoops Daniel Sachs what about you chimed in yeah hi Eric so we've seen some incredible initiatives by our customers for example Vodafone when combined with hitting today what about that with us to collaborate on an emergency market place and that was a market place to highlight our cloud and digital services that would help everyone brand of people in the education sector to be critical sector get easy access to cloud services that would enable them to collaborate and may drug promotions out Microsoft teams and other products and really became a great conduit for their business customers and people in.

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"All right, folks, back here on inside analysis. Your host Eric Kavanagh. Here would is wrapped up a fantastic segments with coffee in layman of SAP. She's now the senior VP of cloud data is I recall, formerly the chief data officer next up. We've got Voelkel hunches he's gonna talk to us about security and Volker goodness gracious. There are so many security breaches we keep hearing about. I mean, just really significant events, and it I think companies are finally taking this very seriously. I think companies now realize that really there are only so many top notch security professionals in the world so expecting, you know, mid size enterprise to find the best folks is getting to the point where it's just not all that realistic. And the cloud is now respected as being more secure than on print. I think we passed that inflection points probably a year or so ago, and I don't feel. See it ever go back the other direction. I think the major cloud providers like SAP, not only have the technology, but he didn't have the expertise in the wherewithal and the ability because no matter how good your technology is you're always going to need people to monitor these systems to pay close attention to know what they're looking at and know how to detect issues, and so we'll talk about security in general, and then sort of how a and M L machine learning in artificial intelligence irrespectively can help with security so Volker just walk us through of kind of a high level view of SAT's vision security, and what it's actually doing to achieve that. Yeah. And and yes, all right. I mean, we have this trend of digital transformation that we went and. Enterprises, tons of the intelligent and the prizes,.

senior VP Volker SAP Eric Kavanagh Voelkel officer
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Eric Kavanagh? All right, folks back here on the radio. We're talking all about artificial intelligence today. And the big bats that major vendors are playing like SAP with Leonardo like IBM with Watson like Salesforce with Einstein. These are their artificial intelligence plays more or less S E P takes a bit more broad a view of these things. But right before the break, we were talking about chat bots and how popular chat bots are. I mean, you can't go to a website anymore. Chat. Bot popping up quick. The I can I help you. What can I do for you? And I was wondering to myself why is this happening? Well, it's partly happening because there's a lot of innovation in that space mentioned I took a briefing SAP at the summit in New York this past December and saw what recast dot AI, which is now part of SAP is doing it's a very powerful tool because you can build a modular way responses to specific questions that come in. So I broke my. Computer? I lost my phone like basic stuff. What's your address thing is a lot of times customer service winds up handling all these really inane tasks that guests want a chap Bach and bang out for you. And then that doesn't cost you any more money on top of the solution. But I was wondering myself why is this happening? I think that a big part of the reason is because we're now seeing defacto admission by users and developers everywhere that search kind of failed because back in the day, if you wanted to find something a website, you go to who will search window and type it in. If you want to all the menu options type in the search and usually get back like ten links half of which works the companies press releases the other half which had nothing to do with what you're trying to figure out. I think that's why you start seeing all these chat bots down because search in that context kind of failed. But Eric right from turbo. What do you think about that? Yeah. Holy agree. I mean, if you do this thing or you search for something on a product that you all you get back is a little bit. But fate industry-leading game changing like every. Description of marketing of it. But. Like, I actually want to solve a problem with it. So what you can interact through chat. You can actually like Andy talked about intent and sentiment trait. You could now do stuff with chat through a chat box that you can it can. Your sentiment an IBM event a couple of months ago going IBM thinking emphasis next week as well. This is the big thing. Right. What does the actually doing allowing people to detect sentiment? So people who get angry, you can it can tune the way it answers based on the way that you're interacting with it. And it's it's kind of funny because it'd be thinking like, oh, it's terrible that we're getting rid of that frontline like human interaction. I can tell you. I personally know a handful of people have probably wouldn't pass a turing test. I kind of trust the chat. I. From there. Then do the handoff to the person. So I remember that was the whole thing is like press one for this year. Just yelling into it. Going operator operator. I just wanted to get. But now, you can actually interact with and it's right that the difference is that it could do so much more and these interactions then again like you said like the more we do at a gale it allows it to become better at answering. You know, I I'm Canadian to my English is a little weird. So they can understand me weren't pretty good. That's funny. No, you make a really really good point. And besides. Go ahead. Andy. I was going to pass what we agree. I mean, if you. Brew working your way to a phone tree. You recognize that companies have been facing that situation for years. It's expensive. Every phone call picks up within as back. They use divey arts channel called the right person and the world of bots. Such a lunch. More satisfying. Consumer experience that actually has a huge positive impact. Not only on on concrete. But also on the level of action the customers yet because it tremendously shorten their path the answer, by the way, I totally agree. With your statement about the failure of search, and it is completely a war between search engine optimization chocolates. And and. The fact that the search engine optimization has one. Yeah. No, that's right. And to the detriment of us. All right. We're all trying to find stuff. And now, I will say Google has a pretty good response to that. Now, I'm sure you've all seen it where you start typing, and it gives you suggestions of what it thinks. You're looking for. And I mean, let's face it. Google, absolutely. Has crushed the search. That's right. I mean who who goes to ask Jeeves anymore? Anybody? It's still out there. But they've absolutely won that game. And. I remember when the search was that was a real battle being fought excite was out there like host all these guys out there, all the web was my favorite facts. Never that company. All the web. I'm dating myself again here. Erica remind the I'm not that old. If they raise your hand, if you used to do a bunch of white text on a white background with a bunch of words. Before better, tag, we bizarre things found and he can't. Right. I did it. I was there nine thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety eight. That's so true. But.

SAP IBM Eric Kavanagh Google Andy Bach Erica New York Jeeves ten links
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

12:09 min | 1 year ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Equal housing juror. Afternoons never been smarter fifteen ninety WC geo smart dog for the north shore. Your source of information and insight about how to make the most of this sighting. Eric learn more at inside analysis. And now here's your hoax. Eric kavanagh? Welcome to the future your host, Eric Kavanagh time once again for inside analysis, the world's only radio show about the information economy, so far as I know if I'm wrong correctly. Send me an Email info inside analysis dot com. But folks, I'm very excited today to talk about a topic that is near and dear to many data practitioners heart. I can tell you right now. And also the business and IT everybody in the organization, in some way, shape or form as if they've heard about this is excited about it. Because it's very very cool stuff. We're gonna talk about data preparation or prep is the short version of that term data preparation in a self service world. So a lot of people want to serve themselves these days, you don't wanna send in requests and have someone in IT put together something for you. And send it down down the pike. You want to be able to tackle some of that stuff yourself? Well, this term Dataprep came up just about four or five years ago. And the earlier vendors did some really interesting things with it. And now there are a whole bunch of companies that have really focused on it in are delivering the general idea here is to empower users people on the front lines of the business to massage some of the data and to correct some of the data. So in the world of data quality for many many years now that has been an IT function. Meaning there's a project that is set by a senior director or the or somebody with budget. So we've got some data quality problems. We need to go buy some software and improve this. But it was always a kind of an inside out or a top down kind of thing where it's due to prep is an outside or bottom up kind of approach. So really it's giving capabilities to the people on the front lines your organization to correct some problems when they find them and also to work on the massage the data, those of you who know a bit about the analytics space for data science, for example, probably heard this term that a lot of these very well paid. Very intelligent seat of a folk spend lots and lots of their time just doing data Pratt literally preparing the data for analysis while the people who really understand that data are the people on the front lines. The people who were in the line of business. Whether that's marketing or procurement or manufacturing or whatever the case may be the people who have the most intimate knowledge of that data are the folks who work with it every day. That's typically not the IT people who have been traditionally charge with rolling out these kinds of projects. So we now have this very interesting outside in world. Then allows us to empower these end users to do something and excited about this for a lot of reasons. One of which is morale if you don't have a recourse to fix something, and you're in the business besides just calling someone or sending it help message help ticket or something that can be fairly demoralizing, and then you just don't start carrying as much about the data quality products that you see. But if there is a way you to dress that if there is a way to get that done. That boost morale you can actually focus on solving problems. What other people don't have to? So to help us understand. What all this stuff means you a couple of guests for you today. I'm very pleased to have we've got fell shine. I she's a senior director over with SAP particular SAP HANA. We're also going to be hearing from downloading the productivity and later on in the show, but I'll throw it out to you. I to tell us a bit about this whole Dataprep movement. Now in SAP is getting very serious about this stuff about giving that power to the end users to kind of solve some of their data challenges and fix these problems that have been kind of lingering for a long time. Exactly. And I love your point your point about the morale because it really goes to a business funding to be able to fix the problems and stuff. As well. As if you find a request to IT and have them work on preparing data. They don't always understand exactly where it's going to be used in the context and semantic data very much unrewarding task for them and disconnected. Business bringing that context. And meaning right to the people who understand it and are on the front lines at the data. Yeah. You know, you bring up another good point there about morale on the IT side. You'll lot of the friction that comes from IT with respect to new technologies and new platforms stems from the fact that they tend to be overworked. So you can off load some of that work. They can focus on the higher value tasks, and that's exactly what we're talking about here. Because a lot of times even though the error or the the lack of enrichment I'm sorry Richmond. That's been done a data. Maybe it's not hugely important from a strategic IT perspective. It is important for the end user. But the person in the center can't go down a list of five hundred seventy eight data quality problems to burn those people out. So if we can offload some of that work and get the people who know the data on the front lines working with it. Well, guess what you say morale goes up both on the front lines and tonight IT and now you're not going to have so much static about getting new stuff done, right? Yeah. Much time going back and forth with. If you're an IT guy with fifty of data to provide here and either I mean, that's a lot of back and forth between oh, I'm gonna try to say that's not quite what you're trying it for for this. A lot of back and forth. Multiply that by the many business. Need for data right now. I understand that makes them more database decision making. Pass. No way that need, and I totally disconnected way through. Need to bring that this is what we're trying to do with agitated crack. Yeah. From the audience. Go ahead. Go ahead. It's just going to say my favorite analogy. Here is you know, years ago with my started school, we would get all these forms at the beginning of the school year. All these paper forms. That name and address, and you filled out all of these ten forms for every kid. Now, we've got to the point where when the school year start they used to just get an Email saying. Correct. Your data. If any changes, it understanding how the kids are connected. The oh the home address saying there and just the ease of use. It's so impressive to me as a parent who doesn't fill it all those forms, but also for that school district because all of the sudden now they don't have somebody trying to manually after all of that data. And so to me the change is impressive to think about that. Where we used to be fifteen years ago. And now the school district serving themsel- whether they're getting that data themselves. They're analyzing it of different ways to try to target programs to try to target. How many new students are coming in and serve them differently? It's just a whole. How that changed from going to some district and under there? Now. Yeah. That's a really really good example number reminded of another example to as we see more and more hospitals employing portals through which their patients can log in and check status of different tests and things of that nature. It's the same kind of thing to kind of your point of just hideous work of data entry when you go to the doctor's office. And they give you twenty pages to fill out. Don't you have eighty percent of the sensational ready? Right. So in the same to say, let's assume lesson. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. So kind of walk us through what it actually looks like for the business that engages with data crap. How does that change their day-to-day workflow what some of the functionality that they get with the program might that? Yeah. So. Two major youth kids in the first one data migration. This is many times in our industry. Great. Listen. And brand new programs and transformation. Totally changed. The way you do your business. And with each of those initiatives comes a glut of data that someone has to understand and figure out maybe how to move into your system or share with another system that broad category of data migration require somebody to be very intimate with a day data understand how the data is structured and the meta data that with it and the very quickly. It into a good program that Corey agitated preparation where you may have people who know that specific program or businesses and have really well, but don't have the time to be hanging out sequel queries database that they don't understand but to interact with the data very quickly makes them very substantive impactful changes, and then share it and collaborate with fear larger group of people. We're agile data preparation key. Yeah. You hit on a really key term right there, which is collaboration. Right. A lot of times in the old world. It'd be can make this analogy a few times in the old world of getting data ready for analysis or for some new project or something you had is very linear approach meaning Bob handed off to Susie Susie works on for a while hands it off, Jim Jim works on hands. It back to Bob got this linear process that has a fairly clumsy hand off at each point. Whereas with Dataprep, it's a much more collaborative kind of environment where you have multiple people working on it at the same time, right? Yeah. Because I think you're lucky plenty more cases. It's a spiderweb where one person starts it has to hand. The sixers. That's a different people to complete the next phase. They're all getting back at different times vacation. Doesn't quite understand how their pizzas. Visit allergic program. So it's more that spider webs out it gets bigger and bigger project on collaboration become Keith. Is really? So much of the push in analytics and be I felt service. And I love the story talking to the customer a couple on preventing. How how long does it take you to edit feel to a report, and I'm very to tell you that the average around was probably six months. Well, that's not that's not agile. Personal business users. You can take six months what they're gonna do to start doing it themselves. An ungoverned way. Not maintainable way. But nobody's going to wait around for six months to get a feel that they're going to start to do these things. That rises self service there. Of course, become the data that goes. The one that'd be great. If that if you could at least govern that data, of course. You bring up a really good point here, which is basically shadow IT and shadow systems writer what I call the we can refer to it's almost like the black market effect where she could make a rule too stringent..

Eric kavanagh senior director SAP Bob allergic Pratt Richmond Keith sixers writer Dataprep Corey Jim Jim Susie Susie six months
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Your host, Eric Kavanagh. All right, folks. Welcome back, one well-considered teachers in deed. It's twenty nine, gene. Oh my goodness. Neck here is twenty twenty. All that hindsight is twenty twenty. So hopefully, the whole world's gonna get a lot better next year. But in the meantime, got nine I'm sorry eleven and a half months to go in two thousand nineteen tackling the big issues here in the information economy. And obviously if you're talking about the information to come. Yeah. Huge component of that is data hard data. Transactional. Data who bought how many widgets wear and for how much money all that kind of stuff? My guest today actually is going to be a somewhat irregular co host of our shows as one of my best friend the business. Lamenting many years I've known district John loudly. He's an author. He's written several books. One is making I work for business. A guy managing information as an asset data governance expert. We're to talk a lot about data governance today on the show, and what that means for you. And you know, historically, that's been a very SO teric conversation wouldn't run into too many people on the street who if you ask the evidence would give you a decent answer because. Just wasn't that it -portant or at least that that privilege. There weren't that many people in companies that really had the authority to do a whole heck of a lot about what we can loosely. Call data governance, and that's all changing. Now, we're starting to hear a lot about CDO's chief data officers that's going to be the chief data. Officers job is to oversee data governance program and simply put data governance deals with the practices and policies and behaviors and technologies that you use to control the use of data in your organization so security as part of that is kind of on the fringe betting on how you look at it at least in terms of org charts, and people responsible thing for things that organizations, but nonetheless, I promise you is going to be a much more popular determined five years than it is today. And it's probably going to remain a significant concept for many many many years to come with that. Let's bring in John Lee. Thank you so much for your time today. John toss a bit about your background and the governance world and. And why you think it's really important that people understand what it means. Thank you Eric for the. Allowing people to hear about something.

John Lee Eric Kavanagh CDO John five years
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

12:06 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"All right. Welcome back once against the inside analysis. This is your host Eric Kavanagh. I'm very excited today to talk about the topic. That is really quite interesting and media, quite frankly, where to talk about intellectual capital, I have Ludo pice on the line calling in from across the pond over in Belgium, beautiful day. I hear over and tells him it's kind of rainy day here in the state fair enough. We're going to talk about intellectual capital. This is different than intellectual property. A lot of people understand what the concept of intellectual property is all about intellectual capital really deals with the implicit knowledge as well. As the the explicit knowledge, so tacit and explicit knowledge within your organization that has value. So when would something like this come into play. Well, certainly if you're going to try to merge with someone trying to figure out the value of your company want to understand what the intellectual capital is worth. What is it? First of all. And what is it worth? Also, if you're going to go to an initial public offering an IPO, well, what is your company worth? Tonight. Obviously a lot of time and effort goes into figuring that out when companies to Wall Street and tried to go do their IPO while these folks at a company called PA. A Pisces founder of REO have come up with a very interesting and compelling methodology for determining the value of intellectual capital with that will be bringing our guest Ludo pice, welcome once against the inside analysis. Tell us a bit about our yoga and really where this idea came from. And then as the segments goes by we can dive into what it actually entails. So where did you come from? Oh, that's a good question. Thank you for being the leading me in. Well, that's a long story already. It started in nineteen ninety seven already when a good friend of mine. A banker asked to come and have a chat they were looking for IPO candidates for dot com. That was come areas that time. So I went to have a chat with all the analysis of the Bank, and we are a company at that time, we were a consultancy company, and they start asking me all kinds of questions with the based on the old fashioned accounting system, meaning cost accounting based on the past. And then I suddenly realized that we are be those folks were talking about the past and past and make extrapolation based on the past three lost years and stuff like that. So I started challenge. Hey, guys. I always learned that if you want to talk about. If companies then you should talk about the present and the future and all about the past, and I can take them or to to analysis or auditors, for example. The fast. I have good developers in software applications that we don't use it anymore. Well, the value of that knowledge is there. Oh, so what you need today in what you're going to need your future, daddy's three eight innovation. So the big challenge with the guys, and it all ended by me saying to them that they were stealing Jurassic Park and talked about the knowledge economy and the thought of that game from another planet. So that's the end of the discussion. And then I came back in your organization my organization, and I said, well, these strange, and I learned one other thing if you don't talk money, nobody listens to you. And I said, what do we actually need to do is to come up with the measure system for the intangible assets? But all of them of organizations, of course, there were a lot of things existing already brand's value, for example. But that's fine Magnon companies called Coca Cola also, but if you are a startup, then probably your brand is not worth much, and there are many more what we call intangible assets that you should actually be fine and is late in calculate so and then we were in line because you can't always do you have an accountant, and he comes in an organization the first thing he does is making a list of the acid. There are the tables cubs the computers, proper, just Kicevo's. Etcetera. And then I said why don't we do that for intensive blessed? So what we finally came up with was a model in the beginning. And the mobile you can do nothing with it's a frame of thinking, Molly, we call it. The former beef model in degraded model that need are four intellectual capital areas. The human capsule the customer capital. Partner capital and the structural capital. The degraded, and I'm not doing too much detail about that. But we'll be finally did we out of all those ingrate areas we didn't defined as absurd value creating phenomenon. In a company, and what is another value-creating phenomenon? Actually, very simple, everything you do what adds value to your organization are recruited person. I have a new accounting system. I have a use software system. I have a new partner and everything that you can say I have new well that are actually assets that's something that you add to your organization, and that should have value. Now did is that there are seventy seven of those value creating phenomenon and let me take a quick example, if you recruit, for example, the person you don't recruit the person you recruit is networks experiences skills intelligence, motivation ability, and all that you can multiply with the value of the road is going to do. And why do I say multiply because the the parameters that they just described here. Nick, take them all together, they form an echo metric formula. And that's not new. That's something that is used. In the business already longtime plan euros in many Suras companies where economic Pixar regularly used so in that sense. We could why don't be Megan for each of those seventy seven editor you crazy phenomenon which we did any because you always at a financial element to it in in the recreation. You can get always output in dollars. And so what we did is we calculated actually depression and the future value and from each of the categories the explicit because that is something that every account that would immediately tell me, and they say, yeah. Yeah. But knowledge that resides in the heads of the people, and if they go home, and they don't come back. You don't have it. Right. They are. So only the knowledge that you kept your store and make reusable that can be considered as a Nashik. And it's not only knowledge because we store a lot in our organization like roses. Dislike software packages like documents and call it that our assets. That are explicit. It doesn't mean that. It has no value. It means that it is not an asset. Avery risk goes, the people go away. Yeah. They don't come back. There goes your knowledge of your organization there goes your assets. So in that sense, it's an interesting phenomena because you have a lot of working areas where you can start working for example during the Bessette into explicit for your knowledge carriers. These are people who are very important in your business processes. And now there's something there's a lot of organizations forget to do. Anyway, we managed to calculate the seventy seven I was value-creating phenomenon in the monetary value and in Britain any future and into tacit to explicit each day. And of course, then be working challenged a little bit by the ESPN, the damage the damaged and be said, yeah. But why should be changed something because there is something in the thirty eighth. It's called in at this already since ninety seven. Seventy seven and it says that every intangible assets should be fireable should be controllable and should have future economical benefit. Now, exactly because we calculated and be majoring, and we can remember it each time again, and again, and again, well, the the definable, and it's controllable, and it can create future value if we are able to create multiple money streams from now Debbie stumping in large contradiction with something that you can find on all balance sheets or the classical balance sheets, which is goodwill and good Bill is the only positive element in classical accounting in many cases based on the top skill which is the difference between book probably a market value market value is what the food wants to pay for it. We say no good should be explicit knowledge presents value yet. But that'd be something. Very difficult to change. The interpretation is exactly. Especially with the regardless. Finally, Davies said, no, you know, what we are not going into the direction of trying to put it in classical balance sheets, but because we are going to invent a new accounting system starting with the journal injuries. The ledgers accounting rules evaluation rules et cetera. And we came up with an accounting system that looks exactly the same. And he's based on the same principles of the classic balance sheets and piano statements and are constantly dateable with each other. Because we say intellectual capital is the value minus the costs. So he tends to be can consolidate and we can make the value of companies very visual in in a balance sheet. That's the way of communicating in the financial world across if we do all that. That's all nice. But at the end of the day, nobody in a war in the world is waiting for a new accounting system. So we had to define the application areas. And you may already a few of them if you are in an initiation if you are an IPO situation if you are even look at HR imagine that your manager. And you're only valuate on the value of how good you spend your budgets. If you stay within the budget lines up you were allocated in the beginning of the fiscal year. Then you're a good one. And why should we create and calculate the return on investment could be stayed within the limits? But the value is nothing. So well, what the heck is not good. So there are many more applications the application areas, and when you mention coal transfer pricing, call we only investments of training sections going to the value of departments outsourcing joint research projects and call it. So we have one hundred and forty five which we test for each of them in around two hundred ninety so it is quite predict sensitive, and then we have of course, the calculation we can account this. We can all we have. The the application areas. And none, of course, now there is a big challenge here. Because if you talk to classical, accounting, your organization, imagine that the sealer who guys they are convinced they want to work with this to be give a path to grow Pat of steps that they can go through to manage their intangible assets in a professional way. And then they go through their their normal, accounting men, and they the guy or girl will say, oh, you're you're big panic. If we are going to apply that I'm going to lose my job, and I'm going to be put in jail because I'm going to talk about Enron the Enron case. Of course, it, and then I say, okay. Yeah. It was. So we need to solve the problem to what we are doing is setting up a chain of junior accountants worldwide. And what did you mean that we are teaching also in our our knowledge we or? Ever a way of working in colleges and universities and business schools? And of course, also in schools for the train accountants, and we cherry pick the best guys and girls, and we convinced them that they should not go to work for a big five, but they should start their own business and become a specialist and intellectual capital accounting. And we'd give them the customers because we have thousands.

partner Enron Eric Kavanagh Belgium Nashik PA Jurassic Park founder daddy Kicevo Molly ESPN Nick Suras Coca Cola Avery Megan
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Welcome to the future is bright two thousand eighteen is wrapping up. This your hosts Eric Kavanagh here on the only show about the information economy that I know of at least, and we're going to end the year with a bang folks, not a whimper to paraphrase T S Eliot my favorite poet of all history. And we're to talk about this big thing called, the cloud, and cloud computing, and what it really needs for big business, and I'm super excited to have my longtime friend and colleague a real visionary in the space of veteran of the enterprise software industry, Dan, LOL of SAP on the line today. Dive and all that first of all merry Christmas to all of you. And happy holidays for very excited to be sharing this time with you on Christmas Eve in some of our marketplace's other places of a bit later, but the good tidings to all of you. And let's hope two thousand nineteen brings up for peace and prosperity and less conflict conflict is always unpleasant, folks. I've seen some things online recently about the victims in wars in places like Syria and elsewhere, and it's just tragic, so let's hope for peaceful resolution to the world's conflicts and today, we'll talk about enterprise software. So good, buddy. Dan law is on the line. Dan, you buy have talked many times now about the evolution of enterprise computing, and the changes these days are pretty big their groundbreaking. We really are at the at the beginning. It seems to me a very significant change in the marketplace in how enterprise computing gets done and the big word of the day is cloud. Right. So SAP SAP cloud platform. There are lots of other folks in the space to we've got oracle. You've got IBM you've got Microsoft, of course, Amazon web services really jumped out in the lead. And we also have things like platform as a service and functions as a service at all these different things, we'd get into over the course of the show. But first of all, let's just got to talk about. Out cloud computing for business, and I love this concept from SAP, you are building the business cloud platform. Can you kind of talk about that? And what that means. Yeah. Thanks for having me on Eric really appreciated in. And and first of all I echo your sentiments prayers go out to those in the Middle East, especially in Syria. During this really tough time as we reflect on on the Christmas season. Just proud school to them. So yeah, cloud moving to that topic cloud is is I think really really eating up really becoming under interesting. I think a couple of years ago were customers were we're placing cloud was if a if a developer wanted to spin up some small little project, they could do that on AWS or if the business wanted to lift Shepton application just move it out of their data center onto AWS, Azure, D C P or or some other public cloud provider. They would do that. But I don't see cloud in in two thousand eighteen I think going into twenty nine thousand nine I don't see cloud being just a a a cap axe to optic situation anymore. I actually see it as really a move as a new way. That customers fundamentally are gonna be hosting their applications innovating in in spaces and and doing fast fail and agile development and DevOps. And all the innovative things. So that they can differentiate as as a business. So I fundamentally.

Dan SAP Syria Eric Kavanagh T S Eliot Middle East Amazon IBM Shepton developer Microsoft
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Talk WC. Radio. Here's your host, Eric Kavanagh. All right, folks, back here on the radio wrap it up the second last show two thousand eighteen it's a good topic to the data fabric. How data forever can weave the modern business? It got Bill Peterson back from map. Are we talked a lot about the nuts and bolts here, but what about the business benefit how do companies how does the business user does the CEO to whoever on the business side? How did they benefit data fabric in your opinion? Sure. I think there's a number of areas link number one, reducing TC, oh by sharing a common data infrastructure across data across users and workloads and multi. We haven't heard a whole lot about multicolored. But if they're sharing common data across their entire infrastructure, including multi cloud, there's an opportunity to reduce CO there. I think. You can organization can use last three sources using a unified security and administrative environment under a fabric. So if you think about it if it's done, right and the data's accessible doesn't matter. Where is conceivably you're using less resources to manage that data onto administer the data to move the data? Right. The data. I don't care. We're in two thousand eighteen still hard to move. Right. So that's an opportunity to. Excuse me, use less resources. And then let me throw a couple in on innovation. I talked about early on building in analytic application. I think again done right fabric would allow companies to focus on those new new applications and build out those application instead of worrying about maintaining application legacy application and don't get me wrong. They're not going away. We are talking about that. Here are more talking about a focus on innovation by where's our innovation? Come on the company versus you know, nothing keeps the lights on. And then finally from an innovation point of view development time and thinking about the developers again, data fabric right allows developers access told this data to develop new application here. I'm talking about streaming data operations data relationship. Real time data legacy data while maintaining security control. So things like multi tenant and things like a distributed replication model allow developers to have access to that data therefore, potentially reducing. And if you will make the first one I mentioned that during the nation allowing the focus on or two applications, and then somebody mentioned containers earlier, you know, if you even role that piece into container and say, okay, let's let's make these really kinda quick container based applications, and if we may come easy, and they're reducing development time, and they're reducing TC. Oh, all within the data fabric. You know, we we we might be onto something. Yeah. I think that's a really really really good.

Eric Kavanagh Bill Peterson CEO
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Hello. And welcome back. Welcome. Once again today, I'm radio. Yes. Indeed. This is your host Eric Kavanagh and excited to be closing out the year only a few shows left and twenty eighteen it's been the fastest here of my life. I don't know about you. And I think there are people who would feel the same way and those people are the folks in the crosshairs of digital transformation. Yes. Indeed. It's happening everywhere. It's all over the place. It's happening now in a theater near you. And just about every business you're gonna find out there in the real world digital transformation really refers to automating and digitizing what we're manual or analog processes. So the exact top today's digital transformation. Don't miss the boat. Things are changing the cloud is a big part of that. No doubt about that. The cloud is very serious force in the world of enterprise technology. These days it has been for a long time. But for some reason in the last year or two I think Microsoft has a lot to do with this. The enterprise large organizations have realized that cloud, Israel, the cloud is the future at least for most of enterprise computing, not for everything data centers are going to be around for a long long time. But cloud is the new center of gravity, and the cloud is a great marshaling area. So just think about simple things like collaboration like what Google docs did for collaboration. The fact that you could suddenly have multiple people all of the world working on the same document at the same time. It'd be able to see what each other is doing you couldn't do that before Google cloud. I mean, maybe somewhere you could with some homegrown application, but Google absolutely revolutionized workflow and collaboration by rolling out that functionality. I was frankly stunned that they beat Microsoft to the punch Microsoft has come roaring back for sure and their focus on as your as as I think really pushed the ball downfield at terms of getting big companies to realize that cloud is real. So today, we'll talk about digital transformation of great lineup, folks. We have Debra Barone from Tom Sawyer software. We've got Jeremy Levy from indicative rod periods. AST technologies for Sean Bhatia of Stevo systems on the line. So with all that content. Let's dive right in spring. Our first guest Debra Barone, Tom Sawyer software. Tell us a bit about yourself your company and how you see digital transformation playing out. Well, thank you. Eric and good afternoon to everyone. I appreciate the invitation be on the program today. My my role at comfort software, vice president of marketing partnership, but at my heart on data person and began my career in the telecom industry doing data modeling, I think before the specs to data scientists and moved from there into communications as the core technology so messaging than. What the fuck Email wars between Microsoft and Lotus idea and worked in big tech running product management product marketing corporate marketing, and then I'm out here in San Francisco Bay area so jumped into into the start up world and help build the company from forty people to four hundred and handful customers two hundred million dollars run rate when we were acquired by the second largest software company in Europe. And now, I'm on my fourth, and that brings me to the Tom Sawyer software are, you know, our our goal is to is to dig deep into data with data driven models visualize the interconnection. So, you know, find the find the ringleader behind a fraud scheme when they're banding in plain sight, but you can't see them because the data's spread a cost five different silos of transactional customer. Log files pulling the pulling the connections out of the data putting them into a graph the easiest way to think about a graph. We all have our Burlington network, Dr graph. Now, imagine if you could pull up your linked to network and interact with it and give me everyone who is in the Chicago area is I'm going out there for an event, and I want to buy some let's go to a White Sox game. Yeah. Those are. Still, you know, teen years ago that was difficult to do because graph consumes a lot of speak to you. There's a lot of data, and it's difficult to pull it all together. And some of our co-panelists are rather expert at doing that master data management. And other kinds of systems that polling formation together. And we're the layer that sits on top. So our core technology is called Tom Sawyer perspective. And that's exactly what we do. It's a platform that allows you to build enterprise application to get the perspective, you need on that information in a visual format, and it combined crap. With classic data view line for lines and time series and pie charts. Nothing like, you know, the high end and analytics, Jeremy company manages that it brings it all in synchronized view, and that's important when you're making decisions. So for example, Airbus's one of our customers, and they're doing something called model based systems engineering, and this is a this is a digital transformation that's going on cross companies and industry that Bill. So JPL aerospace automotive Toyota, I'm Proctor and gamble healthcare product brushes. It's amazing the complex models that go into building tiny little things holding our hand or KPL building the shuttle and the mission to Mars, and they need to visualize the dramatic an connection. So it's not AutoCAD where we're we're doing a three D model. But it's rather the information about what's connected to let the dependency the flown, the propagation of risk of power of energy of you know, now network grits. So you can see on the big band. This is what I was excited about. Go ahead. Go ahead. When you first told me about the program in digital transformation. It it may be thinking about one of our financial services companies customers, and what they're doing, and Eric I've got to tell you what what they've done what they've design and what they're piloting right now is like nothing I've ever seen before it. It takes you from zero to sixty and what they're doing is similar. I think to what Zillow has done for the real estate industry. Right. So who who who on the panel have used have you.

Tom Sawyer software Microsoft Google Debra Barone Eric Kavanagh Tom Sawyer Zillow Jeremy Levy Israel vice president of marketing Eric Airbus Sean Bhatia San Francisco Bay fraud Jeremy company Europe
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"At DM radio dot biz now host Eric cabinet. Gentleman. Hello and welcome back. Radio. Humble if excitable hosts Eric Kavanagh on the road today conflict down in the thing. Very excited to be getting some cool stuff with big data. And the product is all about David David talked about this for the last. Years. The whole big data coin was appointed day about how a technology, really. It's been a whirlwind of activity said about a decade ago that late years ago. Extracted because we went from the whole world of get warehouse. All laughing and then with all. All. Them. Democrat analyze them. After analyzing. Hey. B E dot. Who? Thank for. Back on the radio. The opportunity for talk about. Yeah. Introduction. Data. We've done a pretty good job. Her gathered. Quite a. Aggregating kind of all of those old tricks to make larger data smaller. So I'm Nick side, we're focused on what we call extreme analytics and extreme is marrying big data with an interactive analytics experience, so that you can actually take. Tens hundreds of millions of rows, billions of rows and interactively explore and crossed filter it with sub second response time. That's what we're focused on to try to bring big data into a place that really.

Eric cabinet Eric Kavanagh David David Nick side
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"We would give are pretty good. Good. One more time. Are you not? I think. It's more important things to do here. Very exciting day for Eric today. It's not Monday. Got that going for all of us. That's right. Eric turns thirty years old big birthday guy livers turning sixty. Not so much into the birthdays. It's good though. Eric Kavanagh it used to be dirty. Anymore now his liver. Pristine tiptop shape. Yeah. Let me clock and Ford. It's getting better. Let's get better. It takes a while to he'll get worse and worse. Sorry. I got I got the cost. So. I don't know what that's like. Big Bertha guy or no. It. No, I imagine the wife is gonna give me some sort of cake can make me some dinner, but not very good. So the latest accuser. It's going to summarize this real quick because she doesn't really deserve our top. She graduated high school in nineteen eighty. Hundred eighty two as a college student. She was tending school parties where drugging and gang rapes occurred regularly. She went back to those parties ten times. And now she decides to come forward with this information. Thing. That's. Supposed to believe right now. She went back to these gang rape party. He's ten times. And she does claim that it wasn't cavenaugh whoever did rape her. I don't know. But it was what he was just there at supposedly as and then she says in her sworn testimony that. She avoided the punch. Cavenaugh? Would spike the punch okay with drugs. So she she went back to the party ten times. Sure. But she would always avoid the punch punch was dangerous. Always Senator at least they're always gets you at one of these parties that she's been to ten times says that adult. Absurd. This is getting hilariously desperate. I want to read this quote here from NBC. But I and this is the very first time that I'm going to have to do this. I have to run to the hallway and get water. I can't go on to say I can't go on. Sometimes you do the dramatic pause. And I'm like, oh, he's doing the third and other times Mike ashes clear my throat, I little tickle tickle already. Good producer might bring a bottle of water now. That's always intern. And Eric was our intern at one point. Yeah. I was. Yeah. So Dr Laura know, she was produced. At a long time ago. No. So I have a rule. I'll never ask a producer to give me water fully capable of getting me water in my entire year. Twelve years doing radio, I've always been able to power through to the commercial break you like Hillary. Hillary struggled with the cough in the whole thing. Go. It's unbelievable. Can you believe these people? So the question is gentleman are you to capable? Yes. Wow. Well, welcome to the mile miles. Eric.

Eric Kavanagh rape Dr Laura producer Hillary intern NBC Senator Ford Mike Twelve years thirty years
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:43 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is amazing to me. They're manipulating this entire process. They're manipulating the propaganda. You can't win y'all can only lose. Okay. We want to hear from her the sooner the better. Well, then you're a bully. She's not ready. Okay. Now, she wants to be heard. Well, she'll be miscast. And but she ought to be on TV. Adam Schiff says listen stuff. Go ahead. Eric Kavanagh who's been nominated for a lifetime appointment on the supreme court one of the most important roles in our Republican, our constitutional order, and so frankly, the burden should more be on him to present witnesses. The burn should be anew. To present witnesses to say, no, I did not molest her when I was seventeen years old in high school. The burden should be on the accused now under what rational system is that the case. Because the left is not because they're power hungry because they want to sabotage this nomination. Really? So let's say Chris coons has accused of something. It's the burden on him. Given the fact that he's an all white male. This case is not about the history of women in society. This case isn't even about women in society. This case is about an allegation, which so far has had no substantial support of any kind. And I said on the reports I never met the woman I never spoke to her. That is time to create the greatest amount of political Thomas. And make it increasingly more difficult. For the president United States to get his nominee on the supreme court. That's what it's about. It's not about what happened to women in one thousand nine hundred ninety one and so forth. And so on. And now we learned that the accusers being is by a democrat operatives. By democrat operative. I can find it here. During the break. My heavy pile of information here. She's being advised by democratic operative. So this whole thing stinks at politics because it's saturated with politics. All right. Let's take some calls valley. Let us go to Cindy Rossland. Michigan XM satellite. Go right ahead. First of all, I do not by the professor four. He had this awakening in July. Came back tiller. Civic duty, by fouling, judiciary appointments. I would like to know why she didn't come forward twelve years ago when judge Cavin or sworn into the circuit court. Because she was suppressing her memory. That's the argument. I don't buy that one bet, you know, apparently, she was suppressing it all the way up to July. All the way up to July. And now she wants to reveal what she knows. That's just amazing to me. And I would like to know your opinion on because I just thought of it. The actress and drama and everything would be as bad as bad with this nomination. Because as a lead travel election here. Yeah. I do actually I think the Democrats would manage it perhaps in a different way. But yes, I do I think they they believe they own the United States Supreme court, and you have to you have to understand why. I mean, they've nationalized our social and cultural issues, they're nationalizing immigration issues. They're nationalizing a lot of issues and by nationalizing. I don't mean for the national government. In the aggregate. I mean by the supreme court supreme court's gets increasingly more powerful, they want to push their agenda through the supreme court, whether they win elections or not they they can count on five six justices. And that's there. It's been their plan for one hundred years. That's what they've been doing. And they're not about to give it up. So if they have to destroy all the destroyed cavenaugh they have to try and destroy Clarence Thomas. They'll destroy him Robert Bork destroy him. As a matter of fact, the smarter. These guys are and the more faithful they are to the text and the original meaning of the constitution and its language the more they're the enemy. Because progressivism is the entity of constitutionalism. Thank you for your call. My friend. Let's see let us go to Kevin Newport, Rhode Island, the great WPRO Vigo. Hey, Mark love your show. Yeah. Hey, I wanted to draw a historical analogy in the last three months you've been discussing how the sitting president cannot be indicted by any prosecutor or some state I've been saying that's the position the United States Department of Justice for almost a half century. I wanted to. Transfer that also to acquire two supreme court judges or federal judges that they can't be harassed by any they can be indicted and the distinction is you have one president. And if that president. Is forced by single prosecutor. To in the end, potentially be imprisoned or to go through the trial process or or to be charged than the single. Prosecutors more powerful than all of the other branches of the government combined. Agreed here if you're charging a supreme any judges court Justice or remember congress. It's just not the same case. Okay. Makes sense. It does. All right, my friend. Thank you for your call. Gary Huntsville, Alabama. How are you? I'm well, Mark. Thank you for taking my call. You got daughter my daughter and her husband WGN, and by the way, the great affiliate. Go ahead. That's right. They are recent graduates of university of Alabama law school, and they told me that this columnists this off air, brighter is a communist nutjob, they had him for constitutional. Why can't say that? He is that obviously on the air. But you're telling me, he's a leftist. He's a leftist strong and firm. Yes. Kroto since ski. I believe is name is right. Something. Kroto since Geffen. Yeah. So I left this any any demonstrate sat in his op, Ed, which has a pathetic op-ed. But notice the New York Times gives lots of space for the kooks. He noticed that they do. And I've told you about the history of New York Times a year regular listener. I am almost every night. And I've told you and the the whole country about the New York Times and the record of the New York Times when it came to the holocaust, right? Yes. That the holocaust. They pushed to the back pages to the extent they reported on it at all. That they censored photographs. They've since admitted this. Decades later. Let me ask you a question. Gary if a newspaper in the teeth of the holocaust with massive horrific genocide. Decide said it is going to protect its good name. By trying to ingratiate itself with elements in the United States that would find such reporting offensive or troubling. How the hell does that newspaper remain the paper of record? How the hell does that newspaper have any credibility whatsoever? As is usual. You have posed an excellent question and one for which there is no real answer. You're right. The left has a high tolerance for everybody else's suffering. Have you noticed that? All right, my friend. Thank you for your call. I love Huntsville, Alabama. It's a wonderful wonderful town. We'll be right back..

supreme court New York Times president United States Supreme court United States Gary Huntsville Alabama prosecutor Mark Adam Schiff Chris coons Eric Kavanagh Clarence Thomas Robert Bork WGN Michigan Cindy Rossland judge Cavin professor Huntsville
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"So the right people can here since we're in over one hundred markets across thirty four states tended in American Samoa. I'd say it's a pretty good place to start. If you want to know more just Email sales at gab radio network dot com. That's sales at gab radio network dot com. Welcome back inside analysis. Here's your host, Eric Kavanagh. Right. Back here on inside analysis. Talking all about the world of data. The information economy is upon us. It's all around us. It's a very exciting time to be in business. And we're talking about data driven companies. Did it driven business models? My colleague, George Fraser CEO and co founder of five trans on the show with us today. They just did this wonderful benchmark report on the cloud data warehouses. So we're talking all about Microsoft is your Google big query than there's presto, Amazon Redshift and snowflake are all the new solutions, and George you had mentioned that you've got some road map plans for facilitating data warehouse migration on been tracking the space for longer than I care to admit, I guess about twenty years now, and I know that. The the speed of innovation in this space right now is so fast and the bottom line is that the old world solutions. Many which are still standing up today and still doing the jobs have been doing for many years. They're just not going to hold up to to the amount of data. That's needed the speed at which it's needed and so forth. And so at some point big corporations fortune two thousand companies that have been bested like literally millions and sometimes tens of millions of dollars in some very complex warehouses at some point. They're going to have to I think start running some of these cloud data warehouses in parallel. What's probably going to happen is they will look at the the low hanging fruit, but be the most important data that the use to drive their business. So for example, you could look if you're the data warehouse director, for example, for a fortune two thousand company, you could kind of do some assessment to see who are our power users who really. Uses this stuff to drive their decisions and focus on that. And probably start building up a cloud data warehouse in parallel, and that'll probably run for one or two or even three years as you slowly deprecate the old solution and kind of move into this new direction. But is that kind of how you see it going for companies that have already invested so much money in their warehouses. Do you see that as a viable past forward? George. Again. I can't hear them for some reason. Yeah. So anyway, I'm pretty sure that's what's going to happen. Is that these companies are going to have to make the painful decision to start winding these solutions down because number one they're very expensive. Even though you know companies like, Terry. I guarantee you're focusing on finding ways to learn those costs. Yeah..

George Fraser American Samoa Eric Kavanagh Microsoft Terry CEO director co founder twenty years three years
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Ladies and gentlemen too low and welcome back, once again AM radio yes indeed my name is Eric Kavanagh I will be your humble if excitable host for the show that, is designed after all to peel away to marketing veneer get down to brass tacks and figure out what is. Going on in the field of information management of data the topic today, is a very hot topic in this field data science but I love, the fact that Bernie. Get right down to brass tacks talk about use, cases so a lot of times, in the technology world especially in the enterprise software realm a lot of folks will talk about what's possible and the big. Ideas and the blue sky and all, that fun stuff but at the end of, the day you have to do something with these technologies you have. To actually apply them and change something? About your business so what is that gonna. Look like that's what we're going to. Talk. About today we have an absolute. All-star cast today folks we have Steven. Pratt from noodle we have Steve would from Dell Bumi, we have Stephen Smith from exit group and Carla gentry who is an analyst Data scientists basically for higher she's out there doing really cool things with all kinds of. Companies or learn from them what is, going on field of data science so in, the spirit of getting right down to it I'll let's go ahead. And bring in our first guest Carla? Gentry ladies first data scientist you've been wearing. A hat for a while now talk. About. What you do out there what. Your race on Detroit's is as the. French would say and how they decides plays into your day to day life Well I, am a day of. Course and the founder of analytical solution started. That about seven years ago but actually after, working in data science the ninety I graduated ninety seven and my first.

Carla gentry Eric Kavanagh Bernie Dell Bumi founder Steven Detroit Pratt Stephen Smith scientist analyst Steve seven years
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"All right folks have low welcome to the future once again the sense your host eric kavanagh for another episode of inside analysis the show i know of focused exclusively on the information economy what's going on out there and most importantly how can you take advantage of all these new technologies and methods and disciplines and all the fun stuff that's happening out there in the world of information technology as it mates information and the users people out there doing cool things in the world of business that's what we talk about on the show and today we're gonna talk about something that really does affect everybody and police anyone who touches a machine somewhere or the internet or some application in their job at their workplace or even if they go out into a store and someone is trying to help them out we're going to talk about performance performance management and how that all works these days not give you a quick overview of my understanding of how all these things come together we have a great guest today ben segment of light step who's doing some very interesting things at his company and as you know sometimes we have really long form conversations with folks like a few weeks ago we had greg mix traffic president of sap's database and data management division telling us all about what those folks are doing in this whole concept of the intelligent enterprise that is sort of unwinding in front of us and on furling if you will and ben is also doing some very interesting things in the space of performance management well to put it up in the street vernacular everyone deals with performance management if they have a computer and the computers running slowly start doing things if you're an apple person you see that stupid spinning wheel that means your computer is thinking and something isn't working quite right there are lots of reasons why that stuff happens right describes get old for those had just flash memory other things can happen in your operating system lots of stuff can take place to slow the performance.

eric kavanagh president sap greg ben apple
"eric kavanagh" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"eric kavanagh" Discussed on WINS 1010

"The principal start as a wintry mix before changing to all snow by the afternoon accumulations of six to ten inches expected for most of us before it's over but some places could see a foot or more good morning i'm donavan wins news time at the tone will be five thirty good morning i'm bridget quinn the winter storm warning kicks in and half an hour and we'll be in effect until eight tomorrow morning this fourth nor'easter of march is expected to dump six to ten inches the heaviest snow falling during the drive home new york city schools are closed the allied wer is saying don't travel if you don't have to let's get a live update from the devil devastation station in mineola and ten ten wins reporter carol d'auria carol you're right bridget this is a day for only essential workers and for good reason you will be able to get to work because there's no snow right now but you might not get home the wr says ten inches of more and it will shut down the trains and the system will go into snow clearing mode so it means if you go into the city come back home early that's what eric kavanagh is planning to do he's a carpenter and his attitude is the snow be damned new york i'm a winner baby so all right just grin and bear basically that's what you can do what are you gonna do sit on so again ten inches or more and the long island railroad will shut down carol d'auria ten ten wins live at the mineola train station our carolina coverage with a ten ten win severe weather team continues at five forty and live accu weather coming right up but i had five thirty one traffic and transit on the ones and a good morning to karen stewart good morning bridgette wilson's carol about mass transit i will continue that tirade here on the new jersey transit we've got a severe weather schedule and basically that means cross honoring everything private buses light rail also nj transit buses path trains across honoring nj transit.

mineola eric kavanagh bridgette wilson principal donavan bridget quinn reporter carol d'auria carolina karen stewart nj ten inches