22 Burst results for "Eric Embarrass"

The future of the gig economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:24 min | 1 year ago

The future of the gig economy

"Yes we know that president biden new. Well what he was in for but it has still got to be tough when first thing on your first full day. The labor market pokes you right in the eye. It's thursday so today was weekly. Unemployment claims day. Nine hundred thousand people asked for state unemployment assistance for the first time. That is down just a little bit from a week ago. So good but still monumentally high and then claims for the newly reinstated federal program for gig workers shot up more than forty eight percent. Nearly four hundred twenty four thousand people lost jobs in the gig economy. The jobs a lot of people turn to when they run out of options. Marketplace's eric embarrass gets is going with that. When last year shutdown started joy tout hurry. An uber driver in new york city was in a bind. There wasn't work. I was struggling to pay my rent as a gig worker shout. Hurry didn't qualify for typical unemployment benefits matt until congress passed. Its first relief package. This latest spike in pandemic unemployment claims is likely linked to the lapse in the program before the last aid package was approved new shutdowns and to the after holidays. Slowdown according to dmitri costas an economist at the university of chicago about a third of the labor force the some work in the gig economy and if more people are relying when gig work. A lot of the risk is on the workers themselves. That's because according to aaron hatton a sociologist at the university of buffalo. We've attached a whole bunch of rights and privileges and opportunities to employment retirement plants. Parental leave health. Insurance unemployment are tied to traditional fulltime jobs. And heidi sure holt. A labor economist at the economic policy institute says that was problematic before but with the pandemic. It's really shown us that the there are gaps in a regular unemployment system that you can drive a truck through. We do have the ability to close them. The existence of this program shows us that we can do it. Josh godfrey in houston. Texas knows this well. His door dash earnings dropped from six hundred to one fifty a week without the temporary gig unemployment benefits. He doesn't know what he would have done. This kind of pushed me to kind of reevaluate. What i'm doing in life. So he's going back to school to get a job that if he does lose. Get unemployment

President Biden Dmitri Costas Aaron Hatton University Of Buffalo Eric New York City University Of Chicago Matt Congress Economic Policy Institute Josh Godfrey Holt Heidi Houston Texas
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live music and the economy surrounding it have had a lousy nine or 10 months. Gigs have been canceled clubs and stages of closed by the hundreds. There was a welcome news for fans and musicians as 2020 came to a close, though $15 billion in that most recent relief packages to help independent music and theater venues. His marketplaces. Eric Embarrass reports that money is going to help clubs in big cities. Yes might go even farther, though in smaller places. Clarksdale and the Mississippi Delta is known as the birthplace of the blues. This music has been played here for generations and homes and juke joints and gathering places of all kinds. And every year, thousands of people from all over the world come to hear it. Over the past 20 years, Clarksdale has been redeveloping its downtown around blues tourism. You could have heard live blues, 365 nights a year and clubs and juke joints. Bang came covert 19 Roger Stoli is the head of the Tourism Commission in Clarksdale. He also owns Cat Head, Delta blues and folk art, a venue and shop. Stoli says the loss of nightly local shows has had financial consequences for the whole area. This impacted everything from the sales tax that's paid, which effects the city of Clark Stills budget, a county Too, You know all the mom and pops So it has been a disaster. Now, every night live music and small venues has been replaced by live music on big streaming platforms like Facebook and YouTube. This is from a show Terry Big T. William streamed last fall. Virtual.

Clarksdale Roger Stoli Terry Big T. William Eric Embarrass Mississippi Delta Facebook Tourism Commission Cat Head YouTube Clark Stills Delta Bang
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

"16th Day of November. Good as always, to have you along everybody a couple of things right off the bet. Some of the headline news of the day as we see it, and then as usual, the context of what is going on in this economy. I'm one. Of course. The vaccine news from Madonna, the 2nd 90 plus percent efficiency rate vaccine in one week, the stock market as we know Is not. How do we know that Because I hear it on the radio all the time. We know it's not the economy, but it could give a real time indicator of feelings about the future of this economy overall today. Feeling pretty good eventually item to President elect bite, and he had a meeting today with some corporate CEOs and union leaders. Mary Barra gm such an Adela and Microsoft name a couple Made some remarks afterward, the president elect dead, said he supports a $3 trillion relief package. He wants money to support state and local budgets in there as well. And you said labor unions are gonna have more power while he is in office. Item three. California And here is where things turned more sober. This afternoon, Governor Gavin Newsom rolled back a host slew of business re openings here in what is, I think? Like the fifth largest economy in the world. If we're country, maybe seventh largest, I forget, but you get my point. Anyway. He did that, as is happening in virtually the whole country, the virus raging out of control. There are echoes in this of what happened back in the spring, when small businesses in particular got clobbered. So marketplaces Eric Embarrass spent her day on the phone with some of those small businesses. When things shut down in the spring, the stampede cocktail club in Seattle Washington Gotta pee Pee. Pee alone, held a go fund me to help support employees, scale back days and hours, sold gift cards and merchandise and to go drinks. I always joke around that we've pivoted so much that our hips hurt. That's general manager Sarah Grind staff, she says. Business revenue is down by 75%. And with this new shutdown looming, I think it's gonna be completely different. I think it's a different ballgame. I think people you know, we didn't know what we were going into the first time. So it was colic. Oh, a pandemic, but now it's like this is a pandemic. And more than half a year later. Many people have been struggling for months, says Matthew Slaughter, an economist at Dartmouth College. Unfortunate more their customers and clients are more stressed financially because of the absence is from the federal government support that have rolled off. That worries Wendelin Scott, who owns yoga source in Santa Fe, New Mexico. When things shut down the first time she had two locations. It was pretty stressful, the psychological and emotional Trusted everybody was under and the intense learning curve tol get everybody online. Then in June, she shuts on one of her studios. Now, most of her classes are online, but she's just breaking. Even She hopes her remaining brick and mortar studio will survive the winter. In Chicago. Candace Pals who owns hair salon, come cc Me, where she makes custom wigs and weaves for her clients hopes she's prepared before the pandemic clients would bring her hair bundles and sheets, Val them in shop. Now Kyle's buys the hair styles. It sends it to customers and then virtually walks them through how to do it themselves. We don't even have to touch each other, see each other anything so now I actually the profits are higher. Houses optimistic, but her business depends on clients with disposable income and how they weather the covert 19. Winter America. Barris for Marketplace we talked on Friday if you remember about the holiday shopping season and how retailers are outfitting their warehouses to get ready for a pandemic induced Serge in online sales. Was a whole bunch of logistics They have to worry about and staffing and I t stuff Also, though, some simpler things is marketplaces, Marielle Segarra reports in a pandemic Retailers kinda have to take the sales they can get. But this whole shift online shopping over the holidays. Is going to cost them because they have to spend money on things like cardboard boxes. If it's a very small box, it could be in the sense. If it's a very large box. It can be dollars. Brian Smith is an executive at Georgia Pacific. It makes corrugated cardboard boxes, he says box orders for online retail are up by more than 30% compared to last year. It's certainly been a challenge because we're taking extraordinary steps to keep all of our employees say which can slow production down considerably, so sometimes it involves running extra hours and into the weekends to keep up with demand. Also, the company's paper mills are running a full capacity, and Georgia Pacific has been buying paper from small suppliers when it can't make enough. In recent earnings calls. Other cardboard box makers have also said demand is off the charts. David Mark odd, a Cantar says. We're not seeing a shortage of cardboard boxes in the US at this point. But with covert related shipping delays, it might be tough to get all the boxes to retailers when they need them. The boxes have to be shipped from the manufacturer to whoever is going to be using them being Amazon target WalMart dissenter One scenario If a worker at a warehouse doesn't have the right sized box, they could use the wrong size you her order a bottle, a hand soap online, and it shows up rolling around in a box that could fit a pair of knee high boots. When things are getting pressed and things are going quickly, and they can't grab the box that's really suited for a box of stuff. So grab whatever box because I got to keep the line moving, which costs a little more and doesn't always go over so well with customers who see it is wasteful. Mariel Sierra for marketplace. This was one of those days on Wall Street where you knew right from the jump that the algorithms we're going to go wild. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Number one app yesterday for both Android and iPhone users was the social media platform parlor. It is geared distinctly to conservatives, right wing conservatives. We should say, who say they do without grounding in any kind.

Georgia Pacific President Governor Gavin Newsom Madonna Matthew Slaughter California federal government Eric Embarrass Mariel Sierra US Amazon Candace Pals Dartmouth College Mary Barra Santa Fe Microsoft
"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"16th Day of November. Good as always, to have you along everybody a couple of things right off the bet. Some of the headline news of the day as we see it, and then as usual, the context of what is going on in this economy. I'm one. Of course. The vaccine news from Madonna, the 2nd 90 plus percent efficiency rate vaccine in one week, the stock market as we know Is not. How do we know that Because I hear it on the radio all the time. We know it's not the economy, but it can give a real time indicator of feelings about the future of this economy overall today. Feeling pretty good eventually item to President elect bite, and he had a meeting today with some corporate CEOs and union leaders. Mary Barra gm such an Adela and Microsoft name a couple Made some remarks afterward, the president elect dead, said he supports a $3 trillion relief package. He wants money to support state and local budgets in there as well. And you said labor unions are gonna have more power while he is in office. Item three. California And here is where things turned more sober. This afternoon, Governor Gavin Newsom rolled back a host slew of business re openings here in what is, I think? Like the fifth largest economy in the world. If we're country, maybe seventh largest, I forget, but you get my point. Anyway. He did that, as is happening in virtually the whole country, the virus raging out of control. There are echoes in this of what happened back in the spring, when small businesses in particular got clobbered. So marketplaces Eric Embarrass spent her day on the phone with some of those small businesses. When things shut down in the spring, the stampede cocktail club in Seattle Washington Gotta pee Pee. Pee alone, held a go fund me to help support employees, scale back days and hours, sold gift cards and merchandise and to go drinks. I always joke around that we've pivoted so much that our hipsters That's general manager Sarah Grind staff, she says. Business revenue is down by 75%. And with this new shutdown looming, I think it's gonna be completely different. I think it's a different ballgame. I think people you know, we didn't know what we were going into the first time. So it was colic. Oh, a pandemic, but now it's like this is a pandemic. And more than half a year later. Many people have been struggling for months, says Matthew Slaughter, an economist at Dartmouth College. Unfortunate more their customers and clients are more stressed financially because of the absence from the federal government support that have rolled off. That worries Wendelin Scott, who owns yoga source in Santa Fe, New Mexico. When things shut down the first time she had two locations. It was pretty stressful, the psychological and emotional Trust that everybody was under and the intense learning curve tol get everybody a line. Then in June, she shuts on one of her studios. Now, most of her classes are online, but she's just breaking. Even. She hopes her remaining brick and mortar studio will survive the winter in Chicago. Candace Cowles, who owns hair salon, come cc me where she makes custom wigs and weaves for her clients. Hopes she's prepared before the pandemic. Clients would bring her hair bundles, and she'd style them in shop. Now, Kyle's buys the hair styles it since it's a customers and then virtually walks them through how to do it themselves. We don't even have to touch each other, see each other Anything. So now I actually the profits are higher Cows is optimistic, but her business depends on clients with disposable income and how they weather the covert 19. Winter America. Barris for Marketplace we talked on Friday if you remember about the holiday shopping season and how retailers are outfitting their warehouses to get ready for a pandemic induced Serge in online sales. Was a whole bunch of logistics They have to worry about and staffing and I t stuff Also, though, some simpler things is marketplaces, Marielle Segarra reports. In a pandemic Retailers kinda have to take the sales they can get. But this whole shift to online shopping over the holidays is going to cost them because they have to spend money on things like cardboard boxes. It's a very small box. It could be in the sense. If it's a very large box. It can be dollars. Brian Smith is an executive at Georgia Pacific. It makes corrugated cardboard boxes. He says box orders for online retail are up by more than 30% compared to last year. It's certainly been a challenge because we're taking extraordinary steps to keep all of our employees say which can slow production down considerably. So sometimes it involves running extra hours and into the weekends to keep up with demand. Also, the company's paper mills are running a full capacity, and Georgia Pacific has been buying paper from small suppliers when it can't make enough. In recent earnings calls. Other cardboard box makers have also said demand is off the charts. David Mark odd, a Cantar says. We're not seeing a shortage of cardboard boxes in the US at this point. But with covert related shipping delays, it might be tough to get all the boxes to retailers when they need them. The boxes have to be shipped from the manufacturer to whoever is going to be using them being Amazon target WalMart dissenter One scenario If a worker in a warehouse doesn't have the right sized box, they could use the wrong size. You ever order a bottle, a hand soap online, and it shows up rolling around in a box that could fit a pair of knee high boots. When things are getting pressed and things are going quickly, and they can't grab the box that's really suited for a box of stuff. So grab whatever box because I got to keep the line moving, which costs a little more and doesn't always go over so well with customers who see it is wasteful. Mariel Sierra for marketplace. This was one of those days on Wall Street where you knew right from the jump that the algorithms we're going to go wild. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. The number one app yesterday for both Android and iPhone users was the social media platform parlor. It is geared distinctly to conservatives, right wing conservatives, We should say..

Georgia Pacific President Governor Gavin Newsom Madonna Matthew Slaughter California federal government Eric Embarrass Candace Cowles Mariel Sierra US Amazon Dartmouth College Mary Barra Santa Fe Microsoft Seattle
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The 16th Day of November. Good as always, to have you along everybody a couple of things right off the bet. Some of the headline news of the day as we see it, and then as usual, the context of what is going on in this economy. I'm one. Of course. The vaccine news from Madonna, the 2nd 90 plus percent efficiency rate vaccine in one week, the stock market as we know Is not. How do we know that Because I hear it on the radio all the time. We know it's not the economy, but it could give a real time indicator of feelings about the future of this economy overall today. Feeling pretty good eventually item to President elect bite, and he had a meeting today with some corporate CEOs and union leaders. Mary Barra gm such an Adela and Microsoft name a couple Made some remarks afterward, the president elect dead, said he supports a $3 trillion relief package. He wants money to support state and local budgets in there as well. And you said labor unions are gonna have more power while he is in office. Item three. California And here is where things turned more sober. This afternoon, Governor Gavin Newsom rolled back a host slew of business re openings here in what is, I think? Like the fifth largest economy in the world. If we're country, maybe seventh largest, I forget. But you get my point anyway. He did that, as is happening in virtually the whole country, the virus raging out of control. There are echoes in this of what happened back in the spring, when small businesses in particular got clobbered. So marketplaces Eric Embarrass spent her day on the phone with some of those small businesses. When things shut down in the spring, the stampede cocktail club in Seattle Washington Gotta pee Pee. Pee alone, held a go fund me to help support employees, scale back days and hours, sold gift cards and merchandise and to go drinks. I always joke around that we've pivoted so much that our hipsters That's general manager Sarah Grind staff, she says. Business revenue is down by 75%. And with this new shutdown looming, I think it's gonna be completely different. I think it's a different ballgame. I think people you know, we we didn't know what we were going into the first time. So it was colic. Oh, a pandemic, but now it's like this is a pandemic. And more than half a year later. Many people have been struggling for months, says Matthew Slaughter, an economist at Dartmouth College. Unfortunate more their customers and clients are more stressed financially because of the absence is from the federal government support that have rolled off. That worries Wendelin Scott, who owns yoga source in Santa Fe, New Mexico. When things shut down the first time she had two locations. It was pretty stressful, the psychological and emotional Trusted everybody was under and the intense learning curve tol get everybody online. Then, in June, she shut down one of her studios. Now, most of her classes are online, but she's just breaking. Even. She hopes her remaining brick and mortar studio will survive the winter in Chicago, Candace Pals who owns hair salon come cc.

Governor Gavin Newsom Eric Embarrass President Matthew Slaughter California Madonna Mary Barra Microsoft Candace Pals federal government Sarah Grind Dartmouth College Adela Wendelin Scott Santa Fe Seattle general manager
"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today, the 16th Day of November. Good as always, to have you along everybody a couple of things right off the bat. Some of the headline news of the day as we see it, and then as usual, the context of what is going on in this economy. Adam one, of course, the vaccine news from Madonna, the 2nd 90 plus percent efficiency rate vaccine in one week, the stock market as we know Is not. How do we know that Because I hear it on the radio all the time. We know it's not the economy, but it can give a real time indicator of feelings about the future of this economy overall today. Feeling pretty good eventually item to President elect bite, and he had a meeting today with some corporate CEOs and union leaders. Mary Barra gm such an Adela and Microsoft name a couple Made some remarks afterward, the president elect dead, said he supports a $3 trillion relief package. He wants money to support state and local budgets in there as well. And You said labor unions are gonna have more power while he is in office. Item three. California And here is where things turned more sober. This afternoon, Governor Gavin Newsom rolled back a host slew of business re openings here in what is, I think? Like the fifth largest economy in the world. If we're country, maybe seventh largest, I forget, but you get my point. Anyway. He did that, as is happening in virtually the whole country, the virus raging out of control. There are echoes in this of what happened back in the spring, when small businesses in particular got clobbered. So marketplaces Eric Embarrass spent her day on the phone with some of those small businesses. When things shut down in the spring, the stampede cocktail club in Seattle Washington Gotta pee Pee. Pee alone, held a go fund me to help support employees, scale back days and hours, sold gift cards and merchandise and to go drinks. I always joke around that we've pivoted so much that our hips hurt. That's general manager Sarah Grind staff, she says. Business revenue is down by 75%. And with this new shutdown looming, I think it's gonna be completely different. I think it's a different ballgame. I think people you know, we we didn't know what we were going into the first time. So it was colic. Oh, a pandemic, but now it's like This is a pandemic and more than half a year later. Many people have been struggling for months, says Matthew Slaughter, an economist at Dartmouth College. Unfortunate more their customers and clients are more stressed financially because of the absence is from the federal government support that have rolled off. That worries Wendelin Scott, who owns yoga source in Santa Fe, New Mexico. When things shut down the first time she had two locations. It was pretty stressful, the psychological and emotional Trust that everybody was under and then the intense learning curve tol get everybody a line. Then in June, she shuts on one of her studios. Now, most of her classes are online, but she's just breaking. Even. She hopes her remaining brick and mortar studio will survive the winter in Chicago. Candace Cowles, who owns hair salon, come cc me where she makes custom wigs and weaves for her clients. Hopes she's prepared before the pandemic. Clients would bring her hair bundles and sheets, Val them and shop. Now Kyle's buys the hair styles it since it's a customers and then virtually walks them through how to do it themselves. We don't even have to touch each other, see each other Anything. So now I actually the profits are higher. Kyle's is optimistic, but her business depends on clients with disposable income and how they weather the covert 19 Winter America. Barris for Marketplace we talked on Friday if you remember about the holiday shopping season and how retailers are outfitting their warehouses to get ready for a pandemic induced Serge in online sales. Was a whole bunch of logistics. They have to worry about and staffing and I d stuff. Also, though, some simpler things is marketplaces, Marielle Segarra reports in a pandemic Retailers kinda have to take the sales they can get. But this whole shift to online shopping over the holidays. Is going to cost them because they have to spend money on things like cardboard boxes. It's a very small box. It could be in the sense that it's a very large box. It can be dollars. Smith is an executive at Georgia Pacific. It makes corrugated cardboard boxes, he says box orders for online retail are up by more than 30% compared to last year. It's certainly been a challenge because we're taking extraordinary steps to keep all of our employees say which can slow production down considerably, so sometimes it involves running extra hours and into the weekends to keep up with demand. Also, the company's paper mills are running a full capacity, and Georgia Pacific has been buying paper from small suppliers when it can't make enough. In recent earnings calls. Other cardboard box makers have also said demand is off the charts. David Mark odd, a Cantar says. We're not seeing a shortage of cardboard boxes in the US at this point. But with covert related shipping delays, it might be tough to get all the boxes to retailers when they need them. The boxes have to be shipped from the manufacturer to whoever is going to be using them being Amazon target WalMart dissector one scenario If a worker at a warehouse doesn't have the right sized box, they could use the wrong size ever order a bottle a hand soap online, and it shows up rolling around in a box that could fit a pair of knee high boots. When things are getting pressed, and things are going quickly, and they can't grab the box that's really suited for a box of stuff. So grab whatever box because I got to keep the line moving, which costs a little more and doesn't always go over so well with customers who see it is wasteful. Mariel Sierra for marketplace. This was one of those days on Wall Street where you knew right from the jump that the algorithms we're going to go wild. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Number one app.

Kyle President Georgia Pacific Governor Gavin Newsom Adam Matthew Slaughter California federal government Eric Embarrass Madonna Candace Cowles Mariel Sierra US Marielle Segarra Dartmouth College Mary Barra Amazon
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

"The 16th Day of November. Good as always, to have you along everybody a couple of things right off the bet. Some of the headline news of the day as we see it, and then as usual, the context of what is going on in this economy. Adam one, of course, the vaccine news from Madonna, the 2nd 90 plus percent efficiency rate vaccine in one week, the stock market as we know Is not. How do we know that Because I hear it on the radio all the time. We know it's not the economy, but it can give a real time indicator of feelings about the future of this economy overall today. Feeling pretty good eventually item to President elect bite, and he had a meeting today with some corporate CEOs and union leaders. Mary Barra gm such an Adela and Microsoft name a couple Made some remarks afterward, the president elect dead, said he supports a $3 trillion relief package. He wants money to support state and local budgets in there as well. And You said labor unions are gonna have more power while he is in office. Item three. California And here is where things turned more sober. This afternoon, Governor Gavin Newsom rolled back a host slew of business re openings here in what is, I think? Like the fifth largest economy in the world. If we're country, maybe seventh largest, I forget, but you get my point. Anyway. He did that, as is happening in virtually the whole country, the virus raging out of control. There are echoes in this of what happened back in the spring, when small businesses in particular got clobbered. So marketplaces Eric Embarrass spent her day on the phone with some of those small businesses. When things shut down in the spring, the stampede cocktail club in Seattle Washington Gotta pee Pee. Pee alone, held a go fund me to help support employees, scale back days and hours, sold gift cards and merchandise and to go drinks. I always joke around that we've pivoted so much that our hipsters That's general manager Sarah Grind staff, she says. Business revenue is down by 75%. And with this new shutdown looming, I think it's gonna be completely different. I think it's a different ballgame. I think people you know, we didn't know what we were going into the first time. So it was colic. Oh, a pandemic, but now it's like this is a pandemic. And more than half a year later. Many people have been struggling for months, says Matthew Slaughter, an economist at Dartmouth College. Unfortunate more their customers and clients are more stressed financially because of the absence from the federal government support that have rolled off. That worries Wendelin Scott, who owns yoga source in Santa Fe, New Mexico. When things shut down the first time she had two locations. It was pretty stressful, the psychological and emotional Trusted everybody was under and the intense learning curve tol get everybody a line. Then in June, she shuts on one of her studios. Now, most of her classes are online, but she's just breaking. Even. She hopes her remaining brick and mortar studio will survive the winter in Chicago. Candace Cowles, who owns hair salon, come cc me where she makes custom wigs and weaves for her clients. Hopes she's prepared before the pandemic. Clients would bring her hair bundles and sheets, pal them in shop. Now Kyle's buys the hair styles it since it's a customers and then virtually walks them through how to do it themselves. We don't even have to touch each other, see each other Anything. So now I actually the profits are higher Cows is optimistic, but her business depends on clients with disposable income and how they weather the covert 19. Winter America. Barris for Marketplace we talked on Friday if you remember about the holiday shopping season and how retailers are outfitting their warehouses to get ready for a pandemic induced Serge in online sales. There's a whole bunch of logistics they have to worry about and staffing and I t stuff Also, though, some simpler things is marketplaces, Marielle Segarra reports in a pandemic Retailers kinda have to take the sales they can get. But this whole shift online shopping over the holidays. Is going to cost them because they have to spend money on things like cardboard boxes. It's it's a very small box. It could be in the sense. If it's a very large box. It can be dollars. Smith is an executive at Georgia Pacific. It makes corrugated cardboard boxes, he says box orders for online retail are up by more than 30% compared to last year. It's certainly been a challenge because we're taking extraordinary steps to keep all of our employees say which can slow production down considerably, so sometimes it involves running extra hours and into the weekends to keep up with demand. Also, the company's paper mills are running a full capacity, and Georgia Pacific has been buying paper from small suppliers when it can't make enough. In recent earnings calls. Other cardboard box makers have also said demand is off the charts. David Mark odd, a Cantar says. We're not seeing a shortage of cardboard boxes in the US at this point, but with covert related shipping delays, it might be tough to get all the boxes to retailers when they need them. The boxes have to be shipped from the manufacturer to whoever is going to be using them being Amazon target WalMart dissenter One scenario. If a worker in a warehouse doesn't have the right sized box, they could use the wrong size ever order a bottle, a hand soap online, and it shows up rolling around in a box that could fit a pair of knee high boots. When things are getting pressed and things are going quickly, and they can't grab the box that's really suited for a box of soap. So grab whatever box because I got to keep the line moving, which cost a little more and doesn't always go over so well with customers. Who see it is wasteful. Mariel Sierra for marketplace. This was one of those days on Wall Street where you knew right from the jump that the algorithms were gonna go wild. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Number one app yesterday for both Android and iPhone users was the social media platform parlor. It is geared distinctly to conservatives, right wing conservatives, We should say. Who say they do.

President Georgia Pacific Governor Gavin Newsom Mary Barra Adam Matthew Slaughter Microsoft California federal government Eric Embarrass Madonna Adela Candace Cowles Mariel Sierra US gm Dartmouth College
"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"But even if people want bigger houses, they can't necessarily afford them. Alley Wolf is chief economist at Zonda. The housing data and consulting firm and so builders air really struggling with should we build larger homes that may have to come with a larger price tag? Or find creative work arounds that buyers can afford. One builder she knows took a bit of extra closet space and turned it into a zoom room. Just big enough for a desk and chair. Same square footage. Whole different vibe. I'm Amy Scott for Market place, All right. Here's a quiz more than 12,000 locations more than $7 billion in market capitalization. What company am I talking about? Okay, fine. It's a little bit vague, so I will give it to you. Duncan it of coffee and donuts is in the news said to me and talks to be bought by Inspire Brands, which has Arby's and Jimmy John's in its portfolio. And in the process would be taken private. Again. Marketplaces Eric Embarrass explains and takes a look at that strategy. Company starting out private, then going public. That's kind of the end of the story, right? Actually, no, says Carnegie Mellon finance professor Dickson Gupta. Going private could be beneficial for accompanies trying to reposition itself or to make substantial changes to its business model. Duncan had a rough go of it at the start of the pandemic than sales picked up but still aren't what they used to be. So an acquisition now might make sense to shield the company from shareholder scrutiny because big changes take years. It's a strategy Duncan's tried before back in 2005. Then it went public again in 2011. It could work for Duncan because the brand is powerful, says Spencer Ross, a marketing professor at U Mass. Lowell and the company's invested in its APS and contactless payments. A company like inspire brands. We want to be able to kind of absorb it up. And rather than having to duplicate those types of efforts in their other brands in their portfolio, they can actually leverage. What you know what they're buying. Remember that old Duncan ad campaign time to make well it's been years since Duncan actually made doughnuts on site..

Duncan Inspire Brands Amy Scott professor Alley Wolf chief economist Zonda Carnegie Mellon Eric Embarrass Dickson Gupta Spencer Ross Arby Lowell Jimmy John U Mass
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eric Embarrass Has that story for Paul Goldenberg of San Diego. It was at the height of stay at home orders in March when it started when everyone was going crazy over toilet paper and ice all in all that stuff I turned it is the card. The APP connected him with a shopper that brought him what he wanted from an out of the way Albertson's. Then there was this 96 degree day when my dog soiled sheets on my bed, and I just knew that I was either gonna have to give the store with the whole eveything in the mask and all that. So it was back to insta card for cleaning supplies and new sheets, this time from Walmart. Goldenberg was already an online shopper. He bought lots of stuff from Amazon. But instead, CART is different. The APP launched as a way to get someone else to do your grocery shopping. Now it matches up gig workers with all kinds of same day shopping errands. Insert card has added over 100 stores during the pandemic, including some that were all about the experience like Sephora. In certain cases, it's a connection to a brand. Nick's Shield is an analyst with third Bridge and right now for stores that are struggling like bed, bath and beyond, he says. This is another way to stay relevant with customers. They opened the instrument after buy groceries, but also you know, though, by some Hellos and towels and things like that, Of course, many stores already offered shipping. But because of Amazon, no one wants to wait. Carnegie Mellon marketing professor Jeff Gallic, the logistics of doing something like same day delivery for a relatively small outfit like Sephora. It's really hard for them to do that, especially at a time when lots of retailers don't have cash for that they don't have a choice. Really. They have to partner with someone else to build out that system for themselves for every retailer to go out and do that. That's impossible, so consumers are willing to pay both a delivery charge and by providing a data drip. Because now instead, CART nose with their weekly grocery list looks like what their kids are wearing Halloween. What over the counter meds they use? That means retailers have to share that precious shopper data. And it might be worth it to retailer, says Chameleon Wsky, an analyst with CFR. We think that the habits of reform during Cove in 19 cocooning will stick even after the pandemic subsides in San Diego, Paul Goldenberg continues to rely pretty heavily on insta carts. Shoppers were wearing their masks. They're going to the store. I'm not going in the store. Bringing stuff to my door. I'm giving them Tio. It's a nice arrangement, and he says it's probably an arrangement that'll stick America Baris for Marketplace. The governor of Puerto Rico, relax some of the islands Corona virus restrictions last week. Slight bumps up in restaurant theatre capacities among them. Did keep a 10 p.m. curfew.

Paul Goldenberg Amazon San Diego analyst Sephora Eric Embarrass Walmart Albertson Carnegie Mellon Chameleon Wsky Puerto Rico third Bridge Nick Jeff Gallic partner America Cove professor
"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Eric Embarrass has that story for Paul Goldenberg of San Diego. It was at the height of stay at home orders in March when it started When everyone was going crazy over toilet paper by Saul and all that stuff I turned is the card. The app connected him with a shopper that brought him what he wanted from an out of the way. Albertson's Then there was this 96 degree day when my dog Soiled sheets on my bed, and I just knew that I was either gonna have to get to the store with the whole anything in the mask and all that. So it was back to insta card for cleaning supplies and new sheets this time. From WalMart. Goldenberg was already an online shopper. He bought lots of stuff from Amazon. But instead, CART is different. The APP launched as a way to get someone else to do your grocery shopping. Now it matches up gig workers with all kinds of same day shopping errands. Since the card has added over 100 stores during the pandemic, including some that were all about the experience like Sephora. In certain cases, it's a connection to a brand. Nick Shield is an analyst with third Bridge and right now for stores that are struggling like bed, bath and beyond, he says. This is another way to stay relevant with customers. They opened the instrument APP to buy groceries. But also you know, they'll buy some Pillows and towels and things like that, Of course, many stores already offered shipping. But because of Amazon, no one wants to wait. Carnegie Mellon marketing professor Jeff Gallic, the logistics of doing something like same day delivery for a relatively small outfit like Sephora. It's really hard for them to do that, especially at a time when lots of retailers don't have cash for that. They don't have a choice. Really. They have to partner with someone else to build out that system for themselves for every retailer to go out and do that. That's impossible. So consumers are willing to pay both a delivery charge and by providing a data drip because now instead, CART knows what their weekly grocery list looks like what their kids are wearing for Halloween. What over the counter meds they use. That means retailers have to share that precious shopper data and it might be worth it to retailer, says Camilion Necevski, an analyst with CFR. We think that the habits that reformed during Cove in 19 cocooning will stick even after the pandemic subsides in San Diego, Paul Goldenberg continues to rely pretty heavily on insta card shoppers were wearing their masks. They're going to the store. I'm not going in the store bringing stuff to my door. I'm giving them Tio. It's a nice arrangement, and he says it's probably an arrangement that'll stick America Baris for Marketplace..

Paul Goldenberg San Diego Amazon Saul analyst Sephora Albertson Eric Embarrass WalMart Nick Shield Carnegie Mellon Camilion Necevski third Bridge Cove Jeff Gallic partner America professor
"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Remittances is the word used to describe money that expats send back to their home countries. It's a lot of money in the aggregate, and it's often critical for those economies. Last year, Migrants from Latin America and the Caribbean sent nearly $100 billion home and early in this pandemic. As you might imagine, the World Bank figured Remittances from the United States, the Latin America would fall 20%. His marketplaces. Eric Embarrass reports payments sent to some Latin American countries have in fact bounce back. For the past eight years, 24 year old Byron Tomatoes father has been sending money to his wife, Byron's mom in Guatemala. Then the pandemic hit lots of people stayed home. The not tomatoes, father, he delivers food for an Italian restaurants in Brooklyn. He actually started working on the weekend, which was something he did not do. And the money he re mitts to Guatemala the amount that he sends increase a little bit during the epidemic 1 50 a week instead of 100. Mark Hugo Lopez with the Pew Research Center says in April, there was a steep decline in Remittances to El Salvador in the Dominican Republic. But those have rebounded, he says. That's because migrants from those countries tend to do essential work farming. Food production hospitality. Meanwhile, Remittances to Mexico never declined at all. In fact, they've been increasing all year. Many Mexican immigrants have been in the US for so long that they're able to navigate better some of the uncertainties about the labor market associated with covered 19 downturn. That's good news from Mexico, which is grappling with the loss of tourism. Roy Germano, a scholar at noon, you says that's true of a lot of Latin America. But often in these countries, there really isn't much of a safety net to speak of, and migrants play that safety NET role. Diego Vaca Flores, an economics professor at Texas State University, plays that role. He sends money monthly to his parents in Bolivia when he saw the shortages of products happening here in the U. S. I knew that was gonna happen eventually in Latin America, and I tried to get my family. To be prepared for that to do it before things run out off. In the market, so he sent them an extra grant this spring America Baris for Marketplace. After a bunch of delays, the new Christopher Nolan movie tenant is hitting US movie theaters this week as in actual theaters. Notably not in New York or big parts of California like Los Angeles. But in the 45 states where they're open tenant is going to be on a lot of screens. It's the first big budget theatrical release in months. So there is, of course, a lot riding on it. For theater owners who were trying to get to the other side of this pandemic. Some theater people are trying to survive in other ways, including Stephanie Silverman. She's one of the 10 people we've been following in our series called the United States of Work. She runs an independent here in Nashville called the Belcourt. And she sent us an audio diary she recorded this past Saturday night. It is the end of the night for us it here at the bell Cord Theater in Nashville. We just wrapped our first night of our Of our Covad pivot to drive in movies. Um, it's about 11 o'clock and we showed North by Northwest tonight. Alfred Hitchcock CE remarkable film. In our parking lot, and it wass a blast. The movie looked gorgeous. The storm's magically blue around the city that were looking pretty ominous. When we all got here tonight, the people were so excited and so eager to be back doing something. Together, but also really careful. Lots of masking lots of caretaking lost lots of distancing. So all the things we were hoping to see in a little, maybe nervous about weren't there and Yes, Most of all, it was just really great to be back in person, even with masks and distancing with the staff of the Bill court working together, it's imperfectly. But it's a perfect as it's going to get right now and Ah, it's feeling a little bit.

Latin America United States Diego Vaca Flores Mark Hugo Lopez Stephanie Silverman Guatemala Mexico Byron Tomatoes World Bank Nashville Covad bell Cord Theater Eric Embarrass Christopher Nolan Alfred Hitchcock Pew Research Center Roy Germano Dominican Republic
"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"If I may say so. So why the recent sharp spike in Corona virus cases? This tourist ferry, leaving the port of serious, maybe part of the problem. Bank worker. Every couple who says it was the orbit reduced influx of foreign visitors when travel restrictions were lifted in May that helped fuel the current upsurge. Greece depends on tourism, so we have to open the borders for tourism. So I think that destroyed all the work that we have them, But we cannot do it without tourism. It accounts for almost 20% of Greece's GDP and a big chunk of her family's income. Her husband is a leisure yacht skipper. His employment's been very patchy. This year. There's a big hole in the family budget, but if he feels nothing like the shame and stress of the debt crisis When Greece was a pariah in Europe. Now that I know that everybody has the same problem. It's not stressful for me. We're all in the same. In the same boat. For the first time in a decade. She actually feels optimistic about Greece's future, and so does book publisher Costas Papadopoulos. We can look at ourselves in the mirror now, before Rick wouldn't he feels encouraged that the center right government that's been in power for a year now took such decisive action at the start of the pandemic. I say we trust the state a lot more than a year before, and I hope we're not going to be very disappointed in the future, then your official. But I'm feeling optimistic. Guess that optimism, though, could be sorely tested in the months ahead. The IMF has forecast the Greek economy will shrink by 10% this year. A bigger annual drop than any seen during the debt crisis at the European desk. I'm Stephen Beard for Marketplace a story now about product. And brand and reclaiming control, you might not be seeing Nike product. It's a major retailers much longer, both of the brick and mortar variety Belkin Dillard's to name a couple and online as well at Zappos. The athletic wear maker is said to be cutting off a total of nine retailers. Part marketplaces. Eric Embarrass tells us of Nike's recent strategy of taking tighter control and selling more directly to consumers. Nike is trying to sell its gear and make its customers feel special, like LeBron or Serena. Sam Poser, an analyst at Susquehanna Financial Group, says the stores Nike is dropping. They were selling Nike product, but they weren't you know. They weren't of the place that we're really doing something to enhance that the Nike brand. Nike wouldn't confirm or deny that it's cutting the store's accounts, but the company did say it's doubling down with strategic partners, Poser says. That means retailers with splashing Nike displays. The company is also doubling down on its digital approach. Last year, Nike cut ties with Amazon, in part so I could collect its own data on customers. Jeff Gallic is a marketing professor at Carnegie Mellon. They're going to know basically everything they want to know about a consumer, which might be information that was kept close to the chest by retailers. Now Nikki has control of that data. Taking control is the bottom line. So, says Matt Paulus, sports industry advisor with the NPD Group. Know you're able to control their message. They're able to control the product show the product the way they want it shown and and To some extent haven't impact on pricing. With so many brick and mortar stores closing. Camilion Necevski, an analyst at C F. Says This is also a great way for Nike to protect himself from shrinking revenues that already going to current that channel. Mikey's not the only brand that's taking more control, Necevski says. Ralph Lauren, Skechers.

Nike Greece Sam Poser Camilion Necevski analyst IMF Ralph Lauren Stephen Beard Belkin Dillard Europe Costas Papadopoulos Eric Embarrass Zappos Mikey NPD Group Rick Jeff Gallic official Carnegie Mellon
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

"A milestone of sorts in the vacation industry in this corona virus economy, Airbnb said this month. For the first time since stayed home order started being a thing back in March, people have booked a 1,000,000 nights of accommodation in a single day. The company has had, of course, a rough year. Pandemic induced loss is it laid off nearly 2000 people not so long ago. So too soon to talk turnaround marketplaces. Eric Embarrass has that one. Spring is usually pretty busy for Charles Chapman's rental house on the Lake Erie Shore in Ashtabula, Ohio, But not this year. In March, Airbnb bookings dried up completely. Then, in June, we went back to being like 100% book for the summer. More of his visitors unusual coming from nearby from the Cleveland and Pittsburgh areas. I'm not having anybody really coming from far Which usually I'll get a couple people, Airbnb says. What Charles Chapman is seeing is pretty typical right now. Recent bookings tend to be in remote areas and guests tend to come from within a couple 100 miles. Hospitality analyst Andrea Stokes with JD Power says surveys have found that travelers are way more comfortable taking road trips over flying somewhere and then trips closer to home. Were, you know, going to be a little more popular than longer Dr Trips by avoiding hotels, it's easier to steer clear of potential infection. Crystal Watson, who works on pandemic preparedness at Johns Hopkins says it's actually healthy so want to hit the road and senior things we've all been under. This social distancing regime for the last several months, and I know everyone is tired of it. Bookings at remote locations or a boon to those hosts, but they may not too much for the company, says Dan Thomas, an analyst with Third Bridge. It's large cities that are driving a lot of traffic on the platform in a lot of the bookings on the platform. And it's large cities where Airbnb makes most of its money. America PARIS for Marketplace.

Airbnb Charles Chapman analyst Eric Embarrass Lake Erie Shore Third Bridge Ashtabula Andrea Stokes Ohio Cleveland Crystal Watson PARIS Johns Hopkins America JD Power Dan Thomas Pittsburgh
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

"The pantries of Latin next and non Latin ex families. Not only here but throughout Latin America. Adobo sauce, beans and olives, seizing all of that. It's also the biggest Hispanic owned business in the United States. And right now in a perhaps cautionary tale. It's become the target of a boycott, led by Latin Nick's activists. Marketplaces Eric Embarrass Has that story. It all started with comments. Goya CEO Robert Conway, made at the White House yesterday were all truly blessed at the same time to have a leader like President Trump, who is a builder. The reaction Videos like this all over social media, you showing up job? Well, a Cynthia's house is Tom by what he'd be from the random, you know. Go there being Joe a couple hashtag started trending going away and boycott Goya Warren, marketing professor America's Reid says, while the boycott may hurt the brand's image in the short term Long term boycotts typically do not work. Consumers are distracted by other things. They have short memories. And if you look at what's going on 24 hour news cycle There is always another story that hits that will take a bit of oxygen away from that existing story For a boycott like this to work customers need choices. There are other brands Concetta Obadiah area, but stores have to carry them. Ohio State University supply chain expert Terry Esper says if they don't already maybe a touch more difficult. Because, you know, kind of getting access to some of those competing brands, especially in a situation like this, where those supply chains are already pretty strapped. Because of just the ways things are with covert 19 the store's best position to stock. The competing brands, he says, are big chains or smaller ethnic groceries. That's where Emily Pascual shops she grew up with Goya products in New York City. But the marketplace is competitive. And I think so many of us are happy to take our business elsewhere and by us, she means her mom Abuela and Tia. They had a group called last night and decided to stop buying. Goya Company didn't respond.

Latin America White House Goya Company Goya Goya Warren Terry Esper Eric Embarrass Emily Pascual Ohio State University President Trump Robert Conway New York City CEO Joe Reid professor
US companies hunt for loopholes to beat China tariffs

Marketplace

02:24 min | 3 years ago

US companies hunt for loopholes to beat China tariffs

"We begin today where we often have lately the trade war the escalating tariffs between the u._s. and china perhaps you've heard that mentioned here before now yes for sure those tariffs have had an impact on trade between the two nations and during the g twenty summit that starts on friday and japan president trump and president xi jinping will meet to talk about their relationship issues but meanwhile business finds a way to go on as usual and many businesses have resorted to work arounds loopholes shall we say that helped them avoid paying these tariffs marketplace's eric embarrassed has that story work arounds on tariffs sometimes called transshipments have been around as long as terrorists have existed says emily blanchard professor at dartmouth but right now they're having a moment when tariffs were lower before this trade war it wasn't a profitable strategy now that tariffs are going up we would definitely expect to see transshipment becoming more popular and not all transshipments are created equal practices like shipping furniture made in china to a third country with lower tariffs like vietnam and then removing the made in china sticker that's a legal but doing most of the production in china and the finishing touches elsewhere that's arguably legal says michael moore who teaches economics and international affairs at george washington university if you bring the product in and you use a screwdriver to screw in the last screw that doesn't mean it's made in vietnam it has to be a substantive change in the product like assembly new kind of paint or a crucial part since the beginning of the trade war a lot of goods made in china have been shipped from sapient nam or other southeast asian countries entering the u._s. via transshipments mary lovely and a communist and fellow at the peterson institute says industries like footwear toys and steal can use transshipment but others can't like industries that have to be certified so called life and death industries artificial knees any kind of medical products that are made in china those that whole supply chain is certified by u._s. regulators you can't all of a sudden just say oh i happen to get any from someplace else that leaves those industries with no option but to pay those terrorists or move their production elsewhere altogether america bears from

President Trump Professor Dartmouth China Vietnam U._S. Peterson Institute Japan Jinping Emily Blanchard Michael Moore George Washington University America
"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get in the management of big corporations? They work for democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders plans to weigh in on this issue from the lion's den today. He said to speak at the annual WalMart shareholders meeting in Arkansas. Marketplace's Erica Barra says more on shareholder meetings as campaign venue. We're used to seeing candidates at town halls and state fairs, but the shareholder meetings of a publicly traded company, I think this is very unusual. That's greenfield professor at Boston College law school, who researches corporate governance is rare because usually people think that the operation of businesses occurs, this black box really is immune to political or social pressure. And I think that's changing because says greenfield, there's a lot of interest in corporate governance wages benefits docked by backs factory moves. But candidates may not wanna speak at structure time controlled events like a shareholder meeting says political advisor Alex Fogel and corporations might not want the tension and scrutiny. I don't think there's anything positive for any company to have presidential candidates, come and address their shareholder meetings, and those meetings, they aren't as easy to get into a say a parade or a state fair. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. As a developing country. India enjoyed a special trade relationship with the US lower or no tariffs on many products. That is until today. The Trump administration says India has given the US quote equitable and reasonable access to its market and the US is ending preferential market access my marketplace colleague, the BBC's, John is in London high anew. Hi, david. This is about terrorists, but also about whether India is defined as a developing economy. What's really going? On here. Well, I would say, look we are developing economies. And so we need to be a little protectionist, but you're quite right that from President Trump's point of view. This is not a level playing field. So you've had Indian products like imitation jewellery, leather products building materials food coming into the US tariff free, but then American goods like motorcycles and whiskey have faced high tariffs. So from President Trump's point of view this growing market needs to increase access for American manufacturers. So moving away from the tariff-free relationship with India, you think that'll put enough pressure on Indian prime minister Modi to make some changes to deal, and maybe meet some of the US's demands, it's unlikely to have much of an impact if you look at the net tariff advantage that India's had from being under this tariff-free status. It only adds up to about estimated two hundred sixty million dollars according to experts in Delhi. So the impact. Is pretty negligible. Now it's early days for president, the after the election results in late may. So it's hard to say, but so far he has not retaliated against the US with tariffs, and he also has caved in all right? My marketplace, calling.

US India Bernie Sanders President Trump Trump administration Erica Barra Arkansas Modi greenfield WalMart president Eric embarrass political advisor Boston College law school Alex Fogel professor david Delhi BBC prime minister
People in their 20s are injecting face fillers to look like their selfie filters

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:24 min | 3 years ago

People in their 20s are injecting face fillers to look like their selfie filters

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash MBA. People in their twenties and thirties are getting injections to look more like their selfie filters from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. Selby's are an art form on social media. But some young people aren't happy with just a Snapchat or Instagram filter. They want the lip cheek and forehead injections. So that their real life faces match the doctor itself fees. The American Academy of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery says there's been a twenty percent increase in botox injections among eighteen to thirty seven year olds in the last five years. Marketplace reporter, Eric embarrassed, it's reporting on this recently. And she told me that the makers of injectable fillers which smooth out the lines on your face like a photo filter. Does are starting to spend a lot more money on social media marketing, our Gan, which is the company that makes boat talks makes Juve Dharam does cool sculpting. That's where they're paying influencers to do a lot of the work. So people are on Instagram anyway, looking at other people's faces all the time. And then they're seeing people that they might follow women that they might look up to. And they're seeing that they also were are actually, you know, talking. About these things, you know, they're like hash tagging Sunday afternoon. Hashtag tocks hashtag filter. Hashtag fillers. You know, the whole thing. Yeah. Tell me more specifically about what people are getting done like what specific procedures than what are people trying to look like. So the most basic thing that most people are getting done is just getting, you know, likable talks injection that kind of freezes your face and kind of makes you look relaxed. But then after that there's a lot of small spas that have opened up that are offering things like institute, which is some stuff that you can get put in your cheeks that give you like sort of a higher cheekbone. You can get your lips done and make them a little bit plumper a lot plumper. There's all kinds of stuff that you can get done. I understand that one woman told you she really has heard of people asking to look more like the filters that they have seen on social media. Right. Yeah. So one woman I spoke with who's Twenty-seven-year-old in Rhode Island. And she says she just gets her lips done. She gets imbo both talks. But it's pretty like normalized amongst her group of friends, and she has a couple. They get a little shot of Duve Derm in the tip of their nose. It makes them look a little bit like that Snapchat filter, and I just thought that was kind of fascinating like the idea that you wanna look like what your online reflection looks like do you have a sense of whether any of the doctors are ethically conflicted about this. Do they resist it at all? Yeah. So I did talk to one doctor who actually is the head of one of the plastic surgery. National plastic surgery associations in Memphis, and he refuses to give anyone any kind of injectable or bow talks unless they medically need it or if they're under a certain age. So he's adamant lead not doing it. But at the same time, he knows that there's like clinics just right up the street that you can just walk into. I think the big part of it is is that because you know, it's it's an elective procedure. It's a lot of money. And so you're budgeting thousand or two thousand a year, you know, it can be hard to say no to that. Erica barris is a reporter with marketplace. Last year. Researchers at the Boston University school of medicine Warren. About what they called Snapchat, Dismore FIA and said, it could lead to body Dismore fic- disorder, a mental illness that causes people to obsess about their imagined defects. And now for some related links head over to our website. Marketplace tech dot org for a link to a longer story that Erica did about this four marketplace and more stories about Snapchat, Dismore, Fiat, and how it has plastic surgeons worry earlier this year doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital published a guide for cosmetic practitioners to help them figure out when they're dealing with someone who is beyond normal discontent with their appearance and onto the obsessive compulsive spectrum that is body this Morphing disorder their research that as many as thirteen percent of people seeking cosmetic surgery have the disorder and in a fun. Fact, I learned that dissatisfaction with your appearance is so common in basically, everyone that researchers call it quote normative discontent. There is a hopeful story from Taylor Laurenz over at the Atlantic though from just a couple of weeks ago about how even though those twenty and thirty somethings or getting the nose injections, look more like their filters. The next generation. Of influencers is actually rejecting the carefully edited super stylized aesthetic, and they're going for a quote, Messier and more unfiltered vibe, the story quotes, a fifteen year old influencers who says that avocado toast and posts on the beach are generic and played out and that it's not cool anymore to be manufactured. So maybe the children really are our future. Unless allergen comes calling with the big check. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM.

ALI Reporter University Of Florida Warringt Erica Barris Snapchat Selby America Duve Derm American Academy Eric Embarrassed Rhode Island Dismore Fia Messier Boston University School Of Me Memphis Taylor Laurenz Massachusetts General Hospital Fiat
"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This morning's jobs reports will cover February after a strong January on average two hundred thirty thousand more people have been getting onto payrolls each month as marketplace's Mitchell Hartman reports among those seeing gains people in their prime working years. People aged twenty five to fifty four are in their prime earning and career building years now as massive layoffs swept the economy in the great recession their participation in the labor force plummeted. Says Elise schooled at the Economic Policy Institute and many people thought that they were. Are going to be these permanently sideline workers that would never make their way back. But as the economy recovered prime age workers did start coming back and since August with unemployment at or below four percent and labor shortages spreading their participation has spiked back to near pre recession levels rising wages have been enticing. These sidelined workers back in Michael strain. At the American Enterprise Institute says employers are changing some of their hiring practices. Businesses are less likely to require drug tests for marijuana use. For example, there are hiring more people with a criminal record or a disability as well. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. And we have a new jobs report page find out about the latest jobs data this morning and learn how those numbers are calculated consult, marketplace dot ORG. Which salaried workers are eligible to get paid overtime. Now. There's an ongoing debate about what the salary cut off should be the Labor Department has just proposed moving at higher. Marketplace's Erica barris is on the story today. Erica what's the current rule? The current rules say workers who make less than twenty four thousand dollars have to be paid extra for overtime. This proposal would be stats at thirty five thousand that that would cover just over a million workers in industries like retail fast, food, nonprofits. So if this rule goes through a salaried assistant manager who gets paid say thirty thousand dollars would make time and a half or working more than forty hours a week or their bosses could increase their salary to get over the cap, but I remember covering this during the Obama administration. I think Yep. That's right in two thousand sixteen President Obama had a similar proposal, but for a higher amount about forty eight thousand dollars, and that one was pegged to inflation that was halted by a federal judge before it went into effect. Ruling the White House didn't have authority for such a big increase. Our give us a sense of the timeframe. So this is just a proposal subject to a sixty day comment, period. And then a final version would be written and sent to the office of management and budget for approval so sometime Eric embarrass. Thank you. Let's do the numbers. Dow.

Mitchell Hartman Erica barris Economic Policy Institute American Enterprise Institute Labor Department Elise Obama marijuana Obama administration Dow assistant manager Michael Eric White House President forty eight thousand dollars twenty four thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars four percent forty hours
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

"A win win, and it gives Amazon a chance to grow its already sizeable several billion dollar a year at business. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. At some point the shutdown is going to end. And when it does there's gonna be some pent up demand. Let loose in this economy, including on Wall Street with the securities and Exchange Commission, not being fully staffed has been initial public offerings just aren't being offered. But when they do start up again, the Wall Street Journal reports slack the workplace messaging service is going to be right there in line, but instead of issuing its doc through traditional IBO slack said to be considering something called a direct listing. Instead marketplace's Eric embarrass explains. What a. Listing is and why a company might wanna do one. Usually when a company is about to make a stock exchange debut with a traditional IPO. There's a whole bunch of people involved investment bankers analysts, and it cost the company a lot of money, Kathleen wise, Hanley finance professor at Lehigh university by using and underwritten process, the underwriter can often get information about how much the securities will be priced and it can reduce the amount of volatility that occurs in the first trading day, then there's a direct listing when a company bypasses the whole process and starts trading. Existing shares. It can be risky without established investor is built into the offering their more exposed to Bala Tilleke. Plus, no company wants to have to go through the education process of doing something for the first time and getting investors used to it J Ritter finance professor at the university of Florida says, although it's unusual for large companies to do it direct listing. Spotify did that, and it's widely viewed as quite successfully. And that's opened it up for companies like slacked, try a direct listing building on their cash infusion an established brands all without paying fees to investment banks and getting a quicker sense of the true market value of the company Joseph grind fast teaches corporate governance at Stanford law school and is a former Commissioner at the SEC. He says if Iraq's offerings become more common. And I think we may actually see a major seachange in the relationship between swing companies and traditional investment banks, and that could be the latest tech disruption. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. Speaking of stocks, by the way, you could say the markets have been facing a lot of this my favorite five syllable word, right all together. Now Vall a till T. We call it the good people at merriam Webster and get this. The number of searches for volatility was more than two hundred and fifty percent last year. You can read more about the history of that. Term at marketplace dot org. If you were following the Golden Globes coverage last.

Eric embarrass professor Wall Street Journal Bala Tilleke Amazon Exchange Commission IBO merriam Webster Golden Globes Kathleen wise Lehigh university Spotify Stanford law school Iraq J Ritter Commissioner SEC university of Florida
"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"eric embarrass" Discussed on KCRW

"Numbers oil is trading up this morning up three point two percent with a barrel. Brent crude going for fifty five fifty three dollars a barrel. SNP Dow and NASDAQ are all down this morning between two and four tenths of a percent. Twenty eighteen was a record year for movie ticket sales. But over the holidays, some movie goers, skipped the theater and only went as far as the couch to catch the latest release according to net flicks. At least forty five million people watched its new horror film bird box, or at least watched most of the way through it. Marketplace's Eric embarrass has more on how well the company is doing at luring viewers and talent from the theaters to find out how much damage Netflix may be doing to Hollywood's box office. I called Robert Thompson, he teaches media studies at Syracuse university when I reached him I was watching bird box lattes of is on Netflix. But it's hard to know, exactly. How many people are watching because that's releases its own data. Unlike TV, which uses measurements from Nielsen and other companies to reach advertisers media analyst will craft says necklaces numbers have a different audience. They're able to tell a different story and have a different narrative to bring back to Walsh. Street and says Kevin Sandler media, professor at Arizona State University. Streaming is good for the box office people who watch films on platforms like Netflix, actually will go to the movies more. Netflix has been producing all kinds of content. Robert Thompson says that's so it can get lots of subscribers a and b keep those subscribers because with Warner apple man's isn't he getting into streaming. That market.

Netflix Robert Thompson Brent Eric embarrass media analyst Nielsen Syracuse university Kevin Sandler Warner apple Arizona State University Walsh Hollywood professor fifty five fifty three dollars two percent
Amazon Makes HQ2 Decision, Snubs Pittsburgh

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:03 min | 3 years ago

Amazon Makes HQ2 Decision, Snubs Pittsburgh

"We're going to go back to the Amazon H Q two palooza here for a minute. And talk about one of the cities that didn't make it to the big dance. You know, one of the cities that spent all that money and all those hours gathering all that data to put together a pitch that as we learned today officially went nowhere or did it from W E essay in Pittsburgh, one of Amazon's top twenty by the way, but not one of its top to marketplace's Eric embarrassed takes a look at what might be the real payoff. Am with Pittsburgh city councilwoman, Deborah grows. Then we're driving through what's known as robotics row. Apple. Facebook. An Uber are just a few of the big names in this fifteen block stretch close to downtown Pittsburgh. There's probably not a place where this many technology innovators in competition with each other our next door. Neighbors all those companies have taken up residents in the past decade or so transforming empty warehouses into offices in laps. The city didn't have to do much to court them. They came to take advantage of the area's highly skilled labor force. And bro says not much improved since the company's showed up. There's not even sidewalk space. So there's no pedestrian infrastructure. There's no safety infrastructure. There were no street lights Amazon has an office here too. But when the company announced it was looking for a second headquarters, Pittsburgh realized it was going to take a lot to learn Amazon a second time so more than four hundred people from government business in higher Ed along with a team of highly paid consultants studied every aspect of the region to prepare the three hundred page proposal for H Q to if it takes a catalyst like that to bring people together in a room to really assess what our needs are what are social needs. Are what our infrastructure needs are and how we can do better to meet them. That's not a bad thing. What did they learn the city schools? Not that great the transportation system hard to get from here to there. And when it comes to ethnic diversity the region is lacking David Rupert. Burger with the Pittsburgh reasonable alliance. Worked on the proposal we've recognized that the odds for long, but we also recognized early on that there was going to be benefit to this regardless of whether we are selected or not, and we feel like we've already won one because Pittsburgh now has a detailed and data rich profile of itself that it can use to drive improvement and since making it onto Amazon shortlist of finalists other companies have come calling, but I would call mini Amazon's like affirm a financial tech company that said last month that will set up a big office in Pittsburgh. There was also this by connection free to Seattle. It's the real deal. Pittsburgh get from the steel city to the emerald city in just a few hours on a new nonstop flight. Pittsburgh was already in line for the flight, but Christina because it's hostess CEO at the Pittsburgh airport set. The timing looked good nonetheless and made it easier to court other airlines and flights Amazon gave us a great platform. Say see look, we're in contention for this and. And that was really that was a fantastic Colin card for us as some cities have learned. Sometimes just being a contender is enough. Let's go back to the nineties. United Airlines was looking to build a new maintenance facility that would create five thousand jobs the finalists were Indianapolis and Oklahoma City when Indianapolis one Oklahoma City pressed United to reveal why former mayor Mick cornet. So they finally disclosed that they had sent in some mid level executives and their spouses and ask them to spend a weekend in Oklahoma City and report back to the board of directors and Chicago. And when the board looked at that report, they just decided they couldn't imagine their employees living there. It was hard to hear. But it spurred the city to improve its downtown and outdoor space with hotels and restaurants and bring in sports teams, and those changes attracted new companies cornet says the United facility was the best thing that that didn't happen years from now some cities maybe saying. The same thing about Amazon H Q, two infants Berg. I'm Eric embarrassed for marketplace.

Pittsburgh Amazon Oklahoma City Eric Deborah Facebook David Rupert BRO Apple Seattle Mick Cornet United Airlines Colin Chicago Indianapolis CEO Christina
Apple CEO Condemns ‘Data-Industrial Complex’

Marketplace

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Apple CEO Condemns ‘Data-Industrial Complex’

"Is going to be brewing. Lots as cappuccinos and americanos at it's ninety two hundred stores by the holidays, so from W ESA in Pittsburgh. Marketplace's Eric embarrass has the pivot to coffee Dunkin franchises have had to put in a lot of work in the company's pivot to fancier coffee Dunkin already makes Expresso Bresso drinks. But makes opponents had to train and -ployees at forty nine Dunkin restaurants in the. The Pittsburgh area. It's a blend drinks and steam milk with new Swiss Espresso machines. It hasn't been as difficult as it would seem and mainly because for the most part, we're just really changing a couple of steps in the process earlier this year, the company invested one hundred million dollars into its business much of that improving Espresso drinks says Scott Murphy chief operating officer at Dunkin and I'd say our franchisees are actually investing even more than that number hafi already accounts for more than fifty percent of sales at some Dunkin locations Spencer an analyst who follows the coffee industry says Duncan is going for an even bigger piece of the growing coffee business Duncan has always been viewed as kind of the every day every man's coffee where Starbucks has been viewed more of an upscale destination as Dunkin prepares to take on Starbucks step. One was dropping the word doughnuts from its name says Peter boat right at Carnegie Mellon. You're still gonna sell donuts. But this allows them to emphasize. Cise a new direction for a new era Dunkin has a lot of room to grow it recorded eight hundred sixty million dollars in sales last year Laos Starbucks reported twenty two billion I'm Erica Harris for marketplace on Wall Street today, which seems very very far from those bombs and bomb scares on the east coast it was bad. But let me say this again, it was normal. We'll have the details when we do the numbers.

Dunkin Dunkin Franchises Starbucks Pittsburgh Swiss Espresso Erica Harris Duncan Eric Embarrass Scott Murphy Carnegie Mellon Chief Operating Officer Expresso Bresso Peter Analyst Spencer Eight Hundred Sixty Million Do One Hundred Million Dollars Fifty Percent Milk