6 Burst results for "Eric Clayton"

"eric clayton" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

05:03 min | 5 months ago

"eric clayton" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Thank you thank you for having me. It's great to be here how you doing today. Doing well bit tired. you know. But i'm doing good. Yes they yes you have quite a thriving business by the sounds of things and i'm really looking forward to talking about that with you today so i think first of all. Can you tell us a little bit about pretty well. Bt and about what you do. And then i really wanna get stuck into the sustainability story with you. Sure so yeah. Pretty what beauty at multibrand conscious beauty and wellness marketplace that. I launched a little over two years ago based here in new york city but we are global or getting there we shipped to canada into the uk as well as throughout the us and we launched. We launched with twelve brands. Now we have a little over thirty ranging in skin care. Makeup haircare bath and body products his products. A whole lot of it all. So yeah. i'm really excited about you. Know what i'm building and just sort of where it's going and i'm really excited about a lot of the brands. I just started taking on. Of course you know. The brands carry including one of your graduates. Lawrence buys so ya. Eric clayton fulsome so obviously in a clean piece is very important but so is sustainability..

new york city canada uk us Eric clayton Lawrence
"eric clayton" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

Green Beauty Conversations

05:03 min | 5 months ago

"eric clayton" Discussed on Green Beauty Conversations

"Thank you thank you for having me. It's great to be here how you doing today. Doing well bit tired. you know. But i'm doing good. Yes they yes you have quite a thriving business by the sounds of things and i'm really looking forward to talking about that with you today so i think first of all. Can you tell us a little bit about pretty well. Bt and about what you do. And then i really wanna get stuck into the sustainability story with you. Sure so yeah. Pretty what beauty at multibrand conscious beauty and wellness marketplace that. I launched a little over two years ago based here in new york city but we are global or getting there we shipped to canada into the uk as well as throughout the us and we launched. We launched with twelve brands. Now we have a little over thirty ranging in skin care. Makeup haircare bath and body products his products. A whole lot of it all. So yeah. i'm really excited about you. Know what i'm building and just sort of where it's going and i'm really excited about a lot of the brands. I just started taking on. Of course you know. The brands carry including one of your graduates. Lawrence buys so ya. Eric clayton fulsome so obviously in a clean piece is very important but so is sustainability..

new york city canada uk us Eric clayton Lawrence
Should Beauty Retailers Boycott Unsustainable Brands?

Green Beauty Conversations

02:15 min | 5 months ago

Should Beauty Retailers Boycott Unsustainable Brands?

"So i think first of all. Can you tell us a little bit about pretty well. Bt and about what you do. And then i really wanna get stuck into the sustainability story with you. Sure so yeah. Pretty what beauty at multibrand conscious beauty and wellness marketplace that. I launched a little over two years ago based here in new york city but we are global or getting there we shipped to canada into the uk as well as throughout the us and we launched. We launched with twelve brands. Now we have a little over thirty ranging in skin care. Makeup haircare bath and body products his products. A whole lot of it all. So yeah. i'm really excited about you. Know what i'm building and just sort of where it's going and i'm really excited about a lot of the brands. I just started taking on. Of course you know. The brands carry including one of your graduates. Lawrence buys so ya. Eric clayton fulsome so obviously in a clean piece is very important but so is sustainability. So can you tell me a little bit about first of all. Wise sustainability is one of your core pillars of what you're trying to achieve with that. Well i think it really just kind of goes back to the whole concept and understanding that without sustainability practices in place. We may not have a place for our future. Children and grandchildren to be able to live and be able to thrive so way thinking about how improve our lives in more circular way in eliminate overharvesting. Waste is something that i'm very very passionate about and so of course because this is something that's very passionate about you know in my personal life it's gonna bleed over into my business because my business was born out of my own need and necessity to define beauty products that spoke to my ideals and standards for clean 'em sustainability so. Yeah it's very important that something that we speak quite a bit about what. i'm betting. the brands pretty won't even something that's sort of a continuous conversation. How not only myself. But also the brands themselves can continue to improve in. Push the envelope in that conversation lowered so that they can continue their mission of

Eric Clayton New York City Canada Lawrence UK United States
"eric clayton" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"eric clayton" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Sally is executive director New Mexico Activities Association. Talk about high school sports. Sports include cheerleading and all those kind of things. And when can the students play? If it all this? You joining us now is the musical director for the CIA's singers. Aaron How? Aaron, Always Nice to have you on Welcome back. Well, thank you for having me. All right. You guys are going to do like everybody else, something different. You're going to do a performance, but you're going to do it via YouTube. Yes. You know, a lot, of course, is that have decided to continue through the pandemic have had Tonto create and transmit their music, uh through social media or through online video of some sort and a YouTube premiere is a really great way to do that. You can record your concert. And then set up a time when it premieres and invite everybody to show up at that time, and you can all watch it together. That's how we're going to do this one. All right, and when is going to want to go on a roll? It's going to roll of this Saturday, January 23rd at seven PM and really easy to find it. You just find the CIA singers YouTube page. And if you look a look through the list of videos very well, have it there. You can. Even set yourself a little reminder on two to go there on on Saturday. Who are disease. Singer's gonna give us the thumbnail. Azia singers is an all female coral ensemble that has been singing in Santa Fe for 27 years. They do every kind of music from from from very serious. Serious and powerful classical protect music to very fun and exciting, You know, show tunes they they just run the gamut. They're really great with lots of different styles. And they are a really great bunch of women. Run the age from the twenties to the eighties. Still Yeah, Yeah, yes, for sure, And you know, now nowadays, everybody's yet that's in the chorus is rehearsing from home, so it's a little bit easier. You don't have to drive around in the snow to get to rehearsal or anything like that. But it's AH, It's yes, a diverse age group of women, but all of them have a wonderful story to tell and very powerful and excited about singing and They're sharing their art with the world, all right, as the director Tell me how this works because it's impossible. Maybe you have a magical magic wand. You could make this work. If you try in thing a group tried to sing on Zoom is it's impossible. You cannot do music because of the delay. Have you found a way around that? Yeah, and it zbig of Ah It's a bit of an unsatisfactory experience to have to do it this way. But it's effective. And then then what you're able to produce that the end is feels really good. And you feel really proud of what you've done so We do you zoom. Um And what happens is that I basically mute everybody, So I feel he's the faces looking at me. And then I play piano. I sing and or or maybe my, I turned my mute myself and have my accompanist. Play the piano, and we basically just sing along with the one person that is making music so we don't actually really ever hear each other until we get to, um, the end and so the way that works is East Zia, Singer records themselves singing their part, right, and then I take all those the audio mix it together. I take all their videos and creative video out of it. All right. So you did have a magic one because it's impossible to try and have people saying Online and be synchronized. So the music this Saturday the YouTube disease singers is gonna be the music of who or what? Okay, So this particular concert is with some of the music that we were planning on doing back in May of 2020, But you know, the horror, great, horrible happened, And so we had to suspend that, but we really wanted to make sure we did. Some of the music because it was for us it was, you know, important to celebrate. 2020 is the 100 year anniversary. The suffering of the yes of the 19th amendment. Women got got their right to vote and So we have some music plan to celebrate specific women with this cool song cycle called unsung. Eric Clayton Burns is a really great composer who was really good with lots of different kinds of styles, pop styles and and theater self, and he wanted to pay homage to some women that he was. You know, just crazy about just thought they were so you know, important, too remarkable an amazing what they had done, And so he selected six different women, and he wrote a song about them. On Daz. Six different styles. A lot of them. These women you would know, like Susan B. Anthony, which you know if it's 100 Year anniversary, But then also Katherine Johnson, who was in that movie, hidden figures, or the movie was made about her life. Um and, uh, someone that I didn't know until I started. This was Queen Liliuokalani, who was the left monarch of Hawaii on him, and she is a fascinating story and it's It's really kind of cool idea. I didn't know about it, and now I know about it, so that's Really great. Of course. Billie Jean King and the are wonderful mother who passed Ruth Vader Ginsburg. So it Z well known women, at least from most people's perspective, But it gives you a little bit more of Ah. You know, just a fun musical way to celebrate them. The entire show runs about how long Only about 40 minutes. I mean, you know these, you know, in life concerts, we would be talking between things and people will be shuffling on and shuffling off the risers and stuff so it takes longer. But you know this one. You just go sung this song to song and it's It's gonna be over in 40 minutes. Alright, people can donate certainly to disease singers. You guys can always use it. It'll be broadcast on YouTube..

YouTube CIA Aaron director New Mexico Activities Associat executive director Sally Santa Fe Billie Jean King Queen Liliuokalani Susan B. Anthony Eric Clayton Burns Hawaii Katherine Johnson Ruth Vader Ginsburg East Zia Singer
"eric clayton" Discussed on The Cross Walk with Dcn. Kevin Endres

The Cross Walk with Dcn. Kevin Endres

16:04 min | 3 years ago

"eric clayton" Discussed on The Cross Walk with Dcn. Kevin Endres

"That'd work slash app for for Android and ios devices. And this year, we've we've changed it. So that it there's an accompanying activity for each day of lent that really again brings that story to the next level. So so brings you deeper into the story of Koumba from young girl from Sierra Leone, you get to hear her voice or your grandmother's voice or you get to really take a look. Around it at what's happening in Syria. And what is it like to be in a school fees extra photos? So there's exclusive content there that that delves deeper into these stories and gives a fuller three sixty experience. And so so first full again, it's an opportunity to to to dive deep into the stories of of communities all around the world. I and realized that we're probably a lot more similar than we are different. What one of the things that in the last couple of years, I've really enjoyed and as a family, and then listeners who have young kids, the the Lenten recipes are really a great way to really enter into land in the right in the whole rice bowl experience. Because you know, let's be honest here in the United States, even though we're Lenten fast on Friday. It's like, okay, I'm not going to get the the prime rib today. But maybe I'll just go with the lobster tail. Instead, you know it. Yeah. There's there's something about, you know, eating not eating meat. But then there's something else about you know, it really entering into the lives of these other communities around the world on what they're really eating on a day-to-day basis to just it. It just kinda hits home, you know, just to not only to connect with them like again solidarity. But really to kind of put it in perspective of how blessed we are here. Most of us in the in the meals that we have on a daily basis. So we we've really kinda taken to tonight, and I encouraged the listeners. Go to the website CRS rice bowl dot org, and they have a tab for lenton recipes, and I got to say, you know, the the the photography that that you guys have really these even though they're very simple meals. They look absolutely fantastic. And even and even in even went to the next step. You know, it's even just like a lot of the cooking apps now where you've got videos that step by step on how to prepare these meals. So again, I I encourage anybody with anybody that's listening, but you know, especially with the kids just as teaching lesson not only to to observe the Lenten fast. But then also again to really dive into the whole rice bowl experience. And and see how other people around the world are eating on a on a daily basis, I'm thinking Kevin thanks for tuning in today to the crosswalk here on the Radio Net move. My guest is Eric Clayton. He's with C R S. We're talking about the rice bowl with lent coming up. We're gonna take a quick break. And when we come back we're going to hear about a story. They actually. Eric's in his experience working in some of the communities overseas. So stay tuned. Volunteers have been the backbone of Virga radio even before we went on the air over ten years ago. If you like to find out how to use your time and Callen who spread the gospel. Give us a call at eight four four two three eight eight five zero eight. Welcome back to the crosswalk with your host deacon. Kevin welcome back to the crosswalk here on the radio network. I'm beacon Kevin under sinks for joining us here. Hopefully, if you're in your car, you're driving safe around in the in the winter weather, if you're bundled up in warm and listening to us on the radio or online through our website burger radio dot com, again, it's always a pleasure that you've join me this afternoon. My guest is Eric Clayton in Eric is a senior program officer in the new mission mobilization division of Sierras. And we're talking about the rice bowl Eric have. You had any experiences yourself with the communities that benefit from the Sierras rice bowl overseas. Yeah. I one of the great kind of privileges of my role as I am able to go to these places go to every year one of the stories that you'll read on the surface baseball. I get to take part in that trip. Where we go and get the photos and meet the people and get the stories and last April. In Sierra, Leone and destroy. You'll read on a serious pool dot org is about a young girl named Koumba who is a student in one of our one of our schools schools that we work with we're fighting school lunches for her and other students like her and that enables students to really focus in on their studies and not on their hunger because sometimes students in Kouba situation in these small villages kind of outside of, you know, main cities in Sierra Leone. They don't have a reliable source of food. They, you know, their families struggle to put food on the tables. And so, you know, getting them to school is hard enough, but they didn't into school to focus really and learn can be a real challenge. And so we we've found that if you provide these school lunches at both incentivizes students to come to school, and it also helps them to really focus once they're there. But the story that I think really impacted me you can read about Koumba on the website, and it's a wonderful story. And she was a really bright young young woman. But her grandmother really really impacted me. I, and I'll tell you why she this was a woman that we met who who when we were talking to her, and we're talking about our, grandchildren. And you know, she she said, you know, I I didn't go to school at all. I is a young person. I was one of twelve twelve siblings. You know, school wasn't in the cards for my siblings and school was especially not in the cards for for for me as a woman, she said, and and so, you know, she works on the family farm, she sold goods in the streets. And she she married young. And she sees now and articulates. I mean, I mean, speak the same language, which you could just see the passion in her eyes. And then the way the translator was sharing. Her words, you know, she knows the value of education, and she she regrets that she was not able to get an education yourself, but is determined to ensure that her children her grandchildren, particularly her her daughters and granddaughters get that education. And so we followed her every day, you know, we're there for about a week, and we wake up at you know, crack, Don. And she's up, you know, stooped over up, you know, pot starting the fire getting breakfast started encouraging all these children to her granddaughter's her daughters to wake up to get breakfast going. She gets the family prepared. She gets the family off to school. And then she walks to this rather large for a single person. I think rather large Bitta land where she's responsible for, you know, for gardening for tending all these these plants and the sun is beating down. I'm sweating you hold the camera sweating and she's out there meticulously watering every single every single plant all these squash. And and and other corner other kinds of of food she then would pick and sell and just was amazed by this woman who who knows you know, which she didn't have who knows the value of education. And again, that's that's not a hundred percent widespread in in in Philly own in countries all around the world, right? We sometimes still to convince you know, parents that that education is important, and we have to convince especially in some places that education of women is important. But. This this grandmother, she screamed Wifa she she knew it and her very being. And I think my favorite moment was we were sitting with her. And she says after you know, telling us how important how she's she's gonna do whatever she needs to do to get her granddaughter's her daughters through through school through university. She says and today the very day that we were interviewing her. She says today, my daughter my youngest daughter is sitting for the college exam. She goes, and she is going to make it she's gonna she's gonna pass it exam. She's going to go to college and Freetown. And we're like what a great thing that this woman who who knows you know, what what she may have missed in life. She wants to give to her to her daughters. And who doesn't what parent can't relate with that? Right. What? Grandparents can't relate with that that, you know, I've learned my lessons in life, and I don't want my children, my grandchildren to make those mistakes. I want let's good for them. I want I want to even better for them. What's best for them? And I just I always come back to her as I think about that trip. And this is almost a year ago now, but. You know, I just I think about her the vibrancy of her person just just easy to laugh easy to smile, but just determined to do what was going to be best for her family and the young girls that she was responsible for. I was amazing amazing. And these are the kinds of these are the kinds of people that we meet all the time in our in our programs and Cirrus rice Bill in in general. You know, I I always think about you know, when you have that everyone wants to have a matching gift, right? When you give money I wanna have my gift matched, which is which is good. You know? But when you have someone like she's matching everything one hundred and twenty percent, you know, I it just that little bit whatever we're able to do to support her, you know, through our partners, you know, in Sierra Leone. She is, you know, coming back, you know, just fierce to get to get it done to to take. What what would whatever is necessary to to to to advance her her daughters in her granddaughters in their in their lives? They're just incredible incredible person. You know, I think if. There's a really good point that that story makes again, it's hard. I think here just with the news media and stories we hear and just our political culture in the United States. You know, that we maybe we get a little bit calloused to giving money to help other people thinking that while they're just sitting there waiting for these cardboard boxes of money to show up. So that they can then go buy food the reality of it is that these people are working hard for the betterment of their whole community, not just their family, but their whole community there just in circumstances in communities where they don't have what what we have. It's not that they're that. They're just sitting around waiting for a handout that they're partnering with Sierras rice bowl to make better lives for for other people, which is you know, like like in this situation, you know, she's not taking the Sierras rice bowl. So that she could not go work in the fields. And just. Sit around all day, she's taking that money to supplement. What how hard she's working to give better life to her children. Absolutely. I give another example I was in Haiti two years ago. If you if you remember if you listen to us, remember, the story of Andrea from Haiti from from last year seeress rice bowl, and I met her in on, you know, there's so many so many details in so many just wonderful little tidbits from these stories that we aren't always able to relate in our materials. But I one of the things that really struck me about Andrea was, you know, here's a here's a young woman teacher who who who had left her community going in education, and then came back because she was passionate about education and passionate about teaching the next generation of patients, and so passionate, this is the detail that she was giving a room and board two other teachers volunteer teachers, I don't know. I don't know if they're volunteer to other teachers at the school, she was giving room and board to these two of the teachers at the school. So that the that the school that she was working at would have the right amount of teachers with the right skill sets. That could come and educate the students, you know, and those kind of little details. They're they're everywhere. All these these these communities that were were working in that were serving and working with, you know, these these these are people that are just are giving so much of themselves in working so hard. This is you know, you and I work hard to to to see their their communities to see their families through their countries move forward in advance and just jump back to Sierra Leone. You know, things, you know, terrible things happen. You know, a civil war there. The Abol crisis was not so long ago, and and they had a terrible mudslide that deadly mudslide in the capital city. But these are these are resilient communities that that, you know, these these things happen terrible things happen. But, but you know, we need to build a better, you know, build a better future. You know, again, I think that that is a great point to make here in just, you know, for the listener for all of us just to keep an open mind that you know, we're we're called to give in not to judge in our giving and not to judge those that are. Receiving, but we are called to give in when we give again got promises us that you know, he will return those blessings upon us tenfold, so or a hundred fold whatever whatever it may be. And so here we are coming into lent. You know, we're called to to give alms into fast and one of the great ways that we can do that one of the the great traditions here in the United States is through is through the rice bowl program, Eric if if somebody the listener wants to get involved with the Sierras rice bowl or wants to support it what what's the best way that they can go about that the best way to beat would be to make sure you have Sierras rice bowl for your fear family. So you can go to serious rice bull dot org and on the website. You'll find everything you need. There's a spot up on the top right order free materials, and all of our materials are free either to to order to have delivered to your parish to your school to your home or to download so make sure that if you're responsible for parish or or for. School that you order enough serious rice bowls for every family and this year for the first time, if you're a family that that just wants to order, you know, one rice bowl for for your for your family. You can do that again on our order page. Just go down as there's a there's an option to select one rice. So get the materials and use them use them through lent. Let them company you're you're letting journey and and and inspire your prayer your fasting and your alms giving when you're on the website. I would also recommend that you sign up for our emails. So that you're going to get those weekly reminders to prayer reminders to to reflect on these stories reminders to return to these these do stories of global solidarity. And then of course, I I would ask you to consider donating to consider giving to serious rice, you either, you know, at the beginning, or as your as your processing has your journeying through lent. You know, those different opportunities to truly put those letting alms into action in encourage you to go from their website or you can go on your phone to your app store in and in download the app and in us. That as kind of one of your guides. Kind of Lee new through through one of those spiritual guides and kind of keeping in touch with what's going on. So again encouraged listeners here, we are we're coming into length in in what a great way to really not just give something up. You know, like a lot of people. Traditionally do this is a great way to do something extra. And so as we give something up, we take whatever, you know money. Maybe we would have spent on those things that we've given up, and we can just drop it in our court box. Even though each individually, maybe we don't think that all of our money is that great or that important, but added together collectively, you know, as as a faith community. Obviously, we can do great things. Just basically is there a said prior in the show that, you know, over the the course of CRS they've raised three hundred million dollars. So don't ever think that your your donations or your OEMs are too small that all gets put to work to help others all over the world. So. Yeah. So Eric, thanks again. For for coming on the show today talking about Sierra's NCRR's rice bowl specifically. We'll pray for you, just as we're pay for all of our listeners coming into lent that they can use that period of time to really draw closer into their relationship with Jesus. Great. Thank you didn't Kevin. It's been really good to talk with. And I will pray for you. And for all your listeners as they begin this this letting journey. Yeah. And again, the for more information, you can go to their website C R S rice bowl dot ORG, or you can go to your app store. Download the app as well. Thanks again for tuning into the crosswalk today growing in our relationship with Jesus is a lifelong journey, but every begins with the first step. I will pray for you today that you have the courage to pick up your cross and follow him on deacon, Kevin Andrews may God bless your week. Thanks for listening to the crosswalk with deacon. Kevin. Join us again next week exclusively on Barra the radio.

Eric Clayton Kevin Andrews Sierra Leone Koumba United States Syria baseball Sierra Haiti Freetown Virga Andrea Callen Kouba
"eric clayton" Discussed on The Cross Walk with Dcn. Kevin Endres

The Cross Walk with Dcn. Kevin Endres

14:40 min | 3 years ago

"eric clayton" Discussed on The Cross Walk with Dcn. Kevin Endres

"The. Welcome. You're listening to the crosswalk with deacon Kevin Andrews a show about living life at the intersection of faith, family and vocations. And now your host Deakin Kevin good afternoon. Thanks for tuning into the crosswalk here today on the burger radio network. I'm your host deacon Kevin Andrews, and is probably the same view are if you're listening to us in northern Michigan. You are hoping that the weather. We are having coming into March is actually a lion. And so that this month is going to leave us like a lamb because I if you're like me, I'm done with the snow and ready for spring and with spring in the church will have a change of a logistical season. Here the week that this show airs March sixth Wednesday, March six is going to be asked Wednesday will be the kickoff to lend. And if you have grown up Catholic or have Ben Catholic for a long time, you are probably aware of the topic of our show today. It is synonymous with lent in that is the. The rice bowl, and my guest is air Clayton. Eric joined Catholic Relief Services in June of two thousand thirteen he is currently a senior program officer in the new mission and mobilization division. He provides strategic direction in near the framing for the agency's largest US based program CRS rice bowl as well. As manages a small content team during his time at Sierra s he has also supported university in young adult outreach efforts assisted in peace building in social cohesion documentation in launch an internal global podcast series. I am C R S which invited staff worldwide reflect on the value of mission and identity in international development work outside of Sierra s he has been a contributor to online faith-based blogs in journals, including busted, halo Sojourner 's in Catholic apostolate center as well as at Shoka change makers an NGO specializing in social entrepreneurship, he has managed the social media channel. For Maryknoll lay missioner's in his currently an adjunct professor in the department of mass communication at Townsend university air colds, a masters of arts of international media from American University in a bachelor of arts from Fairfield university, where he studied international studies in English creative writing his economic research explored the crossroads of storytelling peace building and faith after completing his undergraduate studies Eric served in Santa Cruz Bolivia with the sisters of Mary help of Christians teaching English and supporting community outreach initiatives. He currently lives with his wife daughter and pet hedgehog in Baltimore Maryland. Eric welcome to the crosswalk. Thanks, so good to be here. Yeah. So there's a couple there's a couple of things there in in your bio, social, cohesion documentation. Maybe just give us a quick explanation of that. And then in what is an NGO. I I'll answer that second question. I the a non-governmental organisation an NGO is an organization like. Catholic Relief Services. That's that's doing some sort of public good in the world supported by by donors, and and and other sources of of revenue so so social cohesion we say social cohesion. We're looking at those network within society that are holding people together, it's really sound Dacian to to building peace to having systems and structures in society that are just and that people can rely on and rely on one another to to move forward to to live a good and full life. One of the ways that Sierra does. It's one of the key ways. Sierra does this building on our faith based mission and identity is interreligious peace building. And so one of the things that I was involved. In was what's called the advancing in religious peacebuilding learning event, something to CS sponsored for a number of years bringing together our partners in our on our staff around the world to really reflect on what is the role of interreligious peaceful. Really that that faith-based peacebuilding what what role do different religious actors bring to the table when we're trying to build social. Cohesion. And so the role that I played was very simple. I just helped to to to film. Some some interviews and to take some photos and work on the final report that looked at this. And then one of the things that we're working on right now is part of our as as we're looking to see us in the future and new strategies in new directions social cohesion is gonna play really key role in how we how do our work. I have a continue to do our work. And so I'm I'm a part of the team that's thinking through how that how that might continue to play out. So it sounds like Sierras than really is. You is really utilizing cutting edge. Not only not only in technology, but means in ways and vehicles and platforms to reach people to do the work that they that they want to do which is really kind of a breath of fresh air because you know, you look at and we've talked about this in past shows with other guests that I've had that the churches made such strides in the last, you know, five ten years in really utilizing. Media and are to really reach the world, you know, the the people in in in whatever ways that they're their ministry takes takes them. And so I mean, just the the quality of production has just increased tremendously in. So it's great to hear that Sierras really kind of getting into that as well to increase the effectiveness of the ministry. Yeah. I would say that that the way we tell our stories and the way that we tell our stories that are at engages, you know, folks, all around the country around the world is really key. And that and that, you know, like, you said cutting edge technology leave a number of things with virtual reality. Those kind of three sixty goggles. We're looking at different ways to use augmented reality. So things that really helped people can break down those barriers build those bridges, and and help us build, you know, great empathy better understanding for for how people live in work in and you know, hope all around the world and yet dude newest technology new ways of sharing the stories is. Key to that effort, I'm digging. Kevin thanks for tune into the crosswalk today. My guest joining me by phone is air Clayton in Eric is part of Catholic Relief Services. He's a senior program officer in the new mission and mobilization division before we get into the rice bowl, Eric. Maybe let's just give the listener that might not be familiar with Catholic Relief Services. What they're all about. And all of the things they've done the history that they've had and really supporting the church shirt. So Catholic Relief Services, the international humanitarian aid in response agency of the US Catholic community. So we work in more than one hundred ten countries around the world and just last year. He doesn't eighteen we celebrated our seventy fifth anniversary. So we were formed in the wake of World War Two, and nineteen forty-three helping war survivors and refugees. And we're still doing that and many many more things today, you know, seventy five years later still working to to help refugees around the world. But also doing work in microfinance in peace Bill. Living in humanitarian response when there's a disaster man-made or natural. We're there on the ground making sure people have what they need to build back stronger to not just, you know, have that tarp that's going to help them get through the night. But really to begin to lay the groundwork for, you know, a future that's going to be sustainable, and they're gonna again like I said Bill Beck stronger beyond just immediate recovery. Yeah. It'd be you know, C R S is one of these China lights than the Catholic church that you know, we can hang our hat on the fact that the Catholic church is the one organization that feeds more people close more people educates more people, and cares for more people than any other organization in the world in in a big part of that is through the services that CRS provides throughout the entire tire world. Absolutely. I think what's what's important to remember is that, you know, because the Catholic church is everywhere. Right. That gives us the ability to reach people in places at otherwise forgotten otherwise, we would never even know on the map. You know, by working through those those local church structures, working with local church partners religious organizations, you know, sisters. You know, I it allows us to to know where the need is greatest and to get to that place and make sure people have what they need to really not just drive to really live full flourishing dignified lives. And that's what we're all about. So growing up Catholic in every lent during CCD class getting handed a cardboard box to take home in fill up. Maybe give the listener just a little bit of background on. How how did it all begin? How did the rice bowl come about in? What was the purpose originally so serious rice Bill is our Linton face in action programme, and this Lynch doesn't eighteen will be our forty fourth year, which is pretty cool. It's a, you know, a lot of we see a lot of folks that, you know, our our did it as a young person and now are doing it with their children with their grandchildren. You know, that nostalgia factor is is awesome. Because it really, you know, it's it's a it's a very. Sacramento, people is mean, something this people's faith in something they've done every year and something they want to use to pass the faith onto their children. So it started like I said four years ago, and it was actually a an ecumenical endeavor interface endeavor. There was a Protestant minister, a Catholic priest and a Jewish rabbi who who wanted to see if they could solve hunger work towards ending hunger in during the feminine in the African hell region. And so they said lent is is a time to do that. And and what tools do we have at hand. And so the the Catholic priest just began the dice is Valentine developed this the the rice bowl and the rice bowl was a way to to really literally. Take those prayers fast. You know, the villain prayers people's desire to fast and Muslim homes and turn them into lifesaving aid that had an impact on again, some of those poorest communities most vulnerable communities around the world, so it began focusing on on hunger and food insecurity in in Africa. It's hell region. And now as global, you know, now serious rice bowl supports a hundred different programs in about four or five different countries every year, and the stories that we tell that you get with your rice bowl, and the calendar are examples of exactly what those those kinds of stories are those kind of places where Lenten alms are really turning into lifesaving aid. So in the last forty just over forty years how much is rice bowl taken in. What what is the impact total impact of the money going out to programs? What what what kind of level? Are we talking about here? So it's about just under three hundred million dollars has been raised through serious race pool. And and that's gone that's quarter quarter and nickels and dimes at a time to that's that's a lot of a lot of these rice bowls are filled, you know, with chain especially from the children and things like that. But wow, that's that's that's awesome. Yeah. I mean, I always say if you want to put their their large bills and they're just blank check works in your rights. Yeah. No, absolutely. It's it's amazing to see what that's small amount of money can can do as you know, because you think about your family. All right. I'm sitting at the table. You know, today we're gonna put a quarter in dollar in whatever and land. Okay. We've raised twenty forty sixty eighty dollars. But that's just one family in one parish in the whole parishes involved. The whole parish comes together. And you see oh my gosh. Look all of these families that are coming to to our parish have raised all this money, all the families that are engaged in our school have have have done all this work. They're letting fasting. They're letting alms giving and now that goes that goes up, you know, what what is our diocese done. You know, I it's just amazing the impact when you again, we were talking about earlier, you see that ripple effect of the Catholic church being able to really mobilize people to to to massive amounts of good that that has this huge impact. And I would also just add that that well the money. I described went overseas as as probably longtime fans of serious race Bill. No, seventy five percent of every dollar goes directly to serve those. In need through serious programming. But twenty five percent of every dollar stays in your local diocese and has managed by that, you know, the local office and director in your community usually through things like grants, you know, Catholic charities might might might manage it. Saint Vincent depaul slowly other local organizations that are that are doing good in the local community are also able to benefit from from serious race Bill. So what what are the other? Besides the cardboard box that everybody's familiar with you know, and being able to put their money, you know, in their homes into that. What are the other main components of the Sierra race bowl? So serious baseball as we say, it's a face an action programme, right? So it's it there's the the component of it that that raises money that that turns fast and those went alms until late saving work, but it's also not fraternity to to share the stories of the kind of communities that we work with around the world and also to to pass on face, and we know that that a lot of families love returning to see restful year after year because it's an opportunity. To instill in their children, the importance of of of the Catholic faith and the importance of of of how our Catholic social teaching calls us to be women and men for others. And so what are the components that go into the Sears rice boiled self is a cardboard box and every rice bowl comes with a lend calendar that provides daily reflections daily touch touch points that we we hope families will use every day to again, remind themselves of that that obligation to to their brothers and sisters. There was the counter also has two stories that I mentioned as well as simple meatless recipes that that folks can prepare on Fridays during lent, or whenever we've we've acquired quite a an archive of these simple meals that we collect when we when we go to these countries where we're getting the stories, and so these are these are species that that that the communities that were describing any stories prepare our colleagues in these in these in these countries in these communities prepare, and so it's it's a great way to to kind of eating solidarity to get a taste of of what it's like to literally to to be in. In Sierra Leone to be in Guatemala to be wherever the case may be and also to to adhere to to our you letting you know fast the of staining to abstaining from meat on Fridays addition to that there's a ton of videos, all the stories there's just levels and levels to the stories that you can dig as deep as you want to go. There's videos on our website rice bowl dot org. There's different reflection activities educational materials, if you're a catechist or a schoolteacher and you're looking to bring some Catholic social teaching and some of these Sierra stories into the classroom. There's there's materials for for children of all grade levels. We have our serious bowl app, which again, you can find serious rice bowl that'd

Catholic Relief Services Eric Catholic church Sierras Kevin Andrews Sierra Ben Catholic program officer Catholic apostolate center Michigan Bill Beck Baltimore Saint Vincent depaul US Catholic community Sierra Leone Maryland Sacramento Fairfield university