35 Burst results for "Epilepsy"

"epilepsy" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I'm so thankful for jolie to have the courage to share a story because i know she's helping a lot of young people across indian country. I think A couple of things from joe jolie story was that she had the support of her family and her friends. Knowing how to perform seizure first-aid laying on your side things like that are very important in the moment. When you're having a seizure but I would actually Send a message out to an. I think the doctor for being on the show as well for all the physicians and people in the medical profession who are treating epilepsy. Send a message out to The teachers and the educators. As well. Because i think that Just as family and friends need to be aware of epilepsy. I think your teachers and classmates do as well. And i think teachers can come up with ways to maybe help people like joe louis and other young people who are struggling with their schoolwork. Because i am confident that there's ways to succeed in school While you have epilepsy and I think teachers are the first line to kind of come up with creative solutions to help students succeed. Yes in me. We as educators in the audience today share your thoughts one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. Let's take another call. We have carla in albuquerque. New mexico tuned in on k. Unm karl thank you for giving us a ring on here. I thank you so much for taking my call I just wanted to mention that I used to work in the disability justice field Before i retired and Wanted to just share that. In within that movement disability justice epilepsy is considered a disability and We know many people who have led very successful lives and done a lot of amazing things. And i wanted to mention a man named tony colo who is from california and has epilepsy. And he served in the united states congress for ten years and I think he's currently and still involved with the Democratic party on a national level and he was the main sponsor of the americans with disabilities. Act which is the civil rights law for people with disabilities so You know just to say that People with epilepsy can accomplish. Many things and a lot of people with epilepsy can live live in which they do things that people who don't have a disability do and Just wanted to give a hopeful. Message for people well carling. Thanks for reaching out in brainer attention to this person In congress wow in. Maybe you have more stories like that to share. Go ahead. dial in. We're ready for your call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight..

joe jolie joe louis tony colo congress Just Unm karl albuquerque mexico carla california Democratic party united states
"epilepsy" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Well Is there. there's a real distinct difference between having haddish. Caesar and having epilepsy give you an example when faces just saw recently had an accident and he fell hit his head on a concrete and immediately went into a speech and By the time they took him to the emergency room and they say then they stopped it with medication. It was at least twenty minutes at this one. He had an injury to his head and and then follow up. He was fine. It did a follow electoral encephalogram and it was normal and we said well. I think he can stop taking his medication. And we graduate with through it because we don't think he had. Epilepsy had seizure induced by trauma. So there are a lot of patients who have had a seizure as not epilepsy but what we usually do with As look at a thing such as an eeg Which is the most helpful test for any type of seizure problem. But it's also the history and their background and and their neurologic exam And if you have a individuals had one seizure and is perfectly normal normally We can get people pretty good statistics if you have one seizure there. Eeg is normal Then you have about a one third possibility of having another seizure within a year which you look at the other ways. Two out of three won't have anything. So that's the distinction between having a single seizure but not necessarily having epilepsy. Absorption means you have a recurrent teach and they can be various types and outlook but There are likely to recur if they're not treated in don't do johnson earlier. We heard advice on When a person is having a seizure what those who are in their contacts should be doing help by or ways that they can help Anything you wanna add to that you know what not to do. I think that's also important to know what not to do. Go dr johnson. Yeah well the first thing i tell..

Epilepsy Caesar dr johnson
"epilepsy" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:41 min | 2 weeks ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Yeah unfortunately The according to census data about fifty one thousand native americans are living with active. Epilepsy Although there's not a lot of research And more research needs to be done on. But i think as you'll hear during the program today and the epilepsy foundation is really trying to reach out to increase the awareness of epilepsy and communities because As you said There there are prevention and treatment measures But i think Similar to other Chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease that native americans have there's barriers to native healthcare There's lack of facilities oftentimes i. I mean i know. Many of the listeners experienced in them themselves they have to drive many miles or even hours to a healthcare facility. there may be a lack of specialists There may be a lack of funding so Because the indian health service is actually Severely underfunded For instance in twenty seventeen the indian health service spent only about three thirty three hundred dollars per patient and by comparison medicare spent over twelve thousand dollars per patient so those are some the barriers in order to get funds. That are adequate. Who would that have to be. Does that come out of congress. Yes it does. And so given that. And when we think of ejaz and its capability of treating people with epilepsy Is there a need for more neurologists. In the system. I think so There's there generally across ihs there Our lack of special specialty And that's what happens. People have to be referred out of the indian health care system Through the program called purchase referred care and that's referral for specialty services but back to the funding issue We often see that people are not able to get a referral if there's a lack of funding at that point so i hope that You know particularly during this time of code that there are Increase Attention by members of congress to provide funding to indian health service. Because i think we've seen the healthcare disparities have risen to the top particularly during this time of covert. And i think one of the important Reasons we're doing the show today. Is that even during this time of cova. Nineteen that you can Nor the chronic illnesses that you have You have to continue to be aware and prevent those and so glad that we're able to to Try to educate people in the native american community today about epilepsy in metairie wise. It also important for people to learn about epsile epilepsy even if they don't have it I think it's important because You'll hear from some of the other people today If you have someone in your family that has epilepsy It's important Just like you learn. Cpr to learn seizure first aid. And i think we'll be talking about that later in the program. So to be aware of the symptoms of seizure or when you might need to take a family member or friend or someone in your community to our.

epilepsy congress cova metairie
"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"A management strategies for certain types of epilepsy so The point is lots and lots of possibilities. That may work. Also remember hearing that people with epilepsy or seizure. Disorder are not allowed to drive. Is that true can patients Rive can exercise. Can they play sports. The all-star with the driving so a down one is specifically called out on almost every state law. That if someone had a seizure where they lost consciousness and they make a big point that Then you are not able to drive another duration that you're not able to drive varies from state to state believe it or not From three months in arizona. Six months in minnesota and in florida and it can go to a year for certain other states so at the end they all insist that you become seizure free for that amount of time before allowed to drive but if you are well managed. Yeah you can drive. Exercise exercise is never the wrong answer. You can always find something. That's safe to do Ron walk whatever you got side. So that is something that absolutely is available for anyone. Plays sports louis. Maybe it's not the right thing if you're gonna play boxing or maybe you have to be a little bit more careful if you're gonna do scuba diving where there's a little element of additional risks to the seizure occurred but for vast majority of other sports and activities absolutely. There's no reason the should stop anyone from doing what they wanted to enter serving. You mentioned earlier that there are some predisposing conditions that can cause some Epilepsy over the life over. Their lifetime is our way to prevent epilepsy. If someone should have one of those disorders that might lend itself to that problem. Yeah i wished. I could simply say that. There is an easy Preventative the answer is not really. It's it's really preventing whatever those causes are for Let me kind of take a for an older adult that we know that a stroke is a cause i actually the most one of the more common causes of seizures in the older adult preventing strokes than becomes a way that you actually prevent epilepsy in people same is true for other potential causes for which you can make a very conscious decisions to avoid having a problem with later in life. Once you have Epilepsy specific preventative measures. Not too much that we know of but is that as we try to understand epilepsy. In howard develops in people. We may have an ability to do something such as that in the not too distant future i guess is the best way to put is. They're cured for epilepsy for any patients yet. There are act to epilepsy surgery in the right patient. That is that we know where it's coming from. An it's safe to recite can result in a definitive cure up to seventy to eighty percent of individuals who identify as good surgical candidates. That actually go through. It can lead to complete seizure. Freedom a seizure cure and that is huge news for those individuals with thought about it. Is that often. it's underutilized. Surgery is a scary proposition for a lot of people. But there's so many new techniques it's become so much safety Do them and you don't even have to stay in the hospital that long anymore. At roughly two days is the average admission leave for individuals who undergoes a procedure. So yeah cures do exist for the right people everything as covid nineteen now so i would be remiss if i did not ask you just having epilepsy. Predisposed to greater risk from covid nineteen. No actually having. Epilepsy is not put you at a greater risk off for developing covid. Nineteen therapies are not necessarily ones that are going to Kind of quiet down your immune system or have anything along those lines now to play it on the other side covid nineteen because it's an infection can vary much worsen seizures..

Epilepsy Rive arizona Ron howard minnesota florida
"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Because there's a lot of different seizure types that do occur in that we can classify and it just depends on where it is in the brain to be honest with you. Enter serve an. I grew up in eighties. And i remember many school dances with strobe lights going around the kids all saying oh my goodness at lights going to give me a seizure. Can computer lights computer screens or other lights. Cause someone to have a seizure. There are certain genetic versions of epilepsy and or seizure disorder that are actually very sensitive to the frequency at which a light is flashed the lower the flash rate or the closer at approximates the normal frequencies that occur in the brain. And if you have a genetic predisposition can actually lead to a seizure in fact a couple of movies Which surprised me rissoli. They actually put the signals to that fact Just to be safe. But yeah for a certain group of individuals. You can precipitate a seizure in that way can stress affect someone with epilepsy or caused seizures stresses one of those conditions. I kind of like into Weather reports and so when you get a weather report valley say there's a thunderstorm watch or thunderstorm warning tornado. Watch tornado warning. What they're trying to say that the ingredients are ripe for tornadoes occur or torn or thunderstorms occur in that watch warning me to actually see it very similarly stress is one of those ingredients that makes it more likely to occur but it doesn't mean it's going to occur so it's just one of those conditions that we hear. A lot of people who have seizures were the stress was occurring at the time they had it. And yeah that may been ingredient. But it's not the actual 'cause it was maybe the match or the extra thing that pushed you over that led to the actual cause to lead to the seizure. How do you treat epilepsy. Here's the good news. There's a lot of treatments There's almost The short answer is medications of medications..

epilepsy
"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:58 min | 2 weeks ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Seizures. It affects three million americans and nearly sixty five million people worldwide thankfully treatment with medications and sometimes even surgery can control seizures for the majority of patients with epilepsy or discussing this now because november is national. Epilepsy awareness month. So thanks for being with us in learning something with me today. Here to discuss. This topic with us is mayo clinic neurologist. Dr joseph sirven. Thanks being here today sir. Oh it's a pleasure to be joining you all as well which you talk a little bit about. What causes epilepsy and true. Is it risk for it. The truth is apple up see can impact anyone at any age group so fear radically. Everyone is kind of at risk but there are clear causes and the causes berry by age typically. If you're very young we would worry most about infections or some type of genetic process as you get into adulthood we start looking for things such as traumatic brain injury or brain tumors. As someone gets older we start thinking about stroke dementia and other like blood hemorrhages and things of that soar. One in twenty six individuals will develop epilepsy over the course of their lifetime. So that tells you it can affect anyone in the 'cause they vary so much again depending on how old you are. So it's kind of a universal condition. But i don't think it's appreciated as such. How do you diagnose epilepsy. Your diagnosis of epilepsy still is based on the history and description of having discrete seizures that is having events that are seizures thing about seizures though they can present in so many ways most people. When i use that word they think of big convulsion. Falling down very dramatic. Can't miss it. But dr lot of other possibilities such as people who may stare or may not respond or they may have a certain repetitive tremor. In so listen to that story that clinical histories huge there are additional studies that we do in addition to the history and examination an eeg. That's study where you put brain leads on the scalp of the head. It's painless i can give us some supporting evidence an mri. The brain can also help to show some of those causes. I mentioned earlier to see if that may be responsible. So it's really putting it. All together is how you arrive at that diagnosis. Just to clarify for me. Is it appropriate to interchange epilepsy and seizure disorder. Epilepsy is often considered a pejorative term. Her so many people because it seems to convey a certain sense of negative stigma. The truth is epilepsy and seizure. Disorder are technically the same thing. Epilepsy is a condition of unprovoked seizures. Occurring repetitively seizure disorder is basically saying i have one of them one seizure. She really saying the same thing is for some reason. People seem to give a friendlier passed a seizure disorder than the.

Epilepsy Dr joseph sirven mayo clinic apple berry
Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

All Things Considered

02:53 min | Last month

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

"Air like short movies. If you fall off a bike, your brain will probably record the entire sequence of events that put you in pain that's known as an episodic memory. And now, scientists say they have identified cells in the human brain that makes this sort of memory possible. NPR's John Hamilton has more. They're known as time cells, and they were discovered in rodents years ago, but a team of researchers wanted to see if these cells also exist in humans. So they studied the brains of 27 people attempting a difficult memory task. This type of memory task is not one that like a rodent would be able to do that's Dr Brad Lega, a neurosurgeon at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Legacy's participants were asked to study sequences of words on a laptop computer. The words appear on the screen went after the other about 12 to 15 items at a clip. They're separated by a couple of seconds. Then, after a break, people were asked to remember the words. Meanwhile, scientists were measuring the activity of individual cells in the hippocampus and another brain area involved in the perception of time. This was possible because the people in the study already had electrodes in their brains as part of a treatment for severe epilepsy. Leggo says the team discovered certain cells that would fire at specific times during each sequence of words, the time cells that we found They're marking out discreet segments of time within this, like approximately 32nd window time stamps that helped people recall when they had seen each word And in what order? Legacy says The findings suggest that the brain uses the same approach. When we're reliving an experience, like falling off a bike, we remember the wind in our hair, then seeing the pebble on the road than the pain. So by having time cells create this indexing across time, you can put everything together in a way that Nixon's the time Self study appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Euribor, jockey of New York University, says it's important even though the result was predicted by experiments in animals. The final arbitrator is always the human brain. Jackie says The study helps explain the memory limitations found in people who have damage to the hippocampus. In one experiment, he says, scientists compared the memories of a group of people who had just Just a tour of a university, he says. The people without hippocampal damage all told, pretty much the same story first, because we have seen the fountain. And then there was a little girl who fell off the bike, Physical and so on. And these sequences are completely and absolutely gun in people Cos is probably because their brains don't have time cells to re create a sequence of events. But Jackie says time cells aren't like clocks. Their pace is constantly changing. Depending on factors like mood. You have to wait for the elections. Then every day is a long day. The same thing is gonna be asking, you know when it's covered over is very, very slow, but when you having a good time time flies, Jackie says. As a result, our perception of time isn't very reliable. John

Jackie John Hamilton NPR Dr Brad Lega University Of Texas Southweste New York University Leggo Dallas National Academy Of Sciences John Nixon Proceedings Of
Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

Digiday Podcast

06:15 min | Last month

Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

"Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I've Riley did today's senior correspondent based I've read the UK and it gives me great pleasure to welcome a fellow Brit to the show. This week Christopher Kenna is the CEO brand advance the UK based global diversity media. Network. Said welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. She is Chris So yeah, it's fair to say I to start kind of right at the beginning because I think it's fair to say that you didn't take maybe the most conventional well traveled route into the into the media industry. And I won't stick if our listeners a little flavor if I may of the years that led up to you founding your your current company. So I didn't know where we start kind of at the very beginning Many of our US listeners probably know where the olive man is but. But that's where you were born. Very, very small British island has relation of what like eighty thousand or something like that. Yeah. So let's start there. Yeah the Ottoman. From people on the other side of the potent if you look in. The UK map you've got the big and then you've got islands, which is small bit this a little island right in the middle of the big being. England Scotland Wales on the small bit be an island is a little dot in the middle never rarely shown on whether ups Whether symbol but. Yeah population about eighty, seven, seventy, eight, hundred, thousand. A blockade everyone. You know which Just as. It's off with a with. From the very get guy. I was destined Dabo. Trophies and certificates got a significant for that UH. I don't remember getting obviously I was born but. When could so skip I was in cash in. And when you come out of, can you get like a big thing achievements event? On pretty much anything, anybody's ever written about you open to that point of until you sixteen on the very first thing in now was this. From Jane. Critical Hospital From you spend a number of years in the in the British army. Is that right wherever you based? Yeah. So I was based out a Jimmy Fest So did my member basic training here in England in Boston bond went to blunt it, which is the army school of signals. To do sort of second phase training which is. I was a on communicate so to go. Out to use a radio not but you know what I mean and so I was destined for comes. So maybe not all is so far apart as you think. You. Know army to media we basically doing the same thing. So then yeah I was boasted out to Jimmy went out seventeen. Met My now ex way. My kid when I was seventeen. So. We start on the fatherhood on your after kits. Now they're both off German English they live at JEB new Madonna goes to union bellied son goes to high school and beautiful in Jimmy. Yet did tell us to of Iraq one tour of Afghan and what led you to leave the army. awhile I was involved in an ID so I've epilepsy now. Because of injury on so yeah I icon. Epilepsy in a rifle mix. Ni- I imagine. That's not good company. So and then media came calling for you. Well well, you came cooling for media well I. Don't know who, but but I think I'm good at this. I've lived sound a little arrogant now but I think definitely media needed needs people like me. You. Know just the background I don't mean specifically there's nothing particularly special about May. The I mean you don't people from my background's people that didn't you know two Family Income Kofi Union blind you don't we need diversity of vices. We need diversity of thought. So yeah, I think it needed me as much as I needed it. But no so I started off. Is So when Columbia Street back Manchester. I'd spend a lot of time to care and Blah Blah Blah. Back Manchester. On then. Yes. Fell into acting and presented done even. Go too much into that. 'cause it's a problem, a life of China Forget. But yeah, ended up doing presenting things like price drop TV. MTV completely is. Got My own show on sky which was puppies the most watched show on TV. What was that show? Cope the Chris Candido show. I was destined to be an office as well. Then, I made a production guy start up production company. Of. Factual shows such shows like queer three did drama series those on TV code the ends I wrote in direct produced directed quish. Couple of football documentaries champions one about. Munches to CEOS an official release DVD for Manchester, say did one class rages as well? Yeah a Sold the rights to a lot of the shows that came to London on that's how it got into. Sort of. Went into. Media An. Advertising. Agency wouldn't worked a DO DOT com. And partly, Connecticut now. But yeah.

UK British Army England Scotland Wales Manchester Chris Candido Christopher Kenna Jimmy United States British Island England Iraq MTV London Dabo Kofi Union Connecticut Boston Jane Official
Eric Edgar Cooke Is The Night Caller

Serial Killers

04:14 min | 3 months ago

Eric Edgar Cooke Is The Night Caller

"In January of Nineteen Fifty, nine, twenty, eight year old Eric Cook was in pain. His face was in fresh scratches drawing even more attention to his recognizable harelips features. If anyone asked what happened, Cook blame the scratch marks on his eldest son who was developmentally handicapped while Cook blamed his son for his injuries. The true culprit was thirty-three-year-old Pnina Berkman when Cook attacked Panini in her apartment on January twenty ninth she fought back her long manicured nails gouged his face as she tried desperately to repel. In the end, it was a fight, Pennino couldn't win. She died under living room floor after cook ran from the flat. The city of Perth Austrailia was rocked by the shocking murder and leads quickly dried up cook left now, prints and DNA technology was too rudimentary to conclusively tiny one to the blood under Pineda's nails residents in the Wembley area reported seeing Prowler in the neighborhood on nights leading up to the attack but no one could give a clear description of the man so as. Long as he kept his head down, Cook was in the clear and that's just what he did for the next six months. Cook was relatively inactive but by August he couldn't control his urges any longer be eighth. He left his wife Sally at home with their children and set off into the shadows he ended up in the affluent area of Midland's the suburb was popular with students of the nearby university making it a prime target for cook who loved to Peek in windows at potential targets. One. Such student was seventeen year old Alex Don, who was spending the night alone at her sister's apartment as Alex slept twenty nine year old cook made his way around the building. Until he found an open window, it was too small and high to be an obvious entry point, which is probably why anyone neglected to close it. But Cook wasn't deterred once he managed to scramble through the window he rifled through Alex's purse taking what little money the nursing student had. But even as experienced and quiet as cook was the teen woke up panicking cook seized something heavy, perhaps a fire poker and Hit over the head knocking her out, not wanting to wait for the girl to wake up cook left the way he came in Alex was left alone until the next morning when friends arrived in rushed to the hospital in addition to a nasty Gash above her I Alex suffered a fractured skull and was left with a severe form of epilepsy that derailed her career aspirations and would affect her for the rest of her life. Not that Eric Cook had any cares about the woman who's life he just ruined by the time Alex finally left the hospital in September he'd already moved onto a fresh. Suburb. Full of new houses and clueless victims for the prolific cat burglar a few months. Later, his new favourite haunt was the wealthy neighborhood of Brookwood flats on an early visit to one building. He stole a key from the ground floor apartment of Betty Johnston then returned to burgle the place of few times. Betty's next door neighbor was twenty, two year old daughter, Jillian brewer and terrier designer. Jillian caught cooks I on one of his visits and he took pleasure watching through the window as the young woman had sex with her fiance. But watching evidently wasn't enough Vanessa's going to take over on. The psychology here, and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or a psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show thanks Greg in a later assessment of his psychological development Dr Aaron. Samuel Ellis stated that Cook was sexually naive and afraid of women who might conceivably test his sexual adequacy. It's possible that this misguided fear or hatred of a sexually confident unmarried woman caused cooks thoughts to turn to violence. This theory aligns with cooks first murder victim Panini Berkman who had no qualms about having sex outside of wedlock and even had the gall to sleep naked.

Eric Cook Alex Don Panini Berkman Nineteen Fifty Murder Pennino Austrailia Betty Johnston Jillian Brewer Vanessa Midland Samuel Ellis Perth Pineda Dr Aaron Greg Sally
Family settles lawsuit over death of trans woman in New York City jail

All of It

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Family settles lawsuit over death of trans woman in New York City jail

"Woman with epilepsy who died in solitary confinement on Rikers Island have settled It's federal lawsuit with city for a record $5.9 million. Attorneys for the family of lately in Polanco say the deal was reached on Friday, the largest for an inmate death in a city jail. The terms were not made. Public lawyer David Shane e says he hopes the deal means Polanco's family confined some small measure of peace. City Law Department spokesperson says Polanco's death was an absolute tragedy. The empty

Polanco Rikers Island City Law Department David Shane E
Camila Coelho On Living With Epilepsy, Her New Beauty Brand, Elaluz & Her Exact Nighttime Skincare Routine

Breaking Beauty Podcast

06:44 min | 3 months ago

Camila Coelho On Living With Epilepsy, Her New Beauty Brand, Elaluz & Her Exact Nighttime Skincare Routine

"Hello, hello, Carleen here with a quick pause to talk about the best nutrition hack that I've discovered lately, courtesy our friends at Sikora I've been on a health kick as of late. So I totally know that feeling like I wanna feel better about what I eat but what's going to be Yummy are of tunes, carrot sticks or a grilled cheese sandwich a nobody got time to prep healthy and great tasting dishes though am I right and that's where Sikora comes in their organic ready to eat. Meals are made using curated plant based ingredients designed to boost energy, improve, digestion, and get you feeling and looking healthy from the inside out and one thing I've definitely learned is that healthy meals don't have to be boring like who knew that Veggie fries could taste so good Sakarov creations are chef crafted and change weekly and they're delivered fresh to anywhere. In the US to boost results, you can try the best-selling metabolism, super powder and all natural remedy for bloating and fatigue. It also contains iron vetik. which helped to enhance energy and help minimize those sugar cravings and right now, the car is offering our listeners twenty percent off their first order when they go to Kara Dot com slash beauty or enter code beauty at. That car S. A., K. A., R. A. dot com slash beauty to get twenty percent off your first order will link to that offer on our blog and in our show notes once again that Sikora dot com slash beauty and now back to the podcast. So you're native of Brazil a lot of people know you from Youtube and Instagram and I understand you move to the US as a teenager what to this day is still the most quintessentially Brazilian about you the most Brazilian. Is that I love to dance. I am obsessed with and saying that is definitely like a Latina. And I eat my very traditional Brazilian every single warning actually myself and my husband, we learn how to make the dough at home. So we do a show every week and you can freeze it. You know like cheese balls and we have it every single day in the morning it brings us back to Brazil my hometown. Delicious I hope you'll be marketing those soon. I saw your video dancing with your brother on your instagram. It was so cute and I was trying to picture myself dancing with my brother like that. They would just not happen but you guys were adorable. So tell us about your relationship with your mom and beauty. Did you learn any beauty tips from her or got like a skin-care hacker? Any advice from her? So I've always been a beauty lovers in some of the little girls I remember countless members of myself overly brushing my hair before leaving the house I had like a long Bob haircuts I needed to make sure every little hair was in place and you know playing with my mom's or my grandmother's makeup I was so into beauty and you know my mom always had some makeup on but my. Grandmother was really a beauty icon. In every single way you can think of like grandmothers energy and her confidence in her just like her personality. She was filled with Joy and light always and I remember like looking at her and just saying to my cellphone wants to be like my grandmother when I grow up and she was not like the typical you know beautiful like what people can can consider like. Gorgeous. You know I don't want to say it is wrong way in the runway but like a lot of times they know someone is beautiful in a lot of people just think like imagine a perfect looking you know nine the perfect knows and for me beauties really like that light that you shine through lake that your personality it's the most important thing. If you have a good personality, you are automatically beautiful. That's how I always thought and my grandmother was for me the most beautiful woman I got a lot of things from her. She was the one who gave me my first red lipstick when I was six years old. And I have my pets were photo with Alex on my mom was so mad which one was it do you remember I don't remember there's probably a Brazilian brand but it was a red bold readily I got a lot of things from my grandmother her hair mask she used to do like these homemade hair mask with like avocado. Aloe Vera. A bunch of things in the blender and she would do her home made a face masks to so some things. I still do to this day like the honey and brown sugar facemask like things that are very organic but the work for you you know. Though yeah, I got a lot of it from my grandmother for sure. What about any skincare hacks I feel like I've read a lot you talking about your mom passing on like some cool skincare hacks to you skincare hacks means truly like. My mom always told me like wash your face don't wash your face twice during the day like the through the day I just wash it in, cleanse it at night in the morning it's just water and then my my serum, a Lotta Times, you know keep applying to many things or or rubbing face too much. That's when you we irritate our skin. Right. So in the morning I learned with my mom to just wash with cold water that wakes you up to be tough a little bit and I do a little in fact, massage every morning we can do it with your hands and fingers. It's very Brazilian to the lymphatic from the face you plump like the lymph nodes Chan your. And here on your Tukwila Tay or not exactly between your Tan your shoulder bones. Yeah. So those that's where lymph nodes are, and then if you activated by pumping it three five times, then massaging your face really deeply that would deep up feuds such a beautiful way, and now they have like the these tools like Morton's that you can. They can help you have to do it with your hands but that's one thing that my mom always does and she does these face exercises that look crazy but it's really Like. Putting. Z., but there's a lot of stretching face stretching going on. Like actors exercises for their mouths. But it words you know it's like the same way we work out our body we should do it with our face and it's super healthy event with our there like nasal label folds here these these lines assist for Marionette Line Marianne out. Yes, those you can exercise from the inside with Tong like. Crazy.

Sikora United States Brazil Kara Dot S. A. Bloating Yummy Sakarov Youtube Tukwila Tay Aloe Vera BOB Tong JOY Alex Morton
Episode 15: Managing Behaviors During COVID-19 (Part 2) + A New Partnership with SeizureTracker - burst 01

TSC Now

05:31 min | 4 months ago

Episode 15: Managing Behaviors During COVID-19 (Part 2) + A New Partnership with SeizureTracker - burst 01

"Database looking rather retrospectively your medical records and clinic visits where errands or patients saucer telling their doctor about past events at sometimes it's hard to recollect what happened or what was the trigger something that seizure truck provides is a patient reported outcome almost in real time shoe, the US alliance we record of what event occurred when in sequence of events medication was you'd provides a much finer level of detail that may be important for researchers looking at or relation kinetic years or medication yours or gain a lot more. Year that will be relevant for analyzed some important epilepsies, such a pervasive issue in the DNC community in Rabat's who were saying about. People with GNC who have seizures is a subset within that subset. There's so much diversity in the types of seizures and the triggers, and so beginning this deigned to drill down even further I think it could really open the door to understanding what sorts of options are out there for people who are struggling with seizures. Yeah and I think though as a community and thing because we think about research as an participating researching something that way think will help future generations and our contributions might not be necessarily apple. Now I think as we think about learning system and the. Way that they'll loops between clinicians, researchers, and patients are for me to share this data. We can really make an implant or we can understand location of our therapy decision faster. We can share that information with researchers and clinicians after and ideally create that Lou that come back and provides different therapies decisions that are validated through as data exchange a. so ideally, what we'd be thinking about research on participating in these data share project and the way enable researchers to get therapy changes and advice to our clinicians much faster and actually hopefully participating research double impact of direct did. And the juicy community have experienced that with past therapies have come to market in a much more rapid pace by mining the data is really going to open the door for more a better understanding of how these infect worked together. So you must have talked about how work that the science has done recently has really empowered more people to get involved in research. You know you don't have to go to a natural history. Data by site in order to participate, you can do consenting remotely and you can even have a mobile bottomless come to your house to Collect Your Bio Samples Gabrielle. Can you tell me a little bit more about what that consenting looks like in how people can get started on that cross? Yes. The first way to get involved the email me at G. Rushing at yes. Alliance stopped work in from that email I will. Get a phone call when the gentle participant or Guardian in phone cost only take about twenty to thirty minutes and I can set you on the phone. Right men there you are celebrities in in purchase meeting it will require you to sign a document that I mail to you. But right after that, I submitted a request, your mobile lobotomy company, they will call you to schedule an appointment at a time and deep of. this home in a one simple in I also will send a little emailing where it will click through where to connect their seizure data. If they aren't already, your razor conveniently will pop up with ability to create a seizure tucker without start using that data, and of course, if they are already in or natural history database or not seen at USC clinic, we will need to get medical records that have information on gist. So you do request that those medical records are either fax to US or veiled. And enter that data all those costs will be covered. So you don't have any additional clinic appointment necessary now insurance ills it's yes. Alliance will cover the cost of sending those medical records to us and as far as follow up after the initiation of project may do ask that you Bolos. Annual blood sample it's not required but as she symptoms do change over time in his medications change, it would be great to get up once or one year in any medical record update for any new tests or imaging or things like that. would be relevant important for research. So all in all the whole process shouldn't take more than thirty to forty five minutes on the back end and mobile's lobotomy appointments. He stopped twenty minutes. So a little over an hour of your time to commit to research, you try to make it as easy as possible if you're interested in learning more about any of these projects always visit gs lions website on page there's an interest form provide your information right on top of the page in I will be up to shortly after midday. Rob You've kind of touched on this seizure tracker benefit from this type of partnership. Really. I think with the partnerships and relationships and Your community building on the database and making it or powerful. I think we can really come together as organizations to better understand see. So we zero Tucker benefit of the community, but the whole community that from the data that you collect and store and share one of our most exciting projects now is something that in a partnership with multiple advocacy organizations. And we have a family realize that at blessed is not just

GNC United States DNC Rabat Usc Clinic Tucker LOU Apple G. Rushing Gabrielle ROB
The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

Science Friction

07:05 min | 7 months ago

The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

"Across Australia graduate students are always on taught deadlines to deliver a major work of original research. But now they're all important. Experiments are suspended or hanging on a precipice locked out of their labs or unable to travel to their field research sites. Many of lost the part-time jobs that pay rent or feed their families and some now also wondering what the future is for jobs in science in a post pandemic world. Could this pandemic trigger a as next GEN? Brian drying something that people don't realize about a PhD is that it's very isolating. You're like your. I'm in an office with other people for sure but we're all working on very different things and very niche things. Yeah it's really hard to to not feel learn in this when you've got that initial stress the initial problems that come with doing a PhD and then you wack pandemic on top of this is really Problematic for most of us being in a PhD being so isolated in this line of research. Which is why we get into it. We want to be independent research. Is We want we? It's our own body of work you know it's professional but it's personal and emotional. It's this thing that you divide basically three or more years of your life to and the idea of more isolation. I wasn't immediately helming but as as the month of gone on it's been it's been quite difficult. Scientists get this ID. We have the stereotype of being quite stoic and emotionally removed. It comes from the idea that we the work that we do is at. Its core unbiased survey of the world around us. Become at anything bias. What you're observing. What you're experimenting on So in creating a dialogue around it being okay to tell people what. You're feeling personally without letting gory. This old preconceived notion that talk about your feelings as a scientist today passionate young scientists open up it is a well established fact that went into PhD Students. Experience distress and one in three are at risk of a common psychiatric disorder. The focus the hours a PhD demands a damn hard at the based times. But how are post Grad students holding up in this pandemic and what Judy of k? Do strutting universities and the Australian government have to support them. I stepping up really daunting and obviously now during this pandemic when there's a lot of uncertainty facing aspect dot mental health issues just getting worse Ramana Ri- abuse of each is doing her. Phd At Curtin University investigating molecular mechanisms of aggressive pancreatic cancer to help develop more effective treatments like many students who crucial lab experiments have been halted but she also has the needs of the entire nations post. Grad students on her plate as national president of the Council of a strategy and Postgraduate Associations. Capa but I cannot believe that I inherited the Cup national president's position during a global pandemic. Got It thinking. Forty Years COUPLA existing. They has ever been a pandemic like this. They're doing pay is not like an Undergrad degree. It's MOLUCCA A job. It's the crucial foundation for your career. In Science. In fact it's the stage when many Nobel Prize winners of done some of their k. Work but this pandemic is already forcing Grad students to make really tough urgent choices. The thumbs students have already withdrawn and as a result some international students have already gone back. Herm other students Yet is T-o-n how long this situation will continue. We have a situation now. graduate Looking at what's enough or day. Students circumstances are so different depending on the project. They're doing what they're up to in the three and a half years I've got to finish. Universities are really going to need to respond to this crisis case by case Taylor roads and I'm a third year each student at Latrobe University. And I'm doing my PhD. In a lab that focuses on Christie says over blindness which is a neglected tropical disease caused by a worm. Basically this illness is found in sub Saharan Africa and it can lead to blindness in its worst kind of bombs. Epilepsy developmental delays. It's really a bad thing to how high low is genetically analyzing samples of the parasitic worm. Take him from African communities to understand its evolution and spray it we found the transmission radius is actually a lot larger than what the W. H. Pat originally hypothesized answer. L. Analysis is kind of informing the carrying out of Mass Drug Administration throughout Africa and all these areas to actually eradicate the worm or even control it. What is this pandemic donning? In terms of what you can and can't do. Now I would have been sequencing more ones to get at bigger sample size for some of the analysis. I want to publish at least in the state of Victoria we on able to go into a facility and US out lab facilities. My University universities very strict on this. Or you have to prove that the work you're doing is absolutely essential. Anton sensitive in my work doesn't come under the umbrella. Sir. I'm not able to access the lab and I'm not able to access my computer in the office but I have my laptop at home with me so I'm able to do some work on that right now. I'm just coming through the daughter. I already have and seeing. What kind of story I can make with that Dada? I've it in a publication which is your pending. More daughter Nell yes. I'm Kinda just trying to fill time with whatever I can do. That will be somewhat productive. But I wasn't the merced affected by this. There are people who were on a really long time course. Experiments with moral animals hats euthanize. All the animals basically just pick up and pack up and Gar in the middle of a three months costs which would have been terrible sir trying to keep my inconvenience in. Context

Scientist President Trump Brian Curtin University Australia Australian Government Africa Saharan Africa Nobel Prize Latrobe University Nell Judy Merced GAR Capa United States Christie Postgraduate Associations W. H. Pat
There is so much we don't know about cannabis

Second Opinion

03:32 min | 10 months ago

There is so much we don't know about cannabis

"As best. We know one in. Eight of Californians smokes cannabis that puts California at position number ten in nine other states. People consume more of the drug. Alaska has the largest number of cannabis users followed by Vermont and then Colorado in the US. The number of marijuana users is nearly as large as current cigarette smokers. And as we've all heard cannabis in California is big business three billion dollars and that's just licensed sales given the huge us we know shockingly little about the real benefits of cannabis or about long-term harms most of what we heard growing up as teens turns out to be false. But that doesn't mean that there's not a lot more. We don't know old as any fifteen year old can tell you. Cannabis contains at least two active ingredients. Thc that's responsible for the high from marijuana and CBD Kenna by dial which may be an inflammatory and pain reliever both THC NCD can be smoked. Vaporized ingested applied as oils creams or patch is the route of administration is a key factor in determining how much of the drug is absorbed as doctor. I am not sure what conditions these drugs help. My patients claim. The drugs provide huge benefit for variety of conditions. Anxiety Insomnia blood pressure epilepsy addiction and more studies. Show that people with anxiety mood disorders and depression often self treat with cannabis to effectively manage symptoms with some opting for cannabis rather than antidepressants or mood. Stabilisers what we do know. Is that many of the drugs that doctors prescribe and some that are sold over. The counter have far greater dangers than cannabis products. What is urgently needed are studies that compare THC or CD in known doses to a placebo or other effective pills. Why because we know that about twenty? Five percent of people will claim benefit from a placebo drug. So the question becomes. Does the cannabis perform better than a placebo? We do know that. Heavy marijuana use can cause dependency which is very different from addiction. We also know that marijuana can impair judgement. Fine Motor skills pregnancy and certainly driving. But the dangers of cannabis are poorly understood. Cannabis is known to produce smoke with toxic gases which are then inhaled one. Very recent study published in Jama reviewed twenty-five moderately well conducted studies examining links between marijuana use and developing cancers in general. There were no or very weak associations with the development of cancer. It turned out that few people smoke only marijuana. Many also smoke. Cigarettes and the level of marijuana exposure is difficult to measure and reports from research subjects were biased because of their memory and recall but we really need to know more meaning. We need more research meaning. We need more federal funding to look at the risks and the benefits.

Cannabis Marijuana California Kenna Alaska United States Jama Vermont Colorado
"epilepsy" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

11:23 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Staff writer for Frankel talks about the hunt for new epilepsy treatments. And talk with twist Norbert that using an instrument on the International Space Station to record a gamma ray flash produced by a thunderstorm. Now we we have Jennifer cousin Frankel. She's a staff writer for the Science News Team. This week. She wrote about the hunt for new epilepsy treatments. Hi Jennifer Hi. Thanks for having me. Oh Oh sure so. I was surprised to learn from your story. How common epilepsy is? How many people are you know have epilepsy? And how how exactly. He's a defined well. One in twenty-six people will develop epilepsy over the course of their lifetime and epilepsy is in some ways. An unusual disease these because it's really defined largely by its most striking symptom which is seizures repeated seizures. It sounds like a lot of people have this. But what made you decide to write about the treatments for epilepsy. Now will there. Were two things that jumped out at me and really captured my attention and drew me to the story. The first I is that about thirty percent of patients continue to have seizures despite taking medication to try and treat those seizures. Wow that's considered drug resistant. Epilepsy that just seemed like a really high number to be. There are a lot of drugs out there to treat epilepsy. And yet you still have that thirty percent percent of patients who continue to suffer from seizures. That was the first piece of information and the second. Just a striking piece of information is that that percentage really Lee has not changed over many years. Even though there have been a number of new drugs approved to treat epilepsy so the fact that there was this high percentage that was unchanging are largely unchanging. Despite new therapies really grabbed me because it suggested that we need to do do something differently here to help many of these patients. Can you talk a little bit about why having treatment resistant. Epilepsy is not a great bag. Yeah so it's it's really hard for a lot of these patients. This is a really a varied group of people. Some of these are people kids and adults who might right. Have a form of epilepsy called focal epilepsy. That's pretty common and that affects a specific region of the brain. So someone who has focal epilepsy. That's drug-resistant can wake up every morning. Not Knowing whether they're going to have a seizure that day and you're living with this very intense unpredictability in your life in in addition to living with the seizures and living with the side effects of the medications that you're often taking to continue to try and control them for other patients. It can be very devastating if the seizures are really uncontrolled they could be having multiple seizures a day very young children and babies that have many many seizures. Ken Suffer Developmental Delays and other problems as a result of that You know as you can imagine it. It can be really hard to live with even if the seizures aren't that frequent even if we're just talking a few seizures a year that can still be very disruptive and can make it difficult to live your life the way you want to so when you started to look into this question Why isn't the needle moving? Why is treatment resistant? Epilepsy still so calm. When new drugs are coming on the market? What did you find what's going on? There are traditionally the drugs that are out there. Treat the seizures which is kind of the end of the story here. That's the end point of the disease. Is You have a seizure and the drugs next target seizures and it's true that for many patients that really works well and kind of does what you needed to do. But we're also talking about what doctors refer to as a really heterogeneous disease as a disease that has varied causes and for many patients. We don't really or haven't historically really understood the cause of the seizure. So it's kind kind of almost flipping the pages backwards in the book. What brought us to the seizure in this particular patient and trying to understand the biology behind it and and I think the belief of many doctors and scientists is that we need to do that for many of these drug resistant patients to more effectively? Target Cricket control their seizures. Once you begin breaking down this heterogeneous group you have things like little kids. Infants genetic predisposition Dan traumatic brain injury infection like all these very different factors associated with onset of seizures. How how are they taking this on and and kind of trying to find what leads from that initial insult to seizures? It's a huge job and there is huge variation here. I don't think that one person send can cover it all and I don't know that anyone even in their store right exactly and that was a real challenge with this story to is really trying to put it all together other without overwhelming the reader or the writer for that matter but yeah I think you have different people who are kind of coming at this from different angles so like you say there is this subset of of genetic syndromes babies that are born with certain gene variants that then caused seizures and they might cause other challenges as well and so in that case there are efforts to maybe develop animal models the carry that same gene variant or a very similar gene variant. And then study those models and test drugs the talking about animal models. You mentioned that there. Is this change there as well as instead of inducing seizures in animal models. It's looking for ones that have seizures naturally literally in order to really study. What's going on? Yeah so the history with the animal models was actually really interesting. The earliest animal models which were developed many decades ago involved inducing seizures one at a time initially with electroshocks and now people also use chemicals to induce a seizure. And then see if you can treat it with a drug in some ways. That's a model. That's easier to work with because you have control over it but these are animals that have otherwise healthy brains and you. No you're causing. That's easier to happen exactly at the time of your choosing. Those models have been really useful at helping us. Identify a number of anti seizure drugs eggs and anti epilepsy drugs that are on the market today but in the last several years there was concerned that if we just keep using these models were not going to branch out in the kinds ends of treatments we find were using animals whose brains are not really the same as the brains of people who are dealing with epilepsy so he talked about the genetic underpinnings some attempt to tackle those what about these other things like for example sometimes a severe infection can bring on seizures. There are definitely in cases of severe infection or a very prolonged very high fever. Now some of these types of epilepsy are really uncommon that they can be especially devastating. But but some of that work has been scientifically really interesting. Because it's lead scientist to consider different strategies for example looking at inflammation in the brain gene and inflammatory molecules and targeting. Those which is not something we usually think about is associated with epilepsy. But there is. There's a lot of interest in that now and part part of that is in this world of infection induced epilepsies normally. When you think about epilepsy you might think about channels and how neurons fire rather than you know what's going on with inflammation or immunity? Yup One more thread that we could pick up here is traumatic brain injuries being associated with seizures. What kind head of research is being done with those types of epilepsy so this area is really interesting because in this case you have a brain injury and then you have a a time lag before someone develops epilepsy as a result of that injury and that is a window of opportunity that researchers? I want to harness now in use to try and prevent epilepsy in these patients. So the work is still pretty new. And we're not at the point where we can prevent prevent this or have any kind of therapy to prevent it but there is a big effort now to try and identify which of these patients are at especially high risk and then look for drugs or other treatments that can change that trajectory. So that person doesn't develop seizure disorder or you know maybe has a much milder disorder or one that's more responsive to medications. This reminds me of another point. You make the story. Epilepsy is the endpoint. Sometimes we know the starting point. Sometimes we don't but we really care about what the researchers really care about the ARC from the starting point to epilepsy. That's what they wanna trace and it just seems like there are so many different paths one. We haven't talked about is focal epilepsy. Yep that's exactly right one. One of the most common forms of epilepsy focal epilepsy. In that case you know we often don't know the cause. The low people are still working to understand that but another strategy Radzi one can use instead of trying to dig down and get it the mechanism. If we don't have a mechanism is looking at the drugs and thinking. Okay we have a drug. It doesn't work for everybody everybody. Let's better understand this drug and why it fails in some patients. And how can we modify or create a new drug that that enhances its effectiveness. So that's another area of interest for drug companies and others to try and understand the biochemistry here the Chemistry Ministry of the drugs and what they're doing in the brain which we even with approved drugs. We don't always understand and then understand why in someone who's WHO's not being helped helped by a particular medication. What can we do to make it better for them so that it can better blunt their seizures? I was surprised to see how many different kinds kinds of drugs these researchers were trying. They were really going far. Afield can you talk a little bit about that. Yeah I mean I think that researchers are really trying to cast just a wide net here and they're looking both at drugs that are already approved out there even much older drugs that might help or at least might guide us to something thing that might help as well as newer experimental drugs so that can include everything from a particular anti inflammatory drug two in one case of very old antihistamine. That seem to target a genetic form of epilepsy again. This it's all in the early stages and these are really specific narrow oh treatments and often. We don't always understand why they work. Sometimes we do. But sometimes we don't or why they help certain people so I think what people are realizing thing more and more is that epilepsy is such a very disease. You're not gonNA find one drug that helps that whole thirty percent of patients who are still having seizures despite commitment but the hope is that we can break them down into really narrow groups and then find drugs that maybe through very unexpected avenues. Do help thank you so much Jennifer. Thank you Jennifer cousin. Frankel is a staff news writer for science. You can find a link to her story at science MAG DOT ORG slash podcast. They tuned for an interview with Torsten Norbert about lightning gamma.

Epilepsy focal epilepsy Frankel Torsten Norbert Jennifer Jennifer Hi Staff writer writer International Space Station Cricket Science News Team Jennifer cousin Lee Ken inflammation Radzi scientist Chemistry Ministry head of research
Hunting new Epilepsy drugs

Science Magazine Podcast

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Hunting new Epilepsy drugs

"Now we we have Jennifer cousin Frankel. She's a staff writer for the Science News Team. This week. She wrote about the hunt for new epilepsy treatments. Hi Jennifer Hi. Thanks for having me. Oh Oh sure so. I was surprised to learn from your story. How common epilepsy is? How many people are you know have epilepsy? And how how exactly. He's a defined well. One in twenty-six people will develop epilepsy over the course of their lifetime and epilepsy is in some ways. An unusual disease these because it's really defined largely by its most striking symptom which is seizures repeated seizures. It sounds like a lot of people have this. But what made you decide to write about the treatments for epilepsy. Now will there. Were two things that jumped out at me and really captured my attention and drew me to the story. The first I is that about thirty percent of patients continue to have seizures despite taking medication to try and treat those seizures. Wow that's considered drug resistant. Epilepsy that just seemed like a really high number to be. There are a lot of drugs out there to treat epilepsy. And yet you still have that thirty percent percent of patients who continue to suffer from seizures. That was the first piece of information and the second. Just a striking piece of information is that that percentage really Lee has not changed over many years. Even though there have been a number of new drugs approved to treat epilepsy so the fact that there was this high percentage that was unchanging are largely unchanging. Despite new therapies really grabbed me because it suggested that we need to do do something differently here to help many of these patients. Can you talk a little bit about why having treatment resistant. Epilepsy is not a great bag. Yeah so it's it's really hard for a lot of these patients. This is a really a varied group of people. Some of these are people kids and adults who might right. Have a form of epilepsy called focal epilepsy. That's pretty common and that affects a specific region of the brain. So someone who has focal epilepsy. That's drug-resistant can wake up every morning. Not Knowing whether they're going to have a seizure that day and you're living with this very intense unpredictability in your life in in addition to living with the seizures and living with the side effects of the medications that you're often taking to continue to try and control them for other patients. It can be very devastating if the seizures are really uncontrolled they could be having multiple seizures a day very young children and babies that have many many seizures. Ken Suffer Developmental Delays and other problems as a result of that You know as you can imagine it. It can be really hard to live with even if the seizures aren't that frequent even if we're just talking a few seizures a year that can still be very disruptive and can make it difficult to live your life the way you want to so when you started to look into this question Why isn't the needle moving? Why is treatment resistant? Epilepsy still so calm. When new drugs are coming on the market? What did you find what's going on? There are traditionally the drugs that are out there. Treat the seizures which is kind of the end of the story here. That's the end point of the disease. Is You have a seizure and the drugs next target seizures and it's true that for many patients that really works well and kind of does what you needed to do. But we're also talking about what doctors refer to as a really heterogeneous disease as a disease that has varied causes and for many patients. We don't really or haven't historically really understood the cause of the seizure. So it's kind kind of almost flipping the pages backwards in the book. What brought us to the seizure in this particular patient and trying to understand the biology behind it and and I think the belief of many doctors and scientists is that we need to do that for many of these drug resistant patients to more effectively? Target Cricket control their seizures. Once you begin breaking down this heterogeneous group you have things like little kids. Infants genetic predisposition Dan traumatic brain injury infection like all these very different factors associated with onset of seizures. How how are they taking this on and and kind of trying to find what leads from that initial insult to seizures? It's a huge job and there is huge variation here. I don't think that one person send can cover it all and I don't know that anyone even in their store right exactly and that was a real challenge with this story to is really trying to put it all together other without overwhelming the reader or the writer for that matter but yeah I think you have different people who are kind of coming at this from different angles so like you say there is this subset of of genetic syndromes babies that are born with certain gene variants that then caused seizures and they might cause other challenges as well and so in that case there are efforts to maybe develop animal models the carry that same gene variant or a very similar gene variant. And then study those models and test drugs the talking about animal models. You mentioned that there. Is this change there as well as instead of inducing seizures in animal models. It's looking for ones that have seizures naturally literally in order to really study. What's going on? Yeah so the history with the animal models was actually really interesting. The earliest animal models which were developed many decades ago involved inducing seizures one at a time initially with electroshocks and now people also use chemicals to induce a seizure. And then see if you can treat it with a drug in some ways. That's a model. That's easier to work with because you have control over it but these are animals that have otherwise healthy brains and you. No you're causing. That's easier to happen exactly at the time of your choosing. Those models have been really useful at helping us. Identify a number of anti seizure drugs eggs and anti epilepsy drugs that are on the market today but in the last several years there was concerned that if we just keep using these models were not going to branch out in the kinds ends of treatments we find were using animals whose brains are not really the same as the brains of people who are dealing with epilepsy so he talked about the genetic underpinnings some attempt to tackle those what about these other things like for example sometimes a severe infection can bring on seizures. There are definitely in cases of severe infection or a very prolonged very high fever. Now some of these types of epilepsy are really uncommon that they can be especially devastating. But but some of that work has been scientifically really interesting. Because it's lead scientist to consider different strategies for example looking at inflammation in the brain gene and inflammatory molecules and targeting. Those which is not something we usually think about is associated with epilepsy. But there is. There's a lot of interest in that now and part part of that is in this world of infection induced epilepsies normally. When you think about epilepsy you might think about channels and how neurons fire rather than you know what's going on with inflammation or immunity? Yup One more thread that we could pick up here is traumatic brain injuries being associated with seizures. What kind head of research is being done with those types of epilepsy so this area is really interesting because in this case you have a brain injury and then you have a a time lag before someone develops epilepsy as a result of that injury and that is a window of opportunity that researchers? I want to harness now in use to try and prevent epilepsy in these patients. So the work is still pretty new. And we're not at the point where we can prevent prevent this or have any kind of therapy to prevent it but there is a big effort now to try and identify which of these patients are at especially high risk and then look for drugs or other treatments that can change that trajectory. So that person doesn't develop seizure disorder or you know maybe has a much milder disorder or one that's more responsive to medications. This reminds me of another point. You make the story. Epilepsy is the endpoint. Sometimes we know the starting point. Sometimes we don't but we really care about what the researchers really care about the ARC from the starting point to epilepsy. That's what they wanna trace and it just seems like there are so many different paths one. We haven't talked about is focal epilepsy. Yep that's exactly right one. One of the most common forms of epilepsy focal epilepsy. In that case you know we often don't know the cause. The low people are still working to understand that but another strategy Radzi one can use instead of trying to dig down and get it the mechanism. If we don't have a mechanism is looking at the drugs and thinking. Okay we have a drug. It doesn't work for everybody everybody. Let's better understand this drug and why it fails in some patients. And how can we modify or create a new drug that that enhances its effectiveness. So that's another area of interest for drug companies and others to try and understand the biochemistry here the Chemistry Ministry of the drugs and what they're doing in the brain which we even with approved drugs. We don't always understand and then understand why in someone who's WHO's not being helped helped by a particular medication. What can we do to make it better for them so that it can better blunt their

Epilepsy Focal Epilepsy Jennifer Hi Staff Writer Cricket Science News Team Radzi LEE Frankel KEN Inflammation Chemistry Ministry Writer Scientist Head Of Research
Where NeuroPace Is Headed Under New CEO Mike Favet

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Where NeuroPace Is Headed Under New CEO Mike Favet

"While you're you're part of a really Stellar team now. CEO of Narrow Pace Casey K. had invested in the company around the closing two thousand seventeen. So you obviously had a chance to kick the tires and slammed the doors. So was this a job that you saw it out or was this a job that you up. It was a little bit of both so I came onto the board of directors of neuro pays in the fall of two thousand and sixteen but when Keisuke made the initial part of that investment who was just added to had it too in two thousand seventeen so I had been on the board for almost two and a half three years before I transitioned into the CEO our role and then on top of that about October of two thousand eighteen. I came in to narrow pace as the acting. Chief commercial officer on a on a part time basis so working with Frank Fisher who is the CEO at the time and the rest of the leadership team to make some transition position in particular around the commercial part of the organization on put in place a new strategy make some changes in the organization structure and with that had opportunity. I was spending most of my time pretty pretty much every day. Working Admiral. Pace and so by the time transitioned into the CEO role. I had had several the years of experience with the company as an investor and on the board and then for almost a year on a day to day operating role and so it was it was quite a natural natural natural transition from that Acting role into the CEO role and gave me an opportunity to really get to know the company the people at the company the technology the patients that were impacted by by what it is that we do on a on a day to day basis and get a little bit more of that sense. It's of being involved on the day to day. So you know getting my getting my feet wet again on the operating on the operating company roll. It wasn't an easy. It wasn't an easy transition because I really really truly enjoyed what I was doing Casey K.. So I was in a fortunate spot that I had the opportunity to to make myself a candidate for the C.. The opposition as well as having a job. AKC Gay that. I that I really loved. I'm so not an easy not an easy decision. But ultimately made they made the decision to make myself a candidate for the for the transition that we're making and was selected by the by the board to take it over and have have really. I really enjoyed the opportunity since then. So how do you describe. The situation in neuro paces is starting to created what I think is really really really representative technology. What midtech can be? I mean just a life changing world changing device but as a commercial enterprise as a business in an investment. It's been it's it's a longer in the tooth and most medical startups. It's raised over four hundred million dollars and it's just seems to be getting it straight. Now do you do. Do you see this as as you're you're you're basically taking the the Whitney the cockpit the cockpit of a plane. That's that's airborne are you are you you trying to get this plane off the ground. How do you characterize the situation that narrow pace finds itself in today? I'm fortunate to be taking over a plan that is is already in the air and is rising is rising rapidly of. It's a long time to get there so as you as you stated Developing thing a new therapy which is which is what neuro pace dead new inventing something new on treating. Hey condition a medical condition in a way. That's never been done before is quite difficult. That's A. That's a huge understatement. I'm so it took a long time to develop the technology to run the clinical studies to work through the regulatory Tori process and ultimately get the product to market. The company started commercializing in two thousand fourteen. So when I took over a couple months ago we we were already on past five years of commercialization and had had really seen nice growth in adoption. And so I'm fortunate to come into into a company see that has done all of that hard work establishing the clinical evidence developing the product on getting reimbursement coverage in place. And you know be there to help guide the guide the success of growth. That happens after that after that initial development. So what does that gross look like is it focusing focusing all of the company's attention on your epsile epilepsy a product is it. Is it building this into a larger platform technology. That The treats other diseases. Where where do we go from here? What do you what do you know? Where do you focus on first? Let me ask that. What's your primary for? Our focus is Zayn epilepsy. On the on the up market we have a indication today for for treating medically refractory drug refractory epilepsy Alexi and specifically a subset of patients within medically refractory epilepsy job. One for us is to maximize that opportunity community. We have a a life changing technology on that his being brought into a market where most of the eligible patients are not getting other Therapy on so there's there's really a mission driven sense of for myself and for the organization that we have a solution that could dramatically improve the lives of people with this condition and we need to get it out there so that they can. They can get that benefit

CEO Keisuke Casey K. Casey K AKC Chief Commercial Officer Frank Fisher Representative Four Hundred Million Dollars Three Years Five Years
Is CBD Safe? The FDA Can't Say

Short Wave

10:27 min | 1 year ago

Is CBD Safe? The FDA Can't Say

"NPR. Health correspondent. Allison Aubrey. Hey Alison Hey Mattie so today we're talking about a topic that a lot of people have questions about. CBD Yes can dial or CD as you say. It is compound found in the cannabis Hannah-beth plant so you find it in marijuana and hemp and it has exploded in popularity. It is touted as an elixir that can do everything from relieving Zaidi to to help. Ease your aches and pains. You've heard about it right now. Oh yeah so. There are a lot of companies from big operations to mom and pop shops selling it. I can tell you having been in truck stops in rural Pennsylvania and on the freeway and Silicon Valley. No matter where you are in the country right now you are likely seeing ads for CBD. But here's the thing last week. The Food and Drug Administration came out with some fairly strong warnings. Yes basically they came out and they issued warning letters to fifteen companies selling CD products. And they're basically saying you are violating FDA policy they say you are not allowed to market CBD products as a treatment for any condition or disease. You cannot sell it is a dietary supplement and you may not put it in any foods that are fed to people or animals now just because the FDA has says this is not allowed does not mean that you'll stop seeing products marketed. This way and we'll get to that in a little bit the same day that they weren't all those companies the FDA also updated their consumer guidance for CD there what you need to know about CBD page citing some pretty serious safety concerns. It's a lot of warnings. So today on the show we're going to break down with the FDA DA says about CBD and how some of those warnings might be more valid than others so alison give me the CBD one o one sir can abba dial or CD for short is a component of cannabis. That means it. It is extracted from the plant. Pulled out the plant. It does not contain the psychoactive component. THC that we all know about that makes you high but it still Ella works on your brain in ways that scientists don't completely understand yet. I have reported on studies that are currently evaluating. CBD's potential role in curbing anxiety. There are federal grants. I should say to evaluate whether CBD could be used as an alternative to opioids. But so far there's only one. FDA APPROVED CBD drug on the market. It's approved to treat very specific childhood epilepsy disorders. So we have this weird situation on one. Hand everybody's using CD. There's all this research going on and then the FDA is saying we can't conclude that CD is safe. Yes you're right. It seems paradoxical ago. So let's step back a moment to give some context make sense of this basically CB has been and what I would call regulatory limbo. I mean big time for a longtime. The production of hemp was restricted. It was considered a controlled. Substance Hemp and marijuana are varieties of the same plants cannabis then lashed year under pressure. From from Congress and hemp farmers these restrictions were lifted as part of the two thousand eighteen farm bill and Ben Distri said Alleluia. This is great but the FDA quickly weekly stepped in and said hey wait a second here we have regulatory authority over CBD. And there's a lot we still don't know. Remember this compound kind of came out of nowhere. I mean right have ah you heard of CBD three years ago not really. I mean this year. I wouldn't be surprised if it's one of the more popular items and Christmas stockings around the country. So is it fair to say the FDA might have been a little bit caught off guard by this. Yes this boom of. That's right and it's well within their purview. To regulate it when it's used in foods or as drug but they say they just don't have a lot of data to go on yet right now. The agency is in the midst of writing some specific rules to regulate but before they do. They WANNA know that it's safe. We should also point out that even though the FDA just said we can't say CD's safe the World Health Organization another giant public health three-nation put out a report last year saying CBD is generally well tolerated and has a good safety profile. That's right from what they've seen so far the. Who is saying there can be some adverse effects from drug interactions. But there's no evidence of any public health related problem associated with that. That is what they say. They point to the fact that several countries have modified their regulations to allow the use of CBD as a medicinal product. But again the FDA playing it safe saying it needs more data now one area where they say they need more is on the potential for liver damage from using CD. And you've been looking into that right. Yeah so that is actually one of the things. The FDA warns people about in what you need to know page. I looked into it a bit and some of the state came from when the FDA DA was reviewing the epilepsy medication that we've talked about Basically they found that taking. CBD has the potential for damaging the liver and that was very dose dependent meeting most of the troubling results happened at higher doses And that makes sense right. There's a good bit of data out there. Supporting this and a lot of the serious damage was seen when people were taking other other drugs that also impacted the liver and that brings us to another warning which is potential drug interactions does CBD increase or decrease crease the effects of other medications. You might be taking. Does it. Increase side effects basically the FDA saying they are concerned about the potential safety of taking other medications at the same time. You're taking CD. When you're not being monitored by a healthcare professional and the most interesting warning they put out to me at least was there mention of this potential for male reproductive toxics? Okay Yeah So. The FDA warns that CD led to decreased testicular size mess with the growth of sperm and Development Minton and decreased circulating testosterone. But the thing is alison. All of this data came from animal studies including delightful study on Sea Urchin Sea Urchin Yup. Yep Okay and in one of those studies. They weren't even testing on actual animals just cells isolated from animals okay and even the FDA acknowledges that stuff that happens in animals almost does not necessarily happen in humans right and I asked the FDA for more information about this and they sent me about twelve studies. And I looked at a good bit of them and some of them used I really high doses of how high like ten times the maximum recommended dose for the FDA approved drug that. We've already been talking low which is already a hider the right and to be fair doses researchers using animals are sometimes more than they use in humans but I saw some real variability in the studies. Some found differences and in sperm. And how they're moving around how much there is. But another didn't and it seems to depend maybe on the type of animals that were studied so a lot of inconsistencies. Here a little bit. Yeah and in one of the studies they did show that. CBD Treatment Lead to a decrease in testosterone but it was still within the normal physiological range. So you think these studies might be a little week more like the conclusions at the. FDA is drawing from this group of Studies. There weren't that many of them and I find it odd that the FDA put out this kind of scary fertility warning warning based solely on animals. So those are the specific warnings. The FDA has mentioned here but they also say that they have some concerns about a special populations like the elderly children pregnant women and also a very special population are pets dogs cats. You see all kind of marketing around doggy. CBD for your anxious pup but the FDA says that they can't say whether this is safer effective they also I want to look into the cumulative effects. Meaning what happens if you're using multiple CD products at one time. This was my favorite government warning. Okay let's see Jason Literally said what happens if you eat food with few skin cream and take other CD products on the same day. I am sure there are people out there doing I meant. I know where where they're going with it but it read to me like what could happen if you put it in your eyes and your ears in your mouth and you rub it on your but in the same day what could happen. Alison we we know. But okay real talk. Allison you have been reporting on the FDA and FDA related things for years. What are your feelings about all this you no I think the FDA is in a tough spot here? I mean these are fair warnings. If you consider what they know and don't know the agencies just trying to communicate that the CBD products haven't all been evaluated for safety or efficacy meaning whether they work or not and you know the CD you buy online or over the counter sir depending on who made it might not have the amount of CBD in it it says on the bottle it might not actually contain CBD. I mean given given the current state of regulation. You just can't be sure or you know there could be other stuff in there that you don't want right well. This is the perennial problem with supplements. Right I mean the FDA has this dividing line between how it regulates prescription drugs and how it regulates supplements when something's prescription drug. There's a rigorous amount of testing that it goes into it right when something is regulated as a supplement. It's kind of a wait and watch situation if something goes wrong. The FDA certainly has the power to take it off the market market. But you often don't know what's in the products or if there might be contaminants in there so there was always a buyer. Beware message when you're talking about things that are are you buying off the shelf like dietary supplements and so what do you think about from the safety perspective. You know I really do think it's interesting. With the world. Health Organization Organization has said. I mean they're basically saying from what we've seen so far. The safety profile looks to us. Pretty good I think one possible resolution solution to all of this as the FDA ways exactly how to regulate CD. I mean. Let's face it. CBS Not going away. But I think there could be some tiered system. That's certainly something you hear. The industry talking about there could be high dose products which would be restricted and require a prescription then. Low dose products like supplements Lancer Foods. which would be more widely available makes sense so the PR person that I talked to you said the FDA will have more to say about CBD in the coming weeks so we will be looking forward to another CD UPDATE

CBD Food And Drug Administration FDA Cannabis Alison Marijuana Allison Aubrey Zaidi Pennsylvania Npr. Epilepsy Testosterone Silicon Valley Liver Damage Ella Sea Urchin Sea Health Organization Organizati
Brain implants used to fight drug addiction in US

the NewsWorthy

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Brain implants used to fight drug addiction in US

"For the first time. US researchers are embedding technology and people's brains it to fight opioid addiction reports. Researchers in West Virginia are running the first clinical trial using a deep brain stimulation or D. S. device for this reason. Here's here's how it works. An electrode is surgically implanted inside the brain then. An external device sends electrical pulses to the chip to interrupt the patients. Typical brain behavior like cravings as for a drug. It's supposed to eventually train the patient's brain to no longer want the drug's gadget says. DBS Technology is already FDA approved and used to treat Parkinson's disease leased depressive disorders and epilepsy. But it's still being tested for opioid addiction. If all goes well it could eventually be used as a last resort

United States Dbs Technology Depressive Disorders West Virginia Parkinson FDA
A Top Keto Researcher Shares Her Findings

The Keto Answers Podcast

09:32 min | 1 year ago

A Top Keto Researcher Shares Her Findings

"I think you'd be on the podcast today. Anger Anthony Yes. Yes you are Maybe you say give people information just a little bit of your background currently what you do I'm a research associate at the University in South Florida and the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology I worked with Dr Dominic Douglas. You know we have a lab here where we we study metabolism and how it pertains to the development and potential therapeutic interventions for a variety of diseases. primary focus for me would be cancer Um so he's been cancer. Metabolism things like Akita Genetic Diet or other non talk ways the target metabolism could be a useful advent to standard of Care Therapy for cancer better level so looked at eight non toxic metabolic targeted therapies or other these jazz seizure disorders and also near genetic disorders including some rare disorders like Kabuki Syndrome which is something that we've recently started studying so we have a wide array of interest kind of all related to how we can optimized metabolism to prevent and treat the gotta before we dive in deeper and I think what you do on a day-to-day basis just curious as far as your background and what got you interested in this field in the first place sure so I was always interested in. I was even a a young on girl. I was very much like a tomboy. I would always be playing outside like you know catch lizards grasshoppers than I was just so interested in those dot dot kind of so biology plus always really interested in me to the point where I never really thought about doing anything else. I probably from the time that I knew being scientists was an option. I was decidedly going to be a scientist and I always really loved the idea of contributing something new to be in a wealth of knowledge that was out there so just reading scientific textbooks and thinking about how literally each each launch of their represents an advise some fine history that had an interesting question or idea and tested dot hypothesis and came up with something new that had never been known before and that really drew me the being though after to High School I went to college with that in mind I studied biochemistry molecular biology at Hendrix College which is a small college in Arkansas which is where I grew up had a really great experience there where the the call all just very intent on experiential learning and so I was actually able to work in a neuro science research lab for three years at Undergrad and able to do really really interesting research and actually present at them national conferences even while I was an Undergrad which kind of furthered heard my you know solidified my interest in going on to graduate school and being scientists so then I decided to do my PhD after Undergrad and I came down to University of South Florida for or a PhD program in Biomedical Sciences and started looking around four labs to join though when you start a PhD program you have to identify who's GonNa be your nature Professor and the project that you're going to work work are gone for your dissertation project and that's what I'm doctor you know he was a new faculty member here. USF This is about ten years ago or so and he was doing a load of work at that time for the Navy looking at mitigation negation strategies to combat a unique type of seizure that manifest when you breathe high oxygen concentrations at depth so such a navy diver might experience and that led him down the rabbit hole to booking at he does this which of course the Ketogenic Diet had been used clinically for a hundred years actually to treat epilepsy mets refractory to education and so he was doing work in that field and at the time has kind of stumbled across this idea about a ton of research on at the time by the thought that maybe toes Hud's them properties that could be anticancer and that it was at the time I was looking for a research lab and I met Dr Casino and you described these ideas to me and it just sounded really fascinating in part because it seems so novel. It's funny now when I think about at that time the idea of diet impacting something as serious as cancer. It seemed surprising to me because now it seems so obvious that something so impactful the Diet would have major impacts on something like cancer but at the time it was very enterprising and I I'd had some personal experience with with cancer and and my father had had brain tumors starting when he was very young he had them even had them irradiated was pretty pretty intense radiation therapy which saved his life allowed him to live past you know his back speculation into his you know into relatively old age and and allowed me to to come around so that radiation saved his life but 'cause very long lasting negative effects and that he had cognitive physical decline over time and you know this was at a time we're a lot better now at using targeted radiation to eliminate much of those off target effects but at the time it was kind of more intense whole brain irradiation type therapy and I think I was just very intrigued by this idea that maybe there's here's the non toxic ways that we can before standard of care therapies so that we can protect our healthy tissue while putting more stress on the tumor and I I love that idea about potentially using diet do that and and I think that that really kind of caught my cut my eye. I and I decided to join Donovan and start up the Kantha research program and his love so now still split your serve research focuses. This is in in everybody all in on this sort of like metabolic therapies or or how do you split up. Yeah I would say our whole lab is it's pretty dynamic and their interest we kind of have people have more specific areas adventures expertise I I really enjoy and tend to focus on the cancer work in our lab dominate the classically trained neuroscientists and daas more his wheelhouse but we all kind of are familiar with the whole territory and contribute in other ways. I think that is also really important part to this kind kind of science as being multidisciplinary because we understand and learn a lot from each other though we're lucky about the epilepsy field has a very long history three of studying diet and metabolism and not do these days and there's a lot that we can learn from each other those are those and cancer biology for example or people studying nearer nearer developmental disorders can look at things like epilepsy and learn from I'm definitely we have people who kind of tend to focus on certain things were all also contributing to most of the projects that come out of the lab okay. How many resources do you guys have the right. Now we have about Devon fulltime not fall and then we have a number of students who come in and we'll volunteer or work as a student researcher for some period of time here and there so I would say I'm sure on yours and the answer is not enough of course always okay okay so one of the things you mentioned before was that you sort of have this transition in how you're thinking about cancer therapies and in that you know how could nutrition affect any of this nine eleven obviously. How can it not so? What did you learn that brought you from one mindset to the other. I think just the learning how impactful nutrition is on everything that happens in our bodies. I mean it is I would say one of the main them Eli but but our body is receiving it it tell their internal system a lot about the outside world.

Cancer Anthony Yes Scientist Dr Dominic Douglas Research Associate Department Of Molecular Pharma South Florida Kabuki Syndrome USF Donovan Hendrix College Arkansas High School ELI Navy University Of South Florida Devon
Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

"Not easy to study the development of the human brain. The brain is very unassessable especially the early fetal stages. It's just not ethical thirty we study normal healthy. Human Brains University of California San Diego Biologist Alison Mojo Tree. He says researchers have instead relied on animal models. The human brain is so much different other species that were desperate to have really a human model so he can study the human brain. Now Moody's team may have that model title in the form of small globules of brain cells. They've created in the lab. These piece is structures developed from stem cells that are bathed in a culture of nutrients along along with proteins that control gene activation as the little structures grow their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells and they will form connections and disconnections will form functional synapses that will later on turn into networks after two months the mini brains even begin to limit brainwaves and you can record every week to see how the activity has changed and when they reach about six months of age we see a growth exponentially initially in the number of connections opposites that they can make and at around ten months their brain activity compares to that of premature human infants there prematch which following the same trajectory as the human brain does that could make the mini brains very useful for understanding how our brains become wired early on and they could also provide insights nights into the development of neurological conditions such as autism and epilepsy these very early stages are exactly win some neurological conditions appeared and and behalf the possibility to help millions of people with neurological conditions that mood tree also cautions that as technology moves forward ethical questions will. I'll start to emerge someone my ass. Are they conscious or are they self-aware. Can they feel pain. I think we are in Graz zone where this technology could who'd evolve to something more complex and then I think the ethical question would be what's the status of these miniaturized brains military says is that same question has formed the basis for the rules and regulations governing the use of animals in the lab which can serve as a model to guide the mini brain research the findings in the Journal cell stem cell in addition to shedding light on neurological development. Many brains could also help reveal how the human brain evolved and play a role in an improving algorithms for artificial intelligence. These piece is brains may produce some big

Human Brains University Of Cal Alison Mojo Tree Journal Cell Stem Cell Graz Moody Six Months Ten Months Two Months
Is the Keto Diet Healthy?

Living Healthy Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

Is the Keto Diet Healthy?

"Your your brain and your body runs off. Glucose for fuel tank when you're starving and when you're intentionally fasting even your body converts key tones and you can burn those for fuel so it's a survival mechanism <hes> okay that your body as an able to do. It's an adaptation okay so putting your body and it. Qatada state state to state of Ketosis right funding. Your body in a state of Ketosis is a is a survival mechanism but that happens to who have worked for epilepsy so why does it work now and how does it work you eat a good preponderance of your calories from fat like like seventy percent of your calories from fat and then maybe twenty five from protein and five percent from carbohydrates like down to twenty grams of carbohydrates tweets per day like a sixth of what we say minimum mean person earlier but when you look at okay eliminating things that have natural carbohydrates in them they're going to be plant foods server one and milk products so grains vegetables legumes fruit an even. That's in that sense seats. Oh Yeah getting down to twenty grams a day three times. I mean it's like five grams of carbohydrate per meal. So what is this your body well it. It forces it to make the key ten so you're burning the key tones. <hes> I gotTA survive right right. Wow so at the calories can can still be up there because you're eating so much fat you can still get a high calorie load. Alex out of it. Okay is there any long-term <unk> is there can you do. Kito long-term could use to see that well and I know in the short term illness short-term. You've got weight loss particularly when compared with a low fat diet or just a healthy Mediterranean diet it there's improvements in blood sugar for type two diabetes but in the long-term as you're saying Britney I it's just hard for people to follow hollow and that difference in weight between say the groups that were on Kito in the groups that weren't that difference ms men mole overtime okay so again like take your three months versus a couple of years and I know that there are passionate followers that will that will pool me and say wrong. I've this is my life lifestyle and I've done it for for ten. Yeah exactly you know it's probably but probably the average person based on the environment. They're in it makes it very difficult to sustain sustain. Where you're you're finding a way to only have that low carbs yeah and and I look at I'm a very evidence based practitioner so <hes> if you look at the studies will what research says well. They don't really have populations of people on long-term ketogenic diets to to find out and you're certainly I'm not going to have a a subject group or study group because you're not supplying them food for fifteen years right <hes> so it's also reported really <hes> and funds were as with all these other diets often. It's looking at people's intake getting three dietary recall or having them complete a food frequency easy questionnaire and it's what they say that they're eating how accurate it is whether they're right on it or not.

Ketosis Kito Alex Britney Twenty Grams Seventy Percent Fifteen Years Five Percent Three Months Five Grams Milk
Scientists Developing Chip That Zaps People When They Think About Food

WBBM Programming

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists Developing Chip That Zaps People When They Think About Food

"Obese people may soon be able to get a brain chip implanted in them that would zap them when they think about food the chip known as a response of Nero stimulation system was first developed by Norrell pace to treat people with epilepsy to deliver a mild electric shock when it detected a seizure but a recent study showed that the same technique could be used to suppress binge eating behavior in mice now scientists at Stanford want to find out if it could also work on humans who suffer from what is known as loss of control eating six morbidly obese people have agreed to take part in a clinical

Stanford Nero Norrell
Chip implanted in obese people's brains will zap them when they think about food

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Chip implanted in obese people's brains will zap them when they think about food

"It obese people may soon be able to get a brain chip implanted in them that would zap them when they think about food the chip known as a response of Nero stimulation system was first developed by Norrell pace to treat people with epilepsy to deliver a mild electric shock when it detected a seizure but a recent study showed that the same technique could be used to suppress binge eating behavior in mice now scientists at Stanford want to find out if it could also work on humans who suffer from what is known as loss of control eating six morbidly obese people have agreed to take part in a clinical

Stanford Nero Norrell
Medical marijuana now legal in Louisiana

Newell Normand

13:26 min | 1 year ago

Medical marijuana now legal in Louisiana

"The Louisiana department of agriculture and forestry has announced that it is cleared the final medical marijuana product has passed all testing is is cleared for immediate release to the medical marijuana pharmacies and joining us on the line is Louisiana agriculture and forestry commissioner Mike straying to talk about this Mike welcome to the show hello no how are you doing today doing great doing great you guys announced that the marijuana tincture formulation is available now today Tuesday yes are we cleared the first batch of finals up final product in other words the product that's actually going to be patient last Thursday afternoon and so it is moving to patients but that started you know yesterday and of course the day it should be getting to the pharmacies and so you know we we clear that it did the final testing and we tested now we the first batch was forty seven hundred and sixty five units which in other words each vial has you know he is considered a unit and so that is on its way we expect our to clear the second batch which will be about forty three hundred units on the by Friday this Friday morning and so that's the timetable for that and of course there are successful and it is grown and processed in you know in the production and a batch system and so you know we've cleared it and what you know we don initially we tested the extract which we call the matrix but it's the extract and then the extract is then placed into a solution form and then we trusted that you know would you be SL Ellis you to look at THC concentrations CVT concentrations and also make sure that there weren't any contaminants and then the final solution we tested to make sure that the first bottle all the way to the forty seven hundred and sixty fifth bottle all the same so the whole genius and then we tested and certified the THC level the CD levels in them as well as to make sure that the or no bacterial contamination that you know what could have happened during the bottling process so we take in a sample random samples and then we you will open the vials we take those samples and when we run a battery of tests on them and the first batch we had we ran twenty five separate all units twenty five separate samples were tested and cleared and the second batch about twenty three that's all mathematical model that we use based on you know the the science laboratories of how many and how to do that but it's a random testing and so that they have cleared and the first batch as a matter of flavored the lecture and that product is should be and the date and the pharmacist my day I'm there's been much criticism about this process but this is what you expected in any type of liquid form of medicine that that hits you know that that is put into the stream of commerce correct well you know normally what we would call my list you don't look at the basic kind cable our legislation was passed in really June of twenty fifteen became a law in July of twenty fifteen in June of twenty sixteen so as we go full year I was sure I said I gave us written notice that their intent to be the licensee and on August twenty sixteen southern gave us a written statement that they again we're confirming that they were gonna be licenses production so they had the first right of refusal right and so he was in the fall of twenty seventeen that issue sign with GPS Alan southern sign with their first contractors they began Ellis you began building facilities are getting the building billing cycle sell these sorting all this out you know early in the spring of twenty eighteen and you know and just basically get out of the final facility bear horde facility wasn't finished no really until may or June of this year and so when you look at this you know where the this was done on the FDA it was taken eight to ten years the help from an election to final probably two to three years because clinical trials and really you have to stop when they look at when they started construction of buildings and just design a building coming sore from design construction harmony all of those things plus satisfying the state law as to suitability develop in their standard operating procedures you know putting the manufacturing facility yeah this is a growing marijuana in a in a hot house so this is making a pharmaceutical product that began in earnest in the spring of twenty eight so really in two years the under the state rules we've done what would have taken a katana under federal I think a lot of people really kind of you this is a cottage industry as though this was going to be a mom and pop kind of thing and when you have your facts and facilitate naps lately and I think you know that that was a misnomer from day one and it ended in I think there is actually good reason for because when you look into that other states there have been a number of batches that have been denied in other states for contaminants pesticides mold they have found all kinds of foreign substances there that and as a result the regulators had to reject the product right and so you know what we did we don't work very hard looking at what was going on in other states as well as good manufacturing practices are not only with marijuana but any type of pharmaceutical products so when you look at our first stage of testing we test the matrix and it is tested for things that we will have to look for heavy metals we test for pesticides I we test against for any type of Solomon improper books obstructions in a week that's from a variety of compounds you know in the initial product and then secondarily one week after that initial product is then processed into a solution then we test the THC levels of CVD levels also checking to make sure that no contaminants to there and then church here in the final stage you know we test our again to make sure that it's off that it's all the same reconfirm the THC MCV levels also check for salmonella E. coli east rolled my contractions those sorts of things so that when the patient opens it up we know that they have a safe product and you have to do this every step of the way because as as you know if you remember years ago when they were compounding injectable steroids and remember when they got contaminated how many people got sick from that yeah and well I mean we have to be very very very careful that that nothing leaves because you know I'm responsible along with the LSU GB sciences and southern and I layer of you know we're responsible to make sure that this product gets to the patient in a form that is not contaminated and about will not give out that will not harm them end up like this a base formulation this is something that it can be modified at the pharmacy level in different elixirs meaning as I notice in the article he said that the product can cost between ninety and two hundred dollars a bottle at the pharmacy depending on the formulation yes and so when you look at the the formulation here you know with the the first one with that there have is it's a T. H. C. rich one US one G. H. C. perceive the mother was a hundred fifty milligrams of each box and a bottle then they have a CVT rich twelve hundred milligrams a CD to sixty milligrams CH C. R. so then you know the pharmacist you know I'm a pharmacist has the option to modify this deluded compound or or whatever and the thing that we know is that you know different patients will will be affected differently and it comes on the disease state your trading so you have one you have the physicians and there are eighty seven I think positions as on record of oxygen that are allowed to make these recommendations they will make a recommendation to the pharmacist based on the concentration and the type of product that that they believe the patient needs and then the pharmacist will then you know make sure that's the formula that the patient needs and we do know from a lot of literature that they're you know especially in CH see if they have different effects on different patients and that's why you know specialist for off with a low dose and then you know work the way forward so you get the desired almost the pharmaceutical effect for the disease being treated same same strategy that's taken in a bunch of other different types of medicines the for treatments as well right absolutely and especially when you're dealing with this type of compound get out of the lower the dose is the better you know but what breeding a variety of diseases intractable pain on in college cases cancer HIV aka CAC feel seizure disorders epilepsy MS multiple sclerosis fastest of the severe muscle spasms Parkinson's Bacolod posttraumatic stress disorder autism spectrum disorder Crohn's disease and muscular dystrophy and it is and as a regular looking at directly at eighty four doctors that are able to recommend Mike when so Dick have we studied whether or not there's going to be enough supply for the demand well the initial discussions we had it you know what and again the board of pharmacy was to try to calculate how much plant matter we need that will make the amount of in the pharmaceutical use we would need based on the disease states that would being treated and that being said that's what the initial discussions of size and scope came about now since then of course and contents with that legislatures you see is adding additional on diseases that can be treated and so what where we're at now I wish you is in the production system they are processing and its batch process we will expect to clear again a second batch for distribution to the pharmacist our Friday morning Friday of this week that'd be about forty three hundred doses and then very shortly there after it in a short period of time they will have more batches that will be available again to the public at the same time southern is coming on line several weeks ago they planted there first you know seeds and of course they are ramping up rapidly and by this fall we expect of southern will have on the server products on the street and so it really depends on you know how many patients come to the pharmacy is that what you know how many people will buy the product what the effect will be by the patient find the products you as to the fact on their particular disease condition that they're trading and then I you know if if everything is successful then we would expect that the man would grow and they will have to increase production I own a ongoing basis to meet that demand and we're not we're not aware of in the commercial insurance that actually covers this treatment yet our our our week as far as I know there is no commercial insurance that will cover this because it is not and after the A. regulated drug under the state under the state and so that will probably be a discussion that we were here in the state legislature this year I'm sure we will have that discussion as well also as you know this is right now is in any election reform and the legislature did pass on some law that would allow for eighty eight metered dose inhaler that's not a thing that's not smoking it's one of the compound is placed into an inhaler similar to what you have for delivery of medicines for asthma or other type of you know the diseases and the reason for that is that you can get a more rapid response in the southern alternative delivery system our versus having to take it all away right final thoughts Mike well you know we're all been working hard we can continue to work hard at this point we have to make sure that the production system stays in place we're trying to get LSU and southern both at full production and everyone has worked very hard to get this in place also that they'll be no doctor shopping because there is a reporting mechanism were also keeping records on the effect of the drugs as well if there are any type of country indications and that is gonna be studied by the board of medical examiners the board of pharmacy my office and you know the other medical professionals well thank you for the update we really appreciate it and I know there are a lot of people that are excited about having this opportunity in order the treat those listed ailments as you so adequately were able to recount far better than I would have but I can tell you and we thank you for your

Louisiana Department Of Agricu Marijuana Louisiana Two Hundred Dollars Sixty Fifth Three Years Ten Years Two Years One Week One G
"epilepsy" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Mala Theus mellow fa- Kerem. Sure the which the witch finders handbook? Uh-huh. It was basically in there and either if you had epilepsy, you were a Witcher. You were possessed by demon. Or in some cases you could be possessed by like an angel or something like that. But more often than not, it was like a negative thing, like a negative spirited possessed you or you're under the influence of a witch. So somebody in your village could be accused of witchcraft if you had epilepsy because they were like this, which over here is giving this guy. Epilepsy burner gal is a thing. So epilepsy is always been tied to that and that law about a people with epilepsy, not being able to marry. Yes. There were laws on the books in the United States up until nineteen eighty that said, people with epilepsy can't get married, really can't get married yet, but the I'm sure those were those laws that are enforced, right? Or were they literally enforcing those? I don't know that part. I'm sure they were back in like the twenties and thirties during the generics movement for, I don't know that they were up until nineteen eighty. That sounds like one of those laws where like you can't spit on the. Street after sundown can't put lipstick on a horse. Oh, you can get it on. And then you know, ancient treatments. Are exactly what you would think like everything from drinking blood to killing a dog and drinking. It's bile, if someone's having a seizure near you pee in your shoe and give it to them to drink it, like it's a jellyfish sting yet, but in the shoe, I don't know like, what is that? Just because they know that you have something that holds urine? That would be my guess. Okay. I didn't know that was like, oh, no. This is also p into like cupped hands, cupped hands, and then just kind of like just drop it onto the mouth. Regardless. That's another thing. Don't put a wallet or a Spooner credit card and somebody's about don't put your urine in somebody who's having a seizures mouth doesn't help. I also saw that it wasn't until the eighteenth century that people finally were like. I don't think this is actually infectious, right? The one of the reasons why people with epilepsy were so shunned just Sean and stigmatize and just kept on the outskirts of the the, yeah, the outskirts of society because people thought epilepsy was contagious and you catch it from the breath of someone with epilepsy. So like the people with epilepsy epilepsy have been treated horribly for all time basically. So hopefully we can kind of dispel any of the last myths around it. That's my hope with this. So Chuck, let's see if we can do it. Okay. Well, we like to start off every episode by stating our hopes and dreams, you know. So what's going on in the brain? We'll get to that a little bit more. Indeed. Tale, but kind of the the way this article in our on our own website puts it which this was so like ten years ago, riding wise, but they, they basically talk about kind of traffic jam in your brain when there's confusion when there's too much too many neurons firing at once and it can cause an overwhelming sensation that can eventually cause a seizure yet. It's like I've seen it compared to like electrical storms. Yeah, we're basically it's a a sudden overload in electrical overload in your brain, and your brains is like, I'm just shutting down here for a second and then resets at self. Your brain sounds like Bob Newhart. Mine does mine. And you said from from a bunch of neurons firing at once? Yeah, not just a bunch of neurons, but those neurons that are firing fire a lot more than usual, right. Something like a so they fire eighty times a second. Normally, where during a seizure, they're gonna fire like five hundred times a second. Yeah. And you know, we'll talk about the brain machines later, but one thing that's characteristic of seizures this when they look at your brain scan their big peaks and valleys. Yes, it's not a a steady stream of due to know that noise. Bob newhart. He knew he was gonna, show us low and stay. That's great. But let's talk about some of the types of seizures. There are a couple of broader categories, focal seizures or generalized seizures. Focal seizures are just in one part of the brain where generalized and I think about sixty percent of people with epilepsy, have the the focal kind generalized are both sides of the brain. Yeah, like your whole brain is under attack. Whereas, yeah, the the, the focal seizures, it could just be from like a lesion in a specific part or something that's hypersensitive that's just just one tiny region of your brain, but it's enough to do some wacky stuff to you. Yes. And within those groups, there are further sub groups. For instance, the simple focal seizure or a complex focal seizure, the two types of focal seizures. So as simple focal seizure is you're just kinda have like a weird feeling like you're conscious the whole time. Yes. Yeah. And it's also sometimes called an aura, an aura itself. It can just be a standalone seizure, but it's kinda like seizure lite l. i. t. e. right, but that same simple focal seizure can also be the beginning of a larger complex focal seizure or larger seizure of either type there. It's just the or is just the beginning symptoms of it. So it can be stand alone or it can lead to a larger seizure. Yeah, and we'll, we'll get it. You send a really cool thing. We'll get into in the second about like exactly what a seizure as like, but quickly a complex focal seizure. The other type of focal seizure. You do lose consciousness. And if you are around someone that has one of these, you might. See it's a little bit more like what you would think of as a movie seizure, Yankee, better term. It can be like twitching blinking. Maybe some just sort of

epilepsy Bob Newhart mala Theus fa- Kerem United States Spooner Chuck Sean sixty percent ten years
"epilepsy" Discussed on Slate's Dear Prudence

Slate's Dear Prudence

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Slate's Dear Prudence

"Epilepsy, and that is fantastic and your boyfriend's family in a completely unrelated situation has a struggling farm an third unrelated situation. Your boyfriend does not wanna work in the medical marijuana industry, so I can understand how given your bias that you're coming to the table where there's this sense of like, but it works so great for me. I see this really amazing opportunity here. I think everything could kind of work out. Great, but it's not your family and it's not your farm and it's not your career. It's him. He has made it pretty clear. Not that he has some reservations about managing a pot farm, but that he doesn't want to work, you know, in the medical marijuana industry regardless of how legal it is. He would rather do something else. And he also has a, you know. Some tension with you about the medical marijuana that you use and you. You also know that he has kind of a dysfunctional relationship with his family. So even though to you, it's like, man, this would all line up so great. That's not how he sees it. And so I think any attempts to sort of convince like I, there's always room, I think, sometimes like advocate for something for your partner, even if they don't think it's a good idea. I'm not saying you should never try to come up with suggestions or disagree about something, but you think this would be great because you'd really like it, and it doesn't sound like it lines up at all with the things that he's talked about wanting for his life. It's not like he said, man, if if only for my past, I could really see myself helping manage this farm and work in industry. He doesn't want to. So I think what you should do is say, medical marijuana, helping you manage my epilepsy. That is fantastic. My boyfriend seems to do better when he has a little distance from his family, and I don't want to. Encourage him to go into business with them in an industry. He doesn't wanna work in just because my symptoms have been improved, like those are just not related. Yeah. No, that makes total sense. I think it may be when I first read it, I might have skipped over or didn't quite pick up the tension between the boyfriend and his family, but there was just that little bit at the end and it's unclear like what the tension just as past familial dysfunction. So, no, that's definitely definitely does feel like you know the, the writer presents it as you know, how do I, how do I best explained to him my intentions as though it's a matter of her sort of presentation of this idea that is the the stumbling block here or but, but does it sound like you know, he's he has pretty solid, has he has a pretty solid mind made up and reasons for the way that he feels and. Yeah, I feel like I mean the the issue of pot usage of your pod usage, the the, you know, using it to to treat seizures like that is I feel like he should chill about that if there's tension in relationship about that, but but yeah, that's a separate issue from the from these ambitions. Yeah, yeah. And I'm a little unsure. The phrase at the end is passed familial dysfunction in regards to drug use, and that's unclear if that's about your drug use or possibly potential past drug druggies for him. You said that he used to sell drugs. You don't mention whether or not he ever used drugs or abused drugs. So I'm kind of curious what specifically was going on there. You don't tell us, so I don't know..

marijuana Epilepsy partner writer
"epilepsy" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

10:36 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Georgia. Treating people with epilepsy has some significant challenges. Dr Matt cook, the difficult condition to troop because the seizures aren't occurring all the time. So most adults with epilepsy, a having seizures, maybe with bed. Epilepsy may be having seizures a few times a week or a few times a month or Pepsi than less often than that. And that might sound much because the seizures might consist simply of losing awareness for few minutes. It's often difficult for people to appreciate how that disrupts people's lives. But it does because the unpredictability of the events and the fact that they might not be safe operating, say a Cairo machinery or it might make the work environment dangerous all of these issues very real. And it's the unpredictability of the situation which leads to a lot of that disability. Most patients with epilepsy are extremely well in all other respects and to have their life limited by such a random seemingly random and unpredictable occurrences, devastating, and has ramifications for a lot of other aspects of their life. So that, for instance, part from driving and work, it might affect the recreational activities is swimming, might not be safe, how the sports they're involve with might not be safe and it will have social consequences. So other people chiefly through the very low level of under. Standing in the community generally might cause them to have different relations with their friends or their employers who might consider epilepsies psychiatric illness or perhaps even contagious illness. So there's lots of misunderstanding of this kind thick people terribly epilepsy requires close management of lifestyles. So that very important trigger of seizures is sleep deprivation and other important munza of stress compliance with the medication that is taking them regularly and reliably a really, really important, and and these involve changes to people's lives which are way beyond most other medical conditions. Tell me about the main improvements on the horizon in bitter treatment of epilepsy. There's a few big areas. One is it's not having such an impact on treatment of the moment, but it will, and that is the better understanding of the genetic causes of epilepsy. So many applets. He's have a genetic basis and these are being much bitter understood. And you've seen in other conditions, particularly cancer where once the genes ride into fide, it allows development of specific treatments perhaps. And so in the user head, we will see new treatments of all because of that. And that will very important from the point of view of the other epilepsies we getting much better with medication. So new medications tend to have been a side effect profiles overall in it's obviously very important and being able to have a bigger range of medications to select from give you a much bigger Shunichi to find Choon medication to the individual patient. So that's really important to the. Surgeries, improving because imaging techniques always getting bitter more powerful scanners, new systems and wise of finding out exactly where in the brain seizures come from. For instance, we've been involved in a lot of this work with Swinburne university recently using the make Scana so magneto in Kifleh Graham which lets us see activity of the Brian in ways that we couldn't before. And of course, as well. We've been looking at some very novel ways of improving seizure management. So that seizure predictions and important one we've been doing work over some years now in Suzhou prediction, which has been quite successful though it's still not a mainstream therapy, but that will change over the next few years. So we performed a study which we completed about five years ago where we put devices into people. So they were implanted devices with electrodes sitting directly on brine way. We recorded continuously the brain's electrical activity, and we used this activity too. Predict seizures and we demonstrated that could work what really well for some people pretty well for a lot of others. There was some patients that we couldn't predict seizures accurately for though or even generate system to make the predictions useful. So we've been working with all of the data and we generated an enormous amount of data from that study that was still working with very actively their new methods of delivering drugs directly to the brine. And we've been doing that with the pump. These studies still in very early days, but they showing great promise. So I think the people with epilepsy, there's an enormous range of new things happening. Of course, a lot of the spare mental still, but it is proving very successful cook, urologist and hit of the millburn medical school. All in the mind on our in omlund Malcolm, one of the most devastating things about having epilepsy is that you never really know for sure when you might have seizure and depending on when and where it happens to you, it can be a matter of life or death. Mop cook mentioned the new research area of Sesia prediction. He and his colleagues from Melbourne University have been working with IBM, providing them with the patient's brain activity daughter to develop Sesia prediction technology. Dr Stephan HARA is part of the research stranger team which is developing artificial intelligence technology for Sesia forecasting. A little bit of a Jack of all trades. I liked to find ways to bridge disciplines with each other and coming from computer science and engineering. I do have a background in data science. Now, one of the hardest things to be in right now is an artificial intelligence because that allows to technical problems which haven't been solved for decades in completely new ways. And epilepsy came up because it just ticks all the boxes in terms of the the use case that you wanna have to bring a to full fruition. The field of epilepsies a field where a data driven approach has not exactly been the focus for what's been done over the past. And so that has led to a situation where treating diagnosing in managing epilepsy as largely been a trial and error endeavor. And that's something that I. Leave can be changed by looking at Pepsi in a more coherent data driven way. I think that's one of the most rewarding things. One can do to merge skills and advances in two different fields into a project and solve something there that neither one of the disciplines could have been solving by themselves would v have set ourselves as a mission statement is we want to develop technology that reinstates a certain level of control in these patients who have to live with epilepsy. And the way we do this is that v. developed technology that can predict seizures before they happen. And the technology that developing here is not just something rerun on a supercomputer in the basement. But with the research you're doing if actually found a way to build such a prediction system that runs on a chip that is the size of a postage. Stamp and runs on the power budget over hearing aid such a system Ville, allow patients to gain back control over certain part of their lives. Imagine if you're driving your car or your rock climbing, if you're socializing, right? If you know as easier will strike, you can manage the situation and that can make the difference between life or death. If you wanna look at it really closely right putting your car over before seizure strikes can make all the difference. Stephan HARA explains why technology has such good potential in the management of the condition like Lipsey. Epilepsy is highly individualized condition. So changes. Epilepsy looks different in different patients, and it looks different in a patient over time. That's what makes it so hard to find a coherent way to tackle it. And what you need is essentially technology that automatically Norris to recognize conditions for a patient and also continually adepts to that patient over time that technology has just not been out there and with the advance of machine learning, specifically deep learning be all of a sudden do have an analytics technology that allows us to tackle these problems. So you mentioned deep learning. Just explain to me what you mean by date learning and what role that has in this breakthrough right. Deep learning is a type of machine learning that. Allows to find patterns in big, noisy, unstructured data automatically. Meaning these are algorithms that can learn to recognize specific object, specific pattern, signal features automatically. As we present the with the data, the power comes really into it by the self adaption capability. These aggravates the more data you present them with become smarter and smarter in recognizing the patterns of interest, and they do this fully automatically which is different to what classic AI or machine learning does brew. A human intervention is needed to educate the grid every time about specific feature of interest that you need to manually define. Deep learning doesn't eat that deep learning just needs his data and then trains on the data and finds these Petr nomadic by bringing a inspir-. A. and specifically deep learning to the feel of epilepsy, we can bring precision medicine to epilepsy, and that's what's majorly been missing to advance the field of treatment and diagnosis and management of epilepsy stiffen HARA from IBM research strata.

epilepsy Dr Matt cook Dr Stephan HARA Pepsi IBM Georgia. Cairo Swinburne university Choon Melbourne University Suzhou Sesia millburn medical school Petr Malcolm Kifleh Graham Norris
"epilepsy" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Marijuana for epilepsy there's a new epilepsy drug does a new dialects is out there we are starting to catch up we are starting to add it's about time but we're not moving fast enough and a lot of you guys are asking me which can use i guess there's these strains different ones red dragon blues there's all sorts of these strains out there and there's a little bit of confusion and we are relying on the dispensaries too you know kind of help us when it comes to what to take and we're going to try to get a guest on in the next few days who could actually talk about you know the different streams because he actually is licensed and he's done water research with this but it's very frustrating for many of you and first of all we need to attack marijuana just like any other plant it's a plant we also have to attack marijuana very scientifically because i am one of many physicians that do believe that marijuana has medicine you'll benefits we actually have a receptor system in our body which i'm going to tell you about that is designed to react to marijuana i mean i you wanna will cause affects in the body we know that that doesn't take rocket scientist to figure out the problem is is people are self treating because they don't know they just don't know so let me just give you a quick breakdown and then laboratory or synthetically produced cannabinoid are called synthetic cannabinoid.

Marijuana epilepsy scientist
"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"One project at a time that's why i put my name on my company i'm jim peterson founder and ceo of petersendean roofing in solar just call eight eight eight two zero six one one four one that's eight eight eight two zero six one one four one get up fast free roofing quote from petersendean eight eight eight two zero six one one four one florida license number ccc one three two nine zero eight one five six seven two six the real world demands real superpowers unleash yours the chamberlain's with our ganic foods and beverages sports nutrition supplements and all your other holistic health essentials you can feel super when you shop a chamberlain's the super you marquette chamberlain's dot com if you're looking for a quality fence and professional installation call fence outlet today with over twenty three years in business and over one hundred fifty fences installed each week in central florida fence outlet is your trusted fence company visit fenceoutletonline dot com the medical is brought to you every weekday at this time by the orlando epilepsy center did you know that as many as three million people in the united states suffer from epilepsy and many do not even know it dr sonic and as well trained staff at the orlando epilepsy center are ready to help you or your loved ones with the highest level of care from diagnosis to ongoing treatments the orlando epilepsy center provides comprehend epilepsy management for patients with various types of epilepsy and seizures if you think it might be epilepsy the orlando epilepsy center is here to help their experts staff an individual plan of care we'll get you on the road to management and recovery explore online at orlando hyphen epilepsy dot com that's orlando hyphen epilepsy dot com the orlando epilepsy center there is no better time than spring right now to call rhino shield to get your home back in shape rhino shield is a permanent ceramic coating that goes on the outside of your home or business it goes on any surface like wood or stucco were hardie board it can go on in any color even multiple colors and it comes with a twenty five year transferable warranty call rhino shield right now eight four four go rhino that's eight four four.

founder and ceo orlando epilepsy center united states epilepsy jim peterson florida marquette chamberlain orlando twenty three years twenty five year
"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"As well trained staff at the orlando epilepsy center are ready to help you or your loved ones with the highest level of care from diagnosis to ongoing frequents the orlando epilepsy center provides comprehensive epilepsy management for patients with various types of epilepsy and seizures if you think it might be epilepsy the orlando epilepsy center is here to help their expert staff an individual plan of care we'll get you on the road to management and recovery explore online at orlando hyphen epilepsy dot com that's orlando hyphen epilepsy dot com the orlando epilepsy center you know if you're thinking about a home remodel for the spring look no further than s and w kitchens s n w kitchen simply a wonderful locally family owned and operated since nineteen seventy seven we have had our kitchen two bathrooms remodeled by sw kitchens we had a back porch remodeled just a few months ago by sw kitchens and the reason why we call them this very very simple folks they do great work they are the best in town no surprises everything is talked about an agreed upon during the planning process with tim or project manager our designer christa her vision was exceptional like she knows what we want before we even want it okay s n w kitchens if you're thinking about a remodel for spring now is the time to do it visit the updated website s the word and w kitchens dot com or four zero seven four eight seven four nine zero one five showrooms coast to coast and w kitchens.

orlando epilepsy center project manager orlando tim
"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Call augusta precious metals at eight four four three zero seven seventy seven twenty two to get your free gold ira guide that's eight four 430 seven 77 22 as in any investment the price of gold and silver may fluctuate overtime you could lose money check with financial the medical minutes is brought to you every weekday at this time by the orlando epilepsy centre did you know that as many as three million people in the united states suffer from epilepsy and many do not easy note doctors sought iq and as well trained staff at the orlando epilepsy centre are ready to help you or your loved ones with the highest level of care for diagnosis to ongoing treatment the orlando epilepsy centre provides comprehensive epilepsy management for patients with various types of epilepsy and seizures if you think it might be epilepsy the orlando epilepsy centre is here to help they're experts say as an individual plan of care we'll get you on the road to management and recovery explore online at orlando hyphen epilepsy dot com that's orlando hyphen epilepsy dot com the orlando epilepsy centre but what tax upped his time he did really if a new pga to whispers door peabody protesting bit gloves get ready for expert advice and lessons from our certified teaching perot's get ready for the largest selection of clubs apparel susan more get ready for the grand opening of orlando second pga tour superstore altamont springs located a halfmile east of i four exit ninety two next to whole foods during this february twenty four th at nine am for a chance to win of the thirty thousand dollars in giveaways.

orlando epilepsy centre united states epilepsy perot altamont springs orlando peabody thirty thousand dollars
"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Still one she's been dreaming of a forevermark diamonds next weekend february 23rd their 25th at international diamond center all five orlando locations approved credit are you concerned it might be epilepsy dr sought are can his welltrained staff at the orlando epilepsy centre are ready to help you or your loved ones what the highest level of cake from diagnosis to ongoing treatments the orlando epilepsy centre provides comprehensive epilepsy management her patients with various types of epilepsy and seizures if you think it might be epilepsy lee orlando epilepsy centre is here to help explore online at orlando epilepsy dot com that's orlando epilepsy dot com the fire up a cigar for yourself what cocktail evs role was stake on the grill join me for those cigar dave show saturday evenings drums seven tonight pm on news ninety six point five wdbo matt repeat android or apple iphone or tablet we've created a new he was ninety six five dot com that built for any device news ninety six five dot com where orlando click first toward twenty four hour news weather and traffic the new and improved news ninety six five dot com did you just look down at your phone you did it again didn't you you know you're flying down the road in a three ton hunk of steel and a text takes your eyes off the road for an average of five seconds at fifty five miles per hour that's long enough to travel the length of a football field and cause some serious damage turn off trust me whatever it is you'll live learn more at stoptextstopwrecks dot org brought to you by the ad council and the national highway traffic safety administration news ninety six point.

international diamond center orlando epilepsy centre orlando apple football twenty four hour five seconds three ton
"epilepsy" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

NPR's Story of the Day

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on NPR's Story of the Day

"To try to like figure out what was going on the most likely cause was abnormal electrical activity in her brain in other words epilepsy but jays doctors wanted to be sure so in may of two thousand thirteen they admitted her to an epilepsy center put electrodes on her scalp and began watching her brain activity i had a couple seizures and they were able to see that it wasn't an actual lake epileptic seizure an epileptic seizure is a bit like an electrical storm in the brain neurons began firing uncontrollably which can cause patients to lose consciousness or have muscle spasms but sarraj's brain activity was normal it was kinda surreal you know this woman she sat me down she's like okay you do not have epilepsy then i'm like okay so what's going on and she talked about non up electric seizures the woman told j that her seizures were from a psychological disorder it's called psychogenic non epileptic seizures were p nes john stern who directs the epilepsy clinical programme at ucla says about one in three people they evaluate for uncontrolled seizures turns out to have peony s he says that's not something most patients wanna here especially if they've been previously diagnosed with epilepsy the person's being told all the doctors who said this is epilepsy or wrong and there's a condition now the by half which i've ever heard of and that's um disarming that's um confusing and sometimes they simply reject the new diagnosis stern says that's what happened with a patient who had spent decades believing she had epilepsy that person found the idea that the diagnosis was not correct for along to be so disorienting that she continues to receive treatment for epilepsy which is unfortunate because epilepsy drugs don't help people with p n e s a neurologist likes stern has no way to treat these patients so he typically refers them to his colleague patricia walsh shah a.

jays muscle spasms sarraj ucla epilepsy patricia walsh shah j stern
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"In order it has something to do with mystical experience because there's there's a border sat fought the looks like he has a hat but that's not a hat that's a whole bunch of border set this going back to eternity right and this whole in the sky here is like a whole into time in these things are recurring across time it's the eternal recurrence of this of this redemptive archetype in the sky opens up and and you can see that thing recurring and recurring recurring same ideas basically that's the blue buddha who's a healing who's a healing entity sitting in a mandela which is like a representation of paradise and the same ideas like reality opens up and reveals this image of perfection and so it so well it's a universal conception and and well i think it's a representation of the the the the possibility of the metaphysical in the physical coming together in in some sort of in some sort of communication it's something like that any ways and i mean you have to remember that there's absolutely no doubt that people have metaphysical and religious experiences the a that's an absolute fact you can induce them chemically you can deduce electric chemically lots of people who have epilepsy have epileptic pro dramas that are associated with dividing enlightenment so does the 'sky for example he had hit epilepsy and that was really i think one of the things that made him a great author because an dostiev ski would have this feeling that he was going to have an epileptic seizure and he said that the the feeling for him was that the world was opening up and he was becoming more and more and more enlightened and he was just on the verge of grasping the essence of existence and then he'd have an epileptic seizure and for this objective feeling was that that much knowledge was just too much for him to bear all you know you can say well that was a neurological abnormality and fine but god he was dostiev ski and so you can't just brushed that off.

epilepsy