35 Burst results for "Epilepsy"

"epilepsy" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

Ask The Health Expert

01:37 min | 4 months ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

"Super functioning organ. It's miserable. So a ketogenic diet, there was a really, really well done study published last year in patients with epilepsy. They were on a ketogenic diet for their epilepsy. They were monitored very, very closely by doctors, but it was actually the first long-term ketogenic diet study to actually do a thyroid panel in the patients, which was, to me, I'm like, well, you guys have been studying this for a hundred years, and no one thought to do a thyroid panel before. So they did.

epilepsy
Dr. Hamlin Emory Shares the Story of a Unique Patient

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Hamlin Emory Shares the Story of a Unique Patient

"Folks talking to doctor Hamlin Emory, the book is hard to swallow from superstition to psychiatry. You were just telling us about some patient. In my early months as a psychiatric resident, I met a young man who had a master's degree in mass and his wife described him. Experiencing intermittent psychotic episodes in which he would become enraged and he was married and even had a child and had been treated in the clinic at UCLA as a paranoid schizophrenic. But it was strange and I thought that a person with schizophrenia would be able to marry and have a child and the relationship with his wife was reasonable, except when he had these episodic outbursts. And it sounded as if he might have some kind of epilepsy. So I referred him to the neurologist on the faculty and sure enough the EEG was abnormal and showed. Figures and forms that are typical of temporal lobe

Hamlin Emory Schizophrenia Ucla Epilepsy
'Believing Is Seeing' Author Michael Guillen on How Science Led Him to God

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:50 min | 1 year ago

'Believing Is Seeing' Author Michael Guillen on How Science Led Him to God

"Science. It's nothing less than astonishing. When you realize that the idea, most of us have heard in our lifetimes that faith and science are at odds, is not even slightly true. It is in fact the opposite. It's hard for us to shift our paradigms. But we need to, as I said, I write about it a lot in my new book. But a friend Michael gillan, we've had him on before, has a new book out on the very same subject called believing is seeing. He's a real scientist. Michael gill and welcome. Hey, Eric, it's so good to see you again, my brother. Looking forward to our conversation. It's great. It's great to see you and to talk to you. I love talking about all this stuff, especially with somebody who knows about it the way you do. You really came to faith later in life. You had been hostile to faith. And now you're writing books, explaining to people that faith and science are friends and that this is a lie that they're at odds. In the book you talk about how the latest discoveries in neuroscience physics astronomy, mathematics. Point to faith in many ways. Talk about that because I mean, what do you mean when you say neuroscience? I'm not even sure, do I know what neuroscience is? Signs of the brain. Yeah, yeah. It's a study of the brain and, you know, I remember when I was at ABC News, I did a story on the Harvard brain bank, which is the largest repository of human brains. I think in the world, certainly in the nation. So I went there. It's Ian Massachusetts, not too far from Harvard. I was also teaching at Harvard at the time, so it was convenient for me. And I remember being able to hold, they allowed me to hold a human brain in my hands. And even to this day, Eric, it was just a really weird feeling to think, you know, this is the essence of what we call humanity, if you will. Never mind discussions about soul and the spirit. I mean, this is where our personalities. This is where we reside in this two, three pound brain. And the human brain is made up of two hemispheres, the right and the left. And a lot of studies have been done on that. And I talk in the book about I think it was in the 70s when scientists physicians started treating patients with epilepsy by severing the corpus callosum, which is the cable like it's a very thick cable of nerve fibers that connect the two hemispheres. And what they found was that when they, when they cut the two hemispheres, when they separated the two hemispheres like that, the epileptic seizures stopped. Not entirely but to a great degree. But there were some interesting side effects. And that's what I deal with in the book because ultimately I connect that research to my exploration of faith. It's a little bit complicated and we couldn't do it justice here, but I will say this much that when you when you look at these what we call split brain patients, these are patients whose hemispheres have been separated. They there's a lot of interesting side effects. For example, why quote one woman who goes grocery shopping, she's a split brain patient. And she finds that the two hands when she's reaching for groceries or putting groceries in the basket, they fight one another. And what I explain in the book is that what we've discovered from split brain patients is that our two hemispheres are basically at war with one

Michael Gillan Michael Gill Ian Massachusetts Eric Harvard Abc News Epilepsy Seizures
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Struggling Scientists

The Struggling Scientists

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Struggling Scientists

"To this one song. Very very specifically And not to your preferred music. No yeah well. I mean this is what it is i mean but yeah i. I'm confused yes. I don't necessarily know if they actually looked at like the data activity also in the preferred music to see if that did spike even though there was no reduction in ideas I don't think that it or at least show it at least exactly so yeah. It was weird because if we get to the discussion already when they talk about that they really wanted to sort of to me felt reading this that they were trying to make the jump towards the emotional network quite quickly from just a tatum activity essentially. And if that's the brainwave section that's fulton that it makes a certain type of shuns But they also had a model latest version of the case for eight song. They don't really specifically show how was more related but they say that one didn't work because it wasn't as nice to listen to anymore because of the malaysians but i don't know it might be interesting to in the future making make an episode on on just a lot of different papers focusing on this this beneficial music effect. Yeah it's it's an interesting field though. I never knew that. There were an entire field of researcher. Actually looking into the beneficial effect of these mozart. Yeah i mean. There's just a lot of upside though with this right. I mean if you just have like a third of one percent of the entire world suffering from something that you cannot really properly treat and it all it takes is listening to at least thirty seconds of mozart disorder have some beneficial effect. That'd be great. Well they issue however was just a the ninety seconds didn't have an effect that was very long lasting but if you they have previously shown in papers pay if you listen to more of it they do also an epilepsy get a more long lasting effect. Yeah that's actually also wanted something. I wanted to look into a little bit further as well because they had sixteen people. Total for their entire experiment. Split over two groups. Eight eight and that are ninety. Second group was predominantly male. So i don't know like wetter. Maybe doubt long lasting effect might be you know less prevalent for males or something. I don't know it was something. They mentioned specifically in sort of their discussion. No not even. They're stretching just when they were describing their their patient population how it was distributed between the things because they they had these patients where they also had electrodes inside of their skull basically because they wanted to really look specifically at these waves and these locations quite a specific group of patients that were treated with this electrodes in their skull that then where measured for this yes. Oh but it's a very interesting study. I think and it's a very interesting topic that i might want to know more about in the future. So maybe we'll make sign's behind episodes about the effect of music on new. In general i mean in general. It's because now in in the the as you mentioned with like the electrodes these people had like electrode. Sorta the surgically inserted. Yes yes so they were at a yeah. I wouldn't say desperate state but they needed this to find out more information about where are their epileptic seizures and stuff coming from with just for this study we actually a test for for them and then they also played so music him as well. If you're going to do this anyway. Can we also use you for some research. But so i wonder since this is sort of a relatively on the extreme side indeed of the one third of people that don't respond to anything so i would wonder i would imagine as well that the people who do have epilepsy but do respond to medication. Might also respond to mos done but then you might be able to take them off medication. If moser was super might be doubt. Yes. that's a stretch. But i would like to look into that a little bit more because now we don't have that information here for example. Yeah and i'm also really interested in the effect that they measure on just healthy people mean new. I need to listen to mozart. Well at least unhealthy people You get sort of that spatial. Temporal performance boost is and. You also told me that that doesn't happen in musicians. Yes i read. At least i was in the review. There was quickly mentioned that musicians in nazi this beneficial boost to the l. sack so maybe i guess their spatial at least spatial temporal performance. That they are already sort of well versed or well practiced in doubt that they were well. Developed i mean that moser doesn't help them develop that anymore so i don't know okay fair very interesting but i think we have now discussed everything that has been done in his paper right. Yeah yeah. I think more a s interested in this in this mozart effect now as we are. Keep your eyes out for future. Episodes that talks about this in our behind series And if you want to reach out to us you can do that. Fire website struggling scientists dot com or fire email address to struggling scientists at hotmail dot com. We're also on twitter and instagram facebook. Lincoln and basically everywhere. You can look for us. You can find us on the struggling scientists. Yes thank you for listening and Let's play some more mozart for aids for you guys now. Bye bye.

epilepsy fulton moser mozart instagram Lincoln twitter facebook aids
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Struggling Scientists

The Struggling Scientists

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Struggling Scientists

"Okay so that was fifty seconds off mozart. Gay for eight. Do we have a beneficial now. no so what. This paper actually looked at as well. early on is two different groups so they had sixteen participants and they split it up between two groups. One group got fifteen seconds and the other group got up to nineteen ninety. Second sorry split. Over periods of fifteen seconds and fifteen seconds while showing some beneficial effect was not significantly showing beneficial effect. Okay so we are known significantly improve now. Yes but we need at least thirty seconds to really show. What effect yes. From thirty seconds and onwards we'll put a little bit extended version of the end of this. Podcast okay okay. So epilepsy and what kind of epilepsy are studying newspaper. Yeah so maybe just a quick little bit of background Epilepsy is quite common. Actually it's it affects about one percent of the entire global population. And normally you can you. Can you can medicate these people to reduce Epilepsy seizures and symptoms. But apparently one third of all of all epilepsy patients or people have whether it's called refractory epilepsy so they don't respond to medication at all. And yeah so. Apparently because of this then with this artifact this started to become more and more seen as an option to help these patients instead of doing really invasive surgery or trying to medicate them when they are not responding to medication. Okay and also see here that they experience these enter erectile epileptic form discharge. Just so i think when people mostly think about epilepsy they think about these people are having seizures on the ground. Lease that sort. Of what i think when i think about it but there are different. Forms of epilepsy and seizures are quite common happening all of these and all these forms to a certain extent but these ideas. Let's call them. That are also symptom of epilepsy. So they're basically you can measure them with an eeg. They're basically of on your pat right. Electrodes yeah but you'll basically see is like those peaks of your brainwaves And then you'll see like a certain population of neurons firing sora yeah those no specific neurons firing and those specific neurons and to be related to the epileptic network. Because we're yeah and they your way more than they normally should in these uplift versions. Yes okay and this is what they measure in this paper. Also right yes okay. So they they have these pieces and then they play these songs for these people in different lengths and then they measure if these become less yes but it's not only just a just playing it in different links at a certain point. They'll also the i'll try out wagner's song because that's a very different song or sonata. Compared to mozart while mozart has apparently very specific parts that are very different from each other wagner sort of more gradual increase gradual change so they use wagner sort of control in that sense they also as you said Tro beethoven in there. They try a string version or day. Try altered version of the k four forty eight and a filtered version as well so they try are really quite a few different things to show. How the k four hundred forty eight is affecting these people compared to other versions of it and classical music okay. cool well of course very important disclaimer. That is that this is very march. Fatty march knelt irish. Like at all at all so we have quite a good understanding now after reading his paper. But it's important to know that we are not expert in this field. We are just going off on what is written in this paper what we have seen in our papers right. Yes okay so then result. Well did this show. So yeah i off at least comparing the two different groups like we alluded to earlier already. If seconds in the ninety seconds the fifteen seconds was not really enough to show significant difference in ninety seconds group did show significant difference and yeah they saw reduction in the ideas in addition to that they also tried out. They also wanted to locate where this difference was coming from. So where in the brain. I'm only going to sort of the big general conclusions here. I'm into the more specific ones in a bit. And they found out that the location where the ideas were mostly reduced. Were in the frontal cortex. Okay so that's a big piece of information right there. Yeah and wagner. If i if. I fi- noise did nothing exactly. Yeah that's as well and they also tested. Patients prefer music at some point. Yes that's actually funny. The funny by wanting to get through that and then just a bit but if you actually read their material methods you'll see as earned buoyant since they only had sixteen patients. I think they basically listed preferred music for all of the the patients. Some of them apparently liked to judas. Priest so yeah. Some heavy metal got thrown there as well didn't help no now preferred music didn't know so this effect on reducing the epilepsy. Very specific to this archaic. Four hundred forty eight and your preferred music. Does nothing interesting because you would expect that it would also help right to relax. You prefer music all depends right. I mean again. We're not really experts in this field. But i mean if i listen to music and really depend on my mood. What i'm looking for ride my preferred music could be something that gets me excited or my call me down. So yeah okay. So those were older ola major visuals while there was also the the result of that they found out out of all the brainwaves that the tate activity was the one that was mostly affected or mostly different after listening to the k four hundred. Forty eight okay. So there are five different types of brainwaves at each at different frequencies delta's this is the smallest. I guess the lowest hurts followed by tatum. Then you have alpha beta and gamma and the data is from what i've been able to find and read. Data is more of all involved with emotions creativity. Imagination stuff like that. i'll find baid and delta which are also very close to tater are also sort of associated with that so it's hard to really distinguish if data's specifically just for dot but you know that i'll find data used of our our delta and alpha were also emotional but those are also a little bit changed by. Yes yes okay. Yeah but it's also yeah. It's just hard to really distinguish like the day that because for example delta was i believe from one to four hertz taylor was from roughly four to eight hurts yes but you can see here in the long segment that also adult on off. Our native will change but data was only one. That was really significant. Yes yes so based on this day. Say that it's probably an emotional response. Right yes but that's that's confusing to me because then you have an emotional response.

epilepsy wagner Epilepsy seizures Tro beethoven mozart seizures symptoms baid tatum hertz taylor
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Struggling Scientists

The Struggling Scientists

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Struggling Scientists

"Okay so today. In this episode. We are going to talk about a paper. Anna sort of is tradition in our cutting reaches episode. We found them on the niche facebook. Page so this paper really grabbed our attention. And it's about the mozart effect on epilepsy And i thought that was super interesting. So migiro read. It's so jerem. Tell us about this paper. What is his goals and where his published. Yes so the paper it's held. The title of the paper is musical components. Important for mozart k four hundred forty eight effect in epilepsy. It's published in scientific reports and yeah it's by kwon at all gone at all. Okay so first question when you hear. The style writes Mozart gay for for eight yes. That's a song. well technically. it's a sonata. It's so it's the it's not a for two pianos in d major. So that's eight hundred. Four hundred forty eight part away. And yeah so i guess a little bit. Maybe not really background. But i guess we've all heard of People who play classical music for their yet unborn children or maybe already born children always thought. That was a bit sketchy. Yeah yeah old wives tale. I guess but While there is research being done on that barely. I could find a paper that was from nineteen ninety tree that looked into The mozart artifact as it were in performance or intelligence does actually have an effect yes so already in nineteen ninety-three that they could they could show that doesn't have a sort of general effect on your iq or performance but really like specifically for your spatial temporal performance in in different tasks dot. So it's a very specific effect. And in five years later a paper was published. That showed that apparently this specific sonata could also reduce symptoms of epilepsy. Okay but it's just just this gay for her aid to not that and not any other motaung or classical music or well it. This one is the most studied one but there is another one so k. Five forty five that also has been studied to a bit but less so than this one but so far they've researchers have also looked at for example wagner. beethoven others. i think as well but yeah. They haven't really shown this same effect. And i think we'll also touch on those again in this paper. Okay so only. Mozart gave her aids and gay for five four at both in piano. Yes wow okay. That's that's very specific to the five four. Five is the piano sonata in c major. If that helps anyone really knowing also see here that they previously tested. Beethoven's released a string version of k for eight and it didn't work. Nope wow okay interesting. So i guess we have definitive proof that mozart beethoven and only piano. Well yeah.

epilepsy migiro Mozart Anna facebook wagner aids Beethoven mozart beethoven
Fed's Powell: Several Factors Indicate Elevated Inflation Rate Remains Temporary

The Breakdown with NLW

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Fed's Powell: Several Factors Indicate Elevated Inflation Rate Remains Temporary

"Gave his speech at ten. Am today virtually. And what did he actually say. Well it was basically exactly what the new consensus thought. Let's go through some quotes. And then what. They actually mean quote at the epilepsies recent july meeting. I was of the view as were most participants that if the economy evolved broadly as anticipated it be appropriate to start reducing the pace of asset purchases this year the intervening month has brought more progress in the form of a strong employment report for july but also the further spread of the delta variant. We will be carefully assessing incoming data and the evolving risks. So what does this actually mean. We were going to indicate that we were going to start to taper but now we're focused on delta as a reason that we might need to stay the course or at least be more cautious back to powell if a central bank titans policy in response to factors that. Turn out to be temporary. The main policy effects are likely to arrive. After the need has passed the ill-timed policy move unnecessarily slows hiring and other economic activity and pushes inflation lower than desired today with substantial slack remaining in the labor market and the pandemic continuing such a mistake could be particularly harmful. We know that extended periods of unemployment commune lasting harm to workers and to the productive capacity of the economy. What does that actually mean. Well the non cynical read is that the fed is really truly obsessed and focused on the questions of the labor market and employment way more than questions of inflation. A cynical read is. Hey listen we learned our lesson from the taper tantrum. When y'all freaked out before the last time around back to powell the timing and pace of the coming reduction and asset purchases will not be intended to carry a direct signal regarding the timing of interest rate liftoff for which we have articulated at different and substantially more stringent tests even after our asset purchases and are elevated holdings of longer term securities will continue to support accommodative financial conditions. What does it mean. Even tapering won't really be a hawkish turn and tapering in the form of reduced bond purchases has implications for how fast they'll raise

Powell FED
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Naked Parent podcast

The Naked Parent podcast

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Naked Parent podcast

"Learning to let go of things. I hold stuff that's awesome. I do too doesn't benefit me. Maybe ever really appreciate how you've highlighted the epilepsy. Along with the autism. Do you have any kind of final guidance. That either is in line with what we talked about or something else that you'd like to share with the parents out there. I think i would tell parents when our kids were born. We don't know. I mean my is typically developing. She's works in marketing very successful university graduate of my kids. I had the same expectations. But i think that you have to look towards that as it changes. You don't always have absolute control over it. And i think we as parents sometimes we beat ourselves up over. Oh i'm not doing enough. All i'm you know i need to do more. I need to do more and while that sometimes true. Sometimes you know it's like that saying you know that saying that people say behind every successful child is an involved parent while sometimes it's an involved parent behind kit child who doesn't develop as typically who doesn't make the progress and. I don't think that we can lay blame as a teacher. I try to always remember that no matter what the parents are doing. They're trying. They're doing what they believe is best. I think you gave us a lot of wisdom today. I know that i gained from talking with you. And i appreciate you taking the time to talk with us. Share your story. I appreciate the invite. And i hope that we can connect down the road and stay connected because this is easier together than alone absolutely. I do believe that you know they'll be. There are times when you know. I'm sure people in the community feel frustrated by others in the community. But you know there. There is support out there. Thanks beverly thank you so much. I appreciate you tip by. This concludes our show for today and might to personally thank you for spending the time with us on a topic near and dear to our hearts if you'd like to be part of the naked parent nation and help us reach those parents. That are struggling and overwhelmed. There's no better way to help them. By subscribing rating and reviewing the show on items i tunes highlights the show's based on these metrics and the more the show gets highlighted. The more opportunities people will have to be introduced to the show where they can hear that message of hope or that tip that can change everything so follow the lincoln our show notes and we hope to have you back here tomorrow where we'll do it again from the team. Here at the naked parent podcast. We wish you the life you've always dreamed up and then some so long..

epilepsy autism beverly lincoln
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Naked Parent podcast

The Naked Parent podcast

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Naked Parent podcast

"And thirty percent of net. Something i would definitely want to know about exactly. No pediatrician ever told me that. I suppose i knew because when he had that first seizure the pediatric. So we have kaiser. I don't know if you're familiar with kaiser. The giant and one of the nice things about kaiser. Is that if you have an er visit all of your physicians getting a report from the er visit so after that first seizure his psychiatrists called me the next day and the neurologist was referred to call me and basically said you know i can treat this symptomatically. So he didn't have to go in bernie. Ekg brains measuring the the seizure activities. She said we could do wanna two things. We could either start day seizure meds right away because she said that because of his functioning he had a greater than fifty fifty chance of having a second seizure in which case. They were diagnosed epilepsy. Anyway so it just seemed because i had already believed that i was seeing some seizure activities but didn't know what to say to the physicians. I thought it was a good idea to just go ahead and start it. And i'll rip that. He's had plenty cents then. I had seen him for instance sitting at a table eating dinner and he didn't get upset but his is i forget what they call it. My sister would tell me his is started to rock like that. And it's not something you could do intentionally might as my sister. The optometrist said. Well do their seizure. He's really drunk. That will you know the two possibilities. You can't do it with your eyes as like a balance any aha moments that you can think of. Well i'm in a specific moments. Maybe not but maybe just the understanding that it's important to look at physical causes of behavior as well as other you know as well look at the physical causes for behaviors in other words epilepsy the electrical activity in the brain as well as looking for behavioral explanations. For what kids are doing. I think there has to be a balance between those two jefferson as a great point. Now that i'm lightened yet. So it's just like looking at the two of them. And if i had not looking back at twenty twenty hindsight. I don't blame myself at all. Because i didn't have the background. I knew what i had seen with his eyes. I knew what you odd things that i'd say but nobody talks about that. There are forty different types of over forty types of seizures. Everything is not his tonic seizures where he drops on the floor. I've seen him have a seizure where he stumbled like lack of a better explanation. A drug sailor you know like. He's been drinking his wall dizzy and that that they can look very different than what we expect that they would look like. That would be a partial seizure. Is it affected him emotionally now. He's twenty four hours at affected emotionally. Well after a seizure. The only thing he'll want to do is wait for like a day. And that's pretty typical It's like a recovering period. I don't know that it does. I think it's just. I think he's better accepting himself for who he is. Sometimes than we are so is that he deals with. He's just what it is for him. Yeah i've not my son rocco. That's why i say. He's my greatest teacher does he. Doesn't worry about exactly as you know. It is for me what it is. Yeah so how about for you. How do you. I have to imagine that. This journey hasn't always been easy. How do you take care of you. One of my hobbies is drawing. I don't have any pictures to show you today. But if you look at my facebook page. I have some of my drawings as means. I've always loved to draw. My grandfather was an artist. And it's that's kind of my therapy awesome and so you use that through the years. Yeah i do the years. I'm more so in the last few years. I've gotten back into it but but i have used it through the years to kind of deal with it the way you present yourself. You seem to you know to handle the situation just in stride with what it has. It always been that way for you. Yes no. I'm gonna pay so i'm a teacher and we're pretty good at hiding emotion. Sometimes because like when you're in a classroom if you let a child know that you're angry with them particularly in six or frustrated b- better word by let a six year old now that i'm frustrated with them. They play it. It's like the dog who smells fair. You know that they know it and they'll go with so. I'm pretty good at hiding my emotions. But now i haven't always dealt with it. That well phones used to cause me bone was ringing is to cause me to jump outta my skin. Sound of a phone going off speaking after. Turn mine off forgot to do that. But it will send you know. Send me like whoa. Because i would associated with bad news. I always had a seizure. Oh he's done this out of that right now. You shared a favorite quote of yours. If you can't fly than runners you can't run than walk if you can't walk in crawler. Whatever you do you have to keep moving forward. Martin luther king as one of my favorite quotes. It's wasn't of course applying to disability but just making progress moving forward and changing things. I love that yeah. It's a different approach to that. That quote smart probably favorite quote that. That's a good one. I love that it's You know. I think it's easy to get stuck there. Not having the ability to run enters staying speech if you think of running his speech. So i think running his speech they ability to speak. You can't speak than us a c. You can't use acc than use pecs Find the way to communicate the teach our kids the way to communicate whatever works for them and it still forward movement. it's not backtracking. I like that so we do like a little lightning round with one words. A one sentence answers are you he. Okay with one word to one-sentence yes try to stick to them just to get through more questions so we can get more of your perspective sir. What's the best advice you have received. Take it comes. Share a personal habit that contributes to your success while my drawing and making sure i communicate clearly great. Do you have a talk. Resource recommendation to share with other parents. I would look into the american epilepsy society page. They're interested in epilepsy. Otherwise are plenty of good ones for autism. Once the next thing on your list you wanna add for your individual well-being getting more exercise. What's one thing you think would improve your life if you did it or had it. I mean i can't complain about my life. I think probably.

seizures kaiser bernie epilepsy jefferson rocco facebook Martin luther king american epilepsy society autism
"epilepsy" Discussed on The Naked Parent podcast

The Naked Parent podcast

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on The Naked Parent podcast

"Podcast my name's chad ratliff and i'm your host today and also today with us we have beverly thomas who is a married mom to. She's been an elementary school teacher for thirty years. Her daughter is twenty seven and is not disabled. her son is twenty. Four he's mostly non verbal at has epilepsy and over the years talking about his disability. Beverly has focused more on epilepsy. Because it doesn't get as much attention as autism so we're going to focus their today. But beverly welcome to the show thank you where are you call it. In from pro livermore california livermore california awesome. So can you tell us a little bit about when you knew something was different with your son and when the epilepsy kinda came into the picture. Okay well. He was diagnosed as autistic when he was three years old. I knew something was different before that when he was about and a half maybe he had language it never developed. He never developed language past of about a two year old single words and short phrases. He kind of gave up on that a little bit. Later really doesn't speak much now. He started to have seizures. We was diagnosed with epilepsy when he was fifteen. That which is pretty common for epilepsy to be diagnosed during puberty. It's a common for and was something that came out of the blue sorta of but not exactly so he had gone through. Kind of what i would call a crisis and it was unclear whether it was idea drag or it was seizures. What it was. His behavior became more erratic. He had been up one night. I'd seen some things that had led me to believe that. He started researching seizures. But i didn't really know what to say to his pediatrician. But dan one evening even up all night. He had insomnia was just pacing. The floor is very very anxious and he just had a grandma totta seizure out of the blunt so that was clear that there was no mistaking at first seizure. Did you know what to do in that situation or while sort. I mean i knew to call. I cut because it was his very first seizure. A call nine one one and he was transported to the hospital. They ran the usual tested cat scan. They did other tests and of course nothing shut up in his own the structure of his brain so he was fine. He was released about a day later. His psychiatrists called me and said that she wanted to start anti-seizure mads if we didn't have a referral yet to a neurologist. Which i did that. She was thinking that they some of the things that may have looked like their basis was psychiatric. Were actually seizure. Who are actually caused by seizures. Behavior was the same but some of the things that he was doing. An intense need to flee in that you know to elope and that stuff can be symptomatic of an aura of a seizure. Aura the feeling before seizure. Okay i'm assuming this is like a traumatic experience. It was like two. Am and he's on the ground. Seizing you know back in his flat on his back seizing but in a way it was a blessing in because it brought to light the seizures so in a strange way yes then once you know what it is you can begin to treat it as such okay. What ages his cognitive. I don't to be honest. i don't really know. I've never wanted to do an i. Q. test for him because they're not made for somebody who's nonverbal to do that they could give me a score of at mirman may not be accurate. He understands his receptive language. What he understands is excellent. So you can say i can give them a two step command in a regular tone of voice and tasty of put us on the table and then go bring me that he'll do it. Receptive language is excellent. We have to be careful what we say around him. It's unclear what his cognitive skills are because of his disability but he's toilet trained as independent. I would say it's child. But i'm not really certain but he knew that he was going through seizures and he does now. I don't think fine. He did. I think he was feeling an aura that night when he had the insomnia and he was up pacing. He was drinking water. Compulsively and one symptom of a of an aura can be a bad taste. It can be olfactory hallucinations. You can think you're smelling something in your not before seizure. That the feeling before cesar. I don't think he knew what it was them. I believe now he does. Because of the way i can usually look at him and tell the to seizures coming. You know he'll be very very quiet. He'll stand back against a wall hill. Kind of withdraw. And i can see where his words happen. He can't tell us without language that that's was happening. He can say he doesn't feel well. One time. We were at a local burger restaurant. He loves a burger burger and fries favorite thing and he was getting kind of upset and he just wanted to go he ended. He didn't wanna eat handed us. Try walk out to the car and the minute. He sat down in the backseat. He started to seize news failing coming on and wanted to get out of the restaurant before it happened. Does medication help. It had helped for while it was under control. We look to a period about a year ago or two years ago. It started to get worse. He was having seizures more often he had. What's called the. Ns clint implant done which is colloquially referred to as a pacemaker. for the brain. It's device cut a pacemaker. Like device that gives an electrical current to the vienna's nerve which is the main nerve that runs through the body to the brain and that did reduce the severity but not the frequency. Finally we did. He was still having seizures up to once a week. We requested a second opinion. He's on a different. You're and now. It's been seven months since his last seizure. Yeah yeah well to mets do definitely helped it's looking like it's more controllable through the right medications and oftentimes with epilepsy. It can be trial and error but not all. Epilepsy is controllable through. Meds was one of the worst moments on this journey of yours thus far you know i mean i can't write down that he went through alcala. You know before the seizures were probably the most difficult because he didn't have the language to tell us what was going on. That was probably the most difficult time. Some of his behaviors were very erratic. He did things that would look like. you know. Put himself in danger but overall he is has come a long way since them. And you've already shared you know some of these with us but is there something that stands out that you wish you knew then that you know now one of the things. I wish i knew and that no doctor ever evertonian here. I'm a teacher. I mean i'm not the my my sister's optometrist's my dad was an optometrist to have people in the medical fields in my family. Is it up to thirty percent of people with autism also have a seizure disorder epilepsy and it doesn't get talked about much. I never knew that until after he had that procedure and then they told me. I think pediatricians do a better job of say telling parents at. It's scary but i think the truth is less scary than you know trying to hide it now. One thing about that. As i say that is that seizure disorders are more common. Who have severe language impairment. Who are who have cognitive impairments. But it's still much more common in people who have bluffs epilepsies much more common in people who are have autism that it is in the general population and the same actually goes the other direction between epilepsy and autism. People who have epilepsy are more likely to show autistic traits than the general population. It's a related condition. But not the same one while i'm grateful to know this. I mean my son's nonverbal and very low functioning.

seizures epilepsy chad ratliff beverly thomas insomnia california livermore autism Beverly beverly dan cesar vienna seizure disorder epilepsy mets
The Blood Countess Elizabeth Bathory: Serial Killer or Victim of a Patriarchal Society?

We Saw the Devil

02:28 min | 1 year ago

The Blood Countess Elizabeth Bathory: Serial Killer or Victim of a Patriarchal Society?

"So that brings us to bet battery or elizabeth bathroom for us english-speakers which i will be referring her to for the remainder of the episode after a literally limitless number of films plays poems and books have been written about her. She is also known. As the blood countess lady dracula and the blood lady of qatif ish. She's been given countless nicknames. Just based on what she was suspected of doing and i use the word suspected in h. One and bold formatting but what she actually a victim of the patriarchal culture of her time or was she just really one of the most vicious and bloodthirsty female serial killers with ever lived. I mean that's kind of polar opposites there right. Elizabeth bathroom was born on august. Seventh fifteen sixty on her family's estate in hungary now they were a very powerful protestant family. Calvin est actually and they were one of the most prominent families in the entirety of eastern europe. Her father and mother. Baron george the six by three and baroness on bathroom respectively. More or less controlled its own miniature kingdom within hungary which consisted of modern. Day transylvania in romania. Her uncle. stephen bathroom was the king of poland. So they were. In fact the most well-connected as was the custom at the time royalty sometimes married within their own families. I mean everyone knows the inbreeding jokes. Right so generational inbreeding elizabeth's mother and father were actually first cousins. Both from the bathroom side of the family. This could actually potentially explain why she was plagued with health problems throughout her life but especially during her childhood and fun fact. Elizabeth bathroom is actually remotely related. To vlad the third via marriage whom many of you know as dracula himself vlad the impaler but as a child elizabeth would have epileptic seizures. She was frequently ill and she would reportedly go into fits of white hot rage on a dime. Very little is actually known about her childhood but the urban legend and myth has seemingly just multiplied taken on a life of its own throughout the years. I it was reported that her uncle taught her satanism and witchcraft. Then it was a satanic doctor who attempted to treat her epilepsy with healthy blood. Taken from the peasants apply to elizabeth's forehead via a piece of their own

Elizabeth Bathroom Calvin Est Elizabeth Baron George Hungary Stephen Bathroom Baroness Transylvania Romania Poland Europe Dracula Seizures
"epilepsy" Discussed on Startuprad.io - Startup Podcast from Germany

Startuprad.io - Startup Podcast from Germany

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Startuprad.io - Startup Podcast from Germany

"Health insurance. That's why you're talking about thirty to thirty five. The reason why this is the you know the age bracket in which we are getting on new lives and which addressing anda and we were right about this if you were right about this at a digital where we can get a lot of support and real time information to the interpersonal Will create great customer experience. And can tell you know that we haven't Performance in the phone scored a net promoter score of seventeen while the industry averages fourteen so far of the crowd at and really the own power with epilepsy so that that is something That turned out to be true. And you're right about that. We made an initial mistake..

epilepsy
"epilepsy" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"So how did you come about with we all satellites. I did you come up with the idea of the the bottom of the pilot itself or was it a case of the family or one of the characters what was the first inspiring thing of it was one concept in one image on the concept came from. I actually started thinking about this years and years ago. I was working for an an organization. The epilepsy foundation and i had some. My job was to enter information calls from people who had questions about epilepsy and to run support groups in find appropriate speakers to come in and talk to the support groups and find resources for people stuff like that and so i went to a lot of events like doctors who were speaking to other doctors in that sort of thing. We're looking for speakers. And i was at a symposium for for epilepsy colleges so it was epilepsy. Doctors speaking to each other and one of them was talking about brain devices that were in the pipeline already and She spoke dismissively of one that they had hoped would work for epilepsy. But it turned out. It didn't but it would probably work for parkinson's and i was thinking at the time that was that it would be very disappointing. If you had hoped that this brain this particular implant will come along and then it turned out. It wasn't for you after all but at least you could say well. Hey someone else's getting use out of it and from there. I thought of what if it turned out. It didn't have any of these therapeutic uses by they noticed a side effect of it that could be monetize used and and so. I started going down that road of what what would happen like how frustrating. I wouldn't be if you were the person who was waiting for that technology and it wasn't given to you and actually your precluded from having but else has it and then moving moving from there into the question of how would technology be used for profit..

epilepsy epilepsy foundation parkinson's
Empowering Caregivers Through Technology

The Schmidt List

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Empowering Caregivers Through Technology

"Melissa how are you today. Thank you for joining me curt. Congratulations thank you. Yeah you get really sick of your own voice. When you do this. I'll tell you it's very quickly green. You know absolutely and really. Like i say this all the time in the beginning. And i don't know if you can relate to this but like when i wanted to kick it off. I kept feeling like somebody had to give me permission to do it. Like kept telling everybody like. Hey i'm going to do this thing. And everybody's cool. Yeah go do it. And i'm like but should i don't know you never lose. That is actually speaking of never losing you. Melissa have company called josh. So tell me. Josh is and what does it do for who you are and thanks for the opportunity for being here. John is a tech platform that matches families. With special needs disabilities specialized care needs to find an increase greens a caregivers sitters nannies. And we are an end to end solution for those families and five across the country to really aimed build a team and manage their care needs in one place. It's something that melanie fontaine. My co-founder who happens to sister. We're super passionate about That's awesome yeah the services amazing and it's so needed and from understanding your story. It really came from personal experience right. Yeah melanie and i grew up with our big brother josh. He was the best big brother we can have. He also happened have developmental disabilities and a pretty severe epilepsy disorder to put it in context effort meeting for people who don't understand what those things mean. Developmentally was around the age of ten or eleven. No matter what his age that was developmentally where he was and then epilepsy. He would have two to three seizures a day and different types of seizures and what kind of encompasses those needs. Pretty complex made involved major to call mas Occupational therapy physical therapy medication. Just so as a family really changes your view on life advocacy awareness and just really help precious life is and how little we have a bit and to make the most of it

Melissa Melanie Fontaine Curt Josh Epilepsy Disorder John Melanie Seizures Epilepsy
"epilepsy" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

17:52 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Hello everyone. This is more content. Tuck that's the only show that cuts through all the glitz and all the.

Mastering You from the Inside Out  Skip Cummins - burst 05

A New Direction

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Mastering You from the Inside Out Skip Cummins - burst 05

"Five thousand americans commit suicide per year. Four million americans suffer for treatment resistant. Depression ten times ten times. The number that suffer from drug resistant. Epilepsy and anti-depressant drug market is one of the largest markets in the world. This starts the journey for you. Doesn't it well. of course. The origin challenge started long before that. But yeah that was. That was a seminal event in changing the direction of my life and fostering in me a commitment to improve people's lives especially with intractable illnesses. And the reason why. I say this kind of starts it. All off is because this kind of this whole passion with your mom you lead to you being a ceo at cyber onyx and and the whole thing but of course that's all it all falls apart at one point continued tragedy for you but then what happens is you're as you're building yourself back up after all this right this. You had to hide the pinnacle you had the low. You went to the high pinnacle of venus a ceo cyber onyx and then that falls apart and then you rebuilding your life and this is where i want to start really and get people's attention is let's let's talk about how we rebuild ourselves after we fall from the highest cliff life and and and you know there could be other cliffs right but one of the things that was so powerful to me was in chapter two because as the world starts in chapter. Two's called the origin challenge and it is an exercise that i don't know where you got it. I don't know how you put this together or if you just came up with this but this challenge of determining your origin is so important. Why are why is our pre programming. Or i think you say from whence we came so important. Well when you think about it the first eighteen years of our lives we are the most open the most impressionable and the most vulnerable. Plus we have the the ultimate respect at that point for authority or father and mother figures so the programming. That's done during those first eighteen years by our parents by our coaches by our teachers by our siblings by our friends by our life experiences in essence represents our de part of our dna our emotional intellectual spiritual etc dna the unlike our biological dna we have the power to change then in order to change that emotional spiritual cetera dna. Our origin programming. We have to understand own it. I which for a lot of us is really hard to do. And i want to take people through a little bit of this if you don't mind because he gets important that people because i did this and i discovered some things. I consider myself to be pretty healthy. That doesn't mean. I don't carry my big black garbage sack of crap. Exactly right right from my past. Here's how you started this and people listen replay the show if you want to get the book. Because he's got every one of these exercises right down five to ten words or phrases that immediately. Come to mind to best. Describe your mother during your childhood. Don't think about whether they're positive or negative. Just write down. What immediately comes to mind. Then do this for your father. Here is the big one for me. Step three now right down three to five things that you wish your mother had done more or less to be a better mother and then step. Four is do the same for your for your father dude. This is powerful. Because i never i never had just you know i think we kind of get into denial that. Our parents don't have much to do with what what's going on in my life. Now you're exactly exactly where and so then we get into this denial thing. And then you start to realize it's ted. I had this conversation with my wife. I said i did this exercise. I want to tell you this wert right from this exercise and i was. I was really blown away because they didn't. I didn't really see because what we'll tell. Tell people what gets revealed as you go through this exercise.

Origin Challenge Know From Whence You Came Looking Back To Look Forward Parental Programming Epilepsy Depression
The Case of Sandy Melgar

Women and Crime

02:07 min | 1 year ago

The Case of Sandy Melgar

"Ever heard of this case. I've heard of it. I knew it was on truth and justice. But i don't know the details at all so this is going to be like you're going to be revealing this to me as we go. Let's do it so we have hymie melgar. Who often goes by jim. And that's how we'll be referring to him in this episode. He was born in guatemala and had immigrated to the us when he was just three years old and he lived in texas with his parents and his two older brothers by all accounts. Jim was very smart. Well liked by really everybody. He was described as having a great sense of humor. Living a very healthy lifestyle. He was very active and very helpful to all those around him. And then we have. Sandra known as sandy which will refer to her. Sandy also lived in houston and that's where her gym met back in. Nineteen seventy seven when they sat next to each other in high school classroom. How does that high school sweetheart. They are high school sweethearts. He wanted very cute. He actually sat behind her in class and apparently he was smitten with her in houston. Pull her hair. Oh as an acute so few years after high school in one thousand nine hundred eighty two got married and they started their life together. Jim started his career as an it. Specialist and sandy nurse later they would start a medical billing company together and they worked quite closely with each other and they also managed a few rental homes. The couple had one daughter named liz who was born in one thousand nine hundred five around. The time that their daughter was born to the couple became involved with jehovah witnesses. That's why sorry. That's why i also remember this case. Because she was they. Were jehovah's witnesses yeah. The melgar 's allegedly wanted to provide a strong religious upbringing further daughter. And that's why they had sought out a religion at this time. The family was very close. Knit very happy. According to their daughter there was never any yelling never any disrespect as she would say they were an example of a perfect marriage over like families they did have a few obstacles. It was really sandy's health. That was the problem. Sandy suffered for many many medical ailments. She had lupus epilepsy hypothyroidism. she had double hip replacement. She had short term memory loss. She had bouts of vertigo. She also suffered from multiple violent seizures in which she would experience retrograde amnesia

Hymie Melgar Houston JIM Guatemala Sandy Sandra Melgar Texas LIZ United States Lupus Epilepsy Hypothyroidism Vertigo Seizures Amnesia
The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

Haunted Places

04:47 min | 1 year ago

The Mystery Of The Pennhurst Asylum

"The eastern pennsylvania institution for the feeble minded and epileptic later called pinehurst asylum was originally established as a facility for the disabled opened in nineteen o eight. The property contained in array of buildings all scattered around large tracts of farmland in chester county. Thirty miles outside of philadelphia though it might sound like it was designed for care and comfort. The reality was anything. But the institute was first created to house intellectually and developmentally disabled people alongside those who suffered from epilepsy but this strategy was unwise as such patients had very different needs. What's worse is that. Many of the institutions goals were based on the nineteenth century eugenics movement proponents of the movement believed that the human gene pool should be protected and anyone deemed. Genetically inferior. Should be prevented from reproducing by forced sterilization or segregation from the rest of society. For this reason. People with certain kinds of disabilities whose families could not care for them were sent to penn hearst. Most of them came as infants or children. Girls and boys are separated into different buildings. So there wouldn't be any sexual mixing in the decades since the institution closed a slew of modern day rumors claim that penn hurst carried out forced sterilizations on its patients. But while sterilization did occur at similar institutions in the united states. There was actually no record of it at pinehurst. Rumors of the institute's horrific procedures ran rampant. The last perhaps this is because the hospital was shrouded in an era of mystery it operated almost completely independently of the outside world. It had its own power plant and produced its own. Food and supplies were brought in by a special rail. Line pen hurts was designed so that no one from the outside could get in but more importantly so that no one on the inside could ever get out. Georgie was carrying a stack of folded sheets toward the finish piles. When he noticed a girl arguing with an orderly. George stopped in his tracks. She had long shiny hair and was pointing a finger directly at him confidently shouting and screaming. He was instantly captivated and continued to watch her but eventually to more orderlies came over to give her a shot. And take away georgie side. Good things never lasted. Long at penn harris georgia's mother had left him there when he was only three. He never knew why not what he done or where she'd gone he'd been stuck in this place for twelve years and he knew it like the back of his hand. He knew that when the girl got taken away it was the last he'd see of her or so he thought The next day georgy walked into the laundry building at his heart nearly stopped there. She was if he someone else. He could've tapped on her shoulder and introduced himself but as it was he could barely manage breathing and walking at the same time. Georgie said down in front of his pile of sheets and started cursing himself for being so shy and that was when someone tapped him on the shoulder turned. The girl was standing behind him. A fitted sheet in her hand. She has georgie how to fold it. Her name was kerry. No one was happy to be. A pen harassed. But carrie was indignant about it. She said she didn't belong there. That was why she'd been fighting with the orderly. There was no way she was going to spend the day slaving over an ironing board if she wasn't getting paid the orderly at said that barbital injection might change her mind but it obviously didn't soon george bush love. He used to find laundry duty tedious. But now it was the only thing. He looked forward to because laundry. Duty meant seeing carry a few weeks. After they first met george carey was sitting on a low stone wall outside the laundry carried. Turn to him with a frown. She asked to launch. She was a burden after her parents died. Her guardianship went to her uncle.

Eastern Pennsylvania Instituti Penn Hearst Penn Hurst Chester County Georgie Epilepsy Penn Harris Philadelphia Georgy United States George Georgia Kerry Carrie George Carey George Bush
BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

BTS #46 David (Dedi) Meiri PhD on Cannabis and Cancer, The Future of Cannabis Research - burst 05

"Suit. Today may not looking with thirty eight or centers every time that we are the change so having their kind of a big picture that they can in the federal candidate may influence levin affecting human body looking on the older to get first of all. Give me the tools to ask wished and then the question is are starting to emerging. Of course it's everything is that they did just chemistry and that still in then so having these abilities in these tools first of all change our been away. Many many many scientists physicians collaborations companies approach means. Just that the doing each experiment but they know nothing about the molecules using. Can i purify in with him. I don't know the those music In these open the door for me last year to enter to many different angles of different illnesses and diseases using candidates. You know the best thing. Neuro physician in the world approaching means today the doing this experiment. They need you with me. You're not saying you know this is this is all and we've you know so more and more and more may lab change the way you i researched talking to grow in. There was things so out there. Light with a patient. You know epilepsy or a sleep disorders or in two zero zero there on the on the patient instead just i want to do the understand now the reason. Why can't this effect in which compound how to improve so the roof from allow of six seven students to a level forty five plow which have different groups. I have a group of chemists doing analysis everything every group to doing cancer biology and we can talk about the perfume one every doing a research around neuro. Degenerative diseases like alzheimer's epilepsy. The order In every group. That's working how kennedy's affect the immune system few types of small small think about in small. But it's not be groups. It's individual the doing other things in the last five years in other big project that we did. We crane to big data database in israel on the patient. So in the last five years every cannabis in being bigness. Again there is you know there is a probes to be a small country despite for your board does day and but there is benefit that everybody knows everybody. And everybody's working together. So until last year we had just eight authorize globals just eight greenhouse is easier to work with them to follow up to every candidates. Be every a cannabis They ever product. The patient can get go through my lap. I analyzed all defeated candidates in a in there on the other side. We follow up on on the patient. How it's affecting so does it died improve. Sleep mainly kind of sign of and which i don't call it side effect. If you have a problem of saying oh slipping improving scooping. It's not your scientific. But we we measure that in which we started to to bring that to bed. Get into completed to try to match. Which type of cannabis in which profile of candidates affecting which illnesses in what

Israel Last Year SIX Two Main Strands More Than Ninety Percent Today Eight Forty Five Plow Each Experiment Last Five Years Two Main Cannabis Strain Alzheimer Seven Students Eight Greenhouse Banjul Four Nurses ONE Zero Annabi First Levin Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Epilepsy Epilepsy Kennedy Cancer
Near-Death Experiences

Unexplained Mysteries

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Near-Death Experiences

"Accounts of near death. Experiences can be polarizing indie. Most often happened while people are unconscious so researchers are incredibly limited in what they can actually measure. They must rely on human testimony to fill in. What's actually happening in other words. Andy ease exist near the intersection of two seemingly contradictory ideas science and faith which is why after a neurosurgeon reported in n. d. e. it became central to the conversation in nineteen eighty eight. Dr eban alexander began his career in boston at one of the most prestigious hospitals in the country. Brigham and women's well working as a neurosurgeon. Dr alexander simultaneously target his father's alma mater. Harvard medical school in both institutions. He had access to some of the most cutting edge medical technology in the world. Soon dr alexander became an expert in a non invasive. Surgical treatment called stereo tactic. Radio surgery a procedure that uses targeted radiation to address medical abnormalities. In the brain it can even eliminate tumors without needing to open the skull in his own practice. Doctor under-used stereo tactic. Radio surgery to treat cancer. Epilepsy mentoring nerves and tangled blood vessels and for nearly a decade in the field of medicine. His star was on the rise until two thousand one when an elderly woman from arizona. Whom will call. Rose contacted him to remove a benign tumor in her brain. Dr alexander was one of the few surgeons in the country capable of performing the procedure. So rose flew from arizona all the way to boston but she didn't receive the treatment that she expected when rose arrived at the hospital orderlies placed her in a wheelchair and brought her into the operation. Room apparently no one spoke to her or explain what was happening. After doctors strapped into a device rendering it immobile rose demanded to meet. Dr eben alexander. She was about to go under and he had yet to introduce himself mere minutes before the operation began. Dr alexander stepped in front of her said. Hello and assured her that she was in good hands then she drifted into unconsciousness and the surgery began when rose woke up in the icu. She couldn't move the left side of her face. Dr alexander never warned her about the risks associated with her surgery and though he'd successfully eliminated her tumor half of her face was now permanently paralyzed. Ultimately rose filed a lawsuit. Her lawyers asked to see the paperwork she'd signed before entering surgery. But apparently dr alexander could only produce a single sheet of paper. It didn't even have rose's signature on it. Apparently dr alexander had misplaced a number of her forms. The case was eventually settled out of court shortly after. Brigham and women's fire dr alexander from their roster administrators have not stated whether or not the dismissal was related to the lawsuit. Either way dr alexander moved on to work for umass memorial medical center located in worcester massachusetts. Where apparently his careless behavior continued during one operation. Dr alexander reportedly left a small piece of plastic inside a woman's nick. In addition to the pain this caused her she needed another intensive surgery to have it removed then in august two thousand three umass suspended dr sanders for an error made during an operation. On another patient's brain stem the specific details surrounding. These punitive measures remain confidential by early two thousand seven. Dr alexander relocated to lynchburg virginia and began work as a staff surgeon at lynchburg general hospital but his lack of professionalism and care continued

Dr Alexander Dr Eban Alexander Brigham Dr Eben Alexander Boston Harvard Medical School Arizona Andy Tumors Epilepsy Rose Cancer ICU Umass Memorial Medical Center Dr Sanders Worcester Massachusetts Umass
"epilepsy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Epilepsy. Always continue to run at pretty good shape this afternoon. No accidents or delays other than on eastbound Ronald Reagan's ramp to Cold Rain Avenue. There's still some congestion in the area on cold rain, cold rain also congested around to 75. It's well. I'm Rob Williams News radio 700 WLW. Now the latest forecast from the advanced Industry Weather Center advanced industry would like to say thanks. It's an honor to serve our community during this time and always visit no fear. Dennis dot com Well, we're moving out, giving us a few more rays of sunshine this afternoon or high ends up a 37 degrees with though tonight's cloud deck coming back, and we only dropped to 27 flurries will be falling in the overnight hours, including Wednesday morning, but the Wednesday clouds again well Slowly decrease in the daylight hours. We'll see a high of 36 from your severe weather station. I'm nine first morning, meteorologist Jennifer Catch Mark News Radio. 700 wlw. Very nice afternoon for mid January. Sunshine and 43 degrees our temperature Vaccination of people 80 and older is now underway in Ohio, finding most hospitals or fit finished. There's a few that are just now finishing We're still some of the local health departments are still reaching out to a few of our doctors and nurses in the community that would qualify, But that part of it reaching out to our health care community is almost almost done now in Phase one be in Ohio, according to Governor DeWine during his coronavirus update, which is underway right now, people 75 older plus others will start getting the vaccination next week. Latest numbers for Ohio this afternoon. Nearly 5000 new cases way below the 21 Day average, with 55.

Ohio Ronald Reagan Industry Weather Center Rob Williams Jennifer Catch Governor DeWine Epilepsy.
Brain Tracking: The Future of Brain Health with Paul Sorbo, Director of Sales at Wavi Medical

Outcomes Rocket

05:39 min | 1 year ago

Brain Tracking: The Future of Brain Health with Paul Sorbo, Director of Sales at Wavi Medical

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket. Today i have the privilege of hosting paul sorbo. He is the director of sales at wabi medical. Where they're helping the world to think better they're doing brain performance assessments with a very unique approach and in this interview. I have an extraordinary conversation with him. Learning more about how they're making a difference in brain health. And so with that intro. I am so privileged to have you here on the podcast paul. Thanks for joining me. Thank you chris. It's great to be here. Yeah so you know. We previously had another member of your team. Aaron from wabe. If you guys haven't had a chance to listen to that podcast go to the website. Go to wabe mad. And you'll see our rate chat with erin but today we've got paul on the podcast and he's gonna die of a bit deeper into the topic of brain health and what we're doing to do more and to do better within that field so before we do that though paul you know why. Don't you go ahead and tell us what exactly inspires your work in healthcare watts. Broad question to me I think for me it was always. I had a fascination with the human body whether it was from the performance aspect. i. I'm an ex bodybuilder. And so i always had this huge fascination trying to manipulate the human body to be the best at it could all the way through my undergrad. And we'll getting in about school. I had a huge fascination at the genome and and a genetic and solving things like duchenne muscular dystrophy with genomic other being crisper cast nine gene regulation. And you know all of a sudden. I started thinking about this and you know genetics. You're just familiar with upi genetics and and protonix. And when you really get into that you know you start looking at medicine as a whole and realizing that we are not controlling what we can. And that i want to continue to strive to make people the best version of themselves that they can be and continue to drive the education behind that specifically in now with lobby kind of the brain sector. Yeah that's pretty cool man so you did like weight training professionally or what. What's the story there. Never professionally I had a whole bunch of friends that were professional bodybuilders. Still to this day. You know on a fascination with muscle for lack of a better term probably unhealthy fascination for being I like to call bodybuilders the first bile hackers you know when when tides just now coming out and getting into mainstream medical community us bodybuilders. Been using uptight for twenty years and not in a nearly regulated fashion. Obviously very underground bro science for lack of a better term. But yeah i mean i. I'm five foot nine. I was all the way up to about two hundred fifty four pounds. It less than ten percent body fat which was not healthy by the way could punish shoes And realize that you know. I think that's a good topic of conversation about health. Though you know people. I think genuinely believe that external appearance can actually reflect internal health and that is so far from true. 'cause x i looked extremely healthy right. I ate what i thought right things. I had low body fat. I had astronomical amount of muscle mass for my frame but internally when i started looking at my labs my panels my lipid panels cluster all levels my ratios. My inner cellular calcium levels all of a sudden. I'm like close. I am the furthest thing from health. Yeah and you know. It's a good call and we've got a measure to understand where we're at and that's a lot of what you guys are doing with wabi around the brain so talked a little bit about the business and some insights about how you guys are helping. Health care leaders do their job around brain assessment. Yeah i think the key there to what he's done let me start by saying why doesn't do anything do what we do. Is we make information significantly more accessible so measuring the brain has been really underdone. Because it's never been a accessible be. It's never been affordable. Those are the two things that david oakley data joffe really set out to change e. g. and evoked potentials or. Erp have been around for sixty seventy years. The problem with both of those erp specifically was really only used in brain death situations to measure. You know long hospital procedure and prostate expensive and b. e. g. is really people are familiar with the g. from epilepsy studies. And these really terrible torture base you know. Eeg say league caps. You're just awful and they're expensive and they're not quick right so when you talk about measuring the brain you know. Are you going to send a client or patient to go. Get a yearly. Mri no are you gonna go send a client to get a yearly specs or anything else out there eeg. No you're not gonna do it because it's going to cost them. I don't know that many people that have five to ten thousand dollars our way every year. Nobody i mean right very hit. I know people that do it yearly. And i'm like that's excessive right but when you really look at that the problem is that by not doing that on a regular basis as we don't have a whole bunch of data on the parade you know it's not like we're able to just go in with a stethoscope and listen to the way than our heart is a. We haven't been able to do that with the brain and so really. The only clinton which measurement is happening is when. There's already a problem whether there's already issues of cognitive decline whether there's already ti stroke whether there's already behavioral sheeps and so we don't really know these baseline normative were supposed to be or house amongst progressing their cognitive science progressing as they age. And that's really. The foundation of lavi is providing a simple fast and affordable assessment that we establish a baseline and then compare subsequent. Scans to see how someone is progressing

Paul Sorbo Wabi Medical Paul Upi Genetics Erin Aaron David Oakley Chris Joffe Clinton Foundation Of Lavi
Havent I been here before

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:42 min | 1 year ago

Havent I been here before

"Welcome to kiss myths and mystery. Siamese your host kit crumb. I've got to mention that if you're hearing a little background noise there's nothing wrong with your computing device or however you're listening to this podcast is my neighbor dominate away. Who's drilling well while that said. Today's topic is a deja vu. When you go to a new place me someone that you've never met before and had the feeling that you knew that person or to that place. Well you're not alone. But i deviate a little bit when i was researching this story a french carver. Not a real name said. She grew up in las vegas but eventually moved to shasta city california. She told me it wasn't uncommon for her to have the name of a friend that she grew up with pop into her head. And within minutes would run into that person at shasta. Although janice experiences nada deja vu. I felt it was in the same league and i just couldn't help explain it to my listeners. Okay onward we go. Wikipedia says deja vu feeling that one has lived through the present situation before the phrase translates literally as already seen although some interpret deja vu in a paranormal context mainstream science approaches reject of dacia who is pre cognition or prophecy. So how does science explain deja-vu they the world of science has four possible causes of what is referred to as vu. First attention explanations of deja vu involve an initial perception that is made under degraded attention which is then followed by a second. Take under full attention for example. If you're about to unlock the front door of your house and you momentarily are distracted by a noise in the distance when you return to the task locking the door the first perception may seem further off in the past the distraction that separates these two perceptions could be est fleeting. I said i blink. Their second explanation is memory explanations. They make the assumption that some detail of the do experiences familiar but the source of this familiarity has been forgotten. The premise of this explanation is that people encounter countless things during the course of the day. But don't pay attention to all of the information later. Processing of information may occasionally induce. The million era at deja vu. Then there is the next explanation dual processing explanation so vu suggested to usually synchronous cognitive processes become momentarily as synchronous for example familiarity and retrieval could become out of sync alternate league perception and memory could become a synchronous and finally neurological explanations for deja vu attributed the phenomenon to either a small temporal lobe seizure in a person without epilepsy to a delay in neural transmission between the eyes ears or other perceptual organs in higher order processing centers in the brain. Wow do processing. Explanations have received a lot of attention. They are much more philosophical and theoretical and less mechanistic but do processing explanations can be tested in the lab. Similarly neurological explanations are appealing in their neurological basis and seem logical but again we lack the advanced technology to test them. Thus dual processing explanations are less germane to researchers instead attentional memory explanations are best supported by what we know about cognition and could be tested vertically. Well it sounds to me like the scientific explanations can't be tested and repeated in a generally scientific method. Wow that takes the fun out of experiencing deja vu on monday. I'll provide explanations for deja vu from a pseudoscience or paranormal point of view. And we'll see what stands out

Shasta City Shasta Janice Las Vegas California Epilepsy
Mystery illness puts hundreds in the hospital in southern India

Todd Schnitt

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Mystery illness puts hundreds in the hospital in southern India

"Person has died and over 200 others? Have been put into the hospital. Some kind of a mystery illness is occurring in The southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. This illness was first discovered over the weekend. And the patients there are complaining. Of nausea, anxiety, loss of consciousness. In a 45 year old man who was taken to the hospital and he was experiencing something that was described as almost like. Five epileptic seizure. Yeah, he has something like epilepsy. That was what he described and he also suffered from nausea. He died. And the health officials in India trying to figure out what's going on is the last I saw this was as of Early this morning. In the a time that over 200 people were affected by this mystery illness, so oh, my God, I hope it's nothing Serious. Obviously

Nausea Andhra Pradesh Epilepsy India
"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"A management strategies for certain types of epilepsy so The point is lots and lots of possibilities. That may work. Also remember hearing that people with epilepsy or seizure. Disorder are not allowed to drive. Is that true can patients Rive can exercise. Can they play sports. The all-star with the driving so a down one is specifically called out on almost every state law. That if someone had a seizure where they lost consciousness and they make a big point that Then you are not able to drive another duration that you're not able to drive varies from state to state believe it or not From three months in arizona. Six months in minnesota and in florida and it can go to a year for certain other states so at the end they all insist that you become seizure free for that amount of time before allowed to drive but if you are well managed. Yeah you can drive. Exercise exercise is never the wrong answer. You can always find something. That's safe to do Ron walk whatever you got side. So that is something that absolutely is available for anyone. Plays sports louis. Maybe it's not the right thing if you're gonna play boxing or maybe you have to be a little bit more careful if you're gonna do scuba diving where there's a little element of additional risks to the seizure occurred but for vast majority of other sports and activities absolutely. There's no reason the should stop anyone from doing what they wanted to enter serving. You mentioned earlier that there are some predisposing conditions that can cause some Epilepsy over the life over. Their lifetime is our way to prevent epilepsy. If someone should have one of those disorders that might lend itself to that problem. Yeah i wished. I could simply say that. There is an easy Preventative the answer is not really. It's it's really preventing whatever those causes are for Let me kind of take a for an older adult that we know that a stroke is a cause i actually the most one of the more common causes of seizures in the older adult preventing strokes than becomes a way that you actually prevent epilepsy in people same is true for other potential causes for which you can make a very conscious decisions to avoid having a problem with later in life. Once you have Epilepsy specific preventative measures. Not too much that we know of but is that as we try to understand epilepsy. In howard develops in people. We may have an ability to do something such as that in the not too distant future i guess is the best way to put is. They're cured for epilepsy for any patients yet. There are act to epilepsy surgery in the right patient. That is that we know where it's coming from. An it's safe to recite can result in a definitive cure up to seventy to eighty percent of individuals who identify as good surgical candidates. That actually go through. It can lead to complete seizure. Freedom a seizure cure and that is huge news for those individuals with thought about it. Is that often. it's underutilized. Surgery is a scary proposition for a lot of people. But there's so many new techniques it's become so much safety Do them and you don't even have to stay in the hospital that long anymore. At roughly two days is the average admission leave for individuals who undergoes a procedure. So yeah cures do exist for the right people everything as covid nineteen now so i would be remiss if i did not ask you just having epilepsy. Predisposed to greater risk from covid nineteen. No actually having. Epilepsy is not put you at a greater risk off for developing covid. Nineteen therapies are not necessarily ones that are going to Kind of quiet down your immune system or have anything along those lines now to play it on the other side covid nineteen because it's an infection can vary much worsen seizures..

Epilepsy Rive arizona Ron howard minnesota florida
"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Because there's a lot of different seizure types that do occur in that we can classify and it just depends on where it is in the brain to be honest with you. Enter serve an. I grew up in eighties. And i remember many school dances with strobe lights going around the kids all saying oh my goodness at lights going to give me a seizure. Can computer lights computer screens or other lights. Cause someone to have a seizure. There are certain genetic versions of epilepsy and or seizure disorder that are actually very sensitive to the frequency at which a light is flashed the lower the flash rate or the closer at approximates the normal frequencies that occur in the brain. And if you have a genetic predisposition can actually lead to a seizure in fact a couple of movies Which surprised me rissoli. They actually put the signals to that fact Just to be safe. But yeah for a certain group of individuals. You can precipitate a seizure in that way can stress affect someone with epilepsy or caused seizures stresses one of those conditions. I kind of like into Weather reports and so when you get a weather report valley say there's a thunderstorm watch or thunderstorm warning tornado. Watch tornado warning. What they're trying to say that the ingredients are ripe for tornadoes occur or torn or thunderstorms occur in that watch warning me to actually see it very similarly stress is one of those ingredients that makes it more likely to occur but it doesn't mean it's going to occur so it's just one of those conditions that we hear. A lot of people who have seizures were the stress was occurring at the time they had it. And yeah that may been ingredient. But it's not the actual 'cause it was maybe the match or the extra thing that pushed you over that led to the actual cause to lead to the seizure. How do you treat epilepsy. Here's the good news. There's a lot of treatments There's almost The short answer is medications of medications..

epilepsy
"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Inside. Rose is the fruit of the sea in Cordoba. Carney's previous cases their public that trickled Celia, the public support media, they Instacart solo, those auras receipt public's diagonal shot. Close pressure in Africa. Cargoes pra Penis in question to tell me no See these really that public's soon placid had Doctor Sado Messina Centrale epilepsy, Orlando family, your income, you know, believe it and keep it. Holy Doctor Saadiq getting cemented variance, but I can't Really? Let me familiar. Hold out there. We're going to see that doctor. Saadiq? Yes, Centrally secret set of beliefs If center that left Orlando Orlando Epilepsy Pinto, come, Orlando Epilepsy come this simple lentils on black Friday as their fingers in a 90 day. See Penny, our group on the train for Cento X. You celebrate Alexander Sweater is in Jen's baby. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, I know. I haven't been on a base and the jitters This is a coupon ideas change trigger throughout this in compact living people. That.

Orlando Orlando Epilepsy Pinto Orlando Epilepsy Doctor Sado Messina Centrale Orlando family Rose Carney Cordoba Celia Africa Alexander Sweater Penny Jen
"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Epilepsy, be able Working. Good boy. So Eddie, you get closer. When you when your school just to meet me. It is. Just point So Stumbles on the Lotto Little exit. Also enticing Cinco Epi Bible Madonna Song last week on seeing.

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

All Things Considered

02:53 min | 2 years ago

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

"Air like short movies. If you fall off a bike, your brain will probably record the entire sequence of events that put you in pain that's known as an episodic memory. And now, scientists say they have identified cells in the human brain that makes this sort of memory possible. NPR's John Hamilton has more. They're known as time cells, and they were discovered in rodents years ago, but a team of researchers wanted to see if these cells also exist in humans. So they studied the brains of 27 people attempting a difficult memory task. This type of memory task is not one that like a rodent would be able to do that's Dr Brad Lega, a neurosurgeon at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Legacy's participants were asked to study sequences of words on a laptop computer. The words appear on the screen went after the other about 12 to 15 items at a clip. They're separated by a couple of seconds. Then, after a break, people were asked to remember the words. Meanwhile, scientists were measuring the activity of individual cells in the hippocampus and another brain area involved in the perception of time. This was possible because the people in the study already had electrodes in their brains as part of a treatment for severe epilepsy. Leggo says the team discovered certain cells that would fire at specific times during each sequence of words, the time cells that we found They're marking out discreet segments of time within this, like approximately 32nd window time stamps that helped people recall when they had seen each word And in what order? Legacy says The findings suggest that the brain uses the same approach. When we're reliving an experience, like falling off a bike, we remember the wind in our hair, then seeing the pebble on the road than the pain. So by having time cells create this indexing across time, you can put everything together in a way that Nixon's the time Self study appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Euribor, jockey of New York University, says it's important even though the result was predicted by experiments in animals. The final arbitrator is always the human brain. Jackie says The study helps explain the memory limitations found in people who have damage to the hippocampus. In one experiment, he says, scientists compared the memories of a group of people who had just Just a tour of a university, he says. The people without hippocampal damage all told, pretty much the same story first, because we have seen the fountain. And then there was a little girl who fell off the bike, Physical and so on. And these sequences are completely and absolutely gun in people Cos is probably because their brains don't have time cells to re create a sequence of events. But Jackie says time cells aren't like clocks. Their pace is constantly changing. Depending on factors like mood. You have to wait for the elections. Then every day is a long day. The same thing is gonna be asking, you know when it's covered over is very, very slow, but when you having a good time time flies, Jackie says. As a result, our perception of time isn't very reliable. John

Jackie John Hamilton NPR Dr Brad Lega University Of Texas Southweste New York University Leggo Dallas National Academy Of Sciences John Nixon Proceedings Of
Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

Digiday Podcast

06:15 min | 2 years ago

Diversity 'is a commercial imperative now': Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna

"Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I've Riley did today's senior correspondent based I've read the UK and it gives me great pleasure to welcome a fellow Brit to the show. This week Christopher Kenna is the CEO brand advance the UK based global diversity media. Network. Said welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. She is Chris So yeah, it's fair to say I to start kind of right at the beginning because I think it's fair to say that you didn't take maybe the most conventional well traveled route into the into the media industry. And I won't stick if our listeners a little flavor if I may of the years that led up to you founding your your current company. So I didn't know where we start kind of at the very beginning Many of our US listeners probably know where the olive man is but. But that's where you were born. Very, very small British island has relation of what like eighty thousand or something like that. Yeah. So let's start there. Yeah the Ottoman. From people on the other side of the potent if you look in. The UK map you've got the big and then you've got islands, which is small bit this a little island right in the middle of the big being. England Scotland Wales on the small bit be an island is a little dot in the middle never rarely shown on whether ups Whether symbol but. Yeah population about eighty, seven, seventy, eight, hundred, thousand. A blockade everyone. You know which Just as. It's off with a with. From the very get guy. I was destined Dabo. Trophies and certificates got a significant for that UH. I don't remember getting obviously I was born but. When could so skip I was in cash in. And when you come out of, can you get like a big thing achievements event? On pretty much anything, anybody's ever written about you open to that point of until you sixteen on the very first thing in now was this. From Jane. Critical Hospital From you spend a number of years in the in the British army. Is that right wherever you based? Yeah. So I was based out a Jimmy Fest So did my member basic training here in England in Boston bond went to blunt it, which is the army school of signals. To do sort of second phase training which is. I was a on communicate so to go. Out to use a radio not but you know what I mean and so I was destined for comes. So maybe not all is so far apart as you think. You. Know army to media we basically doing the same thing. So then yeah I was boasted out to Jimmy went out seventeen. Met My now ex way. My kid when I was seventeen. So. We start on the fatherhood on your after kits. Now they're both off German English they live at JEB new Madonna goes to union bellied son goes to high school and beautiful in Jimmy. Yet did tell us to of Iraq one tour of Afghan and what led you to leave the army. awhile I was involved in an ID so I've epilepsy now. Because of injury on so yeah I icon. Epilepsy in a rifle mix. Ni- I imagine. That's not good company. So and then media came calling for you. Well well, you came cooling for media well I. Don't know who, but but I think I'm good at this. I've lived sound a little arrogant now but I think definitely media needed needs people like me. You. Know just the background I don't mean specifically there's nothing particularly special about May. The I mean you don't people from my background's people that didn't you know two Family Income Kofi Union blind you don't we need diversity of vices. We need diversity of thought. So yeah, I think it needed me as much as I needed it. But no so I started off. Is So when Columbia Street back Manchester. I'd spend a lot of time to care and Blah Blah Blah. Back Manchester. On then. Yes. Fell into acting and presented done even. Go too much into that. 'cause it's a problem, a life of China Forget. But yeah, ended up doing presenting things like price drop TV. MTV completely is. Got My own show on sky which was puppies the most watched show on TV. What was that show? Cope the Chris Candido show. I was destined to be an office as well. Then, I made a production guy start up production company. Of. Factual shows such shows like queer three did drama series those on TV code the ends I wrote in direct produced directed quish. Couple of football documentaries champions one about. Munches to CEOS an official release DVD for Manchester, say did one class rages as well? Yeah a Sold the rights to a lot of the shows that came to London on that's how it got into. Sort of. Went into. Media An. Advertising. Agency wouldn't worked a DO DOT com. And partly, Connecticut now. But yeah.

UK British Army England Scotland Wales Manchester Chris Candido Christopher Kenna Jimmy United States British Island England Iraq MTV London Dabo Kofi Union Connecticut Boston Jane Official
Eric Edgar Cooke Is The Night Caller

Serial Killers

04:14 min | 2 years ago

Eric Edgar Cooke Is The Night Caller

"In January of Nineteen Fifty, nine, twenty, eight year old Eric Cook was in pain. His face was in fresh scratches drawing even more attention to his recognizable harelips features. If anyone asked what happened, Cook blame the scratch marks on his eldest son who was developmentally handicapped while Cook blamed his son for his injuries. The true culprit was thirty-three-year-old Pnina Berkman when Cook attacked Panini in her apartment on January twenty ninth she fought back her long manicured nails gouged his face as she tried desperately to repel. In the end, it was a fight, Pennino couldn't win. She died under living room floor after cook ran from the flat. The city of Perth Austrailia was rocked by the shocking murder and leads quickly dried up cook left now, prints and DNA technology was too rudimentary to conclusively tiny one to the blood under Pineda's nails residents in the Wembley area reported seeing Prowler in the neighborhood on nights leading up to the attack but no one could give a clear description of the man so as. Long as he kept his head down, Cook was in the clear and that's just what he did for the next six months. Cook was relatively inactive but by August he couldn't control his urges any longer be eighth. He left his wife Sally at home with their children and set off into the shadows he ended up in the affluent area of Midland's the suburb was popular with students of the nearby university making it a prime target for cook who loved to Peek in windows at potential targets. One. Such student was seventeen year old Alex Don, who was spending the night alone at her sister's apartment as Alex slept twenty nine year old cook made his way around the building. Until he found an open window, it was too small and high to be an obvious entry point, which is probably why anyone neglected to close it. But Cook wasn't deterred once he managed to scramble through the window he rifled through Alex's purse taking what little money the nursing student had. But even as experienced and quiet as cook was the teen woke up panicking cook seized something heavy, perhaps a fire poker and Hit over the head knocking her out, not wanting to wait for the girl to wake up cook left the way he came in Alex was left alone until the next morning when friends arrived in rushed to the hospital in addition to a nasty Gash above her I Alex suffered a fractured skull and was left with a severe form of epilepsy that derailed her career aspirations and would affect her for the rest of her life. Not that Eric Cook had any cares about the woman who's life he just ruined by the time Alex finally left the hospital in September he'd already moved onto a fresh. Suburb. Full of new houses and clueless victims for the prolific cat burglar a few months. Later, his new favourite haunt was the wealthy neighborhood of Brookwood flats on an early visit to one building. He stole a key from the ground floor apartment of Betty Johnston then returned to burgle the place of few times. Betty's next door neighbor was twenty, two year old daughter, Jillian brewer and terrier designer. Jillian caught cooks I on one of his visits and he took pleasure watching through the window as the young woman had sex with her fiance. But watching evidently wasn't enough Vanessa's going to take over on. The psychology here, and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or a psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show thanks Greg in a later assessment of his psychological development Dr Aaron. Samuel Ellis stated that Cook was sexually naive and afraid of women who might conceivably test his sexual adequacy. It's possible that this misguided fear or hatred of a sexually confident unmarried woman caused cooks thoughts to turn to violence. This theory aligns with cooks first murder victim Panini Berkman who had no qualms about having sex outside of wedlock and even had the gall to sleep naked.

Eric Cook Alex Don Panini Berkman Nineteen Fifty Murder Pennino Austrailia Betty Johnston Jillian Brewer Vanessa Midland Samuel Ellis Perth Pineda Dr Aaron Greg Sally
Family settles lawsuit over death of trans woman in New York City jail

All of It

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Family settles lawsuit over death of trans woman in New York City jail

"Woman with epilepsy who died in solitary confinement on Rikers Island have settled It's federal lawsuit with city for a record $5.9 million. Attorneys for the family of lately in Polanco say the deal was reached on Friday, the largest for an inmate death in a city jail. The terms were not made. Public lawyer David Shane e says he hopes the deal means Polanco's family confined some small measure of peace. City Law Department spokesperson says Polanco's death was an absolute tragedy. The empty

Polanco Rikers Island City Law Department David Shane E
Camila Coelho On Living With Epilepsy, Her New Beauty Brand, Elaluz & Her Exact Nighttime Skincare Routine

Breaking Beauty Podcast

06:44 min | 2 years ago

Camila Coelho On Living With Epilepsy, Her New Beauty Brand, Elaluz & Her Exact Nighttime Skincare Routine

"Hello, hello, Carleen here with a quick pause to talk about the best nutrition hack that I've discovered lately, courtesy our friends at Sikora I've been on a health kick as of late. So I totally know that feeling like I wanna feel better about what I eat but what's going to be Yummy are of tunes, carrot sticks or a grilled cheese sandwich a nobody got time to prep healthy and great tasting dishes though am I right and that's where Sikora comes in their organic ready to eat. Meals are made using curated plant based ingredients designed to boost energy, improve, digestion, and get you feeling and looking healthy from the inside out and one thing I've definitely learned is that healthy meals don't have to be boring like who knew that Veggie fries could taste so good Sakarov creations are chef crafted and change weekly and they're delivered fresh to anywhere. In the US to boost results, you can try the best-selling metabolism, super powder and all natural remedy for bloating and fatigue. It also contains iron vetik. which helped to enhance energy and help minimize those sugar cravings and right now, the car is offering our listeners twenty percent off their first order when they go to Kara Dot com slash beauty or enter code beauty at. That car S. A., K. A., R. A. dot com slash beauty to get twenty percent off your first order will link to that offer on our blog and in our show notes once again that Sikora dot com slash beauty and now back to the podcast. So you're native of Brazil a lot of people know you from Youtube and Instagram and I understand you move to the US as a teenager what to this day is still the most quintessentially Brazilian about you the most Brazilian. Is that I love to dance. I am obsessed with and saying that is definitely like a Latina. And I eat my very traditional Brazilian every single warning actually myself and my husband, we learn how to make the dough at home. So we do a show every week and you can freeze it. You know like cheese balls and we have it every single day in the morning it brings us back to Brazil my hometown. Delicious I hope you'll be marketing those soon. I saw your video dancing with your brother on your instagram. It was so cute and I was trying to picture myself dancing with my brother like that. They would just not happen but you guys were adorable. So tell us about your relationship with your mom and beauty. Did you learn any beauty tips from her or got like a skin-care hacker? Any advice from her? So I've always been a beauty lovers in some of the little girls I remember countless members of myself overly brushing my hair before leaving the house I had like a long Bob haircuts I needed to make sure every little hair was in place and you know playing with my mom's or my grandmother's makeup I was so into beauty and you know my mom always had some makeup on but my. Grandmother was really a beauty icon. In every single way you can think of like grandmothers energy and her confidence in her just like her personality. She was filled with Joy and light always and I remember like looking at her and just saying to my cellphone wants to be like my grandmother when I grow up and she was not like the typical you know beautiful like what people can can consider like. Gorgeous. You know I don't want to say it is wrong way in the runway but like a lot of times they know someone is beautiful in a lot of people just think like imagine a perfect looking you know nine the perfect knows and for me beauties really like that light that you shine through lake that your personality it's the most important thing. If you have a good personality, you are automatically beautiful. That's how I always thought and my grandmother was for me the most beautiful woman I got a lot of things from her. She was the one who gave me my first red lipstick when I was six years old. And I have my pets were photo with Alex on my mom was so mad which one was it do you remember I don't remember there's probably a Brazilian brand but it was a red bold readily I got a lot of things from my grandmother her hair mask she used to do like these homemade hair mask with like avocado. Aloe Vera. A bunch of things in the blender and she would do her home made a face masks to so some things. I still do to this day like the honey and brown sugar facemask like things that are very organic but the work for you you know. Though yeah, I got a lot of it from my grandmother for sure. What about any skincare hacks I feel like I've read a lot you talking about your mom passing on like some cool skincare hacks to you skincare hacks means truly like. My mom always told me like wash your face don't wash your face twice during the day like the through the day I just wash it in, cleanse it at night in the morning it's just water and then my my serum, a Lotta Times, you know keep applying to many things or or rubbing face too much. That's when you we irritate our skin. Right. So in the morning I learned with my mom to just wash with cold water that wakes you up to be tough a little bit and I do a little in fact, massage every morning we can do it with your hands and fingers. It's very Brazilian to the lymphatic from the face you plump like the lymph nodes Chan your. And here on your Tukwila Tay or not exactly between your Tan your shoulder bones. Yeah. So those that's where lymph nodes are, and then if you activated by pumping it three five times, then massaging your face really deeply that would deep up feuds such a beautiful way, and now they have like the these tools like Morton's that you can. They can help you have to do it with your hands but that's one thing that my mom always does and she does these face exercises that look crazy but it's really Like. Putting. Z., but there's a lot of stretching face stretching going on. Like actors exercises for their mouths. But it words you know it's like the same way we work out our body we should do it with our face and it's super healthy event with our there like nasal label folds here these these lines assist for Marionette Line Marianne out. Yes, those you can exercise from the inside with Tong like. Crazy.

Sikora United States Brazil Kara Dot S. A. Bloating Yummy Sakarov Youtube Tukwila Tay Aloe Vera BOB Tong JOY Alex Morton
"epilepsy" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Does not help him is like a different supplement we could given for seizures with season for epilepsy patients what we find and I've been in practice a long time now every epilepsy patient we've ever seen Anika Kling dogs the atlas the top bone in the neck rotates out of place and when it does that it puts pressure on what's called the brain stem that the part of the brain that kind of filters down into the into the spine and not saying it's the cure for epilepsy but in many cases we get amazing results which are manipulated or treating the upper part of the neck for epileptic patients then we got to get him off all artificial sweetener asper tame is an exile talks into the brain all monosodium glutamate so no Chinese food for him also what we gonna cover it now probably cover unexpected here is soy protein soy protein isolate any that has a glutamic acid in it that could be a problem as well so if you want to bring him in to see us we'd love to see him of course but this nutrition wise no artificial sweeteners and no nitric oxide in you might wanna try Dr Jos nitric oxide support I'm sorry no no monosodium glutamate or asper tame and nitric oxide will help increase the circulation to the brain as well breaking news from the W. S. B. twenty four hour news desk good evening I'm Jennifer Griffin is live in the W. S. B. twenty four hour news center or breaking weather news to tell you about we've been telling is coming and coming and coming a right now it's at the northwest Georgia there is a tornado warning for northeastern Floyd county south central Walker county and she took a county let's go to channel two for the latest minutes or so until the National Weather Service decides to cancel it will sit wait and see what happens it's gonna moving a little bit out of our viewing area into the Dayton Walker Whitfield Murray county area so that's where that is going up into north Georgia when you folks around Fannin county a western Gilmer county here in Gordon county are you be weather aware because that thing to drop all right back down and move in your direction so we're gonna be here keeping you informed every step of the way and the hour by hour forecast brand you want to take us through the hour by hour forecast to show you where this line is setting up now and where it's going to go by eleven o'clock tonight yeah so what we're looking at here is this line of storms in the gun pointed out extends back towards the west and the main line is going to come in a little bit later so if you flip it over to the weather computer will take you through this was back at seven o'clock let's advance this is this warm front lifts to the north south of at bats with a very unstable areas so we'll go through this this is nine o'clock this evening just a few minutes from now the storms back in Alabama building into northwest Georgia now and through ten o'clock after eleven o'clock this line is going to build into western Georgia as we head past eleven o'clock towards midnight and then moving into the metro area through the overnight and early morning hours so there we are between one and two A. M. that's when the worst of this line is going to move into and through metro Atlanta between two and this is three o'clock in the morning and then towards four o'clock starting to move from the eastern metro out towards Athens any intent and it will finally I clear out it will dry out after that so let's go on back going out to the radar and and get an update on what's going on here I want to point out that in metro Atlanta we're in the clear for now you see the purple between Somerville and try and it's likely some small hail this little bit of cloud.

epilepsy
"epilepsy" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"epilepsy" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Say I quit. I'm not gonNA show any more. You got a point. Yeah that's true. Maybe Steph won't get any points this episode. And then then I'll be half black so I'll start with the real one. The God machine. It was called. It seems to have started as a pretty like normal experiment to study a link between forms of epilepsy and religious visions and quote religious visions so like near death experiences things like that. That would make you see like the tunnel to heaven or something so people with temporal lobe. Epilepsy seemed to frequently only report. that the feeling of not being alone while having a seizure so this device was supposed to replicate like a safer version of that but in tests the researchers reported that eighty percent of subjects felt and unexplained presence nearby but there are a lot of other things that a lot of other experiments that couldn't replicate this at all and and there was a placebo experiment that did replicate it so you know but now they sell some of the people who did these experiments consumer versions Asians for meditation and for Helping you see guide. But they're all supposed to be able to change your emotional state. Button can change my emotional state with the push-button already. It's called twitter. Oh many things flash through my mind got it and I can imagine people around me if I just turn off all the lights and my house. Like something creeks that.

Epilepsy temporal lobe twitter Steph