35 Burst results for "Epidemic"

COVID-19 deaths on the rise again in the U.S.

America's Morning News

01:21 min | 3 d ago

COVID-19 deaths on the rise again in the U.S.

"From the Corona virus in the United States on the rise again to justice health experts had feared in cases are climbing in nearly every state average death per day across the country, Rose 10% over the past two weeks from 721 to nearly 794 as of Sunday, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Former FDA chief, Dr Scott Gottlieb, telling a CNBC right now the United States is at a tipping point where if we took some aggressive, targeted steps right now, we could potentially forestall the worst of it. But we're not going to do that. And I understand why there's a lot of fatigue set in and a lot of policy resistance to taking strong action ahead of you know this spread, so we're likely to see a very Dennis epidemic. I think we're right now on the cusp of what's going to be exponential spread in parts of the country. Stein ISI, Certain states and cities react because the epidemics and more dentists there in Texas, you saw some action in El Paso, Utah's building field hospitals. Wisconsin's done that to you are starting to see reaction, but I think it's going to take more before we start to see broader based policy changes that have gone on, ultimately turn the tide on the spread. Confirmed infections per day are rising and 47 states had deaths are up in 34. The state's California

United States Dr Scott Gottlieb Johns Hopkins University Cnbc Stein Isi FDA El Paso Rose Dennis Wisconsin California Utah Texas
New guidelines address rise in opioid use during pregnancy

WBZ Midday News

00:36 sec | 3 d ago

New guidelines address rise in opioid use during pregnancy

"Well from a pandemic, too. An epidemic, the opioid epidemic their new guidelines Addressing the rise of opioid use during pregnancy, a new report says. Pregnant women with an opioid problem just aren't getting the help they need. The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued new guidelines that include encouraging doctors to prescribe the medication to treat opioid misuse. The academy also says hospitals should have written protocols for assessing and treating newborns who may suffer withdrawal symptoms. Many don't and practices very widely. Elaine Carbs CBS

American Academy Of Pediatrics Elaine CBS
Expert: France has "lost control" of the virus

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 4 d ago

Expert: France has "lost control" of the virus

"Virus patients now occupy more than half of France's intensive care units and some doctors are urging tougher restrictions off to another vehicle jump in confirmed infections the head of the government's virus advisory body has expressed surprise at the brutality of the rise in infections after more than fifty two thousand new cases were reported on Sunday speaking on France's RTL radio he floated the idea of local lockdowns or extending from his curfews the number of people hospitalized with the virus has climbed sharply in recent weeks putting renewed pressure on hospital I see use meanwhile the head of the infectious and tropical diseases department at a leading Paris hospital call may adds we've lost control of the epidemic though he doesn't date from just yesterday I'm Charles de Ledesma

France Charles De Ledesma Paris
Gottlieb warns of "dangerous tipping point" as virus spread accelerates

KNX Evening News

00:49 sec | 4 d ago

Gottlieb warns of "dangerous tipping point" as virus spread accelerates

"Health officials continue to warn that the weeks and months ahead could be especially tough when it comes to the pandemic. Former head of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr Scott Gottlieb tells CBS's face the nation we are at a dangerous tipping point is, it's a little bad everywhere. We don't have regions where it's extremely dense and anyone region like we did when it was epidemic in New York or epidemic in the south outside of states like Wisconsin or Iowa. Most states just have a lot of spread. But most states aren't at the point where they're extremely press right now. That's going to change over the next 2 to 3 weeks. I think things are going to look much more difficult. Gottlieb says he's especially concerned by messaging from the Trump administration about a vaccine, saying that won't affect the curve. Over the next few months. He says, there's still time to take the necessary steps to stop the spread of the virus. But it needs to happen

Dr Scott Gottlieb Food And Drug Administration CBS New York Donald Trump Wisconsin Iowa
U.S. may be entering its 'most dangerous time' in the pandemic as winter approaches

KNX Evening News

01:01 min | 4 d ago

U.S. may be entering its 'most dangerous time' in the pandemic as winter approaches

"In office. Nearly 225,000 people in the country have died as a result of the Corona virus. Health officials continuing to warn of a dangerous tipping point for covert 19 as we continue into the fall, and then winter season's former FDA commissioner, Dr Scott Godly, appeared on CBS's face The Nation. We're entering what's going to be the steep slope of the curve of the epidemic curve. We know what that looks like from the spring. We know it looks like from the summer. These cases they're going to continue to build. There's really no backstop here. I don't see forceful policy intervention happening any time soon. We have a moment of opportunity right now to take some forceful steps to try to abate the spread that's underway. But if we don't do that, if we miss this window, this is going to continue to accelerate its going to be more difficult to get it under control, Gottlieb says A message from the White House appears to be for Americans to buckle up for difficult winter months. Until a vaccine is approved and distributed. But he doesn't believe that's the approach the Trump administration should be taking, he says. We need to take measures like wearing masks and social distancing to try to get better control of the pandemic.

Gottlieb Dr Scott Godly FDA CBS Commissioner White House
OxiContin Maker To Pay Out Billions In Civil, Criminal Penalties

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:10 min | Last week

OxiContin Maker To Pay Out Billions In Civil, Criminal Penalties

"The makers of oxycontin one of the drugs blame for sending off the OPIOID crisis will plead guilty to federal criminal charges. The Justice Department announced those charges against Purdue Pharma yesterday as part of an eight billion dollar settlement NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is with US Brian Good Morning. Steve, how's a settlement? GonNa work. Yeah. So if it's approved by a federal bankruptcy judge, Steve The purdue Pharma will admit to the three felony charges including a charge that they misled doctors about the safety of medications like Oxycontin, over time, then the company would pay out billions of dollars in civil and criminal penalties, Jeffrey Rosen, the deputy attorney general who outlined the agreement yesterday says the sackler family would also be forced to give up control of their company. Instead of being the owners of a major pharmaceutical company, they will have no stake in that company. Now that sounds like a lot but critics are pointing to the fact that Purdue Pharma was already in big trouble facing bankruptcy struggling to hold onto employees and flooded with thousands of lawsuits tied to the improper marketing of opioids, and despite all that under this deal does federal deal the sackler walk away with most of their personal fortunes intact by some estimates there worth as much as ten billion dollars because of OPIOID prophets, they'll pay a fraction of that in penalties only about two hundred, twenty, five, million dollars out of their own pockets and Steve. There are no criminal charges against them the sackler. Admit to know personal wrongdoing. Well, how do prosecutors explain the deal would include no criminal charges and the sackler not entirely but mostly giving up a pile of liabilities rather than a penalty they would really feel. Deputy. Attorney General. Rosen was asked about this yesterday and he says these penalties go as far as the government can right now holding purdue and the sackler accountable. There is no law that says if you've done something wrong, we should just simply strip somebody of all their assets in existence that's not how it works. It has to be that we are looking at specific ex wrongdoing civilly or criminally, and then having a proportionate response but a lot of people including more than two dozen state attorneys, general dozens of members of Congress advocates for people suffering from addiction. They all say, this isn't proportionate response. They say members of the sackler family played a personal role pushing the prescription opioid boom developing these illegal and deceptive marketing practices that made purdue. Pharma. So profitable the Tissue James is New York State Attorney General, and she's suing members of the. Sackler family, her team tracked hundreds of millions of dollars in opioid prophets that the sackler sent to offshore accounts. She told. NPR. This justice department deal doesn't go nearly far enough doesn't account the hundreds of thousands of deaths of millions of addictions caused by produce farmer in the sackler family all of destruction that they have caused it basically allows billionaires to keep their billions without any accounting for how much a really made James says her state probe of the sackler family will continue. Meanwhile, there's one more detailed, the settlement that sparking. Anger, it turns out purdue. Pharma doesn't actually have enough money left to pay out the billions of dollars agreed to in this settlement. So the plan is for the government to reorganize Purdue Pharma into what's known as a public benefit company that means prophets from future sales of opioids like oxycontin would be used to pay for drug treatment and rehabilitation programs around the country Greg mcneal lives in. Ohio. One of the states hit hardest by the OPIOID epidemic and he lost his son Sam to an overdose five years ago. He. Says this idea of the government getting into the OPIOID business now after it's caused so much harm. He says it just feels wrong it. It just seems ill advised having the government entered into that business. Gosh. There's something about that. That just doesn't doesn't add up at all. And I should say Steve Twenty five state attorneys general agree they signed a letter last week they send it to Attorney General William Bar arguing that this arrangement is ethically wrong and could shelter purdue Pharma and the sackler from future criminal or civil liability Brian Kennedy at least be said for the deal that there's some money here that might help people harmed by the. OPIOID. Epidemic. That will definitely that's what the Justice Department is saying. So let's take stock for a second nearly seventy two thousand people died from overdoses last year this is still ongoing. A lot of those were opioid deaths. What US attorneys say is if this deal is finalized by the bankruptcy court, it would mean extraordinary new resources for states and cities and tribal governments struggling to keep people alive. But one thing everyone agrees to here is that this problem is so big now affecting. So many Americans they say the eight billion dollars from purdue, Pharma is really just a drop in the bucket.

Purdue Pharma Purdue Sackler Justice Department Steve NPR Jeffrey Rosen Attorney Brian Man Deputy Attorney General United States Steve Twenty Ohio Epidemic Attorney General William Bar Congress New York James
OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma to plead guilty to federal criminal charges: DOJ

The Takeaway

00:43 sec | Last week

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma to plead guilty to federal criminal charges: DOJ

"Department says it's reached more than $8 billion settlement with Purdue Pharma. Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen says the pharmaceutical giant has pleaded guilty to three federal criminal charges as part of the agreement. In addition, the company has agreed to a $3.544 billion criminal fine. And a $2 billion criminal forfeiture amount further on top of those to resolve its civil liability. Purdue Pharma has agreed to $2.8 billion in damages to the United States. The OxyContin maker was accused of paying kickbacks to prescribers and pharmacies. It has been widely accused of fueling the nation's opioid epidemic.

Purdue Pharma Jeffrey Rosen Deputy Attorney General United States
OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma agrees to $8bn US opioid settlement

Derek Hunter

00:44 sec | Last week

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma agrees to $8bn US opioid settlement

"Rendezvous. Anthony Fox News, all related to the opioid epidemic of drug addiction and overdosing boxes. Jeff Man, also as details, live produce, farmer maker of the painkiller OxyContin will plead guilty to three criminal counts, including conspiracy to defraud the U. S and violating federal anti kickback laws. As part of a settlement of more than $8 Billion. Associated Press. Also reports doesn't release any of the companies exacts or odors from criminal liability in an investigation. That's ongoing as the federal government looks toe hold those responsible for an opioid addiction and overdose crisis linked to almost a half million deaths in America since 2000 For

Federal Government Anthony Fox Jeff Man Associated Press America U. S
Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Edition

03:22 min | Last week

Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

"The Department of Justice just announced a settlement with Purdue Pharma, the drug company makes the opioid OxyContin. Critics accused Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family of helping to fuel the prescription opioid epidemic. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is covering this say there, Brian. Hey, Steve. How are you? Okay. What are the terms? Look, this is a complicated deal. Basically what it means is that produce farm is going to pay out about $8.3 billion the Sackler family. The owners of this company will also give up control of this firm, which they really created and helped popularize opioids over the last 20 years. The Justice Department says. A lot of this money many of these resource is will go to communities around the U. S. Hard hit by this addiction epidemic. Remember about the quarter million Americans have died from prescription opioid overdoses alone on the cost of these communities of recovering even before the corona virus pandemic. This was a devastating public health crisis. And what the Justice Department says is that this deal will rout funds to those communities. One other interesting detail is that Purdue Pharma will now become a public trust company, and that's very controversial. That's something that a lot of critics have pointed to is as something of deep concern. Although there is some criticism of this agreement already, even though it's just been announced, What is it that critics would say It's not enough in the Sackler is giving up the entire company and some of their personal fortunes. Well, One of the things that's happening here is that the Sackler family will walk away with much of their personal fortune. This deal, Steve calls for them to pay out about $225 million in their personal assets. Critics, including New York Attorney General Leticia James, who has sued the Sackler is directly say that's not nearly enough. She put out a statement just minutes ago. Saying This doesn't hold them accountable for the pain and destruction left by what she described as their greed. Another thing that is really interesting here is that this Public trust company will still have to see the details of how it's organized. But this will sort of put the government in the job of producing opioid medications. This will put the government very closely in connection with a company that caused one of the major public health crises or at least contributed to it. Over the last couple of decades. A lot of state attorneys general say they don't like that arrangement. They think it creates a kind of umbrella for the sack, Lear's and produce that could prevent future prosecutions. Well, how are communities that are hard hit by opioids supposed to get the money from this deal? A lot of that is still we're going to see how the details of this process works. What the Justice Department said today is that this will provide extraordinary resource is they also say that under this newly organized public trust company opioid medications will continue to be provided. Remember, these medications do actually have a medical purpose when they're prescribed appropriately? They say that this will rout resource is both in terms of medications and funds. Too many of those communities Brian, Thanks for the update, always appreciate it. Very good. Thanks,

Justice Department Purdue Pharma Sackler Brian Man Purdue Steve Leticia James Lear New York Attorney
Purdue Pharma Reaches $8.34 Billion Settlement Over Opioid Probes

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | Last week

Purdue Pharma Reaches $8.34 Billion Settlement Over Opioid Probes

"Agreeing to a settlement with the U. S. Justice Department to resolve federal probes on how it marketed and addictive painkiller blame for helping to spark the opioid epidemic. Here's Jeff Minahasa, Purdue Pharma, maker of the powerful prescription painkiller OxyContin will plead guilty to three criminal counts, including conspiracy to defraud the U. S in violating federal anti kickback laws as part of a settlement of more than $8 billion. Is that The Associated Press Also reports doesn't release any of the companies. Exact your owners from criminal liability in an investigation that is ongoing is the federal government looks toe hold those responsible for an opioid addiction and overdose crisis linked to more than 470,000 deaths in America since 2000

Federal Government Purdue Pharma Jeff Minahasa U. S. Justice Department The Associated Press U. S America
High Crime Rate Leading Inmates To Consider Moving Out Of Prison

The Topical

01:02 min | Last week

High Crime Rate Leading Inmates To Consider Moving Out Of Prison

"As a number of cities across the country are reporting spikes in crime. The recent uptick is hitting some places harder than others like in Sullivan County Indiana where the high crime rate in the Wabash County Correctional Facility is leading more inmates to consider moving away from the prison. OPR's incarcerated correspondent Marcy Hammond joins me now. Thanks for doing this Marcy. Well, I appreciate the burner phone you snuck in for me Leslie still completely able to sit down comfortably yet, but you're. Welcome. Now, Marcy, what can you tell us about the crime in Wabash Valley? Well, as residents will tell you that Wabash valley has been on the decline for years. The surge of people moving in has forced one spacious single person homes to be converted to hold two or even four occupants while wages stay stagnant at twenty three cents per hour. Now, residents are seeing an epidemic of stabbings, robberies, assaults, and even murders in the maximum security prison, and that's putting residents on edge. Keeping people safe exactly. But the rampant violence and other crimes happening on a daily basis has forced a lot of folks to now consider whether or not. They should pick up and start over someplace else.

Marcy Hammond Wabash Valley Wabash County Correctional Fac Sullivan County Indiana Leslie
US drug overdoses appear to rise amid coronavirus pandemic

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

US drug overdoses appear to rise amid coronavirus pandemic

"U. S. drug overdoses appear to increase during the corona virus pandemic well the national data is incomplete available information suggests drug overdose deaths in this country are on track to reach an all time high addiction experts blame the pandemic which is left people stressed and isolated disrupted treatment and recovery programs and contributed to an increasingly dangerous illicit drug supply even before the corona virus broke out the country was in the middle of the deadliest drug overdose epidemic in its history that's after a record seventy one thousand overdose deaths last year I'm Shelley Adler

Shelley Adler Drug Overdose
Slovenia Declares 30-day Epidemic As Second Wave Breaks

WBZ Morning News

00:15 sec | Last week

Slovenia Declares 30-day Epidemic As Second Wave Breaks

"Formally declaring an epidemic after a major served surge of infections there the move, letting the government imposed further restrictions to help turn the tide. Country already tightening facemask rules and also switching most students from classroom toe online learning

Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

Forum

05:57 min | Last week

Women have been disproportionately impacted by covid-19

"Been disproportionately impacted by the job losses during the pandemic to the point that some are referring to today's recession as a she session. Many of the pressures women already face in the work force, such as the gender pay gap barriers to advance. Men and lack of flexibility have been exacerbated. The crisis could, however, usher and new policy standards and support systems for women across industries and income levels. Here with me to talk about all this is Alexis Crib. Covic, senior partner with McKinsey and co author of Women in the Workplace. 2020 report. Welcome to the program. Alexis Crisco, Vic Chris. Covic. I'm sorry. I'm getting that right. Thank you for having me and we also have in helicopters. Litwin, clinical psychologist and founder of Latinos Think Big a network of professional women and Lumina. Modern psychotherapy practice. Welcome in helicopters. Littwin. Thank you. And Serena Khan, chief executive officer of Women's Foundation of California. Welcome to the program. Serena Con. Thanks so much, and Alexis Krukov itch. I'd like to start with you and some of what the McKinsey Workforce study told us. Why are women facing greater job loss than men? And where are we seeing the biggest impacts? Salute Lee. So the headline here is that we're facing a crossroads in corporate America today, and the reason for that is on one side this pandemic while a humanitarian crisis at its heart has created An opening for flexible work, and that's a good thing because that's the number one thing. Women have said. In the past, they need to advance more in the workplace environment. On the flip side, one in four women today is saying because of the pandemic and the context it's creating in their workplace environment and their home environment. They may need to step back or step out of the workforce. And one and four equates to two million women that would unwind years of progress of women's advancement in the workplace. And it's just something we can't afford to lose. And we're really seeing the gendered nature of work here to right Serena Khan, not only where Caretaking responsibilities end up falling when push comes to shove, but also who falls into this essential worker category and the disproportionate impact on black and brown women's who We're looking at a really layered intersectional issue here. That's exactly right. All of us are being impacted by the pandemic, but we're not all being impacted in the same way. Oh, the gendered impact of the pandemic are particularly profound for especially women of color working moms, gender non conforming folks this pandemic. Highlighting problems that we've needed to work on together to solve three the pandemic, So we know, for example in California. Freak O bed, two thirds of tipped workers, part time workers, minimum wage earners where women and primarily women of color even though California Is the wealthy of state in the nation. It's also has the highest rate of poverty and the people who are living in poverty in California are women of color and their kids. And so when we think about this pandemic, whether It's women who are the essential workers who are making up 80% of our healthcare workforce, or the retail and grocery workers. The essential workers that Are still working or on the flip side. They're the ones that have lost their jobs because the majority of us are working in the restaurant industry. Oh, our other retail industry that have lost significant Numbers of jobs, so it's a very gendered epidemic and Serena Con you've spoken about how there's no going back to normal that that normal wasn't that good to begin with, when it came to gender equity in the workforce. That's right. You know, this pandemic is shining a light on all that was wrong with Our country, our world, our state, and so you know, as hundreds of thousands of women leave the workforce to manage what is really an unmanageable amounts of caretaking remote schooling. You know, our child care costs were making up. Ah, upwards of, you know, 60 70% of the single moms income that's not sustainable and So you know, we have an opportunity here to think about what is the future that we want on. DWI can change some of those systems that we have an opportunity to really Think about care, work into value care and compensate that work fairly as we figure out howto move forward, But the pandemic has really forced us to reckon with how much care we all need, whether we're caring for our Children. For each other for ourselves for our elders on DH so we can build some new solutions for us that the women Foundation California we have believed Since our founding in 1979 that people who are closest to the problems in their communities are also closest to the solutions. And so we have innovative ideas coming out of community. Based leaders about what we can do post pandemics. I think it's important for us now, Tio You know, make sure that people are getting their basic needs met. So you know, one of the other things that we saw very early on in the pandemic is that not everybody was safer at home. That rates of domestic violence were spiking upwards of 40 to 80% and all of California 58 counties. So we and yet so as the need went up the Situation for the shelters was that they had to that They had actually left physical space because of the need to do physical distance event. Soon, though, there's a lot that Yeah, so there's just a lot that we're seeing and that we can think about solving. Yes,

California Serena Khan Serena Con Women's Foundation Of Californ Women Foundation California Mckinsey Workforce Alexis Crib Mckinsey Alexis Krukov Alexis Crisco Covic Senior Partner Founder America Lumina LEE Chief Executive Officer
What we know about coronavirus reinfection from other diseases

PRI's The World

07:57 min | 2 weeks ago

What we know about coronavirus reinfection from other diseases

"Hello I'm Alana Gordon I'm a reporter and producer at the world covering global health here at the world, we've been holding a regular series of Corona virus conversations presented jointly with the Forum at Harvard Chan School of Public Health, taking your questions to the experts. This discussion series is featured on our facebook page, but we wanted to share what we think are really valuable conversations with you right here in the world's podcast feed. This Week I spoke with William Hannich Associate Professor of epidemiology at Harvard. Teach Dance School of Public Health about the pandemic and the latest updates as we approach the holiday season. To start in the United States more than two hundred, thousand people have died of Covid nineteen. The number of new cases is growing by some fifty thousand each day it's a figure that's been rising for four weeks running and is up by more than a third since just a month ago, it's hard to believe. The fear is that this is just a preview of what the late fall and winter might hold cold weather sends people indoors. We could see much more dramatic rises in Cova cases with winter holidays coming, and that's also creating really difficult heart wrenching dilemmas for many families. Do you travel even places in communities where there are lots of infections or to and from So. To Begin William, where do you see us now in this progression of the pandemic? Where do you see it headed? When you write the that are increases happening at the moment. In fact, I think that seventeen states reported record highs in cases just last night However, it's not by on the states which occurred be saying the most activity mostly in the Midwest and these sparsely populated states the. However, the numbers that do add up. said the moment this is what we're seeing. We're seeing continued DHAMMIKA activity on low levels on which of experienced reasonable amount of it already, and then more intense activity especially in some of these small towns in the heartland and that's what we are. That's what's happening right now. It's a bit early I think to be saying that we are saying the stock what's going to happen before but we do anticipate that the more in the shifting indoors to places my transmissions more likely to the end and I think the we all seem impact, find some European conference. So not provides a little bit of a window into the future. So when you see these high numbers in cases being reported now more so than the past, are you saying that most of that were really seeing in some of these what mid Western states right now? Yes. At the moment it is it's also worth noting testing has got a lot better. So when we're watching these sort of epidemic lives increasing with action, we're seeing them way more detail we did not spring so. Ratio of can sort of cases to the actual amount of continued on the. It is now much more clearly defined cutting much more clear in science. What happens with mild ignition switches? And so are you seeing any sort of signs of as people move indoors or as holidays come up of what sorts of risks that poses and? How we might see this. PLOP. So I think the one thing that is really helpful to think of his. We. Can think about preventing pandemic transmission in particular preventing clusters of transmission because remember, this is the virus which tends to transmit and clusters intends to fact number of people up on time. Japan viane came up with this notion of the three C.'s which three CS which can be avoided if not consummation and those three C.'s aw. Close spaces. Close contacts and crowding. and. It's very easy to see how those three could easily be going to could easily come together when it comes to the holidays. So hold events late Indo spices are at risk for transmission. We also know that an furtherest transmission is easing. Now we have a report from a few weeks ago from CDC and declaring fatty clearly that people who'd be needing indoors in a restaurant in the last few weeks where you know that was associated testing positive. So putting all this together I'm afraid that you can see them the holidays to the you know they have the potential to be real serious problems at the salute transmission. And so I think the same time there's also people are experiencing fatigue with this going on for such a long period holidays may be seemed like time were just coming up. To be able to beat with up to ones and at the same time just in general when it comes to the ways that public health has really been stressing. From people like you about this kind of sees or about the mask wearing and things like that, how do you manage the fatigue of this continuing? And it seems like. Is there a shifts to? kind of people being more willing to just live with the risks and live this virus and what that means got I think that you can think you're right and I wanNA start but pointing out that, yeah, I, understand that nicotine. I feel myself I. was like good bunch not touching my face and by increasing touching my face. The thing is that I think what we needed. Was for people to be straight up about this since the pandemic it's of of coined, which is not really been seen in about one hundred years as the response to it will need to be coordinated and staying now. That doesn't mean that it has to be intense guy it's. One of the things which makes me and my colleagues tied is when you when we will saying Oh, we're talking about lockdown to accede. That's true. That's just simply not true. You need very strong interventions if you lose control of. That says attraction. So. What you actually want to do is to maintain a bunch of interventions of kind which described the thinking about the three CS thinking about mass killings thinking about reducing risk in a way that you can't sustain. Its doesn't mean you have to stay a home continuously what it means is you can come up with ways in which you are able to avoid losing control because losing. Control of the pandemic lasting anybody wants to happen because it's that, but then leads to a threat to healthcare and the soldier surges. We saw in the northeast in the spring and you know over the summer and the sun belt. So that's what the personal needs to me. The first goal needs to be avoiding surges and I think you can't invent provided you all prepackaged Putin modern inventions. Angel Athletic. But we have to remember. This is the start of a window which is likely to be really very difficult i. think we got through. I contributed to that it's not going to be fun. So, then how do you weigh those risks and think about that with the holidays approaching? That's very really really good question I. think that people are obvious laden decisions themselves. I think that it's helpful to remain the few things about the virus. Are you often hear that? Is You know either you know you hear that it's incredibly dangerous everybody were that it's not angel anybody neither a true. It is. Overwhelmingly clear that among youngest, the very youngest people beyond the twenty, they are much much less likely severe disease I mean. That's not zero I mean we know that there are now Austin Grimm's which if you rack and if you in fact enough peak on that ice cream, you will see them but then much less likely to something consequences disease. But

Facebook Harvard Chan School Of Public Dance School Of Public Health United States William Hannich Associate Prof Harvard Cova Alana Gordon Midwest Covid CDC Austin Grimm Reporter Nicotine Japan Putin Producer
Philadelphia sues e-cigarette company JUUL over vaping 'epidemic' among young people

KYW 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia sues e-cigarette company JUUL over vaping 'epidemic' among young people

"Is delayed a city to Su e cigarette maker Jule in the lawsuit. City health officials accuse the company of being responsible for what they call an epidemic of e cigarette use among teens and young people. Philadelphia officials allege Jule intentionally markets its products to young people. Jules says it will continue to work to combat underage use. The company says it will respond to the lawsuits allegations through the appropriate legal channels. Have some

Jule SU Jules Philadelphia
A Look at Jennie Livingston's 1990 documentary Paris is Burning

Queer as Fact

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

A Look at Jennie Livingston's 1990 documentary Paris is Burning

"Hello and welcome to Queer as fiction we talk about Queer historical media I'm Jason and I may lie and today we're talking about Jenny. Livingston's nineteen ninety. Documentary. Paris's Bang. Before we start, we have a few called him warnings to this episode. This episode contains mentions of Racism Transphobia Homophobia the AIDS epidemic murder and family rejection. It also contains the use of outdated language surefooted by Queer people on people, call it in courts. If any of that sounds like something, you don't want to listen to please feel free to check out one of. Our other episodes. So I wanted to stop this episode by explaining what is Paris's banning because I feel like a lot of listeners probably a pretty good understanding of this documentary. Some very young listeners may not have seen it. I said Hanson had you seen it before we researched this ups lot no but I had a pirated version of a hard drive for decades. I love with things and have adhd. reasonable. So I was aware of it but I hadn't actually seen it. Yeah. I think I heard the name but didn't know what it was. So Paris is burning is a documentary about the bowl culture scene of New York in the nineteen eighties prominently featuring the African American and Latin American members of that community many among gay and or trans. It documents how they lives intersect with the Bulls the form, the Bulls tight and contains several interviews, participants, explaining concepts, such shade, realness reading, and legendary woods that may be familiar to a modern audience given how by propagated in popular drag culture. Yeah on TIKTOK. The documentary features no narration and very little dialogue from the interview wide lesbian filmmaker. Jenny. Livingston prominent members of several houses in the scene featured including pepple of Asia during Corey Angie Extravaganza and Willi? Ninja. I'll make a nerd here on pronounce while several of the performance featured in Paris boning. Ambiguously Trans Women and so I'm GonNa to share pronounced where I don't have specific evidence I. Do want to note that pepple of Asia describes himself in the documentary is not being woman not understanding the experience of womanhood and being on In a sex change however, her two thousand and three obituary in the new. York. Times describes her as preferring in pronounce ongoing with that as the more recent source compared to this documentary which was filmed in the eighties. So having talked about what Paris has been is I want to I going to kind of how was made so as described by Academic Lucas, Hildebrand in his twenty thirteen book quit film classics Piracy's Boning, which was a major source when I was researching this episode Livingston was taking a film production class at NEOCON. INVESTI windshield observed three young men voguish in Washington. Square Park after asking what they were doing she was invited to an upcoming bowl and soon thereafter began documenting the scene via black and white photographs and audio interviews which were kind of the mediums in which she worked at the time. She was really documentary filmmaker. This was her first data and she since gone on to make several more films which obviously less notable. Because I don't know what they. Yeah. That's pretty wild. Are they on like queer things. Yeah I, believe her I think there's like Queer Antenna. Seems to many of her films. So yeah, it was only the light of that. She began filming the balls and coming up with the idea of turning these into a documentary. Film took seven years to make in no small pod Judah. The struggles Livingston had funding its production. She initially intended it to be appealing observational documentary just kind of following the lives of the Queen's involved in the same but lacked the funding to shoot the endless hours of footage that would be required for such a production. I'm not really an expert on how documentary films of made. Films something like seventy or eighty hours of footage as it is. So like, wow, that must have been. Lot of what is required for something without the kind of caught away stained. Interesting to think about funding a project like this in like post the iphone world. Because there's like a very like obviously a useless modern. Just, film it like whistle the money going yeah. It's like it's interesting. She talks about the various ways in which the film was funded was funded by a bunch of different organization. Thirteen. Different organizations contributed funding including the baby say. And she stalked interviews about how? It's the late eighties you conscious show someone from the BBC your footage you have to fly someone out from. England oh. Wow. Yeah. My Gosh and show them a physical film real. So is that indicative of a certain level of like promises project was seen to have if she was able to show it to someone like that or did this happen quite routinely it was just logistically difficult Y-. Oh. Yeah. So instead of a purely observational documentary, the earlier interviews that she'd recorded were bought back and more interviews were conducted. Most notably interviews conducted in one thousand, nine, hundred, nine broad sense of narrative to the film by depicting the commercial success of Willi Ninja, as well as the tragic murder of Vance Extravaganza young star in the bowl seen who features prominently throughout the Documentary Livingston has self describes the film making process as followers. Suddenly, the people I filmed worked with me in pop because I represented a chance to speak out to be in front of a camera to show off I, consider Paris burning collaboration on the deepest level, the people who. Are Articulate funny poised while the editor and I made coherent full that we saw the documentary was truly written by the bowl people themselves I use that quite because questions of narrative agency consent and understanding of the nature of the documentaries production became deeply controversial upon the film's release and will form a pot about lighter discussion. But before we get into that, I wanted to do a bit

Paris Livingston Willi Ninja Jenny Murder Asia Bulls Jason Adhd. BBC Hanson Trans Women Square Park New York Bowl York Editor Times Washington
"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

"You've been listening to side doors a podcast from the Smithsonian with support from Pierre x this is our last episode of the season. We'll be back soon with a new season, but we're taking a short break to do research and put together some exciting news stories in the meantime. Can really help us out by leaving us a review in apple podcasts. It helps find our show and it's a little digital pat on the has it makes me feel good as I snuggled down my night. This. Episode we did a lot of interviews and we want to send a big time. Special. Thanks to Kirsten Gilardi amy bond and the entire guerrilla doctors team also John Bosco Zeh Lawrence Magee Shah Don Zimmerman Linda Lowenstein and her husband Craig Shirley, annelies Meier Jen's Zun Caroliina Powell and Meredith. Bastion. We got some great bonus content for this episode, a Ted talk about gorilla conservation a youtube link to gorillas in the mist and a Selfie of Justin. At the national. Zoo. All of that will be in our newsletter. You can subscribe at sl that edu slash side door. Are Wonderful Amazing Brilliant, podcast team is just an O.`Neil Natalie Boyd and cannon caitlyn Schaefer just Saad Cameo Neil and Sharon Bryant episode. Our work is by Greg fisk extra support comes from John Jason and Jenni at PR. Our show is mixed talk. Our theme song and other episode music are by Brake Master cylinder. If you WANNA sponsor our show please email sponsorship at r x dot Org I'm your host was EP body. Thanks for listening. See You. Next season. News. That much worse than in here in the house. IS A. There's a whole sign about it's like that's not a skunk. It's wealthier and oh no, let's go somewhere else..

John Bosco Zeh Lawrence Magee Natalie Boyd Pierre apple Greg fisk Kirsten Gilardi Saad Cameo Neil EP Ted Sharon Bryant Craig Shirley caitlyn Schaefer Meier Jen John Jason Jenni amy bond Caroliina Powell Meredith
"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

07:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

"Love learning new things on side door here's something you might not know the Smithsonian relies on support from people like you to make all of the research discoveries, an exhibitions you hear about possible. Smithsonian experts are addressing critical issues in the field of science history art and culture issues that affect us all. And you can be a part of it. A lot of people listen to side door. Imagine what we could learn next if everyone chipped in just a little. Find out how at SL that you slash contribute? Okay. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, a three year old gorilla named Kato died from a mystery illness in the forests of Rwanda at the time guerrilla. Craig Shali was director of this group whose top priority was to make sure that mountain gorillas were happy munching playing and sleeping in their night nests. So. Inkatha died alarm bells started ringing and is director of the mountain gorilla. Project, Shali was feeling the pressure. It was immeasurable time. I, I don't think I've ever ever felt that kind of pressure in my entire life that's like having the power of medical attorney for an entire species. I I certainly don't want to relive that in my life. I mean I get it. Nobody wants to be the person in charge when all the mountain gorillas died. But Luckily, for Shali, he had a lot of support as this epidemic spread invisibly throughout the park a super group of veterinarians, primate disease experts, conservationists, and Rwandan government officials shared expertise over conference calls and fax machines to figure out what was going on with these gorillas when cotto and the other girls died veterinarians in Rwanda did a necropsy. That's what scientists an autopsy that's done on a non human animal. And they send tissue samples to Linda Lowenstein. She's retired now but in nineteen eighty eight, she was a professor who taught veterinary body at the university. Of California, Davis when I was also heavily involved in primate research at the California Regional Primate Research Center as one of the world's leading experts on disease in wild primates it was up to Lowenstein to figure out what had killed cotto and so then I was asked to do the pathology to look at the tissues collected from animals that died during the outbreak. Who It took a couple of weeks for catis tissue samples to get to her at the time, there wasn't really a way to get them from a remote volcano in Rwanda to Lowenstein Slab in California's central. Valley at least not easily. And at one point, some of the tissues actually came over in a diplomatic pouch. Diplomatic pouches like a magic bag that says, this is official US government business do not open me. Then they were hand carried on commercial flights. I think it was British Airways from Kigali to Nairobi to London to New, York to Denver and finally mailed to Lowenstein near Sacramento. All, the while guerrillas were coughing in the forest. But even before she had the tissue samples under her microscope, she had a few ideas about what might be going on. We assume because of the way it was moving that was probably viral. Allowed the viruses that affect the respiratory track 'cause pretty similar signs if you've seen any of the Cova lists of. Symptoms that we're seeing. Now they overlap with so many different things. So basically, these animals had runny eyes runny noses. Coughs. They were huddled. As if they had fever. When tissue samples finally reached Lowenstein Lab, she slid them under her microscope. Here's producer Justin O.`Neil again, he did this interview. So you get it under your microscope, what are you looking for in that tissue I? Guess it seems like the lung would have been the tissue of most concern to us to say, yes many of these diseases although they manifest in the respiratory tract, some of them are also systemic diseases. So, you really have to look at all the organs to get a clear picture of what might be the etiological agent. This is a pathologist way of saying, yes. The lungs of the most important but other organs can also give you clues about the identity of the etiological agent or the source of illness. You're like a detective at a crime scene where like You have the murder weapon rate here but you know you gotta look at the door handle or check the window or whatever. Yeah. Exactly. In this case. There were some changes that helped us narrow down what we thought the inciting agent laws. In this case, Lowenstein was pretty sure she was looking for a virus viruses cause rather specific kind of change usually in the lungs. So virus has sort of a unique look to yeah and unique pattern, and that's what is all about is identifying patterns. And so you look in these lungs you see this pattern that indicates it says Hey Linda I'm virus. What then So some arses leave footprints. So they were called inclusions. INKATA's Lung Tissue Linda saw two different viral footprints, one signs of a specific type of viral reproduction called inclusion bodies, the other small cells that fused together to make giant cells. In. Particularly Kato who was a young animal? In her lungs. Both giant cells and inclusion bodies. That were really suggestive of measles measles. There were signs of measles beyond the lungs to. Her when Ford. System was depleted. And, measles actually I attacks immune cells and then distributes to other parts of the body. So in measles retro signs don't appear until ten to fourteen days after the individuals I infected. And during that time the viruses wrecking havoc with the immune system. Lowenstein suspected measles but she needed confirmation the veterinarians in Rwanda had drawn condos blood. So Linda took a look at those too. She had fold increase in antibodies to measles which suggested an active infection. So that really made us feel much more strongly that what you're dealing with measles. Scale one to ten. How firm was your conviction that what we were looking at was measles. Oh probably a seven. And the question is, what do you do about it? You know? Measles is incredibly infectious is probably one of the most infectious agents known estimates vary, but someone infected with measles could be in a room leave and several hours later you walk into that room. Breathe deeply, and now you have the measles. People. Think. Oh measles measles serious disease. You know measles still causes hundreds of thousands of depths worldwide. We don't think much brought measles in this country anymore because it's pretty much been eradicated with Thaksin's. In one, thousand, thousand, eight. There was a measles vaccine, but it was designed for people not guerrillas because girls are so closely related to us. They are protected by some human vaccinations, but the veterinarians were afraid that the vaccine could harm the healthy guerrillas. They just didn't know what would happen. Meanwhile, Rwanda measles was spreading fast without a better plan. The Rwandan government decided. All right. Let's go for it will vaccinate them but guerrillas aren't just like little kids. You can hand dinosaur band-aid and allow pop after they get a big needle. This was a unique kind of vaccination program it involved. Craig. Shirley and.

Measles Linda Lowenstein Rwanda Craig Shali Lowenstein Slab Kato Lowenstein Lab Lung Tissue Linda director cotto Smithsonian Rwandan government California respiratory tract Inkatha British Airways US California Regional Primate Re attorney
"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

"A was. Much worse day after day Kato got. Sicker and she seemed very lethargic. She wasn't herself. If cotto had been a human living in human society, do you think that she would have her parent would call the doctor at that point? I think it probably would have raised a red flag to to mom and it's like, Hey, something. On here I need to watch this and that was basically the cue that we were given. After a few days, they took the extraordinary measure to pull cotto out of the forest. It's truly a measure of last resort. Guerillas are social animals in Charlie's team didn't want to break the hard one trust of the other guerrillas by being caught kidnapping, one of their family members, but they had no other choice. As the vets treated cotto in the clinic Shali in the park crew started hearing the same scary cough from more guerrillas in distant parts of the park we became more frightened. The research groups located in another part of the puck on they were also called then after a week of getting progressively sicker cotto died. So caught does death was the sort of. Moment, it was beyond the holy I mean it was hope we may. We may lose the only remaining population of Malcolm guerrillas in the world. I don't think I've been more frightening my life..

cotto Kato kidnapping Charlie Shali
"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

Sidedoor

07:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Sidedoor

"The modern west is out. Now, the stories will take you to the windswept prairie were old West Ghost town once stood and a new ghost town in the making were schools and businesses are closing fast. The modern West is exploring rural decline and resilience and asking why does it matter of America's small towns disappear search for the modern West wherever you get your podcasts. Okay let's start with the obvious guerillas are massive. Big Male can be well in excess of four hundred pounds. This is Craig Shelly I mean he's like a big linebacker He's as powerful as ten men today Shali vice president at the African Wildlife. Foundation. But in nineteen seventy-three, he was in the Peace Corps working in Zaire. Now, the Democratic Republic of Congo and that is where he first got a glimpse of these mountain dwelling linebackers today. It's not all that hard to meet a guerilla. If you have a lot of money but back in nineteen seventy-three gorilla tourism wasn't a thing yet is wild animal tourism was starting to take off in other parts of Africa the mountain gorilla experts thought they could appeal to the same set of adventurous and rich tourists. So one day in seventy three, a game warden asked Shali. If he'd help habituate a group of guerrillas, habituate means get them used to having people around step one to tourism. And effectively indicated that I'd be happy to be a Guinea pig. The idea is to find a distance that the wild gorillas are comfortable with, and then quietly work their way closer to the group. At the beginning of this process, the guerrillas tend to be nervous for the most part they've had no encounters with other great apes in particular human great apes and it's frightening for them. One famous story of Habituating Morillas was of Dian Fossey she's a guerilla research pioneer in the nineteen sixties she moved by herself to a volcano in Rwanda and through persistence and patience she ended up habituating a number of guerrilla groups. Fosse's story was told in the nineteen. eighty-eight movie gorillas in the mist Fosse's played by Sigourney Weaver, and there's one part in the movie that shows one of her earliest encounters learning about a guerrillas personal space. Here's what that sounded like. They're scared and lots of wrong inscribing lots of charges in the vegetation and a pretty invigorating experience. I'll say that sounds very exciting. The okay. You're adrenaline going the habituation process is slow. It can take more than a year until a group of guerrillas except having people nearby over the next decade more guerrilla groups were habituated and that habituation gave birth to mountain gorilla tourism because for every new habituated group that meant more tourists could hike into the forest and get close to some of the world's rarest apes and Charlie says from up close there's a lot to love about gorillas. A big beautiful great eighth than an elven guerillas in particular are are very, very majestic. They've got long black hair. They've got lovely features jolly was smitten by nineteen eighty eight. He was still working with guerrillas as director of the mountain gorillas project. It was a group that helped manage Rwanda's volcanoes national park. One of the few places on Earth at that mountain gorillas live in the wild. And why routine would be to go to park headquarters early in the morning Attach myself to a tourist group that was going out with guards and guides assigned to that guerilla group. I would spend the tourist time with them monitoring the Rollo's assessing health and behavioral status and all that kind of stuff. Essentially, it was up to Shali to make sure the guerrillas were healthy. His staff was doing its job and his growing groups of tourists were safe and happy in an average week. He'd visit every habituated gorilla group in the park, which means he spent hours in close quarters with more than one hundred guerrillas. He got to know them and they got used to him. It's the opportunity of a lifetime. Mediate. One of Shali big projects was to do a guerilla census. which is basically the same thing as human senses. But for guerrillas at the time, we didn't even know how many mountain gorillas there were. So every day he'd hike into the park count them watch quietly for a few hours and hike back to park headquarters guerrillas tend to live in these large family groups. So for Shali who knew each group and their habits, they were never that hard to find. A pretty predictable. Pattern throughout the day. Is Sleep throughout the night the and so in the early morning there in what is called night nest daylight the the silverback in particular is likely the first two rows and he's basically often feeding the rest of the group they'll follow and they will feed for a couple of hours they live in electrical a a big salad bowl. Did you say Salad? Bowl? I said that the forest is like a big salad bowl. Guerrillas have basically a diet that consists of probably seventy different plant species and they're selectively feeding as they go about their business in the fourth. Wash Allie was tallying the guerrillas. He also kept an eye on their health. He was used to guerrillas who are under the weather. Usually, it was typical sniffles are sneezes but in case a guerilla got very sick. The parkhead veterinarians on staff the mostly he just watched the gorillas eat and sleep mid morning. They will likely take a rest and so they'll build what are called nests. Girl. Asleep younger Hilas play but mostly they eat. Sounds like the life. Probably six o'clock as the sun is going down the bill, the night nest and starts all over again Mr calling my bed, my night nest. Absolutely. Not. Since Shali spent so much time with these age. They sort of became like an extended family and like everyone's family with goals and cool cousins Shali. Some favorites that he'd get excited to see he remembers this one three year old female named Cotto. Do very very well, she was a very, very interesting young and Albury social within the group and. Yet. She was a very special rule what mater special? I think basically the social interactions, it's not at all unusual for for young males within a group to be very very social I. Mean they're they're young, they're energetic. They're they're feeling their oats within the group As I recall was was a female who who had the personality of a lot of the young nails that especially during playtime she was right in the thick of things in terms of Interactions One day specifically February twenty Fourth Nineteen eighty-eight Shali and his team noticed cotto cough. He remembers it wasn't a normal tickle in your throat. It was more of a hack. Very harsh cough and it just was continuous on that particular day and as a result of that we determined that we would come back the next day to monitor and then as I recall. The call the subsequent.

Shali Rwanda cough Peace Corps Democratic Republic of Congo Zaire America Fosse Cotto Craig Shelly Dian Fossey vice president Habituating Morillas African Wildlife Guinea Africa Albury Bowl
Redefining Radical

In The Thick

04:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Redefining Radical

"Hey welcome to the podcast about politics race and culture from the OC perspective I'M A. And I'm Hutagalung arena. Today, we have a very special guest joining us from yonkers new. York is Jamal Bowman he's the. Democratic nominee for Congress in new. York's Sixteenth District Jamal. To the show. Hello thank you so much for having me. It's great to be here. We don't often speak to you know members, of Congress or potential members of Congress few like somebody maybe unexcited Cossio go. because. You're win like hers was a a really big deal. You defeated Longtime Democratic incumbent Eliot Engel in a huge landslide lead your the likely winner in the twenty twenty general election because you represent a very blue district. So it's really been a super big year for you. Your Primary Win came at the height of the conversation around justice for Black and Brown lives inequity the pandemic. With. It. So really your wind came kind of on the backs of all of that. So. Give us just a quick back story shore. So the back story I guess begins you know being raised by a single mom in the projects along with my three sisters. During the crack cocaine epidemic, which projects I gotTa know which projects Oh Easter projects one hundred, fifteen first avenue in Manhattan. WanNa raise on the. Upper East side East Harlem Section Manhattan went to public schools by entire life lived in the projects in rent stabilized apartments started teaching in nineteen ninety nine in the South Bronx in one of the poorest zip codes in the country, and you clearly can see the inequality the inequity in how wherever you go in a city state or country black and Brown people seem to be suffering more than everyone else. So growing up as a black man in America who has been a victim of police brutality. The first time I was beaten by police was eleven years old and notice I said the first time happen again, the a later on. IOS Eleven hanging out on the street with my friends and being rambunctious in boisterous in doing what kids do and I guess someone may have called the police because we were maybe too noisy a too rambunctious. and. The police came over and tried to live saw curtail us and tell us a comma down. You know we kind of push back in had a few words for them. Next thing I know like I'm being done up against the wall thrones Grou- face dragged all over the floor. In the back you know except Tra, and then we'll take into the precinct and US well to my mom about this later were taken to the precinct in a coma mom to come pick me up with a birth certificate because they didn't believe I was eleven am. makes. Me Think Tamir Rice as I say that out loud rain. She comes with a birth certificate picks me up and takes me home. Didn't explain to her what the charges were if any why they approached us to begin with, they just allow her to take me home in my mom and I didn't even think to you know press charges. Report anything like that. We just kept moving and it just tells you how internalize sort of our oppression is. Right like we just accept we have accepted in I have accepted that okay. There's nothing we can do where powerless. So becoming a teacher. Being a social justice advocate within education and having the opportunity to be a founding principle of my own district, public school charter school, and being education organizers around equity and restorative justice in culture, Responsi-, schools all of that led to me. You know think about a potential run for office and why Eliot Engel while I looked at twenty eighteen election and I saw that me thirty thousand registered Democrats in the district actually voted and he won with twenty two thousand votes. Yeah. Some like, wow. This person has making trillion dollar decisions that impact millions of people and he only got twenty two thousand. Volts Yep you look at who supports him right? Who Funds his campaign we're talking big real estate. Yep Big pharmaceutical companies, weapons, manufacturers, hedge fund managers, and every institution that is hurting our community hurting the working class. Those are the people that are institutions that funded his campaign. So that's why we decide the challenge chairman ultimately were able to win in the end

Eliot Engel Congress York Tamir Rice Manhattan Sixteenth District Jamal Jamal Bowman Yonkers Hutagalung Arena Crack Cocaine Chairman Grou Black America United States TRA
"epidemic" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:58 min | 4 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on The Daily

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Music> we'll be. Right, <Music> <Advertisement> back. <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Yesterday's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> office plans. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Don't match <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your needs of today <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with we work. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Companies have the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> flexibility to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> future proof, their business, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which is <Speech_Male> ideal for navigating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> uncertainty <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> whether you're <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> looking to house dispersed <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> teams, reconfigure <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> offices, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or have flexible <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> terms <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we work can help <Speech_Male> you adapt through <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> change to <Speech_Male> learn more about <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a third of fortune <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> five. Hundred's choose <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> we work go <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to. We Dot. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Co Slash <Silence> <Advertisement> Future. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Here's <Speech_Male> what else you need <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to nominate. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you very much <Speech_Music_Male> Mr. chairman ranking <Speech_Music_Male> member of <Speech_Music_Male> Walden. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you all for the. Give <Speech_Male> me the opportunity to <Speech_Male> discuss with you today. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The role <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the National Institutes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of Health and research <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> addressing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cove <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> nineteen. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> On Tuesday <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> during an appearance <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> before a house committee. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Notre <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Anthony FAUCI <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> warned that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the next few weeks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> would be critical <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to confronting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the dramatic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> surge of infections. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> In states like Florida, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Texas <Speech_Female> and Arizona. <Speech_Female> Seeing <Speech_Female> some data <Speech_Female> the last few days <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> while cases <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are going up <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in this country <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> dancer <Speech_Female> going down. <Speech_Female> Should <Speech_Female> we see this as a positive <Speech_Female> sign, or <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> should we <SpeakerChange> still be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> worried? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I think <Speech_Music_Male> it's too early to make <Speech_Music_Male> that kind of link <Speech_Music_Male> congresswoman. <Speech_Male> Let me explain. <Speech_Male> Deaths <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> always <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> lag <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> considerably <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> behind <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cases. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> During <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the hearing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> felt she cautioned <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that the current decline <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in deaths <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from the virus <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> could quickly reverse <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> begin <SpeakerChange> to climb <Speech_Male> again. So <Speech_Male> you're seeing more <Speech_Male> cases now <Speech_Music_Male> while the deaths <Speech_Male> are going down, <Speech_Male> the concern <Speech_Male> is if <Speech_Male> those cases <Speech_Male> then infect people <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> wind up getting <Speech_Male> sick and go to the hospital. <Speech_Male> It <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is conceivable you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> may see the deaths <Speech_Music_Male> going up so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I think it's too <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> early to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> say because the deaths <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are going <SpeakerChange> down. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Asked about the timing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for a vaccine. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> F- <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Ouchi said that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> he was optimistic <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that it could be <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> ready by early <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> next year. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The. Times <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> reports that as <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the European Union <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> begins to lift <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> travel restrictions. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Next month <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it may <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> block Americans <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from entering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> its twenty seven <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> countries <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> because of the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> failure of the US <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> control <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the spread <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of the virus. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Beside <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the US. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The EU <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> may also bar <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> travel from Russia <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and Brazil. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> it is likely to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> allow entry <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I citizens <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of China. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Where the pandemic <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> began, <Speech_Male> but is now <Speech_Male> largely <Speech_Music_Male> under <SpeakerChange> control. <Music>

"epidemic" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:26 min | 4 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on The Daily

"Makes this much.

"epidemic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:46 min | 8 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Epidemic voyeurs but now for the first time we're facing the probability that we will not just be witnessing will be experiencing and then we'll find out what is the metal of Americans from W. NYC in New York this is on the media I'm Brooke Gladstone the CDC it's not so much a question of if this will happen anymore but rather more question of exactly when and how many people will have the president says he hopes for a miracle and muscle the CDC while pundits predict the future of the virus the market and the presidency except for one everyone you see on TV on Twitter it had no idea what they're talking about because they are they don't know the unexpected thing is gonna come about all coming up live from NPR news in Washington on Giles Snyder defense secretary mark esper is in the Afghan capital of Kabul today and president trump is sent secretary of state Mike Pompeii to the Qatari capital Doha for a signing ceremony expected to get underway shortly the US at the sign an agreement that's been negotiated with the Taliban it's one step toward ending the war in Afghanistan as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports in a statement trump says that at his direction Pompeii will witness the signing of an agreement with the Taliban while secretary of defense mark esper will issue a joint declaration with the government of Afghanistan the trump administration negotiated a week long period of calm leading up to this the goal now is to get the Taliban to negotiate with the Afghan government and civil society leaders on a more permanent ceasefire and a political solution trump calls this a quote powerful path forward to end the war in Afghanistan the U. S. is expected to draw down troops to about eighty six hundred with more reductions possible if conditions warranted Michele Kelemen NPR news the state department Ricky's president says his country's border gates with Greece will remain open allowing refugees to continue attempting to get to Europe NPR's Peter Kenyon reports a flow of refugees toward Greece began Friday saying we will not close the gates to refugees had one signal that Turkey's decision to allow refugees to surge toward Europe remains in effect he calls on the European Union to stand behind it's part of a twenty sixteen agreement with Turkey under which Ankara would shelter refugees in Turkey in exchange for financial aid classes are being reported today along Turkey's border with Greece Greek police fired tear gas and stun grenades of migrants who attempted to push their way through the border federal appeals court has ordered the house judiciary's lawsuit to force former White House counsel don began to testify be dismissed as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports the decision overturns a lower court's ruling and hands a major legal went to president trump the house Judiciary Committee subpoena don began last year to compel his testimony and then sued when he refused to comply the White House ordered him not to testify arguing that he enjoyed absolute immunity from doing so as a senior adviser to the president late last year a District Court sided with the committee now in a two to one decision from a three judge panel the DC circuit court is overturning that ruling the appeals court says the fight over against testimony is a political dispute between the legislative and executive branches and the court says it has no authority to settle such a dispute instead it says Congress has political tools to force the executive branch to comply such as withholding funding in dissent judge Judith Rogers says the decision all but assures future presidential stonewalling of Congress Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington voters in South Carolina going to the polls today in the fourth democratic presidential nominating contest each of the contenders hoping for a boost heading into super Tuesday next week this is NPR health officials are looking into several more percent of cases of the new strain of coronavirus California Oregon Washington state each reporting unexplained infections American Airlines meanwhile cancelling service to Hong Kong after cutting flights to mainland China head Ellen Hershey's reports American says it's suspending service from Los Angeles International to the region through April twenty fourth and out of Dallas fort worth through April twenty third United also announced it's suspending flights between LAX in Tokyo due to concerns over the spread of the virus United has already cut flights to China and Hong Kong through the end of April a third major airline delta recently discontinued service to mainland China also through the end of April so far the corona virus has killed over twenty eight hundred people globally and.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

02:13 min | 9 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Into college at Fourteen. Thirteen years old mean. These stories are everywhere. So now they're gonNA force failing curriculum onto those doing home schooling. How do we stop it number one yet to define what success is for your child and a curriculum in my opinion is a half you choose? It's not something you memorize and lascaux. We mentioned like you little bit. Skeptical Orlean to learn more about unscrewing. Which is totally fine. I prefer the word self directed learning so you are intelligent. Wien children are genius in my opinion so allow them to pursue what they're interested in because the natural of motivation is from. Curiosity is from that. Like what does this mean asking a million questions? So they're allowed to pursue that but in my opinion the politicians are mostly all bought. So parents need to understand. You gotTA withdraw your consent. Make some freedom friends this. Why come here to meet like minded people and not just like online people life I can tech somebody call him. Hey what's going on? Have a genuine conversation because a lot of our family members. Just don't care about freedom the truth and they like their games like those. I like those things too but ultimately if we're not free were in prison we're in slaved and this is what the schools are about. Johann thick the said after one generation of an organization. The state run the schools. You'll become mentally enslaved and you won't need police officers armies they'll enslave themselves and that's what this is. The last part is that the censorship is a huge issue. If you're able to speak what you feel then we've already lost. That's why it's the first amendment. The Second Amendment is meant to protect the first amendment their sensory on facebook. And you myself. I don't have a giant follow like you but I'm getting censored their twitter youtube and starting to realize that we got to speak out wherever we go person the person where you take little cards and pass them around you are the Messenger on the measure where the messengers and it's really high tide to realize that it is now you know like if you're not gonNA fight for freedom now win will you. After the whole country has a mandate vaccine or adults or get the I D. I mean I D- Twenty twenty. It's like so this is why we got to help each other inspire each other encourage each other and let eight. We're all GonNa go in the grave and one hundred years but what about kids and our grandkids you know how much more a meaning is it to pass it. On Inter generation I think.

Twenty twenty Skeptical Orlean twitter facebook TA
"epidemic" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

06:31 min | 9 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"That they're supposed to pay off the obviously cats original sin. She's originally and we if people just wake up so you know. Share this show. I see that so often like people are like the price. Someone's sitting there watching this right now and they're nodding but you didn't hit like you didn't hit that's all you gotta do. Just do something. There are people out here that will help change but we need everyone to help. Everyone don't if you believe about the vaccine stuff and you're not telling your neighbors if you can't right here go ahead you want to talk to the people it right there. Jeff. That's your moment if you're not telling your if you believe vaccines are bad and I believe that if he had any intelligence and you tell your neighbors you don't tell your friends and I know it's scary right. They might think you're crazy. You GotTa do it you have to this is we're running out of time here. I think we're going to get to the good place but it will take everyone else. Hit like hits share. Tell your friends when the government comes around. Tell him to fuck off and I didn't say no. It's Okay Look Jeff I want you know. I know you got a bunch of running entire convention. We're going to set you free baby but thank you so much for inviting us. Thank you for allowing us to have this discussion here. You know continued success. What I think I love the most that you actually believe. See a future that would you describe as heavenly having one and you know those are the types of people that should be Leah Conference if you don't believe that's possible then you shouldn't be leading anybody anywhere? It's really an honor to get to spend some time with your work on line. Thank you all right. Well like I told you. We have been censored a show two weeks ago. Got Into a discussion on the corona virus. We covered all the up to date news. We brought you up to date on what we could prove them and what we could improve but then we brought on a scientist. Dr James Wilder who brought any new theory about the origin of the Corona Virus. Were watching In Wuhan China there has been some questions now. Many articles written that This may have not been accurate or he might have been incorrect. We want to get to the bottom of that. It is shutdown. Our show is a giant banner over it. But I let me just show you that some an expert Excerpt of the discussion that we had. So you know we're talking about again. I told you I'm going to be dead honest with you. We're going to be honest here. Is this something that we should be censored for. Not Take a look at that discussion. Two weeks looking at this particular corona viruses corona virus belongs to a family of viruses that are most closely related to the back Corona viruses however filed. Genetics has a hard time. Placing it with only seventy five percent support all the other notes. You'll see on that tree. This violation genetic tree of of Corona viruses. Actually have one hundred percent support. So what's disrupting the filing genetic signal of placing this into unique monophyletic group as it's called and finally genetics is? I believe this inserted element I found actually did match a vector technology. This vector technology is a mechanism by which molecular biologist insert new genes into viruses and bacteria? This vector technology is called a peace shuttle S. N. factor. Now it's really unusual to find a vector technology sequence in a virus that's circulating in humans and so naturally one thing that we can save I think for certain is this particular. Virus has a laboratory origin. So we can. What you're saying this this this. This technology is something. Scientists use to put in insert things into the genetic coding of a virus to work with it. And what you're saying is that this is a this is an actual product that scientists use. That's now been found by you in what was said to be a wild virus. How would a technology end up into a wild strain? Virus is that puts exactly right okay. It's actually put. It should not be in the wild animals anywhere and in fact if you then take that sequence in compare it to other proteins that encodes we find that. It's actually a SARS protein that was put into a corona virus for the purpose of making the vaccine work better. That's why this element I believe is in there. As the science is showing that element is in there to create a larmore reacted. Genyk more mutagenic vaccine. So if that's the case that doesn't also rule a bioweapons or where they may do the thing for other reasons. I can say don the very very certain it's not just a wild type corona virus at happened to acquire this element while wild virus in the woods. Yes it's laboratory acquired. Some house escaped from a laboratory. Or It's been or the people have been vaccinated with it and that's why it's in their bodies and that's why they test positive for this particular vaccine. I WanNa make sure that what you're getting on this show that you know right now. What James is talking about? These are still theories. They haven't been proven his back so he's giving you really good scientific basis for why he's coming to conclusions. He has and just like James. If we ever make a mistake. We'll be the first to let you know because I want you to know you can trust the information. You're getting here in the high wire there was. That was the discussion. You know reduced down. It was quite long and there's a lot of science to it and I told you we're watching it. One of the things we do here on the high wire is we really kind of geeked out on science once in a while. I don't want to just hand you headlines. And let you find out you know. Just trying to guess met we really got to talk about peace shuttles and inserting you know spike proteins. And things. I found it very interesting in many of you did to. Now there has been some discussions now. The weather that was accurate. Is it really a lab created? Virus was used and was there a spike protein used. And there's you know I think even James.

Dr James Wilder scientist Jeff Wuhan China molecular biologist
"epidemic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Epidemic and that has come in three waves so the first wave was prescription pills like oxycontin and they were over prescribed starting in the nineties and when people's prescriptions ran out a lot of them began turning to street heroin and that satisfied the same cravings so heroin was the second wave of the opioid epidemic but now it is you know a lot of places you can't find pure heroin anywhere almost all of it is cut with fencing and so fentanyl represents the third wave of the opioid epidemic and it's the deadliest yet I mean it's just unbelievably tragic what's the government trying to do about this the D. E. A. especially well the there's been a lot of money dedicated to fighting the opioid epidemic in a number of ways there's been some good progress with things with different types of treatment there's this new drugs one because the box own which can help people taper off these drugs they're also in negotiations with China and so since like I said China is making all these drugs trump is made included in the trade war and is told China that if they don't stop the imp you know the export of these drugs to America he's going to hit them with new terrorists and things like that and so far China has been willing at least to come to the table but where we haven't seen a lot of progress he to me it's almost like biological warfare Ben yeah a lot of people are calling this a reverse opium war in SO in early nineteenth century England was sending opium to China and getting the population addicted and so China inning then went to war these were called the opium war now it's basically the opposite it's China that sending out these opioids to the west and a lot of people like you said are seeing this as a new type of warfare where is most of the cocaine coming from in entering the United States the cocaine is made in Colombia and you'll probably remember Pablo Escobar he was famous Colombian king pin and the D. A. helped take him out in the nineties and this is supposed to stop the cocaine but there's actually now more cocaine coming from Colombia than there ever has been before and does the Sentinel go to Columbia first or what how does it get into the system well all the drugs actually that come into the US are filtered through the Mexican cartels so the Mexican cartels get the the fentanyl from China cocaine comes from from Columbia and Dave package it and distributed throughout the United States and the the Mexican cartels are also selling all the mass that's in the United States who's doing the cutting of the funnel into the cocaine here in this country is at the Ellis distributor the person who's selling that the people on the streets or is it coming in from like you said Mexico or Columbia are they cutting it in first the cartels are doing it and then also the the United States distributors are doing it as well so that the big big problem with the fentanyl is that you can actually take it safe batch you know you can have a safe batch of cocaine offenses.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

12:35 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Certain General hitter talk about a whole range of issues Ezra from you know Ebola and as to issues like violence and e cigarettes and smoking but there was not a single issue that I found resonated as deeply with people as the topic of emotional wellbeing and more specifically loneliness Lope welcome is on the box media podcast network I've been wanting to do an episode on loneliness for a long time I think loneliness is essential the problem of our age but probably also just human life I think it is something we don't talk about in policy discussions because it's not always clear that it is a policy question then but man I mean it it's central at central to the human experience it destroys people's physical health their mental health their ability to be in community and just the richness of their lives we worry correctly about resource inequality we worry correctly by not having enough tangible things but not having enough of the fundamental social relationships that make us feel safe and loved and worthy that'll destroy a soul I've had my own struggles with loneliness have had a lot of it on me and my life it's something that I think a lot about and so I've been looking for a way to get at this issue and and try to explore it on its I've been also watching as earthy the former surgeon general of the United States he during this period when he was surgeon general under Obama he elevated loneliness and try to understand it and get the country to understand that s fundamental public health issue as something that was not just tearing apart people's lives but tearing apart people's Health You know you'll hear these statistics like loneliness is worse for you than the city or smoking fourteen cigarettes today but how and why that's true what what what are the pathways in the body that loneliness is acting upon and how can it hit people even who seem to have a lot of social connection it's a lot less well understood and he's been doing I think really remarkable work bringing this to attention he's bringing a book on it now some really appreciative that he was willing to join me on this you should have that he was willing to come at it personally as heated and as we did because I want to make sure that we're not talking about loneliness which is something some people suffer from acutely and some thing almost always suffer from sometimes as a pathology over there like some kind of illness or affliction loneliness is also an experience and I think it's important that the nature of that experience and how it changes the way relate to the world has also frontloaded so on a note this episode at times is a little more emotionally intense and direct than some of them I don't think it something you need a trigger warning for but I think it's something that you know for a lot of us sincerely for me in the conversation it will bring up a lot and not just may be for you individually but it might make you see some people in your life in a slightly different way so thank you Vivek Murthy for being here as always my email client show at Fox dot com gonNA send me an email only up again Ezra Klein show vox dot com here's former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy Vic Murphy will combust hey thanks very great to be on with you so obviously it my first question is why did you steal my face what what's happening I'm staring at you and it's like staring into someone like an Indian Mirror will this is a surreal moment because I've been hearing for years that we look exactly alike and now I feel like I'm looking at a peeler version of myself it's extraordinarily it it it's very strange you can go for people who are obviously not here with us on Skype you can actually search our names online you'll find people putting up side-by-side pictures it's I didn't know if when I saw you I would actually think it was true but I kind of think it's true we do look alike strange before we talk about loneliness as a public health problem I wanted to talk about it as an experience I don't think you become the first surgeon general in the country's history to elevate loneliness is a central issue unless you awesome sensitivity to it in your own life or around you so let me start with this which is for you what is loneliness feel like Oh surprising I felt lonely often in my life starting from when I was a child and continuing at various points to adulthood including when I was in general but the way it feels it feels physical like it feels like a a not inside me it feels like a sense of despair and it feels like I'm going down a spiral if you will it builds on itself is I think one of the great dangers of loneliness is because he you know it makes you withdraw more at a time exactly when you need to reach out and connect with other people but it feels very visceral and often can feel physical as well like a gnawing sensation that something isn't quite right my my personal experience always been that it it feels like you're speaking a slightly different language and everyone else and that's what's so deeply alienating about it that here you're having this kind of terrible internal experience and other people are not hearing what you're saying about it and often it's because you're not saying anything clear about it but nevertheless there's a feeling that you know they really saw you if they really loved you they would they would be able to see like they'd be able to pick up on the signals you're giving out and the experience of going through life when that's happening and nobody is responding is a very like that I recognize maybe that's not good description of the feeling of only nece to that is the experience of this kind of this total lack of translation between your internal experience of the world and what the people who you often expect to be catch you are able to pick up yeah I think that's very astute and I would add onto that and say that loneliness often feels like an visibility and I've certainly felt that too in the sense that when I fill the depths of loneliness it it feels like people don't see me for who I really am but interestingly heard this from many other people that I've spoken to around the country who has struggled with loneliness who walk around feeling that they are not seen and that if they did appeared it wouldn't matter that feeling of both being invisible invisible and inconsequential I think is a is a hallmark feature of loneliness but one of the things here that lonely sometime sound like it is a mathematical description of life that a lonely person is a person without social connection something really interesting in what you said on the subject is that you never felt more lonely than his surgeon general and I'm sure that if I had looked at your life from the outside when you're searching general all I would connection right I would have seen a full schedule I would have seen people all around you saying Vivek you're so great you look exactly like Klein like everything your life is going so wonderfully a people people wanna be around you you probably have more social engagements and you can possibly say yes to that it would have looked loneliness would have been the furthest thing from a problem business may be exhaustion depression whatever but loneliness so how can it be that at a time in your life when you're probably coming into contact with Moore human beings in any other you were lonely that is one of the great ironies of loneliness is that it's not an objective state it's a feeling and we have so many on the world today who are surrounded by other people at work and at home even people who are married and have children and who to all the world seem we shouldn't be lonely but they really are for me I I did experience a lot of loneliness during my time as surgeon general and I I wanna be clear that it's not because I didn't have good people around me the people who were kind or people who cared about me I was blessed with that I would go to communities and had his incredible privilege of being able to listen to people and have these honest conversations in that felt good but what I realized I had done in retrospect Azra is I had convinced myself that because this was a rare opportunity and we didn't know how much time we would have when I was in office that we had to make use of every moment to make as much impact as possible even if that meant sacrificing time with family and friends on my end and so that's what I did I dramatically reduce not intentionally but just because I by default prioritized work I dramatically reduced team out of contact I had with close friends and even when I was in contact with my closest friends and family I was often distracted I had my phone on me I had my own near me it was buzzing I was thinking about work I was checking my inbox deceive a message responded to I was worried about whether or something had become a problem in social media so I was checking social media feeds I was distracted even though I was physically present and while that took a toll I think on the people around me it took me a while to realize that perhaps the greatest toll was on myself because I deprived myself of what I needed which is the nourishment of close relationships with people who know you and value you for who you are one of the things that I've observed both in me and in other people I've known is that folks who are dude you their upbringing in history or their position or both used to projecting an error of competence and Control and Oh Kanus when things begin going wrong internally they're often not able to actually drop that it's practiced right that they wouldn't be where they are if they weren't really good seemed like everything was going well and in many cases there's a fear if you drop any of that that because you're running an organization or you're the person holding a family together or or there's just some set of burdens that you at least believe on your shoulders that you know you can't let that crack because then you know what will happen to everybody around you but as it happens then there's this growing sense of anger and frustration that people aren't being able to see the very thing that you're hiding from them and I've watched a lot of people we'll and at times myself like end up in real mental health issues for exactly that reason because they they have a set of things that is keeping them from showing what is going on but at the same time it's very alienating for the people around you not realise that you're suffering you know it's really interesting I think we have convinced ourselves as alter that vulnerability equals weakness and that as leaders that to show vulnerability which could be expressing doubt out or uncertainty or talking about moments of sadness or God forbid talking about loneliness will reduce the confidence that people in the organization having new and I realized that that's not true it is the case certainly that a people in organization wants to know that their leader is competent they want to know that their leader cares about them and that their leader has the strength to rise to the occasion when adversity arises but that is not incompatible with being vulnerable and the data is one of the key things that I had to learn over time it was actually something that I felt we were able to build into our culture actually in the surgeon general we had a bit of an unusual culture I would say in the in the larger department which is we we had a culture where people really did get to know each other as as friends where we had a sense of family but I realized early on in part through some difficult challenging leadership experiences I had had when is young that the only way to build that kind of culture though is to lead by example that you can't tell people to be vulnerable and open if you're not willing to be vulnerable and open leader you can't tell people to be honest about where their doubts are so we can fix problems quickly if you're not willing to be honest about those doubts as a leader Oh me to say that it was always comfortable for me to do that because I still have many vestiges of the culture in which I was raised in which is a more traditional model perhaps of leadership but I do I have realized not just through my work in office but by engaging with people around the country and frankly around the world on this issue that there is a deep hunger her for vulnerability authenticity that people have and that's why they respond to it that's why you will find society that sometimes people will follow it and support people even who have dramatically different.

Ezra Ebola
"epidemic" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Epidemic rain down rain down kaby no you you.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You start to see that we are recognising that there are more impacts on health and we thought you know impacts on our longevity increased risk for heart disease dementia depression anxiety but also impacts that go well beyond health in in terms of our productivity in the workplace how children do in school and even our ability to have dialogue at a public and community level it's really powerful to hear a former surgeon general at the united states talk about this in terms of an epidemic why is it important to use that word well we have used the word epidemic to refer to infectious diseases and that have spread in populations but what we see with loneliness is that it is impacting will far more people than many of the infectious diseases that we have worried about in the past that we have termed epidemics so either this is an epidemic just by virtue of the sheer number of people that is it is impacting in how significantly at its spread in the population and it's worth noting that this is not purely an american epidemic this is an epidemic that's impacting countries all over the world united kingdom as as you mentioned earlier has appointed a minister to focus on loneliness but many other countries are starting to wake up to the fact that as we have focused so much on technology and mobility and productivity in the workplace we have lost sight of something that matters is so deeply hi to our fundamental productivity and her fundamental experiences human beings and that's our connection to each other.

united states
"epidemic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It certainly does and if we were to assign a blame for the socalled epidemic of loneliness it probably has to do with and this is a terrible thing say as some of thing about prosperity in the fact that so many people can afford to live alone in some of the countries that experience less uh social isolation it's partly because you don't have the wherewithal to buy your own special apartment where you can be by yourself you're more surrounded with people that you know anzac probably loaf dr murthy what are you what would you add to that would you agree i i do think a one of the interesting byproducts of uh you don't have them but the modern ages eight we do live alone more often than we did before and we live in ways where we have a literal walls between us and whether those her fences between our homes or or actual walls but the truth is its success is not a vaccine against loneliness whether you are financially successful way you're academically successful whether you have a name or fame does not ensure that you will not be lonely i just because you have thousands of followers on instagram and and thousands of contacts on linked and does not mean that you have people in life will you can trust who you can can fight and and what this really brings us down to when you understand the both the prevalence of loneliness but also the impacted loneliness a leads to one fundamental conclusion which is it we need each other we evolved has social human beings we are when we are alone and disconnected free from each other that places us in a physiologic stressed.

social isolation
"epidemic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well we have used the word epidemic to refer to infectious diseases and that have spread in populations but what we see with loneliness is that it is impacting will far more people than many of the infectious diseases that we have worried about in the past that we have termed epidemics so either this is an epidemic just by virtue of the sheer number of people that is it is impacting and how significantly at is spread in the population and it's worth noting that this is not purely an american epidemic this is an epidemic impacting countries all over the world united kingdom as as you mentioned earlier has appointed a minister to focus on loneliness but many other countries are starting to wake up to the fact that as we have focused so much on technology and mobility and productivity in the workplace we have lost sight of something that matters is so deeply high to our fundamental productivity and her fundamental experiences human beings and that's our connection to each other professor hotline instead you either the former surgeon general they're speaking about traveling around the country seeing loneliness in all aspects of our lives all agents socioeconomic backgrounds urban areas rural areas in the heartland on the coast when we often think of loneliness in terms of an elderly problem i would say sometimes but that's not all accurate was at confirmed in your research rate uh our data spans uh we will we looked across all countries um granted there's less data from developing countries um so most of the data does come from north america europe and asia uh but uh what this data shows is that um that this is a consistent across country and it is consistent across ages and we are discussing the dangerousness of loneliness this hour you can join the conversation do you think people.

asia professor north america
"epidemic" Discussed on I'm Still Here

I'm Still Here

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on I'm Still Here

"This is not an epidemic but it's not the deming of epidemics its overdoses its neonatal abstinence syndrome it's hepatitisc which is now the number one infectious killer in the united states it's the children who have been abandoned because one or both parents or you're using this is a broad in complex epidemic that is the greatest public health threat in my lifetime katrina ferguson oak creek in america a local tragedy can spark a national conversation but what happens after the national news cycle mood zone i'm ziba play and this is i'm still here a huffpost podcasts by now we're all pretty used to hearing statistics like these in 2015 or more to fifty two thousand deaths from drug overdose in the us with more than thirty three thousand deaths involving opioid twenty s opioid overdoses have tripled since two thousand in america just a few years opiates inhaling have zoomed into the foreground of american life to the point that it seems totally natural to hear something like this from the president my administration is officially declaring opioid crisis a national public health emergency for this episode huffpost reporter nick wing travel to west virginia the state that's been hit hardest by the epidemic he went they with two big questions what is being done and is it working so neck when we say epidemic what exactly does that mean well as you heard of the top and she has a fifteen thirty three thousand people died of overdoses related to opioids including heroin or prescription painkillers an.

neonatal abstinence syndrome united states america huffpost drug overdose president painkillers public health reporter nick wing west virginia heroin
"epidemic" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"To spend watching to see what happen but it it's epidemic where people are caught lie video they did not like it never happened and then it all goes away we see them from the campaign come on this book tour is like it it's classic honestly i don't know if you've been been watching some of the statements coming out for the book core but it's pretty funny on that show we take a break and we should come back the medicine call beck medicine oncall i mean i think our conversation today is nearly is all about communication and not having somebody some entity think for you you know if we were to follow the guidelines that the media at this point i wouldn't be speaking to you i wouldn't be having a show i me i would be somewhere to pick picket lies some where or fighting some energy that doesn't exist in reality i mean when you're creating a nation of victims who are blaming each other golden i should say this is what they want us to create an ace the victim to hate each other blaming each other somebody took coming from me and i didn't need to work court because i was oded because of history i mean if you really want to go down to brass tacks of everything distant slavery about the world is some form and still exist they exist in the middle east it exists here in our country we have people who are literally slaves who are outside the city ten and trafficking is going on and why we discuss something like that which is actually still happening which affects men women children and we're not doing very much to stop it a lot of talking but not really doing anything about it somebody in a elite telling me that there a victim it there can't that they're outside the system and nothing works with them i don't believe that it's it's ridiculous it's like a mass mental illness at this point and no responsibility you know i'm not happy about police who shoot people in questionable circumstances if get off i'm unhappy about that but you somebody.

epidemic