35 Burst results for "Epidemic"

81-Year-Old Caller Trusts COVID Therapeutics Over Vaccine

Mark Levin

01:26 min | 2 weeks ago

81-Year-Old Caller Trusts COVID Therapeutics Over Vaccine

"I own to tell you that I'm 81 I have not taken the vaccine I did get the hydroxychloroquine and antibiotics and have it in my medicine cabinet in case I get the COVID But to me this is all about control and compliance Those generated a lot of fear just like they did during the aids epidemic And we have Therapeutics that will work but they have refused to let the doctors prescribe them and even shut down the pharmacies from filling those prescriptions I just think it's terrible And so many lives could have been saved had they been allowed to use everything that was available at the time to stop this virus Surely it is absolutely outrageous that and striking that there's hardly any talk of Therapeutics I mean we've got this virus that's been two years And why aren't any of the professionals talking about okay if you get it this is what you should do You would think that that would be a big part of that conversation And I appreciate you laying out what you've chosen to do as an 81 year old woman Can I ask you did your doctor advise you on this or does he know what your choices have been I just got over Brett cancer a year ago and I just got an all clear about three months ago Of course they are on me to get that vaccine but I said no I won't take it I just want their pushing it so hard It makes me very

Aids Brett Cancer
Judge rejects Purdue Pharma’s sweeping opioid settlement

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Judge rejects Purdue Pharma’s sweeping opioid settlement

"Hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi a a reporting reporting a a judge judge rejects rejects Purdue Purdue pharma's pharma's sweeping sweeping opioid opioid settlement settlement the the proposed proposed bankruptcy bankruptcy settlement settlement of of thousands thousands of of lawsuits lawsuits against against Purdue Purdue pharma pharma filed filed over over the the opioid opioid epidemic epidemic has has been been rejected rejected by by a a federal federal judge judge US US district district judge judge Colleen Colleen McMahon McMahon rejected rejected the the settlement settlement because because of of a a provision provision that that would would protect protect members members of of the the Sackler Sackler family family from from facing facing litigation litigation on on their their own own facing facing thousands thousands of of lawsuits lawsuits blaming blaming the the company company helped helped spark spark the the opioid opioid crisis crisis by by pushing pushing doctors doctors to to prescribe prescribe oxycontin oxycontin produce produce sought sought bankruptcy bankruptcy protection protection in in twenty twenty nineteen nineteen the the opioid opioid crisis crisis has has been been linked linked to to more more than than five five hundred hundred thousand thousand deaths deaths in in the the U. U. S. S. over over the the last last two two decades decades hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi

Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Purdue Purdue Pharma Purdue Purdue Pharma Pharma Judge Judge Colleen Colleen Mc Sackler Sackler Pharma United States U. U. S. S.
It's Time for Americans to Get Back to Work

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | Last month

It's Time for Americans to Get Back to Work

"You know, governor Chris Christie has been criticized lately because he's trying to get back into the stratosphere with his book, his book hasn't done very well. And he's been really hard on president Trump about January 6th about election integrity. I don't know about Chris Christie but I know he said something on ABC cut 5. He said something that to me is pretty crucial. This is a we have a problem in America right now. A big problem. Why don't you check this out? Cut number 5. Look, workers do it more leverage now, but Donna, it's time for them to go back to work. I quite frankly don't care whether they're ready or not. You know, it's time to go back to work. And if the president continues to give people excuses not to go back to work, he's not going to get over this problem. And saying that I'm working on the supply chain and working everything else is something that this public's not going to understand. He needs to acknowledge the problem. He will not acknowledge the problem. And people then think he's not getting it. Nobody's acknowledging the problem. We got inflation, a soaring at record heights, nobody's understanding. We've got a jobs problem in America. And I don't, I can't get anybody to understand. Listen to this from axios about half of unemployed Americans say health issues are the primary reason they're not working. Mental health problems in America have reached epidemic proportions. If one of the key drivers of the labor shortage in America is Americans physical and mental health rather than lack of economic growth, that means the fed isn't well placed to get millions more people

Chris Christie America ABC Donna FED
How Serious Is the Threat of Criminalizing Conservatism?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

How Serious Is the Threat of Criminalizing Conservatism?

"Com. We are back with none other than professor Viktor Davis Hansen, the author most recently his newest book is the dying citizen, prior to that, the second world wars, the case for Trump, a fabulous read that I enjoy enjoyed very much is the solar of battle and who killed Homer. Professor hands that we've been talking about the anniversary of Pearl Harbor. We've been talking about the discussion with Putin just a moment to go between The White House and the Kremlin. Let's talk about domestic affairs for a moment. How significant should we take it and how much of a threat to buddy politic done with some kind of normalcy is the raft, the euphoria of subpoenas coming out of the January 6th commission and the attempt to criminalize conservatism. Well, I don't think they're going to go anywhere, but they're trying to create a narrative. They're trying to create two narratives. Donald Trump is satanic, and he's still a danger. And there was a coup revolution on January 6th. You take away those two items. And there's nothing there. They have no other agenda. They lost the Russian collusion hoax. They lost the impeachment frenzy. They can only thrive in periods of frenzy and hysteria. So the movement is waning Joe Biden thought that that narrative that Donald Trump killed 350,000 people due to his laxity and COVID inherited the vaccinations, the epidemic was over. We're all going to be fined by July and then the delta came. And then that narrative was now I don't want to go there anymore. Their attitude. So it's just a narrative. And they don't have anything

Viktor Davis Hansen Donald Trump Pearl Harbor Homer Putin White House Joe Biden
Exposing the Ignorance and Evil Behind the Pandemic with Alex Berenson

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | Last month

Exposing the Ignorance and Evil Behind the Pandemic with Alex Berenson

"Yes, so let's just start there. I mean, February 2020, you were like investigating marijuana and other things and then the virus comes and you just decided, I'm gonna start looking into this and I started to come across your stuff on sub stack where, you know, Aaron gin, who you might know is another guy that was really into it in the early days. And I was so outspoken about the lockdowns and I was we were really into it because I really had nothing else to do. Everything was locked down. And I'm by no means an expert, but just my common sense instincts that something's wrong and you are so informative and so courageous early on, walk us through that because you probably never planned to be center stage of one of the most important medical issues that humanity's ever faced. No, I certainly didn't. And, you know, I was working on a book about really about U.S. drug policy that would have been and I hope to write one day still a follow-up to tell your children sort of broadly about this, you know, the epidemic of legalization, the sort of very broad campaign to legalize drugs that we've seen and not just cannabis, but really all drugs that we've seen in the last ten or 15 years. And so I was working on that and then of course, you know, like everybody else, I saw the videos coming out of China. I think we were all pretty nervous back in January and February. And then in March 2020 and I talk about this in pandemia, I've read that Neil Ferguson report the imperial college London report that said, oh, if we don't do anything, 2 million Americans will die, but even worse, if we do, if we do mitigate a million Americans will die and we need to really lock down our society. And, you know, within days that started to happen in New York and California and everywhere else, and then and then amazingly to me, Neil Ferguson totally changed his prediction. Ten days after releasing this report that really shocked the world and pushed the United States and Europe into Loch Ness, he basically said, oh, you know what? I was wrong. I was wrong by 95%. Did I say 500,000 deaths? I'm at 20,000. Okay, so look, the science or the data was evolving very fast around the coronavirus. Back at that time. And everybody's got the right to look at new data and change their views. But what was shocking to me was that the media was not willing to acknowledge what Ferguson had

Aaron Gin Neil Ferguson United States Imperial College London China California New York Europe Ferguson
"epidemic" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

08:00 min | 3 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Short Wave

"And none of the downside. By 2007, perdue admits, it deceptively marketed OxyContin as safer and less addictive than other prescription opioids. But in those early days, doctors thinking it less potent than morphine were prescribing OxyContin in huge doses. So there was an 80 milligram pill for a time there was a 160 milligram pill. 160 milligrams? It's insane. And they ended up taking that one up. The market, having had conversations about how if a kid took one of those, one pill could kill you. Yes. And what would happen is that people, there was this kind of perverse thing in which the labeling on the bottle said, whatever you do, don't chew or grind up the pills, because if you do, you'll override the slow release mechanism and you'll get the whole hit all at once, which I mean, it's good that they put that warning there, but you can also see how for some people that probably had a perverse effect of being kind of an instruction manual and how to override that mechanism. The walls have come down on Purdue pharma in the last 14 years. The company has pleaded guilty to misleading doctors and patients about how addictive OxyContin is. It's important to note the sacklers have never been charged with any crime, and members of the family who led the company say they did nothing wrong. And verifying the claims and Keith's book, we reached out to representatives of the different branches of the Sackler family. The mortimer Sackler branch said, our focus is on concluding a resolution that will provide help to people and communities in need rather than on this book. The Raymond Sackler branch has previously rebutted Keith's depiction of their role in the opioid crisis. And denied that they had swayed researchers and doctors with money. But when it comes to Purdue pharma, the company pleaded guilty again to federal criminal charges last year relating to its OxyContin marketing. A lot of public health experts think the company's deception led many down a path of harder drugs. Like fentanyl and heroin and we're dealing with that today. For the story we also reached out to attorneys representing Purdue pharma. They said Purdue deeply regrets and has accepted responsibility for specified misconduct that took place before June 2017. So my question to Patrick radden Kyiv as a science show was this. Patrick helped me understand this. How did so many knowledgeable people? Scientists, doctors, trained federal regulators at the FDA and DEA, let this crisis happen. What went wrong as far as the medical and science community and not stopping this? It's such a great question. The first thing I should say just to be just to be really clear is this book that I've written is about the Sackler family. And I think that they and their company deserve special blame for the role that they played, particularly early in the opioid crisis. But that's not to say that they deserve all the blame. You know, you don't get to more than half a million people dead with one set of bad actors. This is really a story of larger system failure. And as your question suggests a failure of the medical establishment the scientific establishment, lots of people who, in theory have patients best interest in mind and who should know better. So how did that happen? I think that in some instances you had doctors who were simply corrupt, so that's one category of bad actors, people who basically just took the money and looked the other way and wrote too many prescriptions and many of those people ended up getting prosecuted. I also think part of the problem is this company comes along and they say we have this amazing chemical panacea. And there were a lot of doctors, I think who were very ready to believe that because they were idealistic and they desperately wanted to help their patients. But I should also say that I think there's something else too. So if you have kind of outright corruption, you have a kind of idealism that was co opted. And then I think you get what I think of as soft corruption, which is OxyContin is a drug that's generated some $35 billion. Over the decades. And when you have that amount of money, I think it just trickles into everything and you see the way in which industry money exerts influence at every level. I mean, this has really been backed up and documents that have come out since that Purdue pharma has released. I know mother Jones just published this whole analysis of some of their payouts and you wrote in your book a lot about how Purdue pharma and the sacklers influenced medical communities and academic communities with money. So I think it's a really important thing to talk about. This kind of intersection of science and capitalism. I completely agree. And I think, yeah, we have the receipts at this point. And the receipts are just kind of adding up. There's huge amounts of documentation of the way in which this type of influence works. I should say that I think that there is I think there's a perception of physicians and to some degree this would be true of scientists as well. That they can be unimpeachable. And in a strange way, I feel as though nothing is a better breeding ground for corruption than the idea that any professional class is incorruptible, you know? The kind of self image of the medical profession was actually part of the problem here. So just broadly speaking, what do we owe those who experience pain? And chronic pain. Oh, it's because that is a very hard thing to live with. It is. Yeah. And I think it's I think that I think that we owe them good treatment. I think the critique in the 1990s 1980s and 1990s that said doctors haven't really learned about the treatment of pain. It's not taught in medical schools in a serious way. This is a problem in the field. I think that was a legitimate critique. I think that was correct. The problem is that into that vacuum rushed industry. What industry wanted to do generally speaking was teach people how to get onto these drugs and not how to get off of them. So I think at a minimum we owe people that that if there's going to be an on ramp, they're either has to be an off ramp or there has to be a kind of a sensible plan for keeping people on in a way that feels responsible and is not going to cut them adrift. And it wasn't just, of course, Purdue pharma that contributed to all of this. There were other drug companies that made and marketed opioids. You know? Yeah, absolutely. I mean, there's a lot of them to go around. It was not just perdue. There were other big companies that sold that sold opioids and marketed them in similarly deceptive ways. There were the wholesalers. There were the pharmacy chains, there are a lot of bad actors in this story. I think that the specific role of OxyContin in the marketing for OxyContin is significant because they were really the first. That was the marketing campaign that changed the way these drugs were prescribed. And you had a bunch of other companies that came in afterwards. But in the words of one scientist who worked on OxyContin.

Purdue pharma mortimer Sackler branch Raymond Sackler Patrick radden Keith perdue Purdue DEA FDA Patrick OxyContin Jones
"epidemic" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:47 min | 3 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. The opioid epidemic has had a lot of faces over the last 25 years. It really started as a prescription painkiller crisis and morphed into a heroin crisis and then more recently into a fentanyl crisis. So it has evolved over that time. Patrick radin keefe is a staff writer at The New Yorker who wrote empire of pain. The secret history of the Sackler dynasty, which came out this year. You basically have a public health crisis that has unfolded over a quarter of a century now. Really starting in the mid 1990s. And has resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths. I mean, conservatively, half a million deaths. And this estimate half a million deaths doesn't also capture the millions of people across the U.S. right now, living with an opioid use disorder. It's been going on so long that it's easy to forget where this all started. In medical offices, with doctors back in the 1980s, in the UK and the U.S., wanting to break from this old school attitude towards pain. There was a tendency to just sort of say, hey, gren and Barrett, you're going to have to deal with this pain. And a lot of these revisionist doctors who are making this case argued that part of the reason the pain wasn't aggressively treated is that you had this amazing solution, which was the opioids, which was a kind of class of drug that derived from the opium poppy. But that physicians had been too reluctant to prescribe these drugs because of a fear of their addictiveness. Back in those days, doctors were administering the opioid morphine, intravenously. So through a tube in patients veins, and that required people to come into the doctor's office on a regular basis. So Keef says a British drug company now called napp pharmaceuticals limited had an idea. What if they figured out a way to put a big dose of morphine in a pill? And then have a coding that would slowly release the drug into your bloodstream over a matter of hours. And so you didn't need to dose as often if you were a cancer patient, it meant that you could go home, for instance. And so this drug was called MS contin. MS content. That was the first ever extended release morphine product. And its developer, nap pharmaceuticals was then owned by the Sackler family. The same family that owned Purdue pharma. An executives at Purdue were really interested in making this new pill marketable in the U.S.. There was an executive at Purdue pharma who talked about how different drugs have personalities. This was sort of a marketing thesis that he had. The problem was that morphine was associated in people's mind with death with end of life care. You know, if your grandmother was going on morphine, then she was going to die. And so part of what they did with them as content was they kind of they created a more approachable, less threatening take it at home with a glass of water version of morphine. And Keith says that was the seed of the opioid crisis. When medicine joined up with marketing. Today on the show, Patrick radden keefe and I take a step back to talk about what went wrong in science. From the chem lab to corporate boardrooms to make the U.S. opioid epidemic what it is today. This is shortwave. The daily science podcast from NPR. Support for NPR and the following message come from Cleveland clinic. Cleveland clinic wants to know what you want to see for the future of healthcare. Help inspire their next 100 years of care by sharing your hopes for the future at Cleveland clinic dot org slash Centennial. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Charles Schwab. Last year taught us, we don't know what tomorrow holds, but Schwab knows that successful financial planning can help propel net worth by 2.5 times. Find easy, flexible planning options and more at Schwab dot com slash plan. In 1984, when MS content, this slow release morphine pill debuted, it did what Purdue pharma wanted helped patients manage pain, made money. But after a few years, the drug was approaching the precipice of what's known as a patent cliff. So at a certain point, the patent on MS content was running out. And there were these discussions inside perdue at very high levels about what are we replaced this with? Our profits are really going to take a slide and we need to find something new. And they really liked that content coding system they'd come up with. The idea of a slow release coding on a pill. So the question then became, are there other opioids that we could use the content coding system with? And they came up with the idea of using oxycodone, which is another opioid been around for a long time. Oxycodone itself was generic, not patented. It was cheap. But what they did then was they said, Emma's content was a big success, but it was a success for cancer pain. And there's only so many people who have cancer. And wouldn't it be great if we could position this new drug OxyContin not just for cancer pain, and not just for severe pain, but even for moderate pain, they actually had a marketing tagline for OxyContin, where they said, it's the one to start with and the one to stay with. Wow. Okay, they were trying to create at that point kind of an all purpose painkiller. And what is the difference chemically between oxycodone, the chemical and OxyContin versus morphine, what they were using before? Yeah, so this is part of what's interesting. I mean, there are chemical cousins and their chemical cousins with heroin. They're both opioids, but when perdue was getting ready to launch OxyContin, they discovered that doctors thought that oxycodone was weaker than morphine. And the crazy thing is it's about twice as strong. As morphine. Oh wow. And they knew this inside the company. And so there's this amazing email traffic where they say, we have to make sure we don't do anything to disabuse them of this. Did anyone push back in that email Fred and say, guys? I don't know if ethically, this is right. Yeah, not that I saw there. Because that would have been the moment. That would have been the moment to change history. It would have been. Yeah. And I should say, none of which is to say that OxyContin should not have been sold and marketed to pain patients. It is a drug that makes a big difference in the lives of a lot of people. The crime in my mind here is not putting the drug on the market. It's how you market it and how deceptive you are about its properties. I think the thing that was interesting is that the drug starts going to in the early 96. And you have all these sales reps going out. And basically saying, for thousands of years humans have known that the opium poppy can produce these amazing therapeutic benefits in which it can make pain go away. But there's always been this attendant danger, which is addiction. And what they're saying is we at Purdue pharma have hacked it. Like we figured out a way to uncouple those two things. So you get all the therapeutic upside,.

Purdue pharma Patrick radin keefe gren U.S. Keef napp pharmaceuticals NPR nap pharmaceuticals Patrick radden keefe cancer The New Yorker Sackler Barrett perdue Purdue Cleveland clinic Charles Schwab Schwab
Pharmacies face 1st trial over role in opioid crisis

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Pharmacies face 1st trial over role in opioid crisis

"In a bellwether federal trial starting Monday some big name chain pharmacies go to court for their first trial over what their role was in the opioid crisis from twenty twelve to twenty sixteen so many prescription painkillers were dispensed in Lake County Ohio the amount equal to two hundred and sixty five pills for every resident according to officials and in nearby trouble it was four hundred pills for every resident attorney say the overdose epidemic has cost each county at least a billion dollars they're suing CVS Walgreens giant eagle and Walmart who say they were merely filling prescriptions pharmacy chain rite aid settled with the counties the trial as part of a broader constellation of federal opioid lawsuits about three thousand and all that have been consolidated I'm Julie Walker

Lake County Walgreens Giant Eagle Ohio CVS Walmart Julie Walker
Cherokee Nation reaches $75M settlement with drug companies

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Cherokee Nation reaches $75M settlement with drug companies

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting Cherokee Nation reaches a settlement with three drug companies the Cherokee Nation has announced a seventy five million dollar settlement with three opioid distributors resolving opioid related claims against the companies the settlement the largest in Cherokee Nation history is with McKesson corporation cardinal health and AmerisourceBergen drug corporation the settlement will be paid out over six and a half years in a lawsuit filed in twenty seventeen Cherokee Nation alleged the three companies and several pharmacy companies contributed to an epidemic of prescription opioid abuse Cherokee Nation also has claims against Walmart Walgreens and CVS that are pending hi Mike Rossio

Mike Ross Cherokee Nation Mckesson Corporation Amerisourcebergen Cardinal Health Cherokee Walmart Walgreens CVS Mike Rossio
Use of OxyContin Profits to Fight Opioids Formally Approved

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Use of OxyContin Profits to Fight Opioids Formally Approved

"The judge has formally approved a plan to turn oxycontin maker Purdue pharma into a new company no longer owned by members of the Sackler family and with his profits going to fight the opioid epidemic bankruptcy judge Robert drain officially has confirmed the reorganization more than two weeks after he announced he would do so pending to launching technical changes however several states among all the parties have already appealed the decision the deal resolves some three thousand lawsuits filed by state and local governments native American tribes unions hospitals and others who claimed the company's marketing of prescription opioids help Spock and continue overdose epidemic linked to more than five hundred thousand deaths in the U. S. in the last two decades I'm Charles there that's my

Sackler Family Robert Drain Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Spock U. Charles
Who Is Exempt From Biden’s Vaccine Mandate?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:34 min | 4 months ago

Who Is Exempt From Biden’s Vaccine Mandate?

"Who's exempt from biden's vaccine mandate members of congress and their staff are exempt from biden's vaccine mandate newsweek dot com biden issued two executive orders however biden's order on federal workers applies to the employees of the executive branch the house of representatives and the senate belong to separate legislative branch and the courts judicial branch of the federal government. The plan says quote building on the president's announcement in july to strengthen safety requirements for unvaccinated federal workers. The president has signed an executive order to take those actions. A step further inquire all federal executive branch workers to be vaccinated. Now when you look into some of the commentary regarding this vaccine mandate it's stunning to see how the propagandists in the media. They're not just at war with the unvaccinated which by the way every person starts out unvaccinated like a normal breathing healthy functioning individual. It's the new social caste system you star on yourself. You are the unvaccinated get over here. You're not allowed to our restaurants. You're the unwashed which many of most of whom by the way are black people so here you see again the racism of white liberals in the ruling class that want nothing to do with black people hispanic people but this one clip from sheryl gay stolberg where she says. Look getting vaccine. It's not a personal choice. It's something that we do for the community. Your personal choice ends. Were my right tanaka killed by infectious. Disease begins okay. Well sheryl gay stolberg under that belief by. They're going to use the same sort of narrative to confiscate guns very soon just so we're clear public health. There's no guarantee for you. Sheryl gay stolberg when you get in the car. You might not become one of thirty five thousand automobile fatalities every single year. No guarantee part of life in part of living in a free society means that things might happen to you that you might not expect. That's what a mature society does instead. The new york times health reporter says that there's no personal choice. I'm gonna tell you what to do because of me. Do you notice that the argument here has now flipped. Originally the moral argument that was being made was go get vaccinated for the people around you to save your grandmother to save your grandfather to go save other people or at the very least get vaccinated because you'll be protected however now the argument is changing. Now you have to get vaccinated to protect me

Biden Sheryl Gay Stolberg House Of Representatives Federal Government Congress Senate Tanaka The New York Times
We Need To Come to Terms with America's Obesity Epidemic

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | 4 months ago

We Need To Come to Terms with America's Obesity Epidemic

"One of the main reasons why we are seeing the dramatic escalation in certain areas struggling with the chinese corona virus in addition to monoclonal being suppressed and in addition to ivermectin and hydrochloric. Quinn is how overweight our countries and again. I say this is someone who has my own health problems. I don't get enough sleep if someone is overweight. You should look have a health problem. Don't try to own it. They'll be like oh. Yeah i'm fat and proud like that's actually really creepy. And it's not the way it should be. It's not good for you. it's not good for your joints. It's not good for you could get diabetes and so what we have here. Amazingly is to governors. That i think are that actually. That's not true. Jay pritzker is actually fatter than these governors. So jim justice. I don't know who's who is bigger. Jim justice or jay pritzker. That's tough tie again. I'm not fat shaming okay but at some point when you get to that level it's just a lack of will. Do you know what. I would love to eat out. Love to eat anything i want. Okay but it takes discipline. It takes order take self-control

Jay Pritzker Quinn Jim Justice Diabetes
Billy Graham's Daughter Ruth Speaks About the Epidemic of Loneliness in America

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Billy Graham's Daughter Ruth Speaks About the Epidemic of Loneliness in America

"Interesting first of all when you say generation z. I'm not sure what that means. Anymore tha roughly what age i talking about. Nineteen ninety five to two thousand fifteen. The twenty five year olds twenty twenty. Somethings on on okay. And do you think ruth they they think of themselves as lonely because you're right. It seems counter intuitive For any young person to be lonely. That's when you're in school that's when you're doing all kinds of things. Why do you suppose they think of themselves as lonely well. They are so connected technology with technology digitally but they have no real heart connections in. That's the problem. The grandson. We'll tell you you know. We have lots of connections but no real relationships. And i think that's the thing that's missing his relationship. I think it needs to be said over and over but this is a good place to start. There's something inherently one dimensional or at least shallow about social media. You're really communicating with much depth. And you've just said it the connection it. It's really a tenuous connection. It's tremendously superficial. It's almost designed to be superficial. But i've never really thought about how if you get a lot of that eventually. It would be almost painful. Because you'd be you'd be even longing for some real connection more than somebody who's not getting any of that kind of connection well and raza and found out through the pandemic that they had more phone calls than even on mother's day because people wanted to hear a voice. Singing texts wasn't enough. They needed to hear voice. They needed to hear the tone in the voice and so people began coal and people. Not just texting.

Ruth Raza
U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

the NewsWorthy

01:07 min | 4 months ago

U.S. Judge Approves Deal Dissolving Purdue Pharma in Opioid Saga

"Drugmaker behind the highly addictive prescription. Painkiller oxycontin is formerly shutting down. We're talking about purdue pharma. Instead of selling opioids the company's resources will be put toward addressing the opioid epidemic mainly with addiction treatment and prevention programs. It will also compensate people and families who have been hurt by purdue products that was just one of the terms laid out in a wide ranging bankruptcy settlement. Judge approved this week. It also says the company's owners the sackler family will have to pay four and a half billion dollars to settle thousands of opioid related lawsuits. Without though this actors will be immune from any more lawsuits about opioids. And they'll still be one of the richest families in the world. They're worth about eleven billion dollars. A lot of states support. This plan saying it's the best way to help pay for a problem. That's only gotten worse. During the pandemic but others like connecticut. In washington planned to appeal saying the settlement shields. The sackler is too much from liability. They say the sackler is downplayed. How addictive opioids are while they aggressively marketed. Those drugs purdue pharma as a company has pleaded guilty twice for that but the sackler is have not been charged with crimes. At least not yet and they say they did nothing illegal or

Purdue Pharma Drugmaker Sackler Connecticut Washington
CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

One Life Radio Podcast

02:04 min | 5 months ago

CHD President and General Counsel Mary Holland on Covid Vaccine Injuries

"Mary holland. One of my favorite people. How you doing today mary. I'm grace could yeah. It's great. We're going to call him a mondays mondays with mary. It's gonna be regular well and there's so much to talk about my goodness let me introduce you for people that maybe are listening for the first time mary holland serves as president and general counsel of children's health defense. She left the faculty of new york university school of law where she surfers seventeen years most recently directing. Its graduate lawyering program. Mary received her master of arts and juris doctorate degrees from columbia university and her undergraduate degree from harvard. She has worked in international public and private law and mary is the co author a vaccine epidemic and the hp vaccine on trial seeking justice for a generation betrayed. You can find mary at children's health. Defense dot org. That's children's health. Defense dot org. We have a lot to cover today with our children's health defense. Update okay so there were an additional twenty seven thousand reported injuries from the covert vaccine in just one week so from last week to this week. So what kinds of what. Kind of injuries. Mary are being reported. And what about deaths bernadette all kinds of injuries are being reported and death the total deaths so far that have been reported and we know that's really a small faction of what the real number probably is over thirteen thousand and the number of total injuries. That have been reported or over six hundred thousand. I don't think this would be possible. Except for the fact that the government and the industry and the healthcare profession all have liability protection under emergency use authorization status It's really distressing thirty. Two percent of those deaths were within forty eight hours of having developed symptoms after the shot. So i it's it's extremely troubling bernadette It's just there. Were over five hundred fifty deaths last

Mary Holland Mary Children's Health Defense New York University School Of Columbia University Harvard HP Bernadette Government
Mike Maples on Value Hacking and Avoiding The Fake Growth Epidemic

Venture Stories

02:11 min | 5 months ago

Mike Maples on Value Hacking and Avoiding The Fake Growth Epidemic

"Is value hacking. How do you sort of conceived this term. And what problem did you set out to solve. We're doing it. Yeah so so Value hacking was intended to Address problem that we saw more and more in the tech industry which we like to call fake growth and so fake growth to me is kind of like the hidden. In plain sight secret that's pervasive in silicon valley it says pervasive in tech and startups as fake news and politics and so we started to think well a lot of companies that we'd worked with some get all the way to the promised land get public like say octa or lift kind of more recently but some start out great and go off the rails and we wanted to understand why it so we did a lot of analysis and thought about it some and interviewed a bunch of founders companies that had worked and not worked and we really honed in on this issue fake growth and to what is baker. What are the most. Common signs at a startup is experiencing fake it. Yeah so fake growth. Basically emphasizes growth optics overgrowth reality so we like to call it grow theater and so you know what are some common examples. You know focusing on funding round sizes and getting publicity around that focusing on. How much pr can you get regardless of your customer. Traction focusing on is my valuation in the last round bigger than my buddies valuation. In the last round that i met at a meet up and even worse it's the board is actually usually complicit in this. It's it's everybody trying to make numbers in a spreadsheet that look good and so board meetings become about okay. I read in some blog. You've gotta grow fifteen percent a month and so are you growing fifteen percent a month and so what we what we learned is that one of the great causes a fake growth. Is that people start trying to grow before they're ready to grow and that the right way to think about it was create a very strong value proposition. that's true and then Grow by syndicating the truth because if value propositions true in theory we should be able to scale it

Silicon Valley Baker
"epidemic" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

09:49 min | 5 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Your credit score. We are shooting all over ourselves as if we're and advice epidemic So we're going to talk about today. You know ryan. I think some advice can be helpful but as you often say all advice is flawed advice and so on the minimum episode. Today this episode. I do want to talk about this advice. Epidemic that we're in how it's amplified by social media amplified by righteousness and on the maximum episode. This week we'll talk about. How all advices flawed advice especially unsolicited advice. And maybe there's a particular subset of this epidemic. Right now where. Everyone wants to give unsolicited advice. But maybe the problem is that we are asking for advice as well talk about how we can let go of all the things that are making miserable on the maximum episode this week over on patriot also run. I have some taboo. Should i want address with you on the maximal episode. We'll talk about vaccines. You should give accident. you shouldn't get vaccinated. We're gonna talk about all these. You should vote. Voting is one of the sheds that gets heaped onto us And also who. I sense like a fun disagreement. Coming on voting. Yes yes well it depends on what you think. We should do fistfights. I punched someone for the first time in twenty years recently last month. I wanna talk about that. But i'm going to save that for patriot. Patriot dot com slash. The minimal is every thursday. We do a very long maximal episode but today on the minimum episode. We're talking about the advice. Epidemic and ryan. We've got some questions here. Let's start with mike's question from facebook stu it. What possesses some people to insist on giving others unsolicited advice. Meant i'll tell you. I think what's happening today. Because of social media like you said it is amplified there's virtue signaling going on And it's it's funny. Because when i see someone else. Give someone some unsolicited advice. Usually it's based from a judgment. In what do say about judgments judgments are but mere that. Reflect the insecurities of the person. Who's doing the judging. So really the unsolicited advice. It's not saying here's what you should do. It's basically saying. Here's what i should do. Yes and i'm going to project that onto you know because that makes me feel better about the decisions i make for myself. I saw thomas soul quote recently. He said politics is when you take your desires and prescribed them to everyone else and that's the same. That's the should thing as well right. And so the virtue. Signaling is fascinating response to this because well virtues seem virtuous Right but when we think about what does that even mean it starts to. Meanwhile this is good. This is bad and so the judgement thing is what you are wrong. I am right. And therefore i must impress upon you. I must convince you or persuade you. That here is the right way to live mike. A your question fascinating to me. Because i think if we even remove the word unsolicited. Because i do want to talk about that. On on the maximal episode the unsolicited apart. We got some questions around that. But if i were to remove the word unsolicited what possesses people to insist on giving others advice. Maybe part of the problem is we feel so compelled to simply give advice because so many people are also asking for advice without trying to what does that mean. All i want to abdicate my own responsibility of diving into this. If i say hey ryan what should i eat. Who should i vote for. What should i do shoot. I buy a home. Should i go to college and you say yes. Josh should go to college. And then it doesn't work out for me stupid ryan. This is all his fault. it's not my fault. It's his fault. I did the wrong thing. And so i wanna talk about right and wrong and ensured and shouldn't but i want to do it through the lens of this essay that i wrote a while ago. This is This came out maybe six months ago. It's called the advice epidemic which is also the title of this episode. Put a link to this in the show notes so you can read it as well. The urge the urge to convince others is overwhelming on the surface. It appears virtuous to help to instruct to coach to guide to motivate giving advice gives the impression of nobility as if we have an obligation to ameliorate the plight of the world to assist. People headed the wrong way to point them in the right direction. We are all middlemen in the middle of a self help epidemic. Just look at social media overnight experts. Espousing advice you should wake up early. You shouldn't eat that you should embrace change. You shouldn't get anxious. What a weird sort of bit of advice there. Don't get anxious. I'll thanks that helps right. Why didn't i think of that right so you shouldn't get answers. You should change your habits. You shouldn't wear socks with sandals true kind of got a point there. Although i see all the kids now they're all wearing the easy sandals. Their socks is a cool now. Danny so we've got our studio audience in the house today. Ladies and gentlemen shawn's the only one that applauding a little worried about him there. He goes nothing. You should apply feeling today. Yes yes podcast sean. We got the whole the whole studio audience here jordan. no more danny unknown podcast. Sean mala bama and immigrant and We're all here today talking about well. The advice epidemic. Back to this essay here but really there is no should. There never was an without the sandcastle of should all advice begins to crumble on the wind. Each time we advise someone may feel like it's a rising from a place of love but it's actually ego saying i know What's best for you back to my ex question from facebook. What's the ultimate source of this. It's the ego it's the righteousness of the go. It's the hubris of the ego saying. Hey look i've figured it out. I was on clubhouse last night. Doing some readings from our new book. Love people use things. And i was talking to someone who is called in to the podcast before we've talked to him on several different occasions but he He was saying that i feel. I feel like a figured out a few things in my own life and it feels so good. But why am i so compelled now to advise others Do you understand this. And i was like well. Yeah i two plagued by self righteousness human and this isn't self-righteous as bad or good. We hear these things we start making all of these sort of value judges but it's understanding. Where is the place from which this emanates desire to change other people. Yeah well. I think a lot of it has to do with. It feels good to help others. You know so which actually is an ego driven to right. Because when i go to the food kitchen it is like this. It extensively selfless act of like. Oh i'm going to help others. But like i get a lot out of that right so yeah. I think it feels good to help others. So people are. They're looking for ways to help others because they're looking for ways to what feel good and if that's the outcome nothing wrong with that fact. I'm talking about the ego here in a second. How can serve you in a way. And i've got a metaphor for you so i know what's best for you. The implication of which is disconcerting. I right you're wrong and if you subordinate yourself to me i will fix you. What a fascinating metaphor. By the way though the fixing as though you are on the sheen and i'm the mechanic and i will fix you now some advice or how. To's can be really helpful especially in a mechanical sense. If i need to learn how to repair my bike chain there are a bunch of really great videos on youtube. That will help me with the mechanics of that now. If i want to be the best bike builder in the world. There's no youtube video. That's going to help me accomplish that anyway. Back to the tax year. I will fix you. How is this loving. There is no bigger ego than that of the helper. The helpful man simply cannot help himself. He feels obligated to tear an eagle from the sky to save it from falling to drag a dolphin to the shore to rescue it from drowning. This is the opposite of helpful. I know because. I've done it a thousand times and for that i'm sorry. A thousand apologies. My first inclination is to delete it. All every exhortation recommendation suggestion and opinion everything from the past thirty nine years but we cannot start over by erasing the past week. Only move forward and the everlasting now. Perhaps i developed an allergy to advice because propagating it only feeds the ego. Now the ego is not a bad thing. Just like fire is not good or bad it can warm you or it can burn you. And that's the point. I want to get across here. It's not that here ego and because we've moralizing everything. Oh ego back you go lists must be good right. Well no throw those out the window.

ryan thomas soul mike Sean mala facebook Josh shawn Danny danny sean jordan youtube allergy
Heather Mac Donald: There Is No Epidemic of Fatal Police Shootings Against Unarmed Black Americans

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Heather Mac Donald: There Is No Epidemic of Fatal Police Shootings Against Unarmed Black Americans

"In the middle of all the challenges with covert in afghanistan and we still have police under attack. I had a chance to catch up with the great heather mcdonald. Heather mcdonald is the author of the war on cops great political voice great commentator on law enforcement. Here's what we talked about. Recently heather mcdonald studies data. And i wanna talk about the data that refused the narrative that blacks unarmed black. Americans are in peril of being gunned. Down by a by america's police officers every day. I have callers who've told me that i had listeners. Who say what. What does the data say about that narrative. It's preposterous narratives. That percentage of blacks allegedly unarmed blacks. Who were killed by. The cops is a minute fraction. it's about point one. two point. Two percent of all blacks killed of homicide each year last year and and i say allegedly unarmed because this data comes from the washington post database of fatal police killings. The washington post defines unarmed. As broadly as possible to try and get as many people into that category as possible. So if you're trying to grab an officer's gun you're unarmed. If you're if you're fleeing in a stolen car with a loaded semi audit the seat next to you. You're armed Last year there were eighteen on allegedly unarmed blacks kills and again a lot of these people were still posing threat to the officer eighteen. We don't know yet. The final death toll from twenty twenty. Which was the largest one year increase in homicide in recorded history. Thanks to officers backing off. Thanks to this phony narrative about policing those eighteen allegedly unarmed black victims of police killings represent likely about one percent of what we're we're likely to see about ten thousand bucks killed last year more than all whites and hispanics

Heather Mcdonald The Washington Post Afghanistan America
The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

Morning Edition

01:43 min | 5 months ago

The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

"Trials underway in New York for Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. Members of Sackler family who owned the drug company have testified they bear no responsibility for the nation's deadly opioid epidemic. As part of the bankruptcy deal, the Sackler czar demanding immunity from lawsuits for themselves and for a network of companies and organizations. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been following this Brian you've reported before the Sackler want to clean slate for themselves, no more opioid lawsuits. But this deal in particular would also shelter a bunch of other people and companies from liability. How would that work? This has been a major flashpoint in this trial A and it was again yesterday as part of produce farmers bankruptcy settlement The sack Lear's who say they've done nothing wrong, have agreed to pay $4.3 billion to fund addiction treatment programs, but the Sackler want something really big. In return, their attorneys have drawn up this single spaced list of individuals, organizations and companies. This list runs for 12 full pages. If this deal is finalized, everyone on the list would be sheltered permanently from lawsuits linked to opioids and oxy cotton and from a wide range of of other lawsuits. And why does that matter? So this is interesting. Critics say the Sackler is in their empire are at the center of one of the biggest man made public health disasters in US history. Hundreds of thousands of people have died in this epidemic. Their company has pleaded guilty to federal crimes linked to the OxyContin business. First in 2000, and seven and again last year again, the Sackler is deny wrongdoing and have never been charged. But there are still big unanswered questions about how this prescription opioid crisis happened and who in the sack Lear's network might be liable. For some of the harm and let me give you

Sackler Sackler Czar Brian Mann Purdue Pharma Oxycontin NPR Lear New York Brian United States
How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

Latino USA

02:00 min | 5 months ago

How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

La Times Stephen Canals Linda Evatt Dino Steven Canals United States New York City Bronx Puerto Rican Stephen
A Procedural Therapy Seeks to Address Type 2 Diabetes

The Bio Report

01:27 min | 5 months ago

A Procedural Therapy Seeks to Address Type 2 Diabetes

"Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much happy to be. Here we're gonna talk about diabetes your company facto and its efforts to develop a therapeutic procedure to treat the condition. Let's start with type two diabetes. How big a medical problem does it represent today. Type two diabetes. A massive problem for the healthcare system and the scale of that problem looms large because it's growing very very rapidly along with the obesity epidemic. There are about thirty million people with type two diabetes in the united states this year. Twenty twenty one there are going to be approximately fifty million people. The disease in the next fifteen years in the us alone. How well controlled this condition with existing therapies. There are nearly sixty drugs that have been approved to lower blood. Sugar for people with type two diabetes across a range of different classes but more than half of the people with the condition still are not getting good control of their disease and that's measured by a blood sugar measurement called hemoglobin onc- so more than fifty percent of people with type two diabetes have hemoglobin. Anc that is above the normal or acceptable range. Despite all of these drug therapies are available.

Diabetes Obesity United States ANC
"epidemic" Discussed on Radical Self Belief - The Mojo Maker© Podcast

Radical Self Belief - The Mojo Maker© Podcast

01:41 min | 5 months ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Radical Self Belief - The Mojo Maker© Podcast

"Com launches in september. Twenty twenty one on the jamaica academy really we have to adult in this rally of life you have to realize that there is a beauty in the rain and the hail the sunshine the storms and everything that has molded us to be who we are today but plays after listening this. Podcast have the self awareness to understand that. Nobody else has done anything to you. Not project has lately down. It's how you decide to discern the difference between hanging onto bain wronged hanging onto what you thought that was an embracing the now and creating a future that you really love and the bottom line is love is what is going to help you create great projects love of something love of abundance love of yourself and an acceptance that you absolutely have the permission to be happy which taught many many years that if you work hard and you know almost break yourself over relationship or over job than you deserve the success that comes with it. That's not how it works. So i want you to find you flow instead of force to understand where you sit in this epidemic of overwhelmed and that taking on more digital devices and apps and time management. It's not going to help you but taking on yourself was a project and understanding on the mastering the out of your thoughts mastering your out of mindset and discovering the incredible toes that we have as human beings planet therein lies the beauty and the challenge. That lies ahead for true. Happiness abundance and success sustainably. So thank you for bearing with me on this podcast as i rise the topic of the epidemic of overwhelm i cement white so crucial that we look at the source not the semantics and that has to start with you on.

jamaica academy bain
"epidemic" Discussed on 5 Things With Angie B

5 Things With Angie B

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on 5 Things With Angie B

"So I have like a mantra for myself. It's big bold moves. And I think. A lot about how These things connect how the idea of am I ready to. To Take that leap right if it's something that's important to you but are you ready to take the leap knowing? That, it can turn out however which way that you you really don't know what the outcome is going to be. Exactly but also the the deep desire to want to do it anyway. And Making that the driving factor behind the decision because I feel like and that's what I'm really interested in this kind of worthiness. Aspect of meaningful risk taking because. I think about when I when I'm thinking about decisions that might be risky. For example. Going to a country I've never been to before right for right to go work. In in a middle of. Epidemic When I think about these types of things. I think about more of the decision that going or making the decision to go. Can have a much bigger impact in my life than making the decision not to go because I'm afraid. And The way that you talk about like kind of worthy. this kind of aspect of worthiness is something I haven't framed in my mind, but it's super accurate because. I have had moments where I'm like. AM. I ready to receive this. Yes. So when when we talk about meaningful risks. In different areas of our lives. I think that it's one area where it's so. Important to take meaningful risks and career and your career. Choice in your career path. A theme a lot of the theme of of the season is this idea that life in general is not linear all the time but careers. Are Not Linear especially in times like this where there's disruption to economy or disruption to the the workforce or just things that. Really, put everything upside down. Talk. To me a little bit about your career path. And and any meaningful risks that.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on Privacy Notes

Privacy Notes

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Privacy Notes

"So this is the privacy notes brought to you by toxic and Pierre Acadamy Toksvig taxi technologies limited is your go-to company revision of Cybersecurity Services Software Solution Development Services, and of course Data Protection Compliance Sevices Andy Paradigm Emmys the training arm where we actually give you data protection compliance training. So we're talking about scheduling calls the epidemic of scam phone calls and today's episode, couple of them talking points or looking at what Ascom phone calls what you've defined already. Elliott and we're looking at what he did dangerous thing just they posed us. Phone calls post to you as an individual was. GonNa be warning signs. You recognize discount phone calls when someone calls. y'All do you know if this is such a discount on just a regular phone call? What do you need to do to prevent? Come from Kohl's? What about when you fall victim as a lot of people have fallen. What do you do when you fall of us? Come on, call doesn't mean that is the end of it or how you do anything to remedy this situation, and generally, what is the way for what as I mean as people individuals on us a nation of course globally to really cut on a global scale. Okay so we're looking at it from the reporter, the FTC the Federal Trade Commission and the United States of America way reports that on average, a writes every substance with phone call when looked at a median losses council, thousand dollars diabetes lost by individuals been fetus of this. Scum phone, calls. Also said about seventy percents of all of the fraud cases off Franchi such, and he begin with call, so the falls are also actually private Arosa most of the time. It's one of the easiest ways to get access to you. Be On all communication channels, letters emails phone calls. All the costs seems to be the easiest and the fastest way because it's much more personal to you, and so we're looking at dangerous discount phone calls here now so. I, don't you talking to your loan is lowering I here. Of course, so let's. Just, let's look relatable days. It's now on the panel now, I'm actually experienced any of discount on calls before. Yes I had I. don't think it's anyone who hasn't experienced much. Yes, okay, will it be safe to say? Everyone has actually experienced. It's like nine and ten people. To. Pass. Not Want, if a multiple times I experience on recently to If you recall before we began this some conversation, there was an idiot, actually pleaded earlier on. If you listen, it was funny trust. The was actually a real case. Alive scenario of the incidents of phone calls. We get all over the place in Nigeria our Malvo. Looked are pretty funny and pretty easy to get then trust me I mean some of the cameras. Gone I mean for lack of a better. I take the device. Different means to actually re people love through this gambling halls, and as this one I had about auto dialers. People have actually put. Some of those guys are put in place now. watio preacher can actually blasphemy now now the. Level, not just an individual. Call you anymore. The robotics pudding place the these automated call that comes to you just get a call on your point. You look at your dialogue. You see agreement. Between tools being put in place that could actually show you a genuine corporate or government number actually bid on your phone. Are you pick? The thinking is one organizational government agency calling you meanwhile. While to defraud you so yes, these dangers are very very. Just dangerous. I'm the Posey now. When we come back, we'll be looking at some the dangerous that discount from calls actually poster us as human beings as sculling view courses organizations.

Elliott Pierre Acadamy Toksvig Federal Trade Commission Ascom Arosa fraud Posey reporter United States Nigeria America Malvo
"epidemic" Discussed on Privacy Notes

Privacy Notes

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Privacy Notes

"By tax. Aid Technologies Ltd tactic. In conjunction with the NPR Academy. Ruina. With, today's my colleague Tax Tech Michael Hi Michael. How are you I'm very well. Thank you how you doing today. Today I'm good. I'm good. I'm good, I mean it's been a very reading. One all the end side pretty cold, but then of course not good. Okay, so we're speaking from legos Nigeria wandering exactly. Today's episode is going to be quite an interesting when I'm quite excited about this one. Because this topic that everyone can relate to its epidemic of scam phone calls in Nigeria. Right let's dive right into today's topic so Michael Tell us about scam phone calls. Come phone calls when we look at that, we could so. I think it's very important to clarify between scam and spa a right I thought. I'll just bring that into it. Because love time, try to confuse both now what is on basically Martinis? Solicited communication. Of. Emails when you receive emails that you did not request. In the event of me, trying to advertise my company to reach out to you now, that is the in the weeds pump. Because he didn't Oxford, we'll get spam calls emails. Way Not becomes come Wendy. Attempt is actually to defraud you to deceive you or to cost you. Someone told arm yourself your personality. Your Data Your Business in some way so that we becomes the come. Of course counseling 'cause they have become very rightfully in. We. Yes, we're speaking from Nigeria League of Nigeria. It's it's not it's not an exception. In fact, we've also joined the week. In terms of being victims of this scam phone call epidemic. Good it's it's actually. Introduce that we actually called epidemic goes as what it is. When something begins to take its toll and affect. People negatively could actually quit on AP damage so yes. Scum phone calls basic needs to. Be They pediatric right now in some of the effects. It has on people across the world all right. Thank you so much for that. So does the retreat. Scam phone call are intentional phone calls that are aimed at getting your personal details and to defraud you, so that means that someone can call me up on the actually for my. Bank details my ATM. Card details with intention of defrauded me. So that's what it is, so we'll take a short break and we'll be back. Remember this privacy notes, but the you buy tax, Beck and the NPR.

Nigeria Nigeria League of Nigeria NPR Academy Aid Technologies Ltd Michael Beck NPR Oxford Wendy
"epidemic" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Anthony Fauci the director of infectious disease at the national institutes of health got the pandemic couple questions how does an epidemic become a pandemic in may we talk about this a little bit already and then even more importantly what would have to happen for a pandemic to become a true global emergency a pandemic in my mind is by definition a global emergency what are the kind that kills you know million people or or of the Spanish flu right well it depends because there are two things that are important in making that determination one is the rate of spread which is called the infectivity of it the transmissibility and the other is how easy it is need to give it to you exactly and then there's another that's why you talked about the respiratory right because it's pretty easy to do that either through aerosol it to drop with the other factor is that point that I mentioned when I said morbidity and that is usually referred to a terminology called the virulence of the micro let's say it's a virus how is it how sick does it make you the one in nineteen eighteen was very fairly and and and make people very sick and killed a lot of people the epidemic the pandemic that we had in two thousand and nine although it had the characteristic of rapidly spreading throughout the world it wasn't a particularly virulent virus so we didn't kill a lot of people in both of those needs both of those things together to come together so could could in nineteen eighteen type of pandemic with the consequences could that happen again it certainly can and that's the reason why we are putting a lot of effort into developing what you call a universal influenza vaccine namely one that would be good against any strain of influenza the reason why influenza is so problematic is that it's a virus that has the extraordinary capability of easily mutating and changing just enough so that you need to get a vaccine virtually every year that's the reason why unlike any of the other diseases that we worry about you say you got to get your flu shot every year you don't say you have to get a measles shot every year you don't have to say you get a mom shot every year but flu you do because it changes with those other viruses don't if we can get a vaccine that would be inducing a response against anything that that virus can do to run away from you then we would have to so called never saw exactly and that's and that's what we're putting against a universal influenza vaccine namely get a vaccine that induces a response against that part of the influenza virus that doesn't change a lot that stays the same no matter what the strain is whether it's a seasonal strain or a pandemic strain we're putting a lot of effort into that and what is that research I mean does that are you optimistic about that or is it you know I am I don't think that we're going to get a single vaccine that's going to be universal against everything but I think we're gonna be able to I would predict over the next five to ten years to get vaccines against influenza that instead of just being against the given strain of that season will be one that goes over strains that evolved over multiple seasons and if we're really successful which I hope we will be I'm cautiously optimistic we'll have one that would be protective enough so that even when you do get a brand new virus it will not have nearly as much of an impact as a true pandemic influenza would have so if I'm doing my math right you said fifty to a hundred million right in nineteen eighteen that's a hundred and fifty to three hundred hundred million today this incredibly large number yep that Anna was incredible consequences right so so the work on universal vaccines some of the other things you mentioned what else is being done right as in it get NIH or elsewhere to help deal with all these things that we've talked about well one of the things that we now have a lot of good tools because we have now thirty seven years of investment is on HIV aids because when I began seeing aids patients in the very early nineteen eighties we had no tools and it was a terribly tragic and and and the dark years of my of my medical life where every patient that I took care of would die from this dreadful disease we now have extraordinarily good therapies that if you give it to a person you could essentially tell them that have almost normal lifespan we also very good preventions well you can give someone who's at risk something we call pre exposure prophylaxis so that it dramatically decreases the likelihood that they would be infected if we implemented all of those tools now and that's the reason why we need to put a full court press on getting to that group of people in the United States who are at highest risk is very interesting that if you look at the map of the United States about fifty two percent of all of the new infections all located in around forty counties in the United States of usually in the southern part of the country Mississippi Alabama Georgia Florida South Carolina center we need to implement that so we're working on better ways to get people on their their cultural constraints that nominee it's it's a combination of things it's sad and something that we really need to address in the United States twelve percent of the population is African American yet more than fifty percent of the new infections among African Americans mostly African American men who have sex with men so those of a group that is stigmatized against those are groups that are often disenfranchised we've got to get rid of that stigma and get out and be able to offer them the kinds of treatment and prevention the other thing that we're working very aggressively on is the development of an HIV vaccine if we get a vaccine which was very tough because H. I. V.'s an unusually difficult vaccine I have a virus to make a vaccine against but if we do that that would would be the nail in the coffin of HIV so one of the things that we're all striving for we're striving forward globally because globally you still have one million deaths a year one point eight million new infections there are thirty six million people living with HIV globally it's still a big problem in the United States we need to put a full court effort to end this epidemic because it still is an epidemic in the United States do you have the resources that you need to know what we have been fortunate Mike that we we have had a good deal of generosity on the part of bipartisan approach to the NIH we've gone through multiple administrations in which we had support up and down the line no matter who was the chairs of the appropriation committee whether it was a Democrat or Republican so we've done well so the NIH is well funded when you're talking about research we could always use more so I'm not saying hello we have enough to worry about us are used to answer the question at the CIA of course I mean his the same talking for actually but we have been well treated right now we have a an appropriations committees and the Senate and the house side that look very favorably upon the NIH so so jumping backwards for just a second why again from layman's question why is the timeline so long on vaccines why does it take so long once you've identified the particular strain to produce a vaccine great question and and it's easy to explain if you compare it to a therapy because testing a drug in determining if a drug works is much quicker than determining if a vaccine works because you're giving a drug to a sick person and you only would give it to a sick person so you'll know pretty quickly whether it works or not where is the vaccine is given to prevent an infection so you have to give it to a very large number of normal well people and wait to see if when the outbreak occurs it protects them and not and often it takes multiple years to do that in order to get enough data to be able to statistically say that this vaccine when compared to a placebo or nothing that this vaccine actually protects against this particular microbe in question and since you're giving it to thousands and thousands of people in order to determine that that takes a long period of time and one of the very important issues with vaccines is safety because you're giving it to normal people so you've got to definitively prove that not only does it work but that it's safe and that just takes a very long period of time you mentioned earlier this distinction between naturally occurring pathogens and then those that are where human were played a role in some way right I guess there's there's two possibilities there one is the release of something that is hidden away in a lab somewhere like I like smallpox or something man made how do you think about that threat how worried are you about that Sucher well as an infectious disease and public health person I'm concerned about both of those but I can tell you purely from what we've experienced and the statistical history that we see I worry more about naturally occurring pandemic of a respiratory virus than I do about someone deliberately Greece leasing something there is still more of the September twenty eighth discussion to come with doctor Anthony Fauci this is intelligence matters I might come around.

Anthony Fauci director epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"epidemic" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"So I saw the ship they would improve the show prep the Daily Mail I believe elderly face a loneliness epidemic I'm going please in what all that we got to worry about come on now I know some folks feel lonely but good grief I mean we got bigger fish to fry I'm lonely will turn on the TV talk so my own when you were doing with Susan's mother were face timing or any I guess face time is that right yeah where we you know choosing can just pick up a phone dialer upper face time and have a face to face conversation we do all sorts of wacky things and she's a lap in and she's doing well I mean you know I understand it's a tough time but got for crying out loud a loneliness epidemic we got people die healthier I'm a kind of me going down the Tollan people worry about a loneliness epidemic get a dog well maybe not anyway so other thing we're waiting on the press cover still nothing joining him okay so one of the in any nobody's even albeit right the H. they do this every blip in time so we're twenty five minutes after where they said they were going to be and then you know venture they'll come out now tomorrow I believe they said they would have Betsy to Voss the education secretary to talk about you know a whole our how to guide to learn at home or you know I got a son has been doing this he's actually taking classes classes are online and he has to be there you know I mean they count you when you're when you're they're not just like being in class exhibits on the internet and what I'm hearing from some folks are there's a making a right a lot of papers because they don't know what else to do with them and the students are groaning about it but Douglas was tell me about this this was in in his class we've done about him a girl in one of the classy heard about where she's doing this and of course you know they can see you too I mean the person on the other end can see you and so she takes the computer to the bathroom you know she said what I need to go to the bathroom so she takes computer to the bathroom and she's you know she's there in the bathroom of the tone of the press says bye thanks for looking I can see you but you hope oh my god what come on folks come on what else out there we've got Biden's keeps lying about trump's responses coronavirus this guy seems to be like three weeks of a behind everything we should do this we should you know what we should shut the borders I did Joe we did that okay we should be testing vultures malaria thing where we're doing that too so fact checking dot org quickly debunked one of the lies he says back on February twenty eighth buying told CNN that president trump had silenced top public health officials are they wrote in fact check dot org Biden went too far when he claimed the trump has allowed scientists to speak out about coronavirus all right let's go to the press coverage finally the briefing today holding a briefing let's listen in good what you do I look at all those microphone please don't never seen it like that boy we'll have the world has changed how the world is changing but it's going to end up being better than ever I want to thank you very much for being here and I'd like to update you on the steps were taken on our ongoing fight to defeat the virus this morning at seven fifty five I spoke to the leaders of the G. twenty had a great meeting and we have a lot of different ideas a lot of good ideas were working together the leaders gathered virtually around the world to discuss the whole subject of the problem that right now a hundred and fifty one nations have got we had president Alberto Fernandez of Argentina prime minister Scott Morrison of Australia president Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil prime minister Justin Trudeau of Canada president xi of China president Emmanuel macron of France chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany prime minister Modi of India president Widodo of Indonesia prime minister just said be content of Italy prime minister Shinzo abi of Japan congradulations to Japan to make a great decision when the Olympics gonna make it next year twenty twenty one president a Jewish manual Lopez Obrador of Mexico I want to thank the president of Mexico for having done such a great job with respect to the military we have twenty seven thousand Mexican soldiers on our southern border and very few people getting through I can tell you that we got to keep it that way and we have a great relationship with Mexico now president Putin of Russia king Solomon of Saudi Arabia president Ramaphosa though South Africa president moon of as you know a country that we spend a lot of time in South Korea we're working very hard and then prime minister Sanchez of Spain president or to go out of Turkey prime minister Boris Johnson of the United Kingdom president of the European Commission there's a vendor relations president of the European Council Charles Cale United Nations secretary general Antonio Guterres World Health Organization director Ken gross and harden song World Bank president David Malpass and the International Monetary Fund managing director Christa Lina Georgia so that's a big group but it's a great group and said how they were all there everyone of them and we talked about the problem and hopefully will be a problem for too much longer the United States is working with our friends and partners around the world to stop the spread of the virus and coordinate our efforts we discussed how vitally important it is for all of our nations to immediately share information and data and we've been doing that to a large extent but will do it even more so into informar I guess you could save for me each of us on the fight that we've got going one way the other it's a little bit different but we're handling it a little bit in different ways but there is great uniformity I think we had a it was a terrific meeting tremendous spirit among all of those countries yet twenty countries plus the other people that I mentioned and tremendous spirit to get this over with after the meeting with the world leaders I spoke with the governors of our fifty states and territories your team has been a constant communication with the governors and we had a we had a terrific meeting somebody in the fake news said to the one of the governor said we need Tom Brady S. again he meant that in a positive way he said we need Tom Brady we do it in a method very positively but they took it differently they think Tom Brady should be leading the effort that's only fake news and I like Tom Brady spoke to him the other day he's a great guy but I wish the news could be could be real I wish I could be honest I wish it weren't corrupt but so much of it is it's so sad to say it's just so sad to say we had a great meeting after what I'm sure you have tapes of the meetings I'm sure that you were able to get tapes were easily see it fifty governors plus and maybe had tape should see it was really a man because no contention I would say virtually none yeah I would say maybe one person that was a little tiny bit of the raising of her voice a little wise wise guys a little bit but usually a big wise guy not so much anymore we saw to it that he wouldn't be so much anymore but he is we had it I mean I would rate my because there's a lot of the folks in the back with their and it was a it was a great meeting took place at about twelve o'clock so we went from the G. twenty to the governor's we also spoke about the economic relief with the governors and the package that were moving through Congress to deliver much needed financial assistance to hard working families and small businesses I want to thank Democrats and Republicans in the Senate for unanimously passing the largest financial relief package in American history ninety six to zero and I have to say it's the largest by far and I'm profoundly grateful that both parties came together to provide relief for American workers and families in this hour of need the house of representatives must now pass this bill hopefully without delay I think it's got tremendous support when you're at ninety six to nothing and as you know a couple of those people are quarantined and one rand Paul is he's actually got it but he'll he'll be better is a he's been a great guys but.

epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Epidemic voyeurs but now for the first time we're facing the probability that we will not just be witnessing will be experiencing and then we'll find out what is the metal of Americans from W. NYC in New York this is on the media I'm Brooke Gladstone the CDC it's not so much a question of if this will happen anymore but rather more question of exactly when and how many people will have the president says he hopes for a miracle and muscle the CDC while pundits predict the future of the virus the market and the presidency except for one everyone you see on TV on Twitter it had no idea what they're talking about because they are they don't know the unexpected thing is gonna come about all coming up live from NPR news in Washington on Giles Snyder defense secretary mark esper is in the Afghan capital of Kabul today and president trump is sent secretary of state Mike Pompeii to the Qatari capital Doha for a signing ceremony expected to get underway shortly the US at the sign an agreement that's been negotiated with the Taliban it's one step toward ending the war in Afghanistan as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports in a statement trump says that at his direction Pompeii will witness the signing of an agreement with the Taliban while secretary of defense mark esper will issue a joint declaration with the government of Afghanistan the trump administration negotiated a week long period of calm leading up to this the goal now is to get the Taliban to negotiate with the Afghan government and civil society leaders on a more permanent ceasefire and a political solution trump calls this a quote powerful path forward to end the war in Afghanistan the U. S. is expected to draw down troops to about eighty six hundred with more reductions possible if conditions warranted Michele Kelemen NPR news the state department Ricky's president says his country's border gates with Greece will remain open allowing refugees to continue attempting to get to Europe NPR's Peter Kenyon reports a flow of refugees toward Greece began Friday saying we will not close the gates to refugees had one signal that Turkey's decision to allow refugees to surge toward Europe remains in effect he calls on the European Union to stand behind it's part of a twenty sixteen agreement with Turkey under which Ankara would shelter refugees in Turkey in exchange for financial aid classes are being reported today along Turkey's border with Greece Greek police fired tear gas and stun grenades of migrants who attempted to push their way through the border federal appeals court has ordered the house judiciary's lawsuit to force former White House counsel don began to testify be dismissed as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports the decision overturns a lower court's ruling and hands a major legal went to president trump the house Judiciary Committee subpoena don began last year to compel his testimony and then sued when he refused to comply the White House ordered him not to testify arguing that he enjoyed absolute immunity from doing so as a senior adviser to the president late last year a District Court sided with the committee now in a two to one decision from a three judge panel the DC circuit court is overturning that ruling the appeals court says the fight over against testimony is a political dispute between the legislative and executive branches and the court says it has no authority to settle such a dispute instead it says Congress has political tools to force the executive branch to comply such as withholding funding in dissent judge Judith Rogers says the decision all but assures future presidential stonewalling of Congress Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington voters in South Carolina going to the polls today in the fourth democratic presidential nominating contest each of the contenders hoping for a boost heading into super Tuesday next week this is NPR health officials are looking into several more percent of cases of the new strain of coronavirus California Oregon Washington state each reporting unexplained infections American Airlines meanwhile cancelling service to Hong Kong after cutting flights to mainland China head Ellen Hershey's reports American says it's suspending service from Los Angeles International to the region through April twenty fourth and out of Dallas fort worth through April twenty third United also announced it's suspending flights between LAX in Tokyo due to concerns over the spread of the virus United has already cut flights to China and Hong Kong through the end of April a third major airline delta recently discontinued service to mainland China also through the end of April so far the corona virus has killed over twenty eight hundred people globally and.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Of our buildings I don't know I mean I think maybe you send out a hit out saying Hey we're aware of what's going on we're keeping our eyes on a we're gonna take the proper steps to make sure that we give our schools please we always do I mean is this suggesting that they weren't prepared for like the flu as sure Clark she said the flu killed sixty thousand people a year in this country you're gonna handle cases of corona virus and we're not really sure they were confirmed so why send this out why make this statement why put this in the newspaper that we're getting ready for a pandemic outbreak an epidemic other people want to know what's the difference between epidemic and pandemic epidemic is an outbreak of a of a disease a pandemic is like it an over arching wider broader epidemic in other words would be a pandemic if it weren't continent to continent and huge swaths of of geographic area epidemic is more locally centralized but it's still you know in epidemic proportions so it people say pandemic they say epidemic the use them sort of interchangeable either they don't mean the same thing epidemic is certainly serious but it's a smaller swath of area in any smaller group of people pandemic is a much broader brush if you will eight eight nine four one tags eight eight nine four one seven two four seven I think smart to be on the ready smart to be prepared but I I don't know that you have to say we're getting ready for an outbreak and it also suggests to me that you might not have been ready for for the flu is whipping people up into a frenzy I know the media is a is a big part of that I'll absolutely agree with that scaring people to death I would you all right quick break here or you got much more to come do not touch that dial.

Clark epidemic flu
"epidemic" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on Second Opinion

"This is Dr Michael Wilks. With a second opinion on Thursday the World Health Organization declared the novel Corona Virus outbreak a global health emergency in the United States said it's advisory level to level four which represents the highest safety risk and the State Department has issued a do not travel apple to China advisory. All of this was badly needed but it came way too late. The lateness is a result of the importance that replaces international politics as more important than public health so the disease is now a pandemic how does a pandemic differ from an epidemic. An epidemic disease refers to a disease that affects a greater number of people than is typical in a period of time in a month or a year so for most diseases there is a baseline number of cases in a region for example each year the. US has about twenty million people developing the flu and about thirty thousand dying from it. This is an approximate baseline when the rate of flu surpasses the the usual. It's an epidemic and a pandemic is a collection of epidemics that spreads outside of national borders and has a global impact. Pandemics are not new but they're more common than they have been in the past more often than not pandemics have their roots in animal diseases that are transmitted to humans a process that we call zoo enosis common viruses like measles and smallpox came from animals. But so have more recent diseases like mad. Cow Disease E. Bola SARS murders and now the end corona virus. The problems started about ten thousand years ago when we started to domesticate animals and keep them in large enclosures around the same time time we started to develop centers of human density villages towns and cities we began to expand roads and built ships that carried people around the world world and we built planes. We used those transport systems to move unique. Animals that typically had never left their jungle or forest to new new areas where they came in contact with domesticated animals. Those animals had no defenses against infections. That they've never been exposed is to and so there was disease transmission in the black death. Thirteen forty seven yellow fever pandemics in Africa in the sixteenth eighteen century. The Spanish flu epidemic of Nineteen Eighteen. Our social behaviors also contributed to disease spread outbreaks of disease are not only destructive to people and families but they re Kavak. On cultural and social and economic well-being part of of managing new pandemics is improved surveillance enabling us to detect disease early ending pandemics dot org is one organization. Asian that's developed new APPS that directly engage communities and crowd source data to track disease spread far faster than the old system system of texting data or sending data by facts. The earlier diseases detected the faster. We can take action. We have also developed new computer remodels that can predict the spread of these pandemics. There are also experts working in places like the one health center in Davis. California where we're microbe hunters are detecting hundreds of new diseases. In the animal kingdom that had previously been unknown in our modern world pandemics endemic are part of the new normal. And we're going to need to find ways to work together to minimize disasters. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion..

Dr Michael Wilks United States World Health Organization State Department China apple Africa California Davis
"epidemic" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Epidemic of mass shootings has put a spotlight on the bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives revealing an agency that is understaffed underfunded and treated as a political punching bag on both the right and the left Jeff more doc justice department reporter at The Washington Times as an exclusive story that says and finds the a TF finds itself at a crossroads Jeff explain pretty interesting the ATF is already one of the smallest agencies and the probably the most critical agency when it comes to keeping guns out of the hand to people of people who shouldn't have them and just by stepping problems in one of the problems that we found that from a source within the eight yeah it is they had a hundred seventy two agents retired last year a hundred and fifty six are set to retire this year putting the number of retirees at around three hundred twenty agency which already battling that's already battling to win the staffing levels and at the same number of agents that they had back in two thousand one and yeah also in addition to those those three hundred are part of about four hundred seventy one agents were already over the age of fifty when there's a mandatory retirement age of fifty seven well what is the a TF do differently safe when it comes to investigating from like a a local or state police department well it was first well they do the port tracing so you can find out where the gun came from and hopefully shut down who's who's who's providing the guns to people the other thing that they do is they police the dealers and they do the dealer regulations so that making sure that the federal firearms licensees who were yes who sell guns they're the ones making sure that they're doing what they're supposed to be doing and doing the background checks and doing the important things to make sure people who should not have guns don't have guns you said the the trump administration and Congress so far have ignored the brewing crisis at the a TF at the trump administration has almost completely ignored the a TF here at they nominated director he's languishing in the Senate that ship Canterbury whose former head of the fraternal order of police he he had a very contentious hearing and surprisingly from a truck nominee his contentious hearing was with the Republicans it was that Mike Lee and Joe Kennedy of Louisiana who gave him a very hard time and said that they probably won't vote for him and that's that's the problem here with the a TF and I think this is so important is the Republicans in the gun lobby had sort of demonized the eight yeah because they look at the a TF has a good organization that's going to confiscate everybody's got the left in the Democrats have demonized BATF because they don't think they're doing enough to keep guns out of the hands of the wrong people and doing enough to enforce gun gun laws and you run into a problem where the Republicans are supporting him the Democrats are supporting them they have this big crisis and they can't get any support on the hill where the administration speak with just more talk justice department reporter at The Washington Times he's got an exclusive story entitled ATF beleaguered by crisis in age of mass shootings are you said there's some lawmakers to just wanna get rid of the a TF altogether yeah it's been eight get that has been a big debate for a while Jimmy Sensenbrenner's say congressman from Milwaukee in twenty seventeen he had introduced legislation to pull the eight yeah into the F. B. I. in the center for progress which is a very left leaning organization put out a report recommending the same thing which again goes back to my point about the Democrats and Republicans equally equally conceivable even more in the problems at the ATM that's been a big issue with the argument is that the FBI does the politics better they do they have more of a reputation they have a bigger budget you could forty eight yep make them a unit within the FBI because some of the investigation overlaps but if you do that did you make the F. B. I. too big and then they're going to kind of be scattered all over the place we have this one agency in the mail each of mass shootings that a really dedicated to doing the things that need to be done to crack down on gun crime is Jeff Jeff more doc justice department reporter at The Washington Times twenty one.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Epidemic and that has come in three waves so the first wave was prescription pills like oxycontin and they were over prescribed starting in the nineties and when people's prescriptions ran out a lot of them began turning to street heroin and that satisfied the same cravings so heroin was the second wave of the opioid epidemic but now it is you know a lot of places you can't find pure heroin anywhere almost all of it is cut with fencing and so fentanyl represents the third wave of the opioid epidemic and it's the deadliest yet I mean it's just unbelievably tragic what's the government trying to do about this the D. E. A. especially well the there's been a lot of money dedicated to fighting the opioid epidemic in a number of ways there's been some good progress with things with different types of treatment there's this new drugs one because the box own which can help people taper off these drugs they're also in negotiations with China and so since like I said China is making all these drugs trump is made included in the trade war and is told China that if they don't stop the imp you know the export of these drugs to America he's going to hit them with new terrorists and things like that and so far China has been willing at least to come to the table but where we haven't seen a lot of progress he to me it's almost like biological warfare Ben yeah a lot of people are calling this a reverse opium war in SO in early nineteenth century England was sending opium to China and getting the population addicted and so China inning then went to war these were called the opium war now it's basically the opposite it's China that sending out these opioids to the west and a lot of people like you said are seeing this as a new type of warfare where is most of the cocaine coming from in entering the United States the cocaine is made in Colombia and you'll probably remember Pablo Escobar he was famous Colombian king pin and the D. A. helped take him out in the nineties and this is supposed to stop the cocaine but there's actually now more cocaine coming from Colombia than there ever has been before and does the Sentinel go to Columbia first or what how does it get into the system well all the drugs actually that come into the US are filtered through the Mexican cartels so the Mexican cartels get the the fentanyl from China cocaine comes from from Columbia and Dave package it and distributed throughout the United States and the the Mexican cartels are also selling all the mass that's in the United States who's doing the cutting of the funnel into the cocaine here in this country is at the Ellis distributor the person who's selling that the people on the streets or is it coming in from like you said Mexico or Columbia are they cutting it in first the cartels are doing it and then also the the United States distributors are doing it as well so that the big big problem with the fentanyl is that you can actually take it safe batch you know you can have a safe batch of cocaine offenses.

Epidemic
"epidemic" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

13:04 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Back to the Ben Shapiro show I am Jason rants from Seattle in Katy TX radio filling in there's an op ed in The New York Times that suggests that we start publicly shaming and doc seeing border patrol agents and they're upset that these agents are doing their job protecting us from people coming to this country illegally and oftentimes doing it in a rather thankless position right I mean they're not a lot of people who publicly say kudos to the men and women and border patrol for doing their job a lot of us think it but we generally don't say anything about and the loudest voices are the ones calling them essentially **** soldiers so what what I find interesting about this movement in general this idea to publicly shame and docs even though they don't consider it boxing is a come from a movement that supports terrorist groups like anti losers who cover their face because they don't actually beat docks themselves but all of a sudden now Danzig is in boxing is cool okay Cronin Furman she's an assistant professor at the university college London she writes in The New York Times this weekend the identities of the individual customs and border protection agents were physically separating children from the families and stopping the detention centers are not on discoverable that's kind of ominous she sounds kind of soccer ash immigration lawyers have agent names journalist reporting of the burnt border have names photos and even videos these agents actions should be publicized particularly in their home communities now her goal in all of this is to get people to stop taking jobs as border agents that's the angle because remember the Democrats are the party of open borders even though we like to pretend otherwise she continues industries the knowledge for instance that when you go to church on Sunday your entire congregation well I've seen you on TV ripping a child out of her father's arms is a serious social costs the bear no the daily caller makes note of this she she doesn't actually acknowledge this as boxing because she's a bad faith actor in a bad faith argument about faith op ed in the back faith newspaper try saying that by the way and time's best she's either bad faith or she just indescribably stupid because of course this is doc thing that's exactly what this is and of course my reaction to something like this is I mean okay if that's the world you want to live in do you understand that you're putting their lives on the line if you don't really care fine can we do the same thing to rapidly progressive college professors because I've had a lot of crazy college professors at Occidental College in LA in eagle rock some of them who were just out of their minds insane and that was back between two thousand and two thousand four okay so I'm going to assume that they've probably gotten crazier and my assumption is a car across the country you've got a lot of crazy progressive professors who don't necessarily want to be docks but if you're telling me that this isn't doctrine okay I guess we'll just put their names out there they're photos their videos their phone numbers their addresses because all is well now what is already in all of this is there was once an argument coming from these very same people on the topic of abortion providers that they don't want abortion doctors information to be out there because I'm told that puts their lives on the line to put their lives at risk is that still wrong or is that okay now they're creating a set of rules that they want all of us to abide by then that means we get to do the exact same thing that I don't want to do that I don't want to doc's anyone who works at the border the same way I don't want to doc's police officers or professors or doctors or anything if they put out their information out there on their own behalf okay that's what they get to do what we shouldn't be doing this on their behalf the hypocrisy in all of this is just sickening and maddening and it's the kind of thought leadership that's threatening to ruin this country we've seen this happen all across the country progressives ideologues following a very strict set of principles that don't really make a lot of sense don't really result in any sort of positive change for the communities that they represent but its ideology right ideology doesn't have to make a lick of sense it just needs to be something that you believe in like a cult would believe a cold this cult member would believe in sort of the principles of the court that they belong to we've seen on a local level what progressive policies are doing they're ruining cities you've got American cities there are very wealthy being over run by out of control homelessness what was happening in Los Angeles you have a serious outbreak of disease thanks to homelessness listen to Dr drew Pinsky talk about what's going to happen it's like we're literally going to get another plate because of the promise of policies on homelessness in Los Angeles you look at San Francisco you literally have human waste patrols people going around trying to find human way so they can reported for cleanup you look at what's happening in New York what happened right here where I live in Seattle our buses what how most people write for free and the stench on some of these buses induces gagging and it's not me saying that even though I've certainly experience that please come from thousands and thousands and thousands of complaints coming into the Seattle metro system saying exactly that I walk by a bus stop on Saturday morning and it was a Starbucks Cup filled with urine I knew was filled with urine because I tasted and I'm getting aids it was very clearly urine is supposed to be a mocha thank god it was not okay it was actual urine it's disturbing you look what's happening right now in Spokane Washington on the east side of the state the libraries are being over run in the city's not doing anything about it there's a piece in the in wonder that's talking about this Daniel Walters reporter there a a writer there he writes the challenges facing the downtown Spokane library are illuminated the instant you enter one of the men's bathrooms everything including the signs warning that the use of drugs and alcohol in our facilities are strictly prohibited is brave inane walrus blue light the blue lights first tested last year make it harder to see your veins and use the library bathroom stalls to inject heroin no me oral candid it over in Spokane Nadine water she's interviewed in this piece and she talks about what's happening at this particular downtown Spokane librarian what she says is what a lot of us have experienced all across the country primarily in these progressive run cities she said I was very surprised by the number of homeless people on the second floor there were dozens and dozens of them she rolled out with their backpacks and bed rolls in luggage occupying just about every computer in the library they have decided in the cities we have decided because we don't fight back hard enough we don't know what the right kinds of people we've decided to C. B. spaces of the homeless that's what's happening in Spokane that's what's happening in Los Angeles and San Francisco and Atlanta and Chicago and Denver it's happening all over the place this is what they do to our cities it is because they believe in this ideological approach to dealing with homelessness and the opioid epidemic part of it is a coddling approach the other part of it is I suppose for the head in the sand approach in LA in a lot of ways like what's happening in Seattle it wasn't as you've got a ton a ton of drug addicts living out on the streets some of the data but I've seen coming at a Los angels is disturbing the high percentage of people living with some kind of addiction living out on the streets homeless yes LA mayor L. Garcetti who by the way professor might actually like air what he puts out this list of leading causes of homelessness you know what's actually not mentioned addiction drugs that's actually a leading cause of homelessness in Seattle we got leaders who pretend the addiction is just this minor issue while at the exact same time pushing for her one injection sites when we need them for we don't really have a drug crisis here they do that because they don't want to judge the drug users you don't find that compassion you're not supposed to negatively judge anyone except from supporters and Republicans who we get called not these on a regular basis which is that you I really appreciate that but I would push that site everyone else you're not supposed to judge that lacks compassion I don't believe in pushing people off of the streets because the question is where will they go well I mean they can go into shelters we got plenty of shelter beds all across this country plenty of them but they don't want to okay well that's on them that's no longer on me if they're offering you services in your choosing not to accept the services and your otherwise not dealing with an addiction because remember in LA you guys don't have an addiction problem there here in Seattle we don't have an addiction problem okay well then there's nothing for you to lean on well for us to excuse away your unwillingness to live in a shelter okay well then we're gonna make it really really difficult for you to live here we're going to actually enforce the law we're not allowed to enforce law because police departments all across the country no longer allowed to do that because they are being led by ideologues ideologues are not very good leaders both on the right and on the left if you're someone who lives in a city that is exclusively run by conservatives for example god bless you I love conservative principles I don't wanna live in a city where there is no political opposition at all because I know what it's like living in a city with no political opposition when the politicians in power happen to be progress made a plan to end homelessness in ten years ago out worse there right now just announced a plan to end youth homelessness in the Seattle area it's of course not going to happen because we don't have anyone who is in power who even weapons to derail a policy because where one party system it works the same way on the right maybe the problems are a little bit different but the problems are still there you want someone who's going to be the form in the sides of the politicians in power and could potentially swing the needle to their side it keeps people accountable but in some cases we don't have any accountability whatsoever in some cases we've got LA we've got San Francisco we have new your and we have Seattle it's causing problem after problem after problem meanwhile we've got a bunch of politicians who are trying to become the next presidential nominee from the democratic side and they're doing the exact same thing they're leading with their ideology and they're making no sense while doing it so we've got holy in Castro who's running and he's taking a position here over the weekend with George Stephanopoulos where he either thanks you guys are all idiots or you're going to be just sort of playing along with it the full all the idiots I don't know where he thinks most of you live but he's on with George Stephanopoulos who pushes him as his hair cut I know you just you say you're not for open borders would you put a song like you're the one when you add up all the proposals your gear you're calling for right now decriminalization of cut of crossing the border no deportation absent other crimes of the offer of health benefits also pot possible path to citizenship I know you reject the rhetoric about open borders but isn't that effectively open borders not limiting how were our immigration in any real way there's no way that we can call that open borders because I mean can we we can but okay continues we have six hundred fifty four miles of fencing which you don't necessarily believe in and isn't particularly affected which is why you're getting in the way of building new ones but continue have thousands of personality border who you demonized on a regular basis we have planes we have helicopters boats security cameras guns that's by no stretch of the imagination open borders and then you know secondly okay so listen to his argument you support open borders it seems but we have a border no no I thank you I I I know that I know the situation on the border which by the way I remember you told me was not a crisis now of us on the Democrats say it's a crisis I get that we have stuff at the border what you just said earlier that you reject the idea of being open border because of what currently exists but what is it that you want to exist and the policies that you take including by the way making it legal to try to get into this country without the proper paperwork well without going through the proper system I kind of feel like that means more people are going to come into this country there is still a civil court.

Ben Shapiro Seattle The New York Times Jason Katy TX ten years
"epidemic" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:41 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Epidemic. And today we kick off eras opioid epidemic. A look at this public health crisis here in the valley with. But we thought it was a good place to start by talking to people who've been directly impacted by that through the eyes of an addict. Right. Because we know that specifically here in Arizona. About a thousand people, this year will die from opioid overdoses, and we hear those numbers, a lot, unfortunately because they keep going up and we know that the governor has done certain programs in order to try to quell the epidemic. But a lot of time to talk about government. We talk about statistics. We talk about law enforcement or health care, we talk about the people in their stories, and that's where we're starting today. Joining us right now is Gabriel tomato and Gabriel has a unique story I think even in the world of addiction for stuff. Good morning Gabriel. Thanks so much for being here things so much ravenous. I'm gonna let you tell your story the way you tell it. How, how did you get to this point today? Where did this start? I think we have enough time, but I can make a quick a quick stop sun on how I got here. I'm not different than many other people that have struggled addiction alcoholism. I, I started really young. I think that's what's my story and a lot of things led into that. But I started using heroin daily at age thirteen he at thirteen years old, and then very quickly started using heroin intravenously, so I started off with the pills doing oxycodone hydro Kodo, and that kind of stuff stuff you can find your in your medicine cabinet by two thousand sixteen. There was over two hundred eighty nine million prescriptions to opioids prescribe each year in America. So it was pretty easy to find opiates in, in, in a medical cabinet so started with that, and then very quickly from there moved onto heroin, and did that for some time in the first time that I did heroin. It wasn't something that I wanted to do. I don't think any Kate or any teenager thinks. Hey, this is what I wanna do. When I grow up is how I want to be early. Adolescence is in heroin. I knew this was. Something that I wanted to continue to do or something I even wanted to do in the first place. So I very quickly after I started using her try to seek treatment detox hospitals and it just it just wasn't working by the time I was sixteen. I had gone into sixteen different treatment facilities, including detox and Reggio residential treatment here in Arizona, and then even in taxes. Well, and it was a long journey, and it just felt like I was a number in and out of, of the programs. I was talking to therapists, and people just didn't understand how. Someone my age or my statue could be addicted to heroin like this. They were they were like talking to an adult just like had done the same things that I was doing. They just weren't understanding. So I was just going in and out of treatment for a long time. And I finally was able to sober up in March of two thousand twelve here in Arizona. Well, congratulations, congratulations for that. I wanna go back to the beginning here Gabriel because you said thirteen. Yeah. And pills were easy to come by. Does it start with pills for me? It's with pills in even now working in the industry to you very rarely hear someone that just jumps directly into heroin. Sure. Absolutely. And that's kinda why I wanna give the lineage for people listening right now. So it, it started with pills was experimentation. I mean yeah, yeah. Yeah, it was just it was just around. And it seemed very harmless to me at the time on thirteen. I'm not I'm not advocating on a diction. I don't know what, what this can do for me for people who have not maybe used these pills and. Heroin will start with pills and use them to excess. What does it feel like? That's like a first time doing. It just it's, it's, it's, you know, euphoric you know, I had drinking alcohol before that, I had, you know, had smoked candidacy for that, and that was all great and dandy. But the first time that I did opiates it was you can't explain it. It's, it's a different type of, of intoxication that's out of out of this world. Arizona's opioid epidemic. Gabriel is joining us right now telling us about his story. So I want I want to transition. Why did you use heroin the first time? What brought you to heroin? Yeah. That that's an easy question to answer pills or expensive. Okay. Pills are expensive. So the same the same intoxication I get for twenty dollars worth of pills. You know, last maybe two or three hours out of the day, if I spent twenty dollars on heroin, I can be high the whole day. So is it was an easy transition game for the first time you used heroin? Yeah. Was it different from the pills? And I talk about that it was, it was different. It wasn't as cleaner what I was used to. But it was it was in the same realm. Rows right at home. When I did it and you were injecting the first time I did hear when I smoked it. Okay, we're talking right now to give real tomato. And he is being very open. And honest about his struggles with drug addiction and now being sober what eight years is correct. Seven seven years. Okay. Again, that is fantastic sixteen different recovery centers. You've been in and out of by the age of. Sixteen which gave real I know that there are a lot of parents right now that, that are glued to the radio because they're listening to this going. What do I need to know if you were experimenting had easy access? The for the parents listening. What advice do you have for them right now? Yeah. Advocate yourself educate yourself on the signs of, of what addiction looks like if you think that, you know, your loved one of your child is, is suffering from addiction or experimentation with, with heartily drugs, talk about it. Go talk to your doctor reach out to treatment facility getting assessment done. I think the biggest thing for me of why went to so many different facilities is because I I wasn't talking about it. We weren't. We weren't talking about it. Just as soon as it got bad. I'll just go into treatment center. Just every time in and out in and out when you said you wouldn't talk about it. Who wouldn't you talk about anybody? I don't why would I want to go talk to anyone about how I can't keep an eat a lot of my arm for more than an hour a day? Wow. I don't wanna wanna talk about that when it gets really bad and getting sick and I'm facing legal trouble reach out and try and get help, but it's not through the normal day that I was I was asking for help. We're talking to Gabriel tomato who is, again, sharing his story through the through the eyes of addict as we talk about this opioid epidemic here I've a question, so you started at thirteen with the pills, you transition to heroin to the point you're putting needles in your arms. You said how quickly did you know you needed help, how quickly did you know? I'm this is a problem that the first time that I did. I knew this wasn't this wasn't going to end. Well, really I knew that I had grown up with people around me that had suffered from addiction, I wasn't just because I wasn't stupid. I knew I knew what this was going to do. No one does heroin. No one in this in this in this world does heroin thinks this is going to be this is going to really great. I'm going to have a real normal life. When I when I stick this Neil my arm. I knew immediately this had this eventually or was gonna kill me again, if you're just joining us right now all week at ten o'clock here on Bruce James and Pamela Hughes show, we're talking about eras opioid epidemic. And a lot of times from the new side, you'll hear the numbers of the amount of addictions, or the amount of overdoses or the amount of deaths or the amount of prescriptions that are being written for these painkillers or people who are truly in pain, the can't get the medication that they need we're going to be tackling all of those topics all week long. But right now, we have Gabriel tomato in studio with us who is so courageously sharing his story of addiction to sobriety. And we know that while Gabriel is going through all of this. He's not going through it alone. There's family members. That are also being in packed it by these choices, and by what's going on in his life. Yeah. I wanted to also throw out there. We know a lot of you have I won't say similar stories but it's touched your life in some way can identify you could let us know. Your story, six oh, two two hundred twenty seven thirty three six oh, two two hundred twenty seven three three don't have to use your name any of that. But we know there's other people out there that have similar stories and maybe their stories can help others and next, we want to hear about the impact on the family, so Gabriel's. Mom is in studio with us right now. You're not gonna wanna miss her story Amazonas opioid epidemic. The conversation continues right after our top three stories..

heroin pills Gabriel tomato Arizona Epidemic. America Reggio Kate painkillers oxycodone Bruce James Neil Pamela Hughes twenty dollars Seven seven years thirteen years eight years three hours
"epidemic" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"epidemic" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"You'll really where kids like to play especially young children. They have no idea about this stuff. And when you have drugs in those syringes, broken syringes, and then some of them are uncapped, and as you said broken, the potential for a young child to hurt themselves, or in some cases, having a lethal dose of the drug south injected because they don't know what that is is significant. I we we're talking a break before. You don't wanna use the word epidemic too much. And then we can we can talk about measles. The return of measles as maybe an epidemic. The number of people who are injecting themselves with drugs in our community is is just escalating, and when you start seeing show up in this manner. Where landscaping companies or people working in parks are routinely running into these things. We've got a very big problem. When I as I've said this before on the show when I know people directly personally who was lives are now being impacted by their children or their spouses or other relatives by this drug scourge. I mean, it's it's absolutely incredible. What's happening? There are easy to get people are chasing, the high and they're doing anything they can to get the money that leads to whole myriad of other problems with crime. This is an epidemic that if we were not. Getting involved in this conversation, we need. So we're going to spend some time next week. Really zeroing in on this thing because I think this is something we should be focused on the flag story is bad..

epidemic