35 Burst results for "Environmental Science"

Build an Online Knowledge Based Business as a Health Professional with Eva Synkowski

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:09 min | Last month

Build an Online Knowledge Based Business as a Health Professional with Eva Synkowski

"This episode was speaking with c. cynic hausky and she is a biochemist engineer. Cross china who teaches athletes. How to eat well. She's extensive education and the life sciences with a bs in by chemical engineering a first m s environmental sciences and a stake in nutrition and functional medicine. She was the program manager for cross fit inc altering the training course materials in savings a subject matter expert. For this station's she has also accumulated more than six hundred hours of public speaking teaching fitness and nutrition Including ticks baga out with more than twenty years experience and academic training seamlessly translates even space scientific data into practical solutions for everyday success. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me on society. I wanna give out some context as to what you do where your expertise lies at a new passion lies in before. We're kind of talking about a lot that you do with educational programs so it gives a bit of background on you how that relates to that. Yeah background on me. I always had a passion for athletics. And that kind of background constantly as i of pursued engineering and career environmental consulting and all these other things but i was always doing on the side and eventually led to a career in cross it and cross at the base of bear. Teaching methodology is actually nutrition so it was a great way to combine my passion with some of my background in biology in the biological sciences. So yeah that's sort of the background and nutrition is interesting and and really yet with my programs. I try to make some of that. Basic education to be to be in bbc format. Nakai talked me about what you do with with educational progress. What does that mean to help. People build them build them for others. Would you do. I build them for customers to take them whether or not. They're members at a gym whether or not they're sitting by themselves at their house. I build a program that people go through to learn about nutrition and there's a couple different levels of them are sort of more basic. Hey let's get you go and then there's more of the heavy hitting you wanna learn about insulin and all the other details questions. People have

Cynic Hausky Cross Fit Inc China Athletics Nakai BBC
"environmental science" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

07:59 min | 2 months ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"A good score but i actually gave it a three point. One i. I think it's a good episode strong episode. There's lots of funny bits here and there But it's not amazing. It's not one that you're gonna remember forever and ever and ever a fully agree with that. Though i i debate in between three and three point one thought that kind of the the right area signed up with three point one. The audience was kind of all around where we were a two point. Nine average which brings the current average to a two point. Eight it is in seventh place out of ten So it feels about right. Yeah right yeah. I would still argue that. I like the pilot a little bit more. But i i think people don't i think in hindsight i would boost the pilot that makes me think like that. I read this one too. Highly was to jeff heavy because the jeff show. Don't remember the pilot and the way they're not going to remember this one yeah span ending elementary on the fly nine. Let me let me do some thinking. I always remember five. I always remember green bay. Honestly the name is terrible for what it should be. Yeah i'm trying to think of a class introduction to. I think it could be something related to i mean like Something related to global warming or something like that would even be better. Because you'd remember green day more. Yeah i am. i'm copycatting you. I'm just. I'm going with a two point seven like i'm kind of following your lead here on on that score. I know it's like such a marginal difference between a two point. Eight and a two point seven but it does matter to a certain degree. I think like i can live with this being just a couple of notches past the pilot. This is the first time are ratings. Matched a i can. I can live with this being a couple notches. Pass the power but you not just past the pilot. And that's just one too many the the big thong finish pushed. What pushed it from three to three point. One for me fair enough and i do think that like these leg if we're even looking at like troy for an as an example touring. The pilot is not like fully formed throwing in. This is much more like trae as see later so. I think that that could be the argument for liking it more. I just looked at the pilot in such a good job in like a twenty five minute span of setting up these characters that i thought it was really good but i get why people wouldn't have it that high so so it's still number seven two point eight five Above advanced criminal law. Two point seven two and below football feminism and you at which has a three point one nine so probably not gonna move too much anytime soon. Pretty good gap in there Yeah yeah that the apart. So that's the episode. Where are we going next week. We are going to the politics of human sexuality and this one is a very optimum. I think it's a. It's a great episode season. One episode eleven Special guests coming on You've probably heard her voice pretty recently. A do push a recaps theater. yes she's specifically requested. This episode The great lindsey. Wilson is coming up is okay. So lindsey wilson is going to be joining us for community building next week super exciting really high issues working towards that a hat trick. Yeah wave your hands in the air. The hatch is hard to get now because we're been around for a forget that doesn't matter alright. That's your citing. The politics of human sexuality left feels like that could be charged. It's going to be great. It's a funny one. It's very funny. The based on my memory is really funny. One you're gonna like it randy. Were there any like lingering community thoughts that you wanted to to get out there while we've well we've got you while you've got. I feel like i've spoken my truth on britta. Yeah i feel good about myself. I felt good to get that out there that you don't like or that. She really like an old man but she's still above the that gives her something. I would certainly hope y'all my good. But yeah i think i've i've loved the amount of love you guys have been. Giving the shirley shirley is a criminally underrated character throughout the series. That don't like her always near the top of my list. Though shirley anne troy abed are really my four that i love but not really like my personal favorites. I i've always loved you. Bet nicole brown. Yeah so great. So yeah i think i generally agree with a lot of what you guys are staying on that stuff. So yeah that's all. I got there all right randy. What a pleasure. Top-five greenvale human being in the house. I'm with the work on that. That's going to be very very disappointing. Disappointing for from our from our pusher recaps community So much going on on post show recaps with. It's down that hats. We've got falcon and the winter soldier so many things happening so if you're not subscribed all various speeds we recommend you do. You could also just subscribe to the main feed. Get all of our shows as they come out. You can also join us on patriot if you'd like become a member of the patriot and you get episodes of community building early in the patron only feed. You also get to watch us record. The podcast mostly stopped going to be every single week. But it's so far been like basically. I think it's been every week. So there's gonna come time so we're not gonna and that's totally fine but so far they've been lives so that is certainly a perk and there's plenty of other patient only shows that we do including the aforementioned post show recaps beater by the time you're listening to this and the main feed you are just a few hours Past the point that we did push a recaps theater live for the first time Talking about the nicholas cage. Movie next So you can listen to that podcast at the very least if you sign up for the patriots on at the podcast only level or you can sign up at the discord level. Join us in the discord. One of the best community is i would say probably just like in human history the hidden. Ta five community and human being history would be My my my vote so consider signing up patriae dot com slash push Patriot dot com slash post. Show recaps just sterling. What should have been ninety shows taught you on shit nineties pod. Recently we're in season two now of dawson's creek so we got to talk all about Pasties frosted tips. Which was very exciting. Jen's hair is not looking so agree not big fan of that But watch we were on wig watch also because again to you got a love transition into a new season where they have to pretend that everybody has the same hair Are still in season. Two of a boy needs world. Actually if you are a member of the post show recaps patron community. Recognizable voice came on our most recent world. Podcast chad who is e as the master. These of He was on our podcast. Dm had a ton of fun. It was a wild and crazy time He bought his girlfriend banana sheets of.

lindsey wilson two point next week Eight nicole brown twenty five minute ninety shows Wilson lindsey shirley three point five three two One Two point seventh place ten first time Nine average
"environmental science" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

Post Show Recaps

08:31 min | 2 months ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Post Show Recaps

"For me rewatch. Burr rejected many of our guests So i don't. I don't have that history with chang because you curated an emphasis that were pretty light on tank Solving i don't know how bad it gets him. I have experienced some moments where it's like. Wow that's a lot. But like i really like ken john alive as an actor and i think that there were some moments this week that i thought were my very very good and funny So i'm actually relatively high on him this week and like really enjoyed the dance. Like the unfiltered sloppy. Make out session on the dance or you may so far. I'm okay that hasn't happened for me. I wonder how. I'd be feeling if i had like the full context the full spread of community in my mind. How would that impact my enjoyment of this. I can imagine it might impact it greatly. But i just i can't weigh in there yet. I have no idea yeah. I think it's like it gets worse. I think like Because i think like your your experiences with chevy chase has. Here's the season and me. It's like pierce so bad in season. One that's kind of what come away. We're only kinda great. I mean he's obviously awful. But like chevy chase has been great. Yeah i think the moments in the show are in so bad right. When i think of pierces the character i think affleck the worst moments in years and so i think like just like i think him in chain or one in the same in that eventually the both get on my nerves and eventually they'll have plotlines that are old. They don't want them to carry in episode timmy. That is not their purpose. But are they getting on your nerves. Now because they're going to get on your nerves. You know what i mean. I think i think i actually. I have different opinions on both of them. So i think you're gonna be agreeing right with you. Just here's this fine. You're liking pierce and changes like her. Yeah you can't future. And i think it's also just because like he's so changing in this episode that is it's it's too much for me. You know i agree. I agree i would. I would think that pierce. I've given him a new chance with with the west season one and yes. Chang can't get over it. What i know will come in the future. It's just too much all right. Well let's get into the episode. Let's let's do. Let's do the recap. We begin this week just in the cafeteria. And i'm just gonna go out on a limb and say actually i've seen a head so i i could've canes beans in the on the dean's list this beam even me like i i got. He's ridiculous this week. he's incredible. There's just a really great dean stuff straight out the gate as the is announcing envir- dale this. It's it's such perfect dean He he starts up. Good morning. i'm here to kick off. The first day of new tradition at our school called green week all this week greenvale college becoming so smart that we're changing our names enviro day. You're right there. He was so close at it. And of course starbucks has to be like we're already greenvale. the dean wants to reprint five thousand fliers. Just the opposite of brain league is trying to save environment line. We usually print these. We have five. I'm trying to save the environment. And he announces that green day will be performing which catches everybody's attention because everybody's excited that green day. Yes say that Last week's debate one or nine was a turning point. A fork stuck in the road oregon gotten no for those in the visual medium watching on on twitches doing this. I don't know about time. But i've grabbed me by the wrist to direct where to go a long way to go for trying to just like Dude the full time of your life. I'll see what else they could sneak in. Wake me up when the ends that was another son nailed it. That was the jazz. Do you have the time. Okay keep going so we're now in spanish class. Everyone's taking a test Chang has you know head on the desk. He doesn't look happy. He's pencils down. Everyone picks her hands up except for any This is a bit you were talking about. He drags her desk out of the room and shuts the door in her face. Assigns a one page essay entitled any mistake Here's why he doesn't have to write it. And ching upsets to two pages entitled the consequences of questioning authority. Surely says she doesn't know enough spanish and he upset to six pages. British stops everybody from saying anything else in sucks up to chain and he changes it to twenty pages on ask to on monday important outside god so funny any i know just said many times throughout the life of this podcast that she relates to anne and i honestly do too. I have a lot of that. Same very organized. Abnormally or knowingly over organized. I high school overachiever attitude. I fully admit that was one hundred percent me man. So i i've always loved anne and i thought that that line kills me forever. And she's the it's notebook he's like ready to write it down to you. Know why she was like she wouldn't put her pencil down. I thought that like maybe like we were in ann arbor. She's like standing up defiant against chang. But you get it all out yeah. I don't think we're there yet with anne. I think that like she's willing right now. She's she's still very much like not like teacher's pet. But like i think she respects authority too much right now but maybe maybe later. I don't know she grows. So we're we're in. The dragging. Anne out of the classroom is just prime material and just silence. No one's saying words like there's sort of the danger of chiang can can really cracked me. And i feel like because everyone has their hands like this like this is not the first time he's done this that everybody knows this. Yeah so we're in. The study room says chain gets crazier. He'll win a grammy award. No one laughs. No one says anything. Any has reported to the dean and apparently the dean's been trying to get him fired for three years but nobody wants his job which is greenvale to me Shirley's nervous because she has public speaking assignment and pierce offers to help her aubin and troy. You're three days behind on their biology lab because trays afraid of rats and traces he Choose not to be around rasp because they're unpopular like centipedes in lakes which i had to rewind that a few times i think did he say lakes because i was like what is he getting there. I didn't get lake aren't popular. I guess like it's well. I guess it makes some sense from like my east coast elitist Perspective is like. Why go to a lake. Would you can go to the ocean now. I mean i'm not that great shannon very close to many lakes. The ocean and notion is clearly superior to a lake. Really not that. I think i disagree. I think that lakes freshwater there aren't sharks in jellyfish and stuff so daring dirty. Well yeah but the alana waterway oceans fairly elite though. Yeah you know there's a crash into mealey's yeah yeah. Lakes are cool definitely lakes great. I'm not saying wakes bad. Lakes are awesome. I love lake but oceans are elite. They're more popular. I feel like would be the least popular of those though. Oh yeah i think upon. We'd do well. It depends on the size of the pond. I suppose Probably like a stream.

Shirley three years ken john six pages Last week five twenty pages two pages greenvale college this week Anne starbucks one page Burr greenvale chiang one hundred percent both nine anne
1st Female Members Fulfill Requirements For Eagle Scout

Morning Edition

02:01 min | 2 months ago

1st Female Members Fulfill Requirements For Eagle Scout

"Been just over two years since girls were first allowed to join scouts be ESA, formerly known as the Boy Scouts. And now some have fulfilled all the requirements needed to reach the prestigious Eagle Scout rank. Delaware Public media's Sofia Schmidt went to see one girl except the Eagle Scout Challenge. Ready. Hi Scarlett Home, Marquis. I scroll it homemaking, darkly recognized and take upon myself. I thought, believe, recognize and take upon myself the obligations and responsibilities of the rank of Eagle Scout the obligation of responsibilities of the rank of Eagle Scout 14 Year Old Scarlet Hell, Mickey repeats the Eagle Scouts pledge read by an alumnus of the program, Scarlett's family and fellow troop members air here for her Court of honor and to celebrate her place in history as one of the first girls to achieve the rank. As the sun shines and cake waits to be eaten on a nearby table. She tells the audience about her journey. It was a lot to learn Eagle and I know that I can help Younger scouts also achieve this ring. I'm proud to join many eagles in the special group. Scarlett is one of about 1000 girls nationwide who are in the inaugural class of female Eagle Scouts. It's scouts be essays, highest rank, and only about 6% of scouts achieve it. Get it. Scouts need to earn 21 merit badges, which require mastering basic skills on topics such as first aid and environmental science. Scarlet says that on occasion, she and other female scouts have endured teasing and belittling comments from people outside her troupe. She says That's one reason her troop leaders didn't cut her any slack. They always pushed me because they knew people would say. Hey, like you don't really earn that Sarah. That's giving it to you know iron this for her required community service project. Scarlet helped rebuild an old foot bridge over a stream coordinating a team of 20 volunteers, and she says she learned some valuable lessons. Just be patient for lie on your team. They're here to help you.

Delaware Public Media Sofia Schmidt Scarlett Home Scarlett ESA Marquis Court Of Honor Mickey Eagles Scarlet Sarah
A Childhood on the Farm

Nurture vs Nurture with Dr. Wendy Moge?l

04:08 min | 4 months ago

A Childhood on the Farm

"So let's jump off from one. Animal will benefit the other to talk about the family so moving to hear you describe this because it reminds me of students taking an environmental science class. And then there's the quiz lit and the flash cards and the phrase kurban sequestered and drew are false. This is learning by doing. And it's absolutely the way. Children learn best using all five senses in the three dimensional world. And you also mentioned joan about the changing of seasons and how the children are accustomed to that and learn the rhythm of that so one animal benefiting the other in your particular described to me that challenges and reward of. Let's start with. Sasha how does she benefit and tax and challenged the rest of the system right. Well i would say. Sasha is our observer and alert system for the families. she's really in tune when somebody's hurt or sick because she's always hyper focused on anything being out of balance essentially if she notices as a change to our rhythm change to our habits. She's the first to say. Why are we doing this or what's wrong about the situation. It's not what we're used to doing. The same goes for on the farm. She's the first one to come running in and say there's an injured goat. There is an injured goat coming into the house and she gets to say that sentence mom. There's an injured goat or or such and such goethe's in heat. We better breed them right now. Oh yes and how does she know about such and such goat well. She's been raised with them since she was born and so she knows their behavior. She knows all of them and their personalities and when they're acting different and with her their heat cycles she's aware that the fall is when they go into heat and she knows that they flagged their tails when they're ready flag their tail. They flagged their tails. Does it mean wave of back and forth her yup and she's smitten with a particular goat. Yes she has. A favourite goat considers it her child the goats name panda and it's an alpine dairy goat. That's funny yup. it's black and white. There is a year where we had a lot of black and white dulling so and they decided to name them all black and white name so there is like orca. Oreo and panda was one of them. Yeah so this is so much fun. This is someone because this is children's imagination applied to a practical purpose because those goats need names. You need to be able to distinguish them when she comes and says that panda is in heat. It's important for you to be able to picture which goat. She's talking about absolutely. She is alert when she comes in with the news on the continuum of excited and enthusiastic veg ing on alarm more panic. What's the tone. I would say it's equally both. I would say that to once she experiences says sees this she comes around in and it's like frantic furious. This is very important. You have to listen to me. So and so is doing this that or the other or so and so's injured and it's just i think it's giddiness that she is able to tell us that. And it's also that she is experiencing what's going on so she is. She's getting both those things going on in her brain at same

Kurban Sasha Joan Drew
President Biden Has Promises To Keep

Latino USA

03:59 min | 5 months ago

President Biden Has Promises To Keep

"Back in november latina and latino voters helped deliver the presidency to joe biden in key swing states like georgia and especially arizona. Let the next. Voters helped turn former red states. Blue and during the campaign biden made a long list of commitments to our communities on day. One i'm sending to the united states. Congress a immigration bill. We're gonna find those kids. We're going to unite them with their parents. The opening school safely will be a national priority for the biden harris administration. Reverse trump's rollbacks of one hunter public health and environmental rules biden has said he'll invest in education and healthcare for letting us he said he'll stop border wall construction and that he'll work with congress to create a path to citizenship for undocumented people but in also said he'll crackdown pollution in communities of color and reduce incarceration so in the lead up to the inauguration that usa reached out to young denness and latinos around the country to your what promises they're hoping biden will keep and what they want biden to do that he hasn't committed to yet plus we're going to speak with these young people about how the changes they wanna see would actually impact their own lives. We're going to start this very non. Comprehensive survey by speaking with virginia. Blasio's virginia's a ninth generation daytona who up near a city on the texas mexico border were in the south texas. Brush country so a lot of trees and prickly pear cactus virginia is also an environmental science and policy consultant that usa producer. Scarsi spoke with virginia. And she's going to pick up the story from here. Virginia lives in a rural area on a fourth generation. Cattle ranch that been her family of for close to one hundred and twenty years. We inherited it from my great uncle. Who was a grand champion calf roper. During the great depression he traveled the radio circuit with his brother. You know they were fortunate enough to be born into families that had a lot of land and so they were able to run cattle and support their families. That way and my dad was enamored with that history of cowboy culture. He virginia and her brother on the land. She remembers running around as a little kid watching her. Dad moved these huge cows from field to field and she thinks growing up this way set the foundation for a love of nature that eventually led her to go to grad school to study climate change. And that's where she was. When in two thousand eleven he had still all the cattle on the ranch because the drought guy particularly bad and There was a national study. That came out shortly after that drought showing bet Climate change me the heat waves longer and temperatures more intense that year and so we know that climate change has already been impacting us. There had always been droughts in south texas though. Virginia says they got worse and worse over time. It meant the grass wouldn't grow. Which meant virginia's dad had to start buying a lot of food to keep his cattle alive so much so that he wasn't making money off his ranch anymore. You know it's kind of funny. Because i was always kinda hassling. My dad was like dad counts. Produce methane and methane is really bad for the climate but when it came to the point where he had to sell them because he realized a drought was so bad. It put things into a different perspective for me. Because i realized that he really didn't have a choice. I realized that we had kind of gotten into this plane. With climate change where it wasn't theoretical. It wasn't something far off in the future that could happen. It was it was happening now

Biden Virginia Biden Harris Administration USA Blasio Scarsi Congress Joe Biden South Texas Georgia Arizona Daytona Roper Mexico Texas Depression
Instagram influencer uses his platform to teach environmental concepts

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 6 months ago

Instagram influencer uses his platform to teach environmental concepts

"Instagram influencers are known for posting selfies and glamorous travel pictures but not isaiah's hernandez his account queer brown vegan has more than sixty thousand followers but his post contain mostly words not photos in each. He asks a question about environmental justice or defined the term for example what is food security or what types of groups are vulnerable to the climate crisis hernandez grew up in a los angeles neighborhood. That he says was heavily polluted to learn how to help this community. He studied environmental science in college. When i went to academia it was a very rough journey for me. His department lacked racial diversity and people in academia often used terminology that was unfamiliar. It wasn't until i finished college. I realized you know you don't need it. Environmental science degree to be an environmentalist. And you don't need to use all the fancy language to truly understand concepts and terminologies so on social media. He aims to make environmental concepts more accessible and he helps by providing a safe space for his followers to ask questions. He can inspire more black indigenous and other people of color to get involved.

Isaiah's Hernandez Hernandez Los Angeles
Does Talking To Plants Help Them Grow?

Short Wave

05:33 min | 9 months ago

Does Talking To Plants Help Them Grow?

"All Right Emily Kwong you are here for another microwave the. Short. Little episodes where we read some listener mail at the end. And we're talking about what science has to say and not say about plant bioacoustics and this question that I can't believe I'm asking which is does talking to plants impact their growth. It is probably the most common question I get from the public. This is Heidi apple professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Toledo. And just to get this out of the way, there is no conclusive scientific proof. The talking to your plans helps them grow. All. Right. Every episode done Boo Boo Boo we. Hold the phone if I? It's not that simple because Heidi is one of the few people who has studied plant response to sound and she considers plants to be sentient beings. They have a sense of vision sight smell. And taste they have hearing. Scientists disagree about what language to use here I mean our plants sentient. They don't have brains. You know those kinds of questions but scientists have found evidence that plants can detect sound all life has some form of McConnell reception. Mechanical reception meaning, they can sense stimuli from their environment like touch pressure and vibration. We humans have pressure receptors on our skin and it turns out that plants can sense pressure to this is this is very cool. I'm getting into this now. Yeah. Through these special proteins called mechanical receptors that can send a signal that sets off a chain of events telling the plant, how to respond so like if a bug lands on them or something yes, and the plant will perhaps release chemical to defend itself plant panic. That's right. So these Magana receptors are really important for telling the plant what's up in its environment and plant scientists think these McKenna receptors may play a role in helping plants, pick up vibrations including the vibrations caused by sound. You know sound waves we've known for a long time that plants can respond to single tones or even music. And they can respond by growing a little differently or their seeds may germinate at a different rate. But we never understood why they would do this. Why would they have this capability and that's where my work with collaborator Rex Co crowd at the University of Missouri comes in. So few years ago. Heidi Rex put together a little study asking if a plant will respond to vibrations in their environment and the vibration they chose to test was caused by a Caterpillar shoeing. What an adorable experiment munch up the leaves of the plant, specifically a mouse ear cress which Heidi had growing in the lab. and. These vibrations are super subtle. The the leaf sometimes moving like one ten thousand of an inch as the Caterpillar bites down. Brexit Heidi played the vibration, the vibration of the nominee caterpillar right back to other crush plants who had not been munched on at all, and then expose those same plants to real. Caterpillars. And measured their chemical response and the plants that had heard the recording beforehand produced more insect defense chemicals Oh so like playing the sound before the real caterpillar primed the plants. Yeah. This experiment show that plants pre exposed to the sound of Human Caterpillar produced a different response more plant panic if you will. Yes I will which suggested you know that plants these plants are sensitive to the sounds of this Predator the Caterpillar and then they tested other vibrations on the plant wind other insect eating noises that were not as threatening and when you know the plants did not respond like chemically they didn't respond. Correct. So okay. So does that mean they have? For lack of a better term selective hearing more like selective responding. Okay. Plants do respond to sound but only to sounds they've evolved to respond to if that makes sense. In, this case a Caterpillar Chewing Gotcha. Okay. So Caterpillar chewing. Yes. But what about a human voice? Well, that hasn't been comprehensively tested. Okay and Heidi thinks it's not likely a plant will be experiencing. No as in the sense of wind or a bird or a singing and Tamala gist. You, but they will they will be tuned to only the things that are important to them. Right, and and we don't know if one of those things is a human voice. We also don't know the. Of what they detect and we don't know if they'd have a reason to respond. So should you talk to your plants? Sure. Why not is it going to help them grow better your voice alone? No I don't think it's going to however. If you connect emotionally with your plant, better because you're talking with them, that means you're probably going to take better care of it, and therefore we're talking to your plants indirectly could

Brexit Heidi Heidi Apple Professor Of Envir Heidi Rex Emily Kwong University Of Toledo Rex Co Mcconnell Tamala University Of Missouri
What is intersectional environmentalism?

Climate Connections

01:19 min | 9 months ago

What is intersectional environmentalism?

"Org. I'm Dr Anthony lies with and this is climate connections. In Twenty Fourteen Lee Thomas was in college environmental science policy when a crisis unfolded in her hometown of Ferguson Missouri. Police shot unarmed black teenager Michael. Brown. Sparking widespread protests. China learn about the Clean Air Act while my sister is getting furious back home in a protest. She says, the events made her question who the cleaner rack really protects. Inner concern increased when she read data showing that people of color are more exposed to many air and water pollutants as a black woman. She was dismayed because I would say that's me on that page. That's my community. That's my family. So this past may in what became a viral instagram post Thomas called on environmentalists to stand in solidarity with Black Lives Matter Movement. And she defined what she calls intersectional environmentalism. Aware inclusive version of environmentalism that identifies the ways in which injustices happening marginalized communities, and the Earth are interconnected. She hopes that the definition helps articulate a new approach to environmental activism one that has the well being of the planet and people at its core.

Lee Thomas Dr Anthony Missouri China Earth Brown Michael
"environmental science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:50 min | 9 months ago

"environmental science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's pretty astonishing to read. What people write from hearing the songs that people respond. Completely directly and intimately to your loss. Because it turns out that that everybody has has lost. I mean, they've lost. In all kinds of ways all kinds of people relationships. I mean, this was when I wrote down somebody, he wrote. I came across this band shortly after I tried to kill myself and the song Thank you reached into my soul and planted a seed of hope, hope that life could be beautiful. That song was the first turning point of healing for me. And since then, cloud called music has continued to change and heal me, and there are like thousands of variations on that theme. Um, I wonder was that of discovery for you two to look up and see that everywhere in the world and Yeah. Yeah, Like I said, our early on it was a personal medicine. But then people started coming to shows that had similar loss of initially it was people that had lost Children as well that they found comfort in That music and As timely on, you know, Then there's More people that were coming with different for different reasons, you know, struggling with addiction there or depression, things like that, And that's where I realized That No flashback to when I was in college and trying to decide what I was going to for a major and I remember being in the woods and feeling like I need to decide between music, composition and Environmental science and sitting out there meditating, waiting and ultimately feeling I had I want to leave this place better. Music feels kind of to selfie and, um, I could do good with the environmental science Thiss point now flashing ahead where people are finding something good in it, and I feel Like I could do good with this. I could continue to do this on DH. That's where things started to shift but is also very Important at that time to realize like that I needed to continue the humility and understand that when people are coming with the stories of struggles that they've overcome And sharing in a way, where They are honoring the band and the music recognize wholeheartedly that has very little to do with us and that Here. A reflection. There's something in this that they're able to see deeper parts of themselves and all of that energy and power of healing and overcoming and And hope is coming out of out of them. Yeah. You got to let it in, right? But you have to let it go through u S O, you know, as thinking And you have two other Children now. I'm surprised when I was reading your story and listening to the music and you know you have again. You hear Caitlin's voice and I've seen pictures of him. You have films of him that come out in films about the band and Two years old, right? A two year old is such an amazing, you know, still so tiny and It's so incredible, and I was thinking about Before it was way before on being I mean, it was when I was doing pilots is called Children and God, but I heard in that time and also I had young Children at that time this there's this old This is Hebrew proverb, and I think there's actually an Islamic version of this to that. Before a child is born. The Angel Gabriel. Tells them everything all the secrets of the universe. And then kisses them on the forehead. And they're born and they begin to forget. I think I had this feeling and I don't know. I saw it in these pictures of kittens, right? Had this feeling with Children like they don't know things like that Mother closer to God or whatever God is And they just kind of embody that mystery, and you just wish they had the words to tell you the secrets they know and you'll also see them growing and becoming more like us and But then Also the fact that that's all of us, right the child in each of us, and so that's all part of our story. And you talk a lot about you. Moving through that loss and through that grief as kind of a rebirth. It doesn't really sound like a question. I just.

Environmental science Caitlin
"environmental science" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 9 months ago

"environmental science" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hazards of catastrophic fire. They're very proactive in casting a vote to approve a $10 million bond. To do this forest finishing work, which I think is really unique situation. They approved it, because economically, it makes sense. Captain of Flagstaff Fire put it like this. His department spent $8000 on passing a bond worth 10 million aimed at preventing 500 million in damages. Remember fires in these areas where the wild meets the residential are crazy, expensive Schultz Fire alone, which didn't actually burn a single structure cost $12 million to fight and another 140 million in recovery costs like property damage. I think about some of the larger fires that cost $100 million or more, I think about The amount of preventive for US treatments that could be done using that money mats new on this project Before this, he worked for years as a hotshot. It's sort of like the Navy seals of firefighting they drop in and work on putting out some of the biggest, most dangerous fires in the country. And in the off season he was going to school to get his master's degree in environmental science. And now he appreciates the slow preventative work of thinning trees up a mountain. I think that the prevention side is You can work for you No many years and you know the the effects may not be apparent right away. Whereas when you work in a suppression side if you go to a fire, and you worked there for a few weeks, you know you can you can see your progress daily. You know the tire's gone? Yeah, exactly. And so that's rewarding. Absolutely. But I just try And remember that for my view, Maybe that's not the right thing I should be doing. You know, I think I know enough now about fire ecology and the importance of fire in the landscape that I really enjoy working in this project because of what the in goals are. The goal, keeping the next big wildfire from happening. Now the city's approach won't work everywhere and the money to try new preventive measures won't always be there. But for now, Matt looks over the forest. Most of the slender trees. He's cutting down our younger than he is. But if what he's doing works, the trees that remain could be around for another 600 years. Thanks.

Flagstaff Fire Matt US Schultz
Fast-Moving California Wildfires Boosted by Climate Change

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Fast-Moving California Wildfires Boosted by Climate Change

"Point to the wildfires scorching the West and say that we can blame this on climate change. Leah Stokes, assistant professor with the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UC Santa Barbara, says no. Because of research from scientists that we have 500% more risk for. Well fires during this climate changed world then we would I have before, Daniel Swain, a climate scientist in the play in the National Center for Atmospheric Research, says. While it's shocking to see the impact of the wild fires out West, it's not scientifically surprising, explaining that a couple of degrees of average warming over decades. You don't notice it as much, but it's still there lurking in the background, sucking extra moisture out of the vegetation and soil

Bren School Of Environmental S Leah Stokes Daniel Swain Atmospheric Research Assistant Professor Scientist
Young conservative speaks up about the climate

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 10 months ago

Young conservative speaks up about the climate

"Twenty four year old tyler. Gillett. Of Ohio has cared about environmental issues since he was young and growing up, he says that sometimes made him feel like an outcast among his conservative peers everyone would call me a liberal or tree hugger or a Hippie I. Thought I was the only one out there that hey, conservative values cared about the environment. But Gillette was not deterred in college. He studied environmental science and he began advocating for free market solutions to climate change for example, by writing an op-ed for a student publication. That op. Ed. Caught the attention of national climate organizers. Soon, the leaders of Republicans in a group that advocates for market-driven climate solutions invited Gillette to join their group. And the citizens climate lobby asked him to come to a lobbying event in DC Gillette says meeting with legislators for the first time was empowering. I felt like I was participating in democracy united playing an actual roll. Through these experiences Gillette says, he's found other like-minded conservatives. Now I know that I'm not the only one that sees things the way that I do. So he encourages others to speak up to.

Gillette Gillett Ohio
Daphne Koller, PhD: CEO and founder of insitro

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

04:30 min | 10 months ago

Daphne Koller, PhD: CEO and founder of insitro

"Tell me a little bit about what you're doing at NC tra-. So the premise for what we're doing. Really. Emerges from what I said a moment ago, which is this last decade has been transformative in parallel onto feels very rarely talk to each other. We've already talked about the advancement on the machine learning side than the ability to build incredibly high accuracy predictive models. In, a slew of different problem domains If you have enough quality data on the other side, the biologists and engineers have developed a set of tools over the last decade or so that each of which have been transformative in their own rights. But together they create I think a perfect storm of large data creation enabling large data creation on the biology side, which when you feed it into the machine learning piece, can all of a sudden give rise to a unique insights and so some of those tools are actually pretty special and incredible. Honestly. So one of those. Is What we call in DC pluripotency cells, which is we being the community not we didn't see Tro, which is the ability to take skin cells or blood cells from any one of us, and then by some almost magic revert them to the state that they're in when you're an embryo in which they can turn into any lineage of your body. So you can take a skin cell from US reverted to stem cell status, and then make a Daphne Neuron and that's amazing because that definitely Neuron Carey's might genetics and if there are diseases that manifest in neuronal. In rural tissue, you will be able to potentially examine those cells and say, Oh, wait this is what makes a healthy neuron different from one that carries a larger genetic burden of disease, and so that's one tool that has arisen a different one that is also remarkable is the whole crisper revolution in the ability to modify the genetics of those cells that you could actually create fake disease not disease because it's real. Disease but introduce it into a cell to see what a really high penetrate mutation looks like in a cell and then commensurate with that there's been the to measure cells in many many many different ways where you can collect hundreds of thousands of measurements from each of those cells. C can really get a broad perspective on what those cells look like rather than coming in with I know I need to measure this one thing. And you can do this all at an incredible scale. So on the one side, you have all the capability for data production and on the other side, you have all this capability for data interpretation. And I think those two. Threads are converging into a field that I'm calling digital biology where we suddenly have. The ability to measure biology quantitatively at an unprecedented scale, interpret what we see, and then take that back and right biology whether it's using crisper some other intervention to make the biological system do something other than what it would normally have done so that to me is a field that's emerging and will have repercussions that span from. Environmental, science biofuel bacteria or algae. The do all sorts of funky things like carbon dioxide out of the environment. Better crops. But also importantly for what we do better human health and so I think were part of this wave, the starting to emerge and what we do is take this. Convergence and pointed in the direction of making better drugs that can potentially actually be disease modifying rather than. As many other many existing drugs just often just make people feel better but don't really change the course of their disease

Disease United States Neuron Carey NC
Planning for Students in the 9th, 10th, and 11th-Grade

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

06:47 min | 10 months ago

Planning for Students in the 9th, 10th, and 11th-Grade

"Wanted to talk about academic planning for students in the ninth tenth and Eleventh Grade Year, and the reason why it's important is because if your college bound high school student, what you do in your preparation as will set you up well for the application application phase. So a lot of times. You know when I meet seniors sometimes, they didn't do what they needed to do in the ninth tenth or eleventh. Grade Year and it doesn't sit them up very welfare success. But if you're the parent or you know your ninth tenth or eleventh grader, you've got some time on your side to be very intentional about academic planning. So to talk about rocks and the principle of rocks big rocks. And a lot of times students don't know what to plan for. When, it comes to planning out there year. So we're GonNa talk about seven things that every college bound high school students should really focus on using the principle of the rock. So it's GonNa make a little clinking noise. Okay. So the first thing that you WanNa do is really focused on your academic profile and the reason why we talk we start with big rocks I wanted have those high priorities must have in our bucket in our because we have limited time. Limited capacity, and so it's important to focus on big priorities and then fill in some of the other things things you can do in your your free time not that they're not important, but it's really important to get those big things and I. So the First Big Rock is your academic profile and when I talk about your academic profile, we're looking at your high school transcript. So at this stage in the game before we start a new school year, go back. And look at classes from the prior year to your ninth grade year and you WanNa make sure you have what I call the core five, you WanNa have your math, English science history and Foreign Language depending upon with your knife going into ten. You're probably only going to have one year of Afar language but you want to end your four year journey with at least two years of the same far language. Okay. Sometimes, students don't know what they want to major in. And so I say it's better to have more math and expected more English. Because you you may think you're GONNA do one thing and end up doing something else. So here's the other thing I want to say about academic planning in your coursework. There are graduation requirements, and then there are college entrance requirements and sometimes they're not the same thing. So sometimes, your high school only may require three years of math or three years of English or no foreign language. That's fine. All you're focusing on is getting out of high school. But if you're here, it's because you're interested in getting into college and securing scholarships to pay for it. So you WANNA have a very robust the most rigorous. Academic profile networks well for you and kind of where you're going. So I just tell students just go ahead and plan for four years of English for years of math. Three. At least three, maybe four years of history including economics. Usually they are a happy year depends on your school and civic. So you know that. And then a three. At, least maybe four years definitely going into a stem field of science science with the lab sciences. So like biology lab, chemistry, lab, Physics Lab, and sometimes students start off maybe their first year with the general science or if they right into Or maybe a physical science. But if they start right off with biology chemistry physics and the on the back in the fourth year, they may do in Earth's. Environmental science or maybe anatomy astronomy something like that. But you know I would say definitely get those three in and and shoot for four, and then you want at least two years of the same aren language like French. Wine in French to or Spanish one Spanish two I. DO I say this? Sometimes students will do Silang they'll do asl as far language. So your high school may recognize it as a foreign language in terms of graduation requirements, but the college may not accept it as a foreign language for an entrance requirements I just want you to be aware that. So. In that case, I always tell students who are interested in learning sign language in they're studying asl just slot that in Jer- elective. Okay. So we've got our core five and then are typically two electives and those who may be p. e. your driver's Ed or you know whatever whenever you enjoy doing band chorus whatever. So that's that then also when it comes to academic planning. You want to take a look at your GPA don't neglect your grade point average. So where are you right now? What's your benchmark? What's your goal? So where are you starting? You know where did you finish at the end of last semester and where do you WanNa go so begin to think about your Your academic, your grade point average, and then if you're able to find out your class rank, some schools rank some schools don't. But if you're able to find that your class rank, talk your guidance counselor or maybe log in and were high school transcript is and know what your class rank it. So go ahead and record all that now. So you know where you are starting all right now our second rock in stomach to look clunky clink noise. Entrance. Exams or entrance testing, and that would be your sat in your act. Now, this year is a little bit wonky slow messy with Kobe right? Just Kinda is what is so normally we have you know where it's very prescribing you're able to stay on track and kind of plan it all out and it's been wonderful. This year is just not kind of you know just messy. But let's say if you're so ninth grade, you don't have to worry about it too much tenth grade in the fall you'll be taking depending on your school, maybe the pricing or the psat the eleventh grade year when you take the PSAT in October, that's when it counts. Accounts for the. National. Merit Scholarship Program Okay So you want to begin to think about that plan for that no at that date is get it on your calendar. So right now, as you're thinking through these seven big Roxie seven things, I want you to write them down. So write down your current grade point average right down those dates for your upcoming test and then for students in the eleventh grade I want you to look. Ahead to spring test states and began to map them out now it. It is a little bit tricky. It's a little bit different this year because of cove in. So you know a lot of places are asking students to consider it to allow students in the class of twenty

Physics Lab Afar Roxie Silang Earth ED Kobe
Spatial Conversations

A VerySpatial Podcast

06:32 min | 1 year ago

Spatial Conversations

"So we're happy to be joined today by Brendan Collins and Pablo Puentes of make path. Thanks for joining us today is. Yeah thanks. And you. So, let's start off with the the really broad question of what is make path. Path is a spatial data science. Shop we focus a lot on open source tools, and we bring our passion from various domains. To gs and we aim to build. Inclusive communities around you as tools, and specifically we have a project X. Ray spatial, which focused on roster based spatial analysis, we combine a rationalization pipeline with a set of universal functions which apply an. To Rosser data and also are named in ways that Gif professionals recognize things like surface analysis tools slow hill shade, aspect on these are the names of these tools in the s domain that people recognize. And we offer those tools As a python based library that anybody can access read the source code to and contribute to. We we take open source tools, and we help solve our clients problems by applying open source to their their specific domains. These these domains are very diverse working in areas from healthcare to environmental conservation. Finance Natural Resource Management. We know that geography and the science of of place is very important, too. Many domains and we find ourselves learning about these different domains as we apply open source geospatial tools to their challenges. We we basically bill. We love building open source, really powerful tools, and then if we have clients are like. Hey, what else can we do with these tools? Can you help us apply these really complex problems and what he help? So, how'd you guys come together as? Building this new path path. That was that was bad, wasn't it? Sorry. That's okay well. It's all good. We'll take it. So I WanNa talk about what you've been doing before and how we can. Yeah so I got involved in GSA in the mid to thousands being the S. lab manager for the Center for Sustainable, development, which is a kind of environmental science group in Central America. Working a lot with agriculture. And then moved on to work. As part of the team at the Nature Conservancy looking at site selection for projects in the red area red in this context is reduction in emissions from deforestation and I. Ever Dacian where Zeh countries that have high carbon output can find carbon credits in developing nations to incentivize them to protect vertically sensitive ecosystems, tropical forest is a great example of that, so a lot of these projects occur in in the main tropical forest areas of Brazil Democratic Republic of Congo Indonesia the top three countries for tropical forest. So using I was using DIS to help. Do Site selection to maximize dollars spent? Two or environmental protection through the conservancy We Pablo night. Live in Austin We started to connect in the music scene. Both of us are musicians songwriters. We go out and play open open mics and so that's how can Pablo and I met, but then we quickly realized that we had a lot in common apart from our music background, and over the years as we would spend time together and hard about things it just made sense to get together in work together as a 'cause. We were hitting the same problems, but Pablo represented us. More! Experience on what it is to create a company and create a culture and I represented a bit more of the technical side, and so we were good partners in kind of coming together, 'cause we represent those different areas. in filming kind of some of some of the. The rounding out the breath of our skills, really we we both. We both think we are easy to find and the other one is a really great fun. So I came out about I came out of Stanford about ten years ago, started a company So I had a lot of experience. Products Scaling a company and I. Really liked. What Brennan was doing and we teamed up and I bring a lot of experience again with the company building with a product design had to think about about by these projects and I've always had an interest I don't have a detectable background in jazz. She fired his. I've always had an interest in it. My Dad was a biologist and we would always go on these. I've been looking at maps since I was five, and and we'd go on walks in the new-look onto poverty maps and understanding vegetation maps so I guess I've been training for this for a long time without even knowing but done now. It's a little bit of my. Time and I love it the physical world and data to to solve problems in the s really exciting to work together and. We've been applying for some of these tools and really really interesting ways, and I'd love for brethren. Talk with it. This is a blog. A very big piece we're working on. That's coming out on the next, Tuesday! And it's A. It's a real world application vary timely of these told rags, these tools, a really cool powerful but the story of Man on the Moon is man on the moon, not N-, not necessarily rocket as cool as. Cool as Mathis, the the real story. Is that the the the the impact that has the? and Ny Brandon. If you WANNA, talk a little bit about the story that were published using the x Ray, spatial tools and data Cheddar I think that's That's a great example of some of the things that we do.

Pablo Puentes X. Ray Spatial Brendan Collins Nature Conservancy NY Rosser Indonesia Stanford RAY MAN Mathis Austin GSA Brazil Democratic Republic S. Lab Manager Brennan Central America Center For Sustainable
Boston - Colleges Move Classes Online As Coronavirus Spreads

Jay Talking

07:17 min | 1 year ago

Boston - Colleges Move Classes Online As Coronavirus Spreads

"With college campuses shut down because of covert nineteen is continuing online WBZ's Ben Parker takes a look at the impact on some local colleges from small schools to large ones private colleges to state university classes are not happening on campuses these days but instead in an online world because of covert nineteen Westfield state university the school remains open while operating remotely we like to make sure everybody realizes that we are completely open for business in terms of not only serving our current students but recruiting new students for next year serving both undergraduate and graduate students he Diane Prue sank his provost and vice president of academic affairs at Westfield state they're moved to teaching online was pretty smooth so are moved to the online will promote format when it first took place I think everybody was a little bit shocked about how quickly we had to move but I have to say to you that at this point we are really pleased with how smoothly the transition has gone not to say it's perfect by any stretch but it has gone really well and I think for several reasons among those reasons having a lot of faculty already trained to teach through some version of it online format and some faculty needed a little extra support there were trainings and workshops at lasalle university a small private college in Newton Massachusetts resident Michael Alexander says their staff and faculty was already prepared to make the move to online learning now we have some advantages also university we've been DJ online for seventeen years both graduate and undergraduate levels we have a summer online program is going for eight or nine years and growing every year and it's been very successful law almost all of our full time faculty at all been trained on how to develop online courses transition to online remote ways of teaching and how to teach online and we extended spring break an extra week to bring the others up to speed a quick crash course including our our jumped up professors Alexander says though most students are off campus there are so well some who have stayed for a variety of reasons the weather right to require every single student leave her campus because some students just don't have a better place to talk and that would include international students students the home situation would not be conducive to teaching and learning people who don't have the technology to access the remote learning that loads that we turn to people who have jobs nearby and their employers still needed the work and so they they need to live here so they can attend the jumble to make money and to support their employers and so that there are any number of reasons why students would need to be here now we're down to just sixty two of them but still we have to feed them and take care of the we spread them out it will consolidated them into three residents all the great amount so everybody has their own room and their own bathroom but and they can't really teach others in the room they're practicing physical distance thing and we're monitoring that but that's an additional challenge Westfield state also has some students still on campus for some classes like biology chemistry and other sciences this lab work to be done that does pose some challenges at Westfield state proves access some classes have enough experimental work and now they can analyze data for others being away from the campus has actually been a bit of a benefit by not being there in some areas for example in environmental science you are now in different environments there are material they can collect and analyze right in their own backyards for example and do some comparison really when you think about our student population at Westfield state over sixty percent of our students are from eastern all the Worcester area that means we have to be all over the state so an environmental kind class they can now look at multiple environments in their discussions online as for where college might be in the future meeting this fall press access they're hopeful getting back to campus will be in the cards but they are planning just in case it's not we're doing a mixture of things right now and we're looking at the continuation of this semester for example a lot of our activities obviously have moved to virtual including things like virtual admissions events that we are running in the next few weeks for two students were to come to a Westfield state and all we're looking at some virtual kind of activities are only may or June orientation sessions for students and thinking about both kinds of activities for our early summer school courses both tend to be more online courses than on the ground in any case when we look at far as the fall which is double pay for some people may seem very far away but doesn't feel that way for us our plan right now Ben is to be fully functioning as a residential campus at that point we assume we will all be back on campus with our students will be in our housing area and so we continue to plan to register students in that way that's not to say that we're not thinking forward about the possibility that they may shift at some point we will of course follow whatever guidelines the governor provides for us in terms of gathering and so we'll think about different variation on what that might look like if there have to be some change in the way that we start our semester at lasalle university president Alexander says they're planning for multiple scenarios which run the gamut it's a totally unpredictable situation nobody knows anybody tell journalists should not sell so we have to prepare for multiple scenarios so we're forming scenario planning task for most other institutions are doing the same thing and and defining various things that could happen from a minor disruption in the fall to the real serious disruption in the fall which would be you know we still can use the campus for that call and and maybe some things in between and then develop a specific plan for each of those scenarios that we can put in place as as things develop or adjust to as things develop and although colleges would rather have the on campus learning resume as long as it hasn't thanks thanks despite the disruption this could be a learning experience that normally wouldn't exist I absolutely agree and that this experience is going to have a lasting impact on all of our students I have no doubt that that's the case I'm one of the things that we're trying to do through our classes and many of our faculty have talked about that because this transition happened so quickly because there's so much happening in the environment for students many of our faculty are having these conversations with students in their classes will guard lists of the subject they're teaching whether it's now whether it's social work whether it's of course in communication faculty all across our campus are having the conversation with our students because they're processing this at their living through it and I agree with you that it is going to really kind of changed the way our students and I think all of us will see the world and see our human connection to each other and so in this world of covert nineteen higher education does go on there are challenges but in some cases there's even more education I'm Dan Parker WBZ Boston news

Ben Parker
Students Want To Fix Air Quality For People With Asthma On The Yakama Reservation

Morning Edition

03:24 min | 1 year ago

Students Want To Fix Air Quality For People With Asthma On The Yakama Reservation

"The CDC says native Americans have higher rates of asthma that causes them to miss school and work and in some cases even die from the condition some students on the Yakima reservation in eastern Washington are trying to solve this problem by going to the root reporter I leash o'neill ask them what they're up to near the middle of the Yakima reservation Travis whole lives with his kids and dogs in a trailer two of his four kids have asthma well since Tyson his middle son has a particularly bad case he'd go through coughing attacks that were just horrible he had to be hospitalized a few times when he was a little person hall says it was hard to see his son in an oxygen tent and it's scaring himself course your your scared for him and of course your parent it hurts you to see them go through it hall says one of the things that would set off his son's coughing with smoke many households on the reservation have only wood stoves to keep warm during eastern Washington's bitterly cold winters that's because electric heat is expensive but woods is free members of the Yakima nation have a treaty guaranteed right to gather wood to heat their homes if you stood out on the deck you would see it as far as the foothills in this whole valley the smoke will just sit in this valley and it really has an impact on people's health that's Jessica black she's an environmental science professor at heritage university on the Yakama reservation we know that there's things that can be done without any data there's not a lot we can do in order to gather that data blacklisted students at a high school on the reservation to set up low cost air quality monitors across the Yakima nation the families are far more comfortable having people that they feel like they know enter their homes so that they can place air quality monitors is that the best spot monitor half a dozen whites one high school students are learning how to set up monitors I think that's closes the doors right here in past years many students put monitors up in their own homes Hey Alexa weasel tail put one in the home of her cousin who has a wood stove when we saw the data is really bad and what is expected to be that bad we still tell herself grew up in a house with a wood stove and she has asthma maybe we should clear the environment the knights have cleaner air monitors weasel tail and others are setting up to detect particulate matter from other sources like forest fires and smudge pots but in the winter the biggest problem is would smoke from heating homes Keith Hurley director of the county's clean air agency runs a program for low income families to get up to six thousand dollars to swap out old dirty stoves for newer stoves that burn cleaner which don't change out was my way of addressing to the greatest extent possible the emissions it's a voluntary program that offers service to some people on and off the reservation the more these we get changed out the greater the reduction will be in any particular that's put into the air shed in the winter months over the past year the agency has spent about six hundred thousand dollars changing out about one hundred stoves there's a smaller amount of money from the EPA doing the same and the federal agency is working with the Yakima nation to better regulate older dirtier wood

CDC
Jet Altitude Changes Cut Climate Changing Contrails

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Jet Altitude Changes Cut Climate Changing Contrails

"Airplanes account for about three percent of the climate altering carbon dioxide emissions. We add to the atmosphere but planes are warming the planet in another way. Cirque up in the sky you probably see at some point an aircraft and behind the aircraft white fluffy streaks on does what we Kulikov trail imperial college. London engineer Mark Staedtler. Contrails are made up of ice crystals that form when aircraft engines emit exhaust that hits the cold air. The ice crystals reflect incoming light from the sun back into space which has a cooling effect on the atmosphere but the contrails also stopped. He coming up from the ground from escaping into space. It's reflected by battles grounds sir. Basil Wilby Affect Staedtler says on balance contrails warm the atmosphere more than they cool it primarily because the cooling effect. Ut reflecting sunlight can only happen during the day when sunshiny whereas the woman in fact you to trapping. A outgoing heat happens all the time. Some contrails can form clouds last for up to eighteen hours during that time they spread out trapping even more heat. This process allows contrails to warm the planet about as much as the carbon dioxide emissions from aircraft but when Staedtler and his team analyze flight data they obtained of airspace. They found that most contrary warming was caused by just two percent of flights and most of those flights originated in the late afternoon because as the sun goes down cooling no longer offset the warming on the warming effect persists into the northern but what if the contrails contribute most to warming could be eliminated such a change could be achieved if aircraft avoided flying in the thin layers of humidity where contrails form by changing the else. You buy a couple of thousand feet up down. It would no longer hold a car. And so what we found in the study was by changing altitude of less than two percent of flights who could actually get rid of just under sixty percent of the woolly affect musical trails. The study is in the Journal. Environmental Science and

Mark Staedtler Staedtler Kulikov Trail Imperial College Basil Wilby Environmental Science London UT Engineer
Your social media could give scientists a more accurate picture of climate change

Climate Cast

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Your social media could give scientists a more accurate picture of climate change

"Change means more flooding but the way we traditionally measure flooding isn't telling us how much more example there just one hundred and thirty two tidal gauges along thirty seven hundred miles of the eastern Gulf coast. But there are sixty million people. They're walking around with smartphones. That can report and photograph floods. That's a lot of reporting power and a new study to work. It found twitter is much better at reporting some floods then Standard Methods University of California Davis Environmental Science. Professor Francis Moore is a CO author on that study and joins us today via skype. Hi Francis you look specifically at nuisance flooding. What is that yes so nuisance flooding? Is this kind of low? Level flooding along the coast maybe flooding a road or two disrupting people's lives but they're not necessarily going to be the subject of major reporting so we follow twitter. We see these pictures. Come up once in a while. What locations did your study find? Had this increased nuisance flooding. What we were looking at in particular with whether the amount of flooding you estimate using the twitter data is different from what you get from the tight gauges and in that we found evidence that there were a few places particularly some of the major cities so New York Boston and Miami as well as much of the Texas Gulf coast and that these were areas. You'd see evidence of flooding on twitter before it would show up in the tide gauge data nuisance flooding. You know that name sounds like it's not a big deal right but It can be costly. I mean there are saltwater in pipes underground in basements and utilities. Have you had a chance to look at the economic impact of these increased? Sunny Day floods. Yes so we haven't actually quantified those economic losses. But what I do think is that leave. Mejid kind of disastrous flooding events due generate a love attention they offer confidential and the costly but climate change author presents us with these kind of chronic impacts that are also costly and in particular if that affecting a large number of people. And they're doing it very regularly. Those could be really costly though. People are kind of not able to get to school and not able to get to what the driving conditions dangerous. This type of study can start to get at some of those costs twitter's full of a lot of Information not all of it may be accurate. Not all that may be scientific. So what are the limitations of this? Study the way you used it. And how do you you know weed out what's real and what's not we? Put out the total volume of tweets. That have some wet in them related to flooding and there is a lot of noise in that you can imagine so very often. People are using what related to flooding when they're not actually talking about flooding but we do is we we relate that volume tweets to the local tide height based on tight gauges and if you see a sudden increase in the volume of tweets about flooding that probably due to the fact that there was flooding in that location. So then we can look at. What tight heights? Do you get that sudden increase in the tweets about flooding and we could compare it to what the tight gauge says if the minor flooding threshold in many cases we find those pretty close to each other but then in the cities around the east coast. We find evidence the flooding happening. I kind of low a tight heights than what the tide gauge would suggest. And we're already crowd sourcing. Some weather data through APPs like M. Ping which keeps track of precipitation. What does your study suggests about. Future value for expanding crowdsourced climate data. Well what I think is really nice about the kind of social media type data and why it can really complement the tide gauge network. That we already have is that is telling US something. Not just about the physical extent of the flooding but it's telling us about the social consequences of that

Twitter Professor Francis Moore Gulf United States Standard Methods University Of M. Ping Texas Gulf Skype New York Miami Boston
Are Single-Use Plastics Really That Bad?

BrainStuff

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Are Single-Use Plastics Really That Bad?

"In early January twenty twenty China joined the growing movement of more than one hundred twenty countries pledging to ban single use plastics. The country of at one point four billion citizens is the number one producer of plastic waste in the world top sixteen million tonnes in two thousand ten but China announced that it plans outlaw the production and sale of non degradable bags by the end of twenty twenty in major cities and everywhere by two thousand twenty two as well as single use straws by late. Twenty Twenty Eh. Market Selling Produce will have until twenty twenty-five to follow suit the push to ban plastic took center stage in two thousand eighteen with massive promotions like the Hashtag stop sucking campaign which featured stars like NFL quarterback. Tom Brady pledging to give up single. Use Plastic straws now countries and companies are saying no to plastics by the dozens. Sims and consumers are following along with them and they're serious in Kenya for example. Any citizen caught using plastic bags for trash. Your groceries groceries can face four years imprisonment and fines of up to thirty eight thousand dollars as the plastic span movement hits major milestones such as China's in his latest announcement. We decided to take a moment to unpack the bottles bags and straws that are causing this global stare. So what is single use as plastic true to its name. A single use. Plastic is disposable plastic. It's designed to be used once and then tossed or recycled. This includes everything from plastic water bottles and produce bags disposable plastic razors and plastic ribbons really any plastic item you use and then immediately discard well. These items can be recyclable. That's hardly the norm. We spoke by email with Meagan Weldon of the blog and waste prevention shop. Zero waste nerd word. She said in reality very few plastic items can be processed into new materials and products unlike glass and aluminum plastic isn't processed into the same same item. It was when it was collected by a recycling center. The quality of plastic is downgraded so eventually and inevitably that plastic will still end end up in a landfill. Take a plastic water bottle. Most bottles say they can be recycled and based solely on their easily recyclable. Pet composition position. They could be but nearly seven out of ten bottles end up in landfills or pasta litter. This problem increased when China decided to stop accepting into recycling cycling plastic in two thousand eighteen for municipalities. That meant recycling became significantly pricier and according to the Atlantic many are now simply opting for the need budget friendly landfill over recycling pair this landfill I approach with the world's ever growing plastic consumption. Humans produce almost was twenty thousand plastic bottles per second. According to the Guardian and America's waist grew by four point five percent from twenty ten to twenty fifteen. It's no wonder. The world is overflowing overflowing with plastic waste and think banning all of his plastic is overkill. There are some very solid reasons why it makes sense. I I the plastic and landfills doesn't just go away according to Weld in. A plastic bag takes ten to twenty years to grade while a plastic bottle takes almost five hundred ears. And even when it's gone it's remnants remain. We also spoke by with Catherine Kellogg author and founder of the waste reduction website. Going zero zero waste. She explained plastic. Never breaks down or goes away. It only breaks into smaller and smaller pieces until they're so microscopic that they can be found in on our air and our drinking water. Some grocery stores have switched to biodegradable plastic shopping bags as a way to meat consumers in the middle but research shows that this this is hardly a savvy solution. One study from researchers at the University of Plymouth. England analyzed eighty single. Use Plastic Grocery store bags made of biodegradable plastic nick over the course of three years. They're go to determine. Just how biodegradable these bags really were. The findings were published in the Journal. Environmental Science and technology analogy. They found that soil. Seawater didn't lead to bag rotation instead after those three years. Three of the four types of biodegradable degraded bags were still sturdy enough to hold up to five pounds of groceries. That's about two point. Two kilos and the non biodegradable bags performed the same. The biodegradable beds ads exposed to sun did break down but that's not necessarily a positive either. The small particles from that degradation can quickly spread throughout the environment. Think Air Ocean or the belly of hungry animals who mistake plastic fragments for food another reason. Many countries are prohibiting single. Use Plastics is because they shouldn't be reused used despite our best intentions as many municipalities. Forgo recycling it's tempting to take matters into your own hands by reusing plastic bottles and containers and sure this may work for bags but experts. Say to take caution when it comes to plastic bottles or food containers one study in environmental health. Perspectives showed that all plastics used in food containers and plastic bottles could release harmful chemicals. If used repeatedly this includes those said to be free of BPA a controversial official chemical that's been linked to hormone disruption while researchers are still analyzing the safety of repeated plastic reuse experts recommend glass or metal to avoid potentially harmful chemicals and according to Weldon. It's time we adopt a reuse mindset be cotton produce bags stainless steel straws or full on zero waste.

China Meagan Weldon Twenty Twenty Eh Market Selling Produce Tom Brady Kenya Producer NFL Air Ocean Guardian University Of Plymouth Environmental Science Catherine Kellogg Weld America England Official Founder The Journal
Paddlefish is now extinct, scientists say

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Paddlefish is now extinct, scientists say

"Chinese media outlets and internet users have been paying tribute to the Chinese paddlefish which sciences declared extinct in a research paper in early January China youth daily said it's a fair well at first sight noting many were unfortunately unfamiliar with the paddlefish before learning of its divine user shared similar sentiments on the Twitter like way both platform scientists believe the Chinese paddlefish or Chinese sword fish has a lineage dating back at least thirty four million years it was one of the largest freshwater species in the world research paper in the environmental science journals science of the total environment so they could grow as long as seven meters or twenty three feet but in

Twitter
"environmental science" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Church. Also being reenacted in Boston. The time is running out to file your income tax return. But thanks to the patriots day holiday. You have a little bit more time to get that return in the deadline is midnight Wednesday. Well, there is a familiar name atop the leaderboard in the final round of Astor's. We get the latest now from Augusta National WBZ's Bubka just moments ago Tiger Woods with a two putt birdie at the fifteenth moves him to minus thirteen and. Yeah, right lead one shot. Back. Dustin Johnson one shot back, Dustin Johnsons and show. Flay? Brooks kept good in a bit of Bata. He's put two balls in the border at thirteen but I would leading here in round four from the masters. I'm bob. One forty nine on WBZ Boston University, professor is fired after a thirteen month investigation into allegations of sexual harassment. David Marshon a tenured professor of earth environmental science accused of sexual harassment during expeditions to Arctic that occurred twenty years ago, administrators dancing has termination saying the university is committed to maintaining a living and learning environment free from harassment of any kind. She's I am remains the number one movie in the US and Canada. The superhero film sells twenty five million dollars worth of tickets it second weekend in the theaters across North America. The comedy little is in second place with an estimated fifteen and a half billion dollar take in its debut weekend. Third-place hell boy taking in twelve billion dollars in its first week in the theaters rounding out the top five or the remake of Stephen king's pets. Jerry, followed by Disney's live action version of Dumbo, captain marvel finishing the week in sixth place. Some experts study oceans trouble by what's happening off the coast of Alaska, researchers who look at the northern bearing sea say they are seeing rapid changes that were predicted by climate models last winter there was record low sea-ice, but those changes were not expected until twenty fifty university of Alaska Fairbanks ocean refer Seth Danielson. I'm very concerned about this situation that it potentially impacts the likelihood of fishermen bearing sea is home to some of the largest fisheries in the world. Dave Schreiber ABC news game of thrones is back tonight. Some folks are asking why is it so popular CBS's Matt piper? Explain it hasn't been on HBO since the last season ended in August twenty seventeen. But it's here the eighth and final season of game of thrones. It airs at nine pm eastern and plays at that moment. No matter where in the world, you are. So in London it'll be on there at an Washington Post. Tv critic Hank Stewart explains why he thinks this show is so popular his always been allegorical. It has always had some kind of moral code. I think one of the great things about getting all that. And it can be as close as you want it to be or it can be.

harassment WBZ Boston University Flay Hank Stewart Tiger Woods Augusta National WBZ Dustin Johnson Boston Brooks Dustin Johnsons professor Alaska North America Astor Washington Post university of Alaska Fairbanks HBO Matt piper Dave Schreiber
"environmental science" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"I'm on in this segment with Marian Lund who's running for alderman of the forty six th word in Chicago. Hi marianne. I kelly. How are you doing? Well. Thanks, great. So I'm going to start you off with our usual. First question. Just tell me a little bit about your background in while you're running for alderman. Well, I am a scientist. I studied environmental science and renewable energy. I did a peach Dan chemistry at northwestern. And when I finished I had a really cool experience where I worked in science policy advisor in the US on it. So I was working in Senator Sherrod Brown's office for a year. And it was just a great experience. Really started to understand what kind of impact that scientists could have in politics and jumps feel that my civic involvement with really important. So after that experience, I decided I always wanted to be cynically involved in when my term was over there and back to Chicago where I had completed my PHD's, and I just go head first into my community became a block club president joined up perk advisory council committee to save uplift high school, which is a high school in my ward that severely under enrolled, north lake shore drive study task for just a highway cast force in the associate sport of a women homeless shelter, Sarah, circle and through my community involvement. That's when I started to understand that there were some issues in the forty six wards that I didn't like the way our current alderman with resolving and I felt that given my background and my experience in politics. It was a great opportunity for me to step up from being a block the president and to take my community involvement further continue to build on the work that I've already been doing. With a run for city council. Excellent in where is the Forty-six toward the forty six word is on the lakefront, we have Montrose beach. We are just north of Wrigley field where the cubs play. It's a great neighborhood really racially and economically diverse, and it has some notable Chicago landmarks like the the green mill which is a jazz lounge arrogance eater to really we'll historic district, and it's the district. I lived in when I moved to Chicago. So that makes it very special. So what are some of the things as you've been talking to people around the ward in as you've been serving in these capacities. What what are the things that you're hearing from people what are some of the issues that they're they're really concerned about. So I'm knocking on doors. I hear a lot of the things things for my neighbors, despite their background their income level. And those things are the importance of public safety in our community the preservation of community assets, including perks school. There's an access point to lay short ride in our ward that we're in danger of losing that neighbors really wanna protect it. It helps us gets other parts of the city and affordability is another big issue in my area. We have a lot of new housing going in and much of the housing that's going in. It's priced higher than the housing. That's already in the ward. And what are the things that you think it's important to have a scientist on city council. So I don't think that's a, you know, usually when I think about alderman people in city council, I don't think about scientists being there. So what are some of the issues that you think having a science background is really going to be helpful with? Well, I think what people are immediately drawn to scientists in politics can advocate for science based issues, which is true. They can advocate for healthcare ability. They can advocate for the environment. We have a goal with our local Sierra Club to reach one.

scientist Chicago marianne Senator Sherrod Brown Marian Lund Wrigley field US president policy advisor uplift high school Montrose beach Sierra Club cubs north lake advisory council Sarah mill
"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

"In terms of greenhouse gas emissions right yes but the osce to other ways in which animal agriculture affects the environment he had like you equally at minneola goons and ends your own factory farms oil associated with africans worst vacation have those are going to have your hand laguna me think well that's going to be a beautiful boat traffic it's a second only to being flown into jacks company middle of kalahari mc'ing sydney admas around with um so yeah there there are other ways in which the other environmental impacts and ends but until intend to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change than than yesterday it does feel like some of the what he would do it you're doing in northern brazil it does feel like if you could if you can get government consent and you can get the authorities to help out it often does end up financially better off full at the local work has to be doing the environmentally sound thing in this in the same way that we've got like trump trying to bring back the coal mines despite every economic expert pointing out that these mines employ very few people and actually fall more good happened in the local economy if we get will people involved in wind and solar right and other sustainable energy sources totalling so i think that's one of their sort of frustrations wanted of the sort of missing pieces in in in in the serb environmental messages is that it in being more environmentally conscious of finally doesn't have to mean sacrificing the things that the some people care about about politics and growth in m there are opportunities for green growth and green economies particularly if there is initiative showed that the tall by the by authorities than actually can they can adjust howell the whole financial system works that actually it ends up being no yet it is a winwin rather than punishing a at doing the right thing glide and nudging the economy in directions that the would be favorable in terms of environmental sustainability would would help so where subsidies are allocated or even just removing subsidies from from industries the chicane vanity damaging would be would be a great stop and i think that i think as more and more cases of it as the business case for green bay you can be demonstrated more think that'll help too.

greenhouse gas emissions osce climate change brazil financial system green bay kalahari sustainable energy howell
"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

"People living in and around forests usda can develop these are the more sustainable alternatives to um to deforestation in agriculture so uh working particularly in the state of actually brazil which divide northwestern brazil was one of the more remote chona's um and partly because there's a the governor the state government that is doing a really good job of trying to push through these green economic development and investing in and sustainable alternatives to diesel with business as usual elsewhere amazon the cat catlin soy and trying to develop an sectors and industries uh to to push than natural rubber and amazonean fish nasa in these are the products supali looking at the viability of those an understanding the impacts today the benefits and i've been to traditional and indigenous people living in an event forests and said the other founded my research is very containing to look at certification programs uh and other mechanisms the tried to through the sustainability of of commodity production to be submitted a gun we have today to look at the cacao industry in eastern northeastern brazil in by year and understanding how smallscale cacao producers can become certified and hopefully that'll get economic benefits themselves but also ensure environmental so this so this is sinking useful mad at beginning of that the this episode lisa matt like the rainbow alliant sorry that rainforest alliance stickers and uh yes it is yeah exotics is different different suffocation programme batum sang central idea and so the.

usda brazil economic development batum amazon
"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

"I wanted to make my message comprehensive and understandable to yes so so against eggs have us a you know you keep it done tyga jolla this point of of mapping out the survey inge of greenhouse gas emissions per unit glad kilogram or a unit protein of different animal products and consistently cowl products suit including beef and milk and and she products come much higher per unit dan do pig chicken other animal products and then but then vegetable proteins of lois still so you can reduce your radio is just a carbon footprint you contend about you can reduce and much more affected by limiting cowboy boots i know people who do things like they'll do vegan vegan for one month and even that mean if if enough people do that us once wealth of the animal product creation of waste right same same idea with me less monday's of you you've ever worn strictly adhered to meet this month added inabe oneseventh assuming we didn't compensate on tuesday all right double double meet you are the roles exactly the the the environmental impact ivana but agriculture is so huge that vaginal response would be a meet monday whereby we only ate meat on mondays than than brace monday's like but you can buy seventh is not an than apob response to the scale of the of the problem reducing by six evans would be much more in line with with what we need to do globally to to reduce their contribution of agriculture an animal agriculture particular too so we'll climate change what proportion of climate change is.

greenhouse gas emissions animal products carbon footprint evans climate change one month milk
"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

"The peace delic now vita blake's as one of the huge great lakes of uh of inland africa where hundreds of thousands of years ago some sun early hominid species had lived until you could find stone tools and fossil was analysts really cool stuff alcoa the you december costs as of yet in iraq tools of knives and and sort of has an accident things and could get people excited about the kind of stuff that i said nasri i mean lanai speaking personally yet i would like it'd be pretty cool i've never been to africa toll so i was seventy very cool to seeing a hippo in the wild or lion in the wild but i would be so much more excited seeing a prehistoric toll ahead the the hitting i like this is the the last present though this was was hit two thousand years ago and this is one of the monk has this is one of the markers of when evolution as well he branched into will as three she used that can then at vaults the where we all today yeah exactly so it was it was um there's all sorts of this history in and or some of them traces and stories it on livingstone and some of the civilian law of severity adam african explosion and then as of the early human history aspects and then these phillpines would just i'm really incredible that it is a i i guess on have been to the moon but it's what i imagine like being on the moon is like is just nothing you go out into the on court bikes will take it love them i atvs into the middle us all pan and then you can't see anything for three hundred sixty degrees just like you you just on this said other planet and so then you'll get people excited about literally nothing like 'cause yet out added silence and there's nothing to see until the sums edson the necessity the stars although just phenomenal alcoholic is it that that has to be about the lowest like pollution is possible the house right yeah the news live in excessive fifty miles away in the house being credible just i again i've never been any way nearly that remote but even so.

vita blake the house africa alcoa iraq three hundred sixty degrees two thousand years
"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on Probably Science

"Ronda lee science boom done have run welcome to properly science wrong the road i'm in colorado visiting the gulf family currently in the basement of the house of the parents house and an old uni friend of mine lives just up the road tonight mess to meet again be fbi icy fourteen years without his his so long i i pete muted what eu now dr could professor repeat newton worked jaw or only about dr vetter yeah goma ph d six years ago back in the uk in and if it in the us since then vacancy eleven twelve and now professor at the university of colorado bolder is download it's a very nice i've been up to bola is a beautiful town to be living in their workplaces to end up as an academic it's very nice place to end up yet of let let's stop let's not kind of tools the beginning get and then we'll get onto like i saw you get a ted talk and i wanna get onto what that was about the vessels are not wiggle main field of research is in joke that's what you'll sort of teaching field is in ted ex just a qualified but yet again so so you're natural sciences student at unia right right right studied neuroscientist specialized in zoology and then you went into the environmental science field yeah yeah i left college uh did nonacademic stuff with years of what can you could toys him in botswana in southern africa uh worked as a guide for a couple of years mounted sofala camps in uh will about to honor and then we found my academic routes and went back to university in the uk for masters in apply to collagen conservation and then stayed on at university sunday for a ph d and environmental sciences nice again they're a west places to wind up then off doing it said holiday curie than off nor is i was thinking will botswana hey okay so what is ecotourism it involve we're also egotism is a any any form of toys and based around our nature and wildlife them so i was a safari guide at a camp in the mukata katty pens ahead of north northern botswana taking.

colorado the house eu uk us professor botswana fbi newton dr vetter university of colorado ted africa fourteen years six years
"environmental science" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on The Science Show

"Truly because anything radioactive is obviously very stressful there is some fear that it could crack in a toffan bought by szekely the area around it is already somewhat contaminated and the us law nothing from 2014 was that even if it did lake essentially the damage that is going to be done from that is a much greater than what's already sort of occurred now so i'm not sure whether they're going to be doing in a cleanup wrought mccain with elbow revise that view and howard the locals koerppen there wasn't an evacuation sort of obviously closer to win the tests were happening but there are now inhabitants of this at all down the other end away from the done yeah that's rod said the dime mom is actually a little bit of why from in a way talk which is the village inhabited die were evacuated during the tests though allowed to come back and i mean the kids sort of sing about when our longer fried of guns and bombs and nuclear tests and stuff like that in the economy school songs which is a bit pointing they coping with our thinks you know some of the locals really demanding action they're caught upset that the us's while narrows has gone of abandoned it'll be interesting to see what what happens down the road gin and worth having a redevelopment story in and seeing those pictures it's really amazing some of the construction that was gone it's gone on to try and deal with that that legacy of the nuclear tests and from that considerable structure to another one in a completely different part of the world and this one also has great environmental implications run is a damn in iraq that got written up in a in a fantastic long reading the new yorker widelyshared earlier in the here what's the story this dan yes i this is a dan that was built under saddam's regime and it was best built against the advice of most of the engineers he consulted about he eventually found an engineer that was willing to take on the job and i built this huge dam on the tigris river that has basically since taiwan been leaking.

us mccain iraq new yorker saddam engineer tigris river howard taiwan
"environmental science" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on The Science Show

"I fanned is they gotta boat trip out to this tunnel little ato and there's basically this giant concrete dime that is has been built to cover the remnants of third the us nuclear testing and what has been found is that basically as say water has been rausing it's been getting into the dime and bicyclists leaching radioactive material they're afraid that it's going to start letting radioactive material out into the sea water which wouldn't be good news not and it's a it's a striking structure isn't in it's amazing that the pictures which were also part of a really beautifully done on on mind story was kind of drawing footage as well it's too it's an unearthly huge dome that kind of dwarfs markings are sort of mock strolling across the top of it and he looks quite insignificant yet i described as looking a bit lucky uf i it's just this huge concrete dawn that looks completely at odds with the environment around at its by said it looks like a sort of tropical paradise with this john almost concrete dan that's about this osborne ifo football grant so yeah it's really out apply and it's causing the locals the loss of stress in ah i seem to remember even the aerial shots there's a sort of echoed by another great big round shape next to it which is actually a crater from another nuclear test try yeah that's right weather the dime was built it was a massive crowd of that a i dropped a bomb on and then i just sort of hate dole of the staff into that crowd of the yet as another second huge crowd next to it and i gather authorities have been there and they've tried to do some some testing in the kind of the official line is that they think it's pretty safe but there are some other views obviously yeah there's obviously a lot of fear around it now.

us dole football official
"environmental science" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on The Science Show

"The key hello and welcome to another science extra summer peronist episode i'm jonathan webb the science editor at abc are in today i'm joined by out online environment report to look back at some of the top environment stories he's picked up during the year of 2017 ethnic killed it how you doing nick on very well thanks so you one great it's nice to have you here we're going to talk through some of the the begin vine would stories that have broken and been disgusted links this year the first one was relatively recently in a came from erin abc the story of an atoll in the pacific which has a bit of a secret dwelling underneath the surface yeah that's right this one was a cracking story put together by the foreign correspondent tame with mark will a seat it comes from a place called in a week talk at all which is at in the marshall islands about half between papua new guinea and hawaii russ and i think we've got a little clip here from the very top of that foreign cars london's episode all about this item my old vision and life was to live on a deserted tropical south pacific island what's out what you tell the lord america tried to bury its toxic legacy pier on a remote carless whole big hovered over with an eighteen inch thick dome and left now the sea is rising and the d'arme is leaking.

jonathan webb editor abc papua pacific island america nick marshall islands hawaii russ eighteen inch
"environmental science" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on KOMO

"Streets i get it i evacuated for my home is well with me and my family florida power and light says at seventeen thousand people have been waiting to restore electricity fbi says it gathered the biggest pre storm workforce in american history alan scaia tampa twenty till now jim bohannon has a closer look at hurricanes with his knowledgeable guest these mobster storms are the subject of study by any number of people of one of the being our guest dr kristen korbel ciro is an associate professor at the the of all but he had the department of atmospheric and environmental sciences you study these things i guess that must be a lot easier these days that just a few years ago what with with the satellites and computers right right exactly that the amount of data that we collect now in hurricane did it staggering we have infamy from battle i i in the atlantic nathan way out there were keenly quiet aircraft into hurricanes at gather really echo went data and our computer power growth by leaps and bounds every year there were better able to take that data and make more accurate forecasts and thatthat's part of the probe bloody people may not be aware of this but even the best computers that we have have trouble crunching that but he dubbers that's how complicated our atmosphere actually is yes all the data that we collect it's hard for our berkomputer than our weather model to really diagnose pick it all land the men predict what they're going to happen now we can atmospheric scientist computer giant bought word were using their it at the limit that computer power and how mike computing we can actually do if they're the booby twister which i guess so she has of course e stands to reason that light of work and it's certainly not a documentary she says but at what read the part about where the bill paxon at the hill characters were tried to put these little of sit soares in two in this case a tornado add to obtain data the booby ah they were able to succeed vitally in in doing that has anyone ever w think like that similar to.

tampa jim bohannon associate professor soares florida dr kristen korbel ciro thatthat atmospheric scientist
"environmental science" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:30 min | 4 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on WLAC

"About a a woman who refused to give up her disabled son she and he she gave birth to her son in china in china the doctors told that his life was not worth saving because he had a birth complication and nearly suffocated it left him with cerebral palsy and the doctors said he doesn't have a life he's going to have these gonna disable these and a very low intelligence mom disagreed with the doctors dad agreed with the doctors kilemi be a burden on the family forever imagine saying that mom said no got a divorce got her son from the chinese hospital she spent her entire life working with with him inner spare time she took him to rehabilitation sessions she taught herself how did massages stiff muscles she play educational games with him she insisted from the start that he would learn and he would overcome his disabilities well she worked so hard she insisted she teaching them how to use chopsticks during meal times even though he founded extraordinarily difficult because of his cerebral palsy she said i didn't want him to feel ashamed about his physical problems i didn't want him to think that he had inferior abilities which he did in many areas but i was quite strict on him to work hard and the catch up where he had difficulties he graduated with a degree environmental science from peking university in 2011 oh he's now working on his doctorate while attending harvard law school but remember doctors said he didn't have a life worth living somebody else stephen hawking only had two years to live look at the difference he made fdr polio paralysed from the waist down ralf braun guy you not heard of youtube should he is a guy was born with muscular dystrophy he started his career a nineteen 66 because he is the inventor of the 'wheelchair accessible van how 'bout marlee matlin is her will like stevie wonder was his life worth living did you know that freedom was in a wheelchair the artist frida was in a wheelchair helen keller my daughter and the millions like her all around the world who most people in the world will not know her name she hasn't done anything famous but she has changed my life she has changed the life of her family she has changed the life of others who know her.

china chinese hospital harvard law school youtube marlee matlin stevie wonder frida helen keller peking university stephen hawking fdr ralf braun two years
"environmental science" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"environmental science" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"He did in many areas but i was quite strict on him to work hard and the catch up where he had difficulties he graduated with a degree environmental science from peking university in 2011 always now working on his doctorate while attending harvard law school but remember doctors said he didn't have a life worth living somebody else stephen hawking only had two years to live look at the difference he made fdr polio paralysed from the waist down ralf braun guy you not heard of you should he is a guy was born with muscular dystrophy he started his career and nineteen 66 because he is the inventor of the we'll chair accessible van how about marlee matlin is herbal like stevie wonder was his life worth living did you know that frieda was in a wheelchair the artist frida was in a wheelchair helen keller my daughter and the millions like her all around the world who most people in the world will not know her name she hasn't done anything famous but she has changed my life she has changed the life of her family she has changed the life of others who know her.

harvard law school frieda frida helen keller peking university stephen hawking fdr ralf braun marlee matlin two years