18 Burst results for "Environmental Justice Movement"

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

04:57 min | 4 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"There's a really good book by rob nixon about environmentalism of her. It still good slow violence in environmentalism of the poor like. That's a really good book okay. We'll add that to our resources are age. What's a personal habit. That has helped you significantly in your work. I don't know that it's a habit that i just know that i'm like privileged with my opportunity and i'm just reminded by that every day and it grounds me and my work all right. What's the best piece of advice you've received. I got really good advice from a professor of mine. Her name is am allow. She's in the nonprofit world for burning justice in she actually just recently told me don't allow supremacy culture to silence your power. Not something. I really needed here in the moment. Powerful his place and finally. What is your superpower. I don't have one. I don't know how laws amazing done sir bouncing dancer. Look at that right. Well who are they so much for your time. And i'll look forward to connecting with you. Some more future all right so we'll go to isabel then if you're ready to ask you the first question wishes. What have you read. Heard or watch that influenced the most. I do a lot of like twitter reading. And i recently rented two days ago may go will replace sixteen million tons of jean born with native variety. Oiseaux bat was really.

rob nixon isabel twitter jean
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

06:35 min | 4 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"White environmental justice like organization frank. They're like oh. We're trying to do with the i and i go back to stewardesses reckless. They hired like a consultant Working they're not from the community fuller. I don't see that happening. So yes you have to have the. And i also think that you are filling a gap like. That's that's just a fact. Ray you are. I in color. You do have these experiences and we have to learn how to take up. Best beef insane. No we are doing it the right way rape your way is actually the wrong way. This is not a good example. What not to do in this field and so like i struggle with that. Because i'm that person that wants to like being the background it'd be like i'm just here. I'm the person fiscal sponsor. You and i want you to like you lead. But i also realized that. If i don't do that then like another organization that isn't doing it alright. Lis commonly credit for it. I've had that happen right. So it's a really hard like balance to achieve rate to assemble but also to take up space and so i think we also learn having acknowledged the important work that we're doing in these spaces. Yeah there's a risk of this is ironic of the environmental justice. Who are being appropriated definitely is being done. I mean that's what's happening now -demia it already has in continues to happen. How do you see it in academia. What does it look like. I mean you can just literally look at the authors between largely not from ej communities. Yes there are pe- in space that are people of color in a father. Environmental justice robert Yes and a lot of people in that space are also privilege white people can so most back to what you were saying. Sort of mixed feelings about this can be. I'm also Of mixed feelings about this because they are clearly people who are doing fantastic work on this right and does the color of their skin matter like our money out saying no because you're doing fantastic for them. It shouldn't matter right. And yan those folks who are clearly using the privilege to just jump on the bandwagon because this is the thing that's in right and sometimes difficult do. I don't know unless i really know. The person icon begun. There's both academic and social capital right now in doing social work and so lake. It's really difficult. Yes yes and money like an actual capital. Yeah and so. I do have a really hard time. Being what the demographic breakdown is of people that like leading the research in academia because again i think it comes down to like i think the best way to really quickly shift environment. Injustice to environmental justice is to have actual representation power hitter of all oppressed communities. Like yes i included parties right. Yeah i think you're brings up a really good point is psych or it made me think rather about how it's okay to have. Non bipartite folk in ej movement. But as long as those folks know that they shouldn't be taking up space and be sources and power but knowing that their role is to kind of facilitate the elevation or the empowerment of what. I don't mean that the by park folk should have power the by faulk focus. Not what i'm saying. But i'm trying to say is i just know that your role is to be more of like using your privilege rather to create that space that power for by talk folk to just need to ej movement rate which is like an auxiliary role. But the problem is that's not a normative white supremacy coulter value then those communities that are say. So it'd be a believer in what happened in the appalachian right are what happened in. Pennsylvania fracking right. These are poor white communities to lead. Sounds more leg gets about giving voice to the communities have borne the brand of all of this action abide and it doesn't matter who that communities it doesn't matter where they come from it doesn't matter what language this is just that has your community impacted an audio to fight back against injustice like that sort of sometime. Simplifies it for me. Going back to my students. that's also back that works in life losses. So when i showed them videos of fracking in bessarabia mall students connect with it because they see someone like themselves suffering because of the environmental harms. If i show that from another part of the war on other part of the country people who don't look like them. They're less likely to face why i think it's like environmental justice like yeah. There's environmental racism like obviously addresses like literally the environmental protection of like blocked brad community but yes lady. Environmental justice encompasses all oppress like over colluded overburdened. Vulnerable as that. Don't have equal africa's exactly well the conversation just god spicier but time is against us but i would love to have y'all again a few months after because the amazing thing about these conversations like they never end and i feel like i have more questions i want to pick your brain some more but this gives us an excuse for a second conversation later down the line and then we can catch up and see how things have kinda come to fruition. Three or collaboration so we'll go into our lightning round. Which is the four questions. After the first thing that comes to your mind laura. I know you have to hop off pretty soon. So maybe we can start with you. Okay all right great. So let's start off with the first question here. Which is what have you read. Heard or watch that influenced you the most. That's tough because i feel like it's just like a collection of small really impactful experiences over time. And.

robert Yes academia frank Ray bessarabia faulk Pennsylvania brad africa laura
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

07:41 min | 4 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"You said mr bohannon ivan told were having dinner door my dad dad look outside the At my best said you my son out of food. Yeah it's a making those connections that are in so obvious and it's like teaching outside of the curriculum like that takes a lot of work with also makes it fun right. 'cause that's the whole point of it right. It's kind of otherwise if you put us in stripped by all your dj bradley. But what does it mean to dis. Algebra herreid visible story do it whereas the mathematics invented was happening there at the peak of the islamic civilization. is it really came to the four and then how did europeans come to learning Happened before that. So it's always a story is just unfortunately tried to compartmentalize things and big. Oa those stories but the story is always exist. Nor there's one thing. I wanted to ask you in terms of ec. Ej you mentioned. There's the element of using data as a way to like communicate. The stories of the community. And then there's also the professional. He said the professional development element of that. What does that entail yet. So it depends now like when i was in the classroom. It was like really being moving in the moment with my students. Right in every day is different every year. Every cohorts different. Now we're making lives is is in like color of teachers grahovo. Educators were they were they trying do. And how can we support that rate. I think also something that why don't explicitly say a lot but this idea of kind of decolonizing education like our schools. Were like if we look at the demographics of who teachers are largely dominated by white women and so really care that the way curriculum is embedded in classroom darter culturally responsive other bunch of groups. In like when this new social justice wave kind of started peaking again. I saw teachers own. Now i wanna do environmental justice. Do you shouldn't doing this the whole time. You don't get to just use this because it's convenient with a like national dare to how it's going to be done is almost going to be like a token experience rate and so that's where for me like i'm really passionate about how they engage or how they're like thinking you're bringing environmental justice in their classes so it's not just a like i'm gonna show a ted talk in like i'm like doing some social justice stuff in my science classroom. And that's where. The power story mapping for me as a tool for educators pretty important. Walk me through. Like what are the elements that make teaching environmental justice successful. Because i mean honestly. I didn't know what environmental justice was until like i mean i would see examples of it but i didn't know the data was the terminology used to describe specific situations of environmental injustices brought upon black and indigenous communities. So i'm guessing that some of these teachers are working in places like some that don't necessarily know what environmental justice or have experiences with it. So how would you go about teaching or training. These tissues teach ej liquidity elements of that. Make it successful or palatable the way that we approach it is designed to meet them. Where they're i and then also shift. And so i think defining environmental justice we take a lot of time actually defining what it is and then talking through like what justice center phenomena is like who's waste needs to be at the center of this work and so like. I'm lucky that i've had time to think through this. And research being this space. And so that i can bring not into the conversation and then it's also having conversations about lake whose voices occupying time as if you don't come from an environment like a vulnerable or oppressed community. Then you shouldn't be the one talking That like i don't worry about being palatable. I think there's certain words that i'm careful about but i think the work it does land. Yeah i don't know. I don't have other words than it should feel like it's powerful like it should feel no less than powerful work. And so if they don't feel like they should be the ones speaking there's video of education there's many other votes of like facilitating that learning experience. And that's what we walk through like so it's like we kind of bombard them with many different ways to engage in this and then we talk through lake. What does it mean to bring justice center phenomenon and whose voice should be at the center. And so that's how. I approach that when we do that work. Thank you for sharing. That have a couple. Like i think one more question kind of toronto it off i guess i hope it does the question that i had as. You're talking laura and also to isabel is. How does the work that you're doing at sc ej in rice's collective. How is it different. If at all from were seeing being implemented in other spaces they would gap or need or perspective that you fulfill but you help fulfill that hasn't necessarily explored in terms of environmental justice and community engagement for me. I don't think that what i'm doing we're doing it. You see a and a collaboration that we're dealing with for me. Like this is my own perspective obviously. I don't assume that what i'm doing is novel. What i'm doing is just reflective of what i feel much community meet. There's so many people in this space and there are so many people doing things in in many different ways. And i also never never approaches where it thinking about. What i'm doing is the right way. Because i think there's so much humility that is needed in the space. So yeah i think. That's how i approach it in a view. Maya were just as icy need. There's a need from like my own personal experience and like i just wanna work in a space. Where like. I know that there is something that can be done in. I have tools. That can help that if i can do. But i think this is something lauren. I really agree on is. It'd be the really the firmly. Both of us believe that we should put students at the heart of doing the sides. Which means if you're gonna talk about say e. j. than they should go collective are if you're gonna dog about house gas emissions than they should not right. It should be something that oh there's value to because you can't do all the work yourself yet. It should not always be that. Oh here's this book spoon that you read a now you answer a few questions at now you want this is about. We have to be ready dorms for this and this is still a minority movement but in pretty based learning is something i think. Most a lot of teachers tried to do in their classes. So what we try to do is combine that activism vet incubus projects for students and. I think that's where the real cash read your article laboratory supplies cash.

mr bohannon ivan bradley isabel laura toronto rice Maya lauren
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

06:50 min | 5 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"Because it's more accessible to them. Subtype is funny like a lot of people are not that there's better or worse here but a lot of them respond more to the suffering of other animals instead of their fellow bigs so it's just is a process for me but i think laura would answer this question better because i actually have to kind of tippy-toe around environmental justice. That's what i do. I do this. Donald switches delicate dads and after about takes like savings that i should savings board leadership business and dad. Because if i used the word that i really should like you saying that it feels wrong to not use the word advisory. If i used it i think i would lose most of my audience and why is and who is your audience so my audience these what my students and i say for all of that. I'm not make a claim here that all of these issues that to the extent that they would fail to engage with me. But i think there's enough of a minority. The majority of the students booed actually enjoy these conversations. But there's enough off of vocal minority. There doesn't want these issues to be addressed all so that the pandemic started at i was speaking with them about the misinformation that was spread about seeds at gobert itself at that coming right from the dump from the president at that time the donald trump was visited. I got bill you suck. Students complained about the principle that he's making the close political. I said i'm not sure like talking more hard science at hard numbers if that's political. I don't awarded to set by so it's a balance. Where if daughter to give most of the students the best of this outlook so that they can develop this more compassionate and more cosmopolitan dog blow for lack of a better word. I don't like gossiping. Just the drink. Give them that out. I think it's i have to sometimes stay away from using because otherwise out ended up in a place where the discussion has become productive. And maybe it is just what it is right nor all i think what is being done is still the same. So it's just how and that matters right and teachers have especially high school teachers i. It's really difficult because we're in a space where we have to be very culturally responsive for me. What it means is like i want students to be equipped with the ability to ask the right options. If i give them the tools like i don't wanna teach them science just so they can get like and then to do well and succeeded so they can go to like some fancy college like those not my world view as a teacher at all. Would i really cared about was like empowering them with the ability like scientists about asking questions like being curious about what's going on right like when i saw these i was like what the heck like wise my communities weeded right. That was my question and why us right. Why not county and so you can still walk students through that process without being the person that says the words that need to be said. But you can facilitate inexperienced. Were someone else in the room. Probably will and like also students are function of their community. And so you know. I'm from the bay area where it's like largely seen as pretty progressive. Although manifestations in policy doesn't reflect that but that's for my work lives but not every community is like that. And so like i think in the work that we engage me to be like equally culturally responsive. It just like earning how the delivery mechanism can change. But the actual meat of the work is still the same Ins of what's being done is the same. It just might look different bands. Awfully sorry yeah and i would never blame my students that they are certainly at because of that. I cannot use this beads of delivery. Absolutely they are where they are. I see them as victims too because they are be separated from the other bass of humanity. Draw these artificial lines that you're up the left and you're the right that you're supposed to have these views that they're supposed to have those views. They are being separated from this process of they have to open their hearts. And if that means that. I just have to lead to bear the other. That's what i have to write. But it's also a learning process for me. Because that i also have to learn what their lives are. I can't go to the decided doodo. We've got it all figured out the sciences on our side. We don't watch we're talking about. No this is thank you said earlier. This is also about human expedient. They've just had different experiences. So it's really. How do we find a common language will be. Betty started looking at the issues as they affect all of us. And i remember talking to like when trump was in office rate in my team to speak to class. And i started getting a lot of pushback from one particular student who was latino which was totally unexpected rate and he was basically regurgitating a lot of rhetoric bit the trump was basically spewing rate. And so you also have this dynamic of young kids like listening and like regurgitating these argument. Coming from republican. I could sense like a lot of self paid. Ray and so mike loud i said you just have to stick to the facts rabies or the facts. This is linked kind of you'll have to go into the history behind policy for me. It was keeping it simple. But i kept getting even after that. He kept coming at me with these arguments. Which is like listen. I'm here to do our. I'm totally would love to continue having discussion with you but we can do it link outside of class. If you'd like but right now. I wanna focus on what i'm here to do. Which just like helping everyone with this meryl rate and so i understand some in teachers ray having all these different energies perspective coming at them. Let's go mind energy as a teacher. Like having to deal with all of these dregs really intersectional and i felt it for one student but i have friends who were adjunct teachers. Enormous and a lot of republican are estenoz state to the point where they want to go back because there was a lot of like just constant.

gobert donald trump Donald laura bay area trump Betty Ray mike estenoz
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

08:17 min | 5 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"And then they can. Years costs and then e. c. j. started and our youth collective is starting data-collection learnt doing like an air monitoring studying in the city of san leandro and so part of my work is actually which is so interesting something that keeps coming out today but is actually lake bringing the human experience to data and so we utilize something. Called story mapping man. That's a large part of where professional development is living in terms of ej. Space is Training teachers how to neri the community experience in vulnerable communities. And so i had seen that somebody had done like a museum. And i was like this is perfect like i just hit up is about because it just hit me after. Like just letting her with the project was amazing. And i heard like how she envisioned that but yeah i think there's a real need like this. Where the power of. Collaboration is which i like really hope that in the nonprofit world more embraced but there's so much power in a collection of perspectives and people and organizations in so i know how i feel when it's not just the data does a thing right but being moved by what that can say what's happening in the community is another thing so yeah like you can show people a bunch of i. Dunno excel sheets or dots on a map. But if you don't know how to interpret that data for them than it doesn't move them to the action or us story around what that data means to them and how they can use it then. It just is a data. That's all right. It's like there's a lot of working decolonizing like science and that's kind of where i'm being savvy in this space right like i have some literacy i've religion than this trained in the world of science Kulik myspace and like now. I want to like like let's actually do something meaningful. He not that they're causing event but like like that's where they can make the data relevant to the people who you're working with or the impact that you're trying to bring about. Yeah i'm also a master student at cal. And i'm getting my masters in public houses. Interesting hearing is about talk about like people are coming into her. And it's like we need to have more people from the communities that they're trying to represent like being the change makers and so. I think that's also really important. And so laura the last time we were talking. You mentioned how you're working with some high school students to develop or gather air quality data. Is that the project. Or the data that you'll getting from that project with the students in san leandro going to feed into your collaboration with isabelle at the collective. Yeah so they're actually college students at one high school student actually but so our youth. We'd his gabriel trivial and he's from the city of san leandro and so we rainstorm together. Like what we wanted to monitor. Why after looking like different data sets and then we got to stopping faces like okay. Cool reflected some stuff like power gonna make this powerful and then that's when we reach out to east of up to like talk about it's also like building community in this process and not clearly something that is really not only get up it it can move into a more powerful than like moving experience for people that seem the work in your aunts. What the project is the products. Like not a right word but it's like really like an experience an experience an artist like at least the ones time and time again right. Whatever issue mike cohen. Oh my god. There's no information are people don't read necessarily and for me it's always like let's bring it to the heart rate and then bait ended up creating just amazing. Artwork doesn't need any data or like a straining or reading like you. Just look at it. And you're like oh i need to get the vaccine are oh i need to wear my maps great because i do want to protect my elders. Just really cool things like shirt. We started silk. Screening t shirt with the word bone bella which could need put it on but it could be put on the vaccine or put on math so me. It's always like like. I said like creating community in this work. Sometimes you feel so alone. Ray like oh my god like nobody's gonna to understand me are like i'm the only word that cares about this data or like can interpret it rate and no like if you sit down with blake. I've done time. Sat down with artists explained to them like the equity issue in ball and then bear mind just shifts and like i have for example. This artist who's dyslexic dropped out of high school. And yet he still was able to be the owner development company. He's an artist right now. Making repurpose are from recycled repurpose materials. It's just incredible rate and so his mind works in this way. That like mine doesn't and so he's able to think about things in a whole different way rate even when i told him about this project. He's like oh like he had already been thinking about sort of using technology to create like three d. r. or something like that where you don't actually have to create it it could be done in the digital world ray. We have apps on our phones. Everyone has phones that you could just download it. Kinda like you know that stargazing app where you put it up and you could see the constellation. He was thinking of something similar using this data. That ladda was talking about in creating like. I don't know something digital that. You could blink views through your phone or something like that. Yeah but anyway so. Everyone has really cool ideas in creative ideas. And that's the point is to like try to inform people through our in a way that doesn't necessarily involve like ridi. That's really interesting in terms of lately. I've been seeing a lot of courses virtual courses about teaching environmental justice. And something that you all mentioned throughout the conversation is laura. I you were talking about having this kind of like a dilemma or conflict of using environmental justice versus environmental racism. And then you know some rock. You're talking about how you are in a fairly conservative space in upstate. New york. so you'll have your own challenges of communicating. What environmental justice is and here. Isabel is talking about the power of art and storytelling to convey the impact of environmental and social justice issues on an in a community. So one thing that. I'm curious to hear a little bit more about is and some aren't we can start with you is. How do you go about educating people. On what environmental justice is an your high school teacher too right so this is not easy. I'm not sure. I really don't know what's the best way to do it because i think i personally change tactics based on who the audience oops i. I tried to stand my audience. Which is my students from year to year at. It's funny that. The composition of the class dubs off their strongly held beliefs been varied from year to year. They come with soda notions about place the war at like all discount off having big enlightened about these issues at abbey no clue there somewhere there right and i have to get a sense of where they are and then have to start on recession at somebody. Converstation doesn't start with people. Sometimes you have to start the conversation with.

san leandro neri mike cohen laura isabelle cal myspace gabriel ladda ridi blake Ray upstate Isabel New york
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

06:51 min | 5 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"It was only specific till like seven to twelve year olds ray and i was like no. We need programs aware like our families can come together. I started reflecting on that collective in sacramento and friends of mine had also started soul. Collective in sacramento. I went to college with them. And i remember. They had purchased -bility for twelve years so they had started way ahead and so they had a permanent space. Rae bailey can't get displayed anymore and they're just having amazing success with their programming and so i was like we need a collector here. We need to just start organizing. And i submitted when i heard my company. Corporate was closing their offices in california. And i'm not moving within. I'm gonna figure out a different career. And that's when i like started talking with a bunch of friends and we all chipped into some effort this fiber whence you three. I thought i was going to have two years to strategize. And we ended up getting three seismic four months. I think it's because it was like giving us agency. Pray to create your own program so my friend was like i wanna do yoga bilingual so we started doing that in like wherever we could get space. Peace and justice center arlene francis center and then we started taking up space in this currently being developed cholera village neighborhood sennar and we were one of the organizations taking up space there after us. A lot. more nonprofit started coming to do events in their right and it was super successful and this was like. I didn't have a website like all our math. Were literally through But letterman. I knew there was just a huge need release kinds of program than it was really literally may just like because i had a community and a network of artists and poets and different people that really wanted to empower community and connect with community that our collective started just becoming release successful and we started doing workshops in the libraries teachers at various school starting reaching out running us to come into their cox rooms. And that's how i met loud. Actually we partnered with the organization costumers redwoods in coast and we did like a using our very first youth environmental artists summit though we took like fifteen sixteen kids out to pomo canyon ray urban kids that don't normally have the means to go out into the open spaces to canoeing and mike watershed education but also part of our work is not necessarily environmental education. That's like westernize but also bringing in indigenous peoples education and their perspective on what it means to take care of landon creation stories rate. So these things that you don't get to learn about in school. That's how i met loud. I think is michelle. Who was a colleague of loud is. I think they might went to school together. Do the program together and michelle was like. Oh i love this feeling. And we did like murals on the bridge and so incorporated a lot of art in there too and social justice we brought organizations like movement generation in the bay area to come in and talk to the kids about environmental and social justice. Issues just powering. The kids all around of the different professions opportunities and issues but also like even though we no longer kind of we stopped working with stewards the redwood stinkers because they started trying to sort of take over our program ranked like over. We're getting these grant and we have to use this money to do specific kind of education and that's when we were like then it wouldn't be our program rain and we had to like step back from it because then new started trying to sort of take over rate and most recently. I think there's an artist who's like asian and she applied for there are residency program and she had encountered with a park ranger. That was really traumatic for her and it was like for her. It was definitely racist and so we still have issues rate. And she brought it up. The executive director of this organization is the executive director. Apologist and artists brought a remediation unlike document. And all of these things ray and bathing do anything rate. So we're also trying to figure out right now. Because i am in this role like trying to bring it up in the larger context because we are still having gatekeepers like park rangers. That aren't making it. see yes. Lake pollution is making us sick but also racism is like an environmental pollutant shrank event to bray no gene with fat to in that level of which opening up spaces. Let's see safe spaces like in our open. Spaces is really super porn Yeah so a few things. I really enjoy learning stories of how people get connected to one another and it just. It always happens in the most random way when you'd be expected but when it does it's just like that a whole moment of like yes. We should definitely collaborate. Because the alignments is just really obvious it so laura you were talking about how you try to use data and isabel believes or is using storytelling as a way to highlight the injustices within the community. She works in so when you saw isabel rough. The first time in like had opportunity to interact. How did you see. This is manifesting or an opportunity for collaboration yet so it didn't happen moment so he's about lake. She presented at a professional development program. That i attended and i just felt really moved her work. And it all came together because we have a common front michelle and she's very like minded right and during the program. Michelle like really built community which was really amazing and so we had an opportunity to dislike. Shing out. I remember just feeling really inspired and really connected and really moved by the work..

bility Rae bailey arlene francis sacramento pomo canyon michelle cholera landon california isabel rough isabel laura Shing
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

03:04 min | 5 months ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"Straight and so our mentors were still around even though they had like retired as professors. Even though i became a business major. I still taking our so one of my professors had been a part of this. Collective art collective called royal chicano air force and basically they were the art front to the movement at that time ray so they would take space like when they were students at day they started that organization when they were student. They brought an ethnic studies. Right they fought to bring ethnic studies and women's studies in they were doing silkscreen printing for the of w right to get workers rights and then one of them became the first chicano mayor in sacramento and then they started a bookstore near the apple. Saw that and then be organized to create like bill washington neighborhood center and it was through. Data wasn't through classes. it wasn't through. It was through stories and it was through creating community rate. We were trying to do the same thing that they were when they were in college. We were like protesting racist comedian rank. That were coming onto campus. We were organizing with students justice for palestine and the blackstone organizations and so we had incredible mentor is that were part of that movement in the sixties and then i come back to cinema county and then feels like i'm back in the sixties where it's like. There's no cultural senators. No like social justice activities or programs that i was used to in sacramento and so i started seeing that part of the inequity or a lot of equity stunned from not having space whether it was community space cultural center bookstore coffee shop. There were no spaces for us to come together and creek community. I couldn't show these stories with anyone. I couldn't talk about issues that were affecting undocumented. People were my community for the community that come from and then also simultaneously working with the corporation with state farm. I think draft his job in two thousand seven when there was a recession and the only job i could get was churn career and so working eleven years for the corporate cuba cool and also feeling like oh my not. It's totally profits over people and it was killing my soul and i couldn't do that anymore and an volunteering in different nonprofits in my community. Also seeing that there wasn't enough women leading there wasn't people of color leading. There wasn't spaces programs for families to even come together a lot of art things that i wanted to.

royal chicano air force bill washington neighborhood c cinema county sacramento palestine apple cuba
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KPCC

"Environmental legislation. It passed in a bipartisan manner by Congress. And you know, it was really a high water mark for the environmental movement. But in the late seventies and eighties, communities of color realized that those laws were not impacting their lives and beneficial ways, and they were still sort of being sought out for the sighting of You know, waste the sighting of, you know, polluting facilities. And so the environmental justice movement really emerged in the eighties as a counterbalance in some ways to the mainstream environmental movement, And from there, we also saw the climate justice movement really takes shape. And then in the nineties in 2000, and now we have this thing called the energy justice. I would call it a movement. That is very much about ensuring that this clean energy transition doesn't leave them behind. And so there's already an infrastructure of activism and advocacy. Related to the environment and climate, and so folks need only plug into those networks to get engaged in this new movement. And what would be the metrics that you would use to judge whether this new movement is getting the results that you talk about? And this is where it gets really exciting IRA. So we're transforming every aspect of our energy economy were transforming the transportation sector were transforming the energy system, which is to say the electricity system. We're in need of again that deep, deep transition that deep Dick organization work away from fossil fuels to clean energy and what I would use as sort of a measuring stick or a couple things one. Our communities meaningfully engaged in this transition process. So you know the rubber hits the road and not to get too wonky on you. But the rubber hits the road on energy policy in regulatory proceedings around the country, So our communities really engaged in those regulatory proceedings. Are they getting support technical assistance to participate? In those hypertechnical proceedings that air really the place where the benefits and burdens are ultimately distributed. So we're talking about the sighting, which is to say the locating of energy facilities. Are they engaged there? The second piece of that is the distributor justice, peace so hard communities actually getting the benefits the economic benefits that inevitably will flow from this transition. And so that means communities of color, which so far have been left out of the solar transition have increased penetration of solar in their communities. There are other mechanisms such as community solar, where renters and condominium dwellers can engage in this transition by Signing into a project are coming together as a community to create their own energy projects. So those are the things that I'll be looking at. I'll also be looking at the end of the day. How much people are paying for electricity and energy. Are Bill still extraordinary? Right now we know that low income communities and communities of color are more likely to pay a disproportionate amount. Their overall incomes simply to meet energy needs, which some have seen as a human, right. And so in this country, we've got to reckon with all of those aspects of our energy system. Let's talk about that energy system. Is there an actual formal plan and legislation to bring about the kinds of jobs and the kinds of industry changed that you're talking about? Also the nominee for the Secretary of energy at governor Granholm. Jennifer Granholm is currently making her way through the process, and we're all anxiously waiting to see what her priorities will be is she hopefully takes that role in the coming weeks. Right now, There are a few different bills. I think that are on the table. In Congress, but there is no actual legislation that has been passed. That is specific to.

Congress Jennifer Granholm Dick Bill Secretary
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"That's I mean, that's a really deep way of understanding. And it's exactly what I was trying to get across. And what I do think that a huge reason. That this work was missed Wass at a lot of it wasn't necessarily happening under the banner of feminism, right? They weren't saying necessarily. This is feminism. But if you look at the kind of work they were doing it absolutely awesomeness, and many of them identified self identified themselves as stubbornness. Theyjust, but they were doing that work in other spaces and the environmental justice movement of the 19 nineties. That was really I'm really doing incredible things, particularly around issues like NAFTA in the Southwest, in particular in the 90,000 movement had its core women of color Latin ex Asian American women who were And African American women who were really, you know, kind of like leaders at all kinds of levels in that movement. And if you look at the movements, founding principles that they include gender equality, right. It's just kind of part of the movement from the very beginning, and the same thing can be said about the labour of men. And there's a long long history of Women organizing for feminist causes in various storm various spaces that are part of the labor movement, and that's been going on for a very, very long time. What Wass Interesting. Also about the nineties is that they were also carving out munitions. So this is when we see the emergence, for example of the domestic workers movement, right, Which is, you know, begins with people just cough into each other on park benches, right and finding ways to meet in churches where people who were doing domestic work already going on their one day off and finding ways to or Is hard, hard organizing, right? Because we're talking about people don't have a lot of spare time who often are working in across cultures. We very, very low wages and you know, really are exhausted. You know, like everyone is ready. And so this was a hard, hard organizing, organizing, built on the idea that everything is about personal relationships right and that these relationships would develop over time. Time and the blossom in tow into more and we seen happened with domestic workers. I mean, they're really just it is just only grown in terms of both E. Their accomplishments and also the size of that movement. Now that is a form of feminism. Are the domestic workers out there saying we got feminists? No. But you look, I mean, why did they beat you? If you look at everything they're about? This is about feminism and so and so as a historian as a person writing about the movement. These are people who, if you're just looking for the word feminism in the archives or in the newspapers that you're looking through you they might not come up. But if you're looking for that's what I mean, in terms of spending our lenses. We need to look for people who might not pop up in a card catalog. Right now. It's no longer radar on the online catalogue in the library, he typed in feminism. They might not come up. But if you're looking on the ground, what's happening is very clear that there in general to this movement At this moment? Yes, And I think that that's such a great example of the domestic workers because, as you're saying, like that organizing is person to person building networks and connections and community, it's not primarily about though sometimes there might be a protest with signs. Do you know where they might go to Washington and And promote a certain kind of legislation. Theres still not this sense of this image that we have in our heads still from, you know, the 19 sixties and seventies of women at the You know, at the Miss America pageant or women, you know, marching, and that's not to take away from that movement. That was incredible. But from the very start that the media focused on white, middle class women and young women for that those were the women who captured the The limelight. Right? So I think that the you've done a such a service to kind of teach us about like this organizing really is and one of the most amazing Parts of this that I found in doing this research was that this emphasis on a kind of human connection between people was also carried over in the many instances in which these activists were forming connections across borders, and particularly with people in the global south, and there was a really sense that the way That the way we're going first of all that this movement had to be glow that we needed to be in conversation. This is an interesting you can do really cool things on the Internet. Right now. One of the things I did was I tracked these the term globalization when it came when it becomes used, and it's the nineties, right people we have to bring ourselves there. People at this time are just kind of starting to figure out what globalization needs and feminists are in the forefront of Teaching talks about that, and both about the kind of promises but also that costs of global the rise of like global capitalist system and what that means, And one of the things that they're emphasizing is our fate is tied up in everybody's face. And this has never been more true than eyes kind of one of these The message is that they're sending, and as part of that work, they are working there. Many of them were working very closely to develop relationships with activists from Latin America from parts of Asia, Asia and many countries in Africa. They were Self consciously doing this in person whenever they could getting a grant to be able to go to a meeting held somewhere or getting a grant to bring people over to the US and to create spaces that were kind of a validly international avowedly centered on activist from the global South. Those stories they believed were important to be focusing on and holding up and also in the spaces were really important Places of learning for activist from the U. S. Where they Turned out that people in the global South had been taking about globalization lot longer than we have. And they learned in these spaces from activists in the global cell and They also form human relationships. You're listening to w o r t 89.9 FM. I'm talking to Professor Lisa Levinstein of the University of North Carolina Greensboro about her new book. They didn't see us coming. The hidden history of feminism in the nineties. If you'd like to join the conversation. If you remember some things about feminism in the nineties, or you are involved in some kind of feminist organizing now, give us a call. Oh, and 608 to 56 2001 extension. Nine, Um Do you have about 45 questions about that last point that you made Lisa? Because First of all, I just want to say thank you because the the The kind of narrative that I have is my pet peeve is the idea that Feminism and all of these different kinds of movements are where identity based and they became self referenced and cultural in the 19 eighties and 19 nineties, and they neglected capitalism, and they neglected the big picture, And that argument has basically emerged in the 19 eighties. And has sailed on ever since. And you can still get published with a non article like with that like basis. Meanwhile, here all these people building this incredible Transnational network, And as you said, a lot of it was about analyzing global capitalism. And so I want to take us there for a second, like You know, there were 22 kinds of ways people. We're talking about globalization in the 19 nineties, and economists and a lot of social scientists were embracing Kel globalization because there was this.

Professor Lisa Levinstein Wass NAFTA Asia Southwest Theyjust Washington US America Self University of North Carolina G Africa Latin America
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Color, but it's also with his 98 rollbacks of environmental regulations is just creating more pollution in the communities that are already ah, disproportionately impacted. And of course, we see that With Kovac, 19 and I think it's really highlighted air pollution and environmental justice issues when we've seen that. Living in polluted communities are dying, especially people of color in African America at twice or three times the rate of white residents. And so I believe that the cove at 19 is really highlighted. Ah, the impact of ah core environment on health outcomes. We know that over 71% as let latte next people live in nonattainment areas, clean air standards, and I looked over 70% of African Americans. So we can understand now why there's such glaring health disparities and why the's communities are dying of covert 19 at a higher rate. The stars. We invite you to call in and ask Peggy Sheppard. Anything about environmental justice or tell us something about it that you're thinking, Be it a local issue. If you're in the New York area or local to wherever you happen to be, or national Green New Deal issue six for six for 35 70 to 86 46435 70 to 80 for Peggy Shepherd, founder of We Act for environmental justice. She's had been at this since 1988 and has become so prominent in as she points out what is now and more people's awareness than It never was before and kind of suddenly for a lot of Americans over the last few years. Let's say this thing called environmental justice. It's not new, but it's newly being centered. 646435 70 to 80 646435 70 to 80 We invite you to call in or tweet a question or a comment at Brian Lehrer. Peggy, What do you think of the Sierra Club announcement? On the racism of its founder, John Muir. Were you surprised that they came out so explicitly? Well. Michael Brune, who's the president of Sierra Club has been very active in promoting environmental justice and promoting hunger climate platform that centers equity. No, it doesn't surprise me that they stand that, of course, those about the Environmental justice movement have known about John Muir and talked about this for decades. So I believe that there has been a kind of a coming to Jesus moment for many of the big green organizations who have not. Centered people of cup. Ah, in their organizations. And, of course, that's AH, Hold another issue. Uh, when we think about the lack of diversity in and green group And you probably know there's been a green two point over court that looks at the state of diversity and environmental organizations. And so Michael, Grune and many, many others. Haven't issuing statements around black lives matter and that you exploit death and it's really creating. Ah, ah Real sea change in how the green groups are developing diversity strategies, improving their hiring on and there has been an improvement hiring The problem is is that they're leaking talent and have not been able to necessarily sustained the recruitment of people of color for a variety of reasons, but the fear club admission It does not surprise me. Also their last think two chairs of the board have been people of color on African American heiress from Albany like you who you are. And Ramon Cruz, who is putting the cannons or chair and so again, having diversity at the top levels of the organization, I think has really That organization to be better. Let's take a phone call Debbie and Lacey, New Jersey You're on WNBC with Peggy Shepherd. Hi, Debbie. Hi. Hello. I'm writing an environmental Bible study book for my church. Uh, so I guess, but I'm encountering as I talk to people and try to get people's views on the topic is Quite a few people believe that either man is not responsible for the environment or that we don't have any responsibilities. Do anything about it? Because This's kind of maybe God's plan. My God had had foretold in revelations, so they kind of don't want to take any responsibility for it. No, I don't even see it as a problem. What do you Recommend for talking to people in a church setting about the environment, how to get them to understand the issue and understand their responsibility. Well, you know, and many denominations there is the the Ah The concept of Of Ah, Creation theory. And if you really go back to the Bible, a CZ many denominations do so thoroughly. I think many parishioners will see. That you know the Bible and God and Jesus have really discussed the idea of maintaining a sustainable earth on maintaining the ICO. Diversity on DH, the biodiversity of our planet. And I think that when AH state leaders really go directly back to the Bible and teach those aspect that it should be influential, too many of those churchgoers and people of faith Jane in Great neck. You're on WNBC with Peggy Shepherd. Hi, Jane. Hide it. How you think it's taking my call? I have a question about the concept of life cycle costs. In other words, if you look at the wildlife refuge or you're with the area's Louisiana, your guests referred to, um The concept of how you repair the damage doesn't seem to be factored into how much this is costing our country. It seems to be more prominent in Europe that they take into the consideration the life cycle costs, so that's really my question. How does she do that? Well, we view that is very, very important, especially we have a lot of activists working on on toxics and chemicals. And you know the chemical lobby and the lobby has been very adamant about Really holding forth, not testing. You know, as you know, our federal government chest only a handful of of chemicals, and so we really Have a problem with the chemical and business industry that will not Focused on safety and so looking at the life cycle of our products is very important As you said, it's very it's very active in in Europe. But we have not been able to make that happen. Hopefully with a new administration, we can begin to to look at enforcement and studies around some of these chemicals on looking at the life cycle of our product. Certainly, you know, there's been a lot more Emphasis on this in terms of plastics and the plastic pollution that we're all living with Andi to that point when you say life silent when the life cycle and when the caller says life cycle of a product We're talking about, like building into the cost of a product the cost of disposing of the product eventually and of its packaging, rather than leaving that to the tax rolls down the line, right? Exactly or leaving it to Ah, landfill or to exporting it, Teo, You know, 1/3 World country, which doesn't have the kind of regulations to ensure protection of its residents and the environmental justice issue again. We have take a break. We'll come back and finish up with Peggy Shepherd. More of your phone calls. Stay with us. If.

Peggy Shepherd John Muir Michael Brune Sierra Club Environmental justice movement founder Peggy Sheppard Jane Peggy African America Kovac Europe Brian Lehrer Debbie Ramon Cruz Teo Andi New York
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is W. N. Y C 93.9 FM and AM a 20 NPR News and the New York conversation. There goes my sea. And as the Democratic convention kicks off today, one of the issues that vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris a centering is environmental justice. Just this month, she introduced a bill called the Climate, Equity Ass. Based on the previous bill she had introduced last year in the Senate, along with New York Congressman Alexandria Locascio Cortez in the House. The bill emphasizes the disproportionate public health impact of pollution. In low income communities of color. Now, this happens to coincide with some traditionally mostly white environmental groups, revisiting their pasts as well as their current missions. The Sierra Club, For example, last month issued a statement about this this from the Washington Post story about this on July 22nd. Listen to this. Says as Confederate statues fall across the country, Sierra Club executive director Michel Brune said in an early morning post on the group's website quote. It's time to take down some of our own monuments, starting with some truth telling about the Sierra Club's early history, unquote refers to John Muir, the patron saint of the American wilderness, as he is sometimes called Who fought to preserve Yosemite Valley and Sequoia National Forest once referred Tio he once referred to African Americans, according to this Washington Post story as lazy quote Sambo's that racist pejorative That many black people consider to be as offensive as thie n word. And while recounting a legendary walk from the Midwest to the Gulf of Mexico, Muir described Native Americans he encountered as Dirty and this article goes on in The Washington Post. Muir's friendships in the early 19 hundreds were equally troubling. The Sierra Club, said Henry Fairfield Eyes more and close associate led the New York Zoological Society and the board of Trustees of the American Museum of Natural History and following Muir's death helped establish the American Eugenic Society, which labelled non white people, including Jews at the time as inferior. So you get the idea that from the Washington Post on July 22nd With me now is one of America's great environmental justice activists. It's been 32 years since Peggy Shepherd founded the group known as We Act, Originally for West Harlem environmental Action. Now we act for environmental justice. She has since won many awards served as the first female chair of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council for the U. S. Epatha. Worked internationally as well. And this year was a point to chair of Mayor Bill de Blasio EOS Environmental Justice Advisory Board in New York City. Peggy Great to talk to you again, thanks for coming on WNBC during an important week. Yeah, wonderful to be here. Gonna start on every day. Great to be on. I'm so glad to hear that peg. And can I start on the news? Are you familiar with Kamala Harris is Climate Equity Act. Absolutely. I had a chance to visit her office as she was beginning to think about developing this equity act, and we were able to provide some recommendations, but it it's a great act that I hope happens within their 1st 100 days. If we're lucky enough for that. And it really aims to center accountability and equity impact in federal climate and environmental action, and so would really be a screen. Were all climate legislation and policy to ensure that frontline communities have a seat at the table. I see that Joe Biden also released the platform position last month called a plan to secure environmental justice and equitable opportunity in a clean energy future. That's just the title. That's not the plan on it. It sets a goal of 40% of clean energy spending going to disadvantaged communities. What kinds of spending with that be, if you happen to know Certainly so that would include very strong infrastructure development in frontline communities. It would include, um developing, uh, affordable housing that is energy efficient. It would include subsidising some energy bills for low income, low income household. On so it would really make strong difference, and I should say that it's modeled on the New York State Climate in Community Protection Act, which also directs 40% investment to frontline environmental justice community. New York has really been a policy leader. Now, as it happens, there's other environmental news just this morning. I don't know if you've seen this yet. The Trump Administration released its plan to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. And he calls the Democratic ticket anti energy does the Arctic Wildlife refuge, having environmental justice angle to it, or has added another category. Oh, no, absolutely. And in fact, He's been threatening to do this for for most of his administration. It absolutely has an environmental justice impact. We work with groups in Alaska and their many indigenous populations. That really depend on their subsistence. More. Ah, uh, the caribou who were there of for fishing and as it is, in terms of climate change, they're already having to relocate from the ocean front. Because of rising seas, so to allow exploration in the Arctic region really would mean ah, wildlife diminishing that Indigenous folks depend on Ah, and their lifestyle would be very, very changed. Now, Trump would say Republican approaches to energy are better for equity because they create lots of private sector jobs in oil and other industries. Us is leading exporter of natural gas now where we were once Importers of energy and the Biden Harris plan to end or limit fracking and the use of coal he would site on Ly make more expensive the energy that people need to buy, including poor people, obviously with an extra burden from that and eliminates jobs that the private sector is creating. To replace them with an energy sector more dependent on government tax dollars. So what would your response be to any of that? When we believe that a green deal and that much of the Biden plan really is focused on Ringing hundreds of thousands of new jobs through and inclusive and empowering all government approach that really will focus decisions driven by Dad and science. And will certainly ensure that We are creating new wind and moving wind power moving waste from fossil fuel will feel dependent And we believe that that will create hundreds of thousands of new jobs to a new, energy efficient future. Says Does all of this suggests a change in the relationship over time. Of the environmental justice Movement to the Economic Justice movement. I think in the past there was more of a sense that you know energy environmentalism. Might hurt the economy at least in the short run, but was necessary for something ambiguously called the planet. Now we have the green new deal, which even if, even in its title merges environmental and economic and economic justice, In a way that I'm not sure people thought about a generation ago. Well, you know, the national Environmental Justice Movement, which has been active over 30 some years, has always Centered thie economy in our communities as well. It might not be something. You know a lot of people just hearing about environmental justice now, But we've already always talked about environmental and economic justice because both are inseparable. And so, you know, you mentioned, you know, Trump talking about job development. Well, you know, if you have been in New Orleans in the cancer Alley, Carter You have hundreds of miles of chemical in oil. Be fine, Aries. But guess what. None of the people in those communities have jobs there. So the whole idea is that Trump is going to create jobs. It doesn't create jobs for people of color living in frontline community, and the Biden plan centers, those frontline communities for jobs for good union jobs. For apprenticeship programs to really move people into family sustaining jobs. And His energy program is really centering, Ah job creation. And so I think that's a very big difference between the Trump the Trump plan, which, of course Not only is the is not improving jobs for people of.

New York Joe Biden Sierra Club John Muir National Environmental Justice The Washington Post Trump Kamala Harris national Environmental Justice Environmental Justice Advisory environmental justice Movement West Harlem environmental Acti NPR News Mayor Bill de Blasio New York Zoological Society Senate New York City
Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

Dare I Say

08:54 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

"Jane Fonda was arrested five times for environmental protest outside the Capitol this fall. She accepted a BAFTA film award while being taken into custody and photographs. The actor cast a striking figure in handcuffs in red will coat. It's a color fitting for the protests which are inspired by global school strikes and called Fire Drill. Fridays fresh from her arrest streak. The activists joined environmental justice campaigner and community organizer. Peggy Shepherd to record a live episode of Dare. I say in partnership with AMEX AT SAKS fifth avenue in New York City Peggy has been at the forefront of the Environmental Justice Movement in the US for a long time. She founded nonprofit organization. We Act for Environmental Justice in North Manhattan in the eighties. It helped low income New Yorkers in particular communities of color fight harmful environmental policies. It now fights for better environmental and health policies on a local and national level in the I live recorded episode of Dare. I say peggy and Jane discussed civil disobedience the green new deal resilience and why it is important for women to lead the climate conversation. How can we remedy empathy crisis? That has hurt generations of Americans. Why is the cult of rugged individualism driving climate disaster? What can older generations learned from teenagers at the decades on the frontlines? Peggy and Jane Have Not Stop Fighting. They are women who dare. Hi You know. We have a lot in common where activists arrested. But why have you decided to be arrested and to be active at this moment in time over Labor Day weekend? I felt great malaise because I drive an electric car and I do away with single use plastics and I make all those right personal lifestyle choices but I knew that they're not going to be able to scale up in time to get us where we need to be is a good place to start but it's no place to stop and so. I read a book by Klein that talked about a green new deal and talked about gratitude and it inspired me to get out of my comfort zone as Greta says we have to do and not behave business as usual as you know better than a lot of people. We have decades many decades more than forty years writing speeches and books and getting the word out about the science. What the science says. And we've marched and we've rallied and we've played nice and it hasn't worked enough and we only have eleven years left and so we have to up the stakes and I think we have to mobilize and go into the streets and put our bodies on the line and engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested. I don't WANNA BE ARRESTED. But you know you have to be willing to risk it so I went. I moved to DC for four months to win gaijin fired real Fridays because Fridays is the day that Greta and the student climate strikers have chosen to strike for climate so I want to support them and helpless their message teenagers today were born more than a decade after NASA scientists warned Congress about climate change in nineteen eighty eight. James Hansen told lawmakers at the time that he was ninety nine percent sure that human activity was causing temperatures to rise. Teenagers today have inherited the climate crisis. They have grown up. In a world of apocalyptic headlines and increasingly volatile weather. It's no surprise that they are extremely intelligent educated and now taking to the streets sweetest teenager. Greta Tonsberg inspired a wave of student protests across the world when she skipped school to strike outside of her country's parliament. And so how do you feel that? We really can motivate young people and youth to really be the strong activists that they need because they are going to inherit this climate this globe right now. What I'm feeling is I don't need to motivate them. They're motivating me. They're the ones because they see that we've taken their future not we. The fossil fuel industry has is robbing them of the future and we can't let them shoulder this burden by themselves. So Granny's unite. Older people have to get out there and and we have to stand along side them. This is a collective crisis that's going to require a collective solution that means all of us together because it is a stomach and we know that we can each take the issues that we need. Whether it's changing light bulbs whether it's recycling. We know that we can do all of those things. But we know that it's systemic and that we gotta come together collectively to educate our elected officials and to pressure the policymakers to really pass the kind of legislation that we all need. But we know that we can't do that with the message. Simply reducing carpet or a message. Simple energy efficiency. We've got a really embraced the values that appeal to all of our communities because Oliver Communities are not whole. They're not healthy. We know that millions of people in this country are living with bad air. They don't have clean water and they are disproportionately impacted by pollution and the Environmental Justice Movement has really for the last thirty years were to achieve environmental protection for all communities and we know also that when we talk about climate change and you hear people talk about climate justice. Climate Justice is not just a cool phrase. It's really a term that is focused on the most vulnerable communities. And how we've got to take action to ensure that the most vulnerable are protected because when that happens we're all protected and so we've got agreement deal and we know that that's been an important framework that's been proposed and it's wonderful that she was not prescriptive. Afc and the others who have talked about this framework we know that it has motivated sectors of of our country to get together and fill in the blanks. What they think is a green new deal what they need for their communities and for their lives and that's been a very important motivator. I think in this moment for a long time. There's been this rap that the environmental movement is white and elite. I think even Obama kind of felt that way but my experience is that that is not the case and then in fact people of color who live in the frontline communities have been very much at the forefront of the environmental movement and are the bravest strongest voices. It's a stereotype that people of color don't really care about the environment. Because they're really concerned with with jobs and food and of course we're all concerned with that but what? I've found predominantly above ninety sixth street when we have monthly membership meetings. It's not the more fluent Brown's donors who are coming out on these sites. It's people from public housing. We get so many calls about air pollution coming into their apartments about odors and emissions from trucks cars buses. We have worker training program for under employed young men and we invited them to come to our membership meetings to hear about issues of climate change or toxins in and chemicals cosmetics and they were able to understand the issue they were able for the probably the first time in their lives to talk to an elected official and tell them what they felt in what they needed and so it's about support. People know what they need. They just need some support to be able to advocate and to be able to. Maybe have a place to come and use computer. Have a place to come and ask some key questions. Let me just tell you that the upcoming mayoral public housing tenants are going to be a major factor in who gets elected and we're going to be organizing them and there's coalitions all over the city to ensure that some of the most vulnerable people are the ones who are going to be part of the solution and so I would simply say that the most vulnerable when we address them we lift all boats. It's not about trickle down. It's about lifting everyone up together and that's what creates an equitable and just society.

Peggy Shepherd Greta Tonsberg Environmental Justice Movement Jane Fonda Official United States Amex Oliver Communities James Hansen North Manhattan New York Barack Obama Granny Klein
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

10:26 min | 1 year ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Dc with the trump administration or whatever administration. It might be nuts in the White House and we're forgetting about all of this incredible Advocacy and growth. That is now happening on the state level and in cities where the president decided to remove himself or move our country from the Paris climate accord. There were all kinds of governors and mayors In both you know red and blue places. Who said wait a minute? This doesn't make sense. We've got to do something you see. Foundation Juicy Business and Industry folks you see young people And frontline communities all coming together to make change happen and all that comes from this set of advocacy this stat of education and learning. You know from fifty years ago with Earth Day and the Environmental Justice Movement and a number of other movement. So I'm even though we're in so very challenging times. I am a hopeful and optimistic that we are right at the precipice of change And I think we're gonNA see some amazing things out a silver lining if you will of creating a new generation of awareness and activism when it comes to to to environmental justice and obviously climate change in particular being the most urgent issue. It seems right now from your eyes what does progress on climate change. Look like both this year as you look at the end of the trump administration's first term and then looking into the future to the end of the decade or even two hundred fifty. How how do you get there on addressing climate change in these this political uncertainty and with the state? Sure well I think. In relationship to year it is a matter of educating folks on the power of their vote. You know we. Are you know just not that? Far Away from when everybody the opportunity to engage in our civic process So we need to make sure that people understand you know that their vote can actually translate into change it can translate into getting people Who you don't have to convince about you. Know the immediacy of the climate emergency It also helps folks understand that we can create a whole new set of economic opportunities in that space. I think that we also in this moment Continue to support young leaders And all the incredible energy and innovation that they have going on And letting them know how valued they are along with our frontline communities providing this or in that space and keeping the You know communication open with brothers and sisters across the planet which is so import Because unfortunately you know. Our current administration is kind of a closed. The doors zoo significant conversations with others all of that moving into November Getting the right sort of results there and then very very rapidly Getting in place a number of steps that are going to be critical as the IDC report. National Assessment report is share with us. You know we'll be in that nine year timeframe there so we'll have have to do a whole bunch of things very quickly To be able to address some very very Significant challenges that we're going to be faced. I'd imagine that if we're not in this era of social distancing right now we would be seeing rallies and protests around the world for the Fiftieth Birthday. Obviously that's not going to happen next week from your perspective as someone with very deep connections in organizing and communities and promoting change How has all of that changed in this new virtual world that we're in right now and I do think some of these changes are are gonNA stick in the way people organize even not being able to see each other face to face? I think it is you know again. It's an exciting time challenges. Bring out the best. Hopefully an in most votes and there were huge huge you know million plus people rallies that were planned and now folks have taken that online There are literally you all across our country and across the planet. A number of virtual events that are plant is exciting. I can't wait until Earth Day because there are so many artists and entertainers Who are going to be apart of helping to bring people together to motivate folks to get people you know connected You know in a number of different ways Young leaders and others. You know we've got the Earth Day network and others who just got all of these different opportunities to learn and engage. People are getting registered to vote online. Where we're where you can It's amazing saying how quickly people were able to sort a schist or pivot And get these pieces in place and I that you will see that. This is also building bridges between Jew bureaucracies organizations who may be had traditionally been as connected And you're going see you know these new online flat arms As ways you know just bring the country and bring others a more closely together in a time. We can't physically touch each other. We are touching each August Platforms in real. Change is not come out of that. That brings me to my last question. Which is your your work with the hip hop caucus. What is it about? Music and hip hop in particular makes it such a a critical or useful platform for speaking truth to power while you know many of these artists and entertainers you know they come. From what folks are talking about. You know it's not a theoretical sort of set of conversations or creations And music you know. Music has always been a big part of my life. But you know it is a connector. It is a bridge builder And you know hip hop is the number one musical genre. The world So you know all the various forms that are out there whether it's country music or Bluegrass or hip hop or raft Or classical Or you know some of the other forms that folks down you know. It's an opportunity To actually connect you know we have way too many walls that people bill between each other between communities between racists And it's an opportunity to break those down And instead of having walls you know to have so you know. I was so blessed to be at the Office for two years and very thankful for that experience because I got a chance to see and hear artist. You know who really got it. You know we work with the taboo from the black. Iv's and he and the magnificent seven to stand up for standing rock which won an MTV music awards for which really put a spotlight on what was going on there and standing rock but also you know y water quality is so important and how there's a cultural aspect to it and a number of others. You know Andy Smith. You know redoing the Beatles Song and just Gene everyone with under comes really pointing folks forward and looking at the positive audibility is really just a reach away so You know music. The Arts is a big part of this new paradigm of how we make change happen. There are times right now when all of us feel despair bleak somewhat alone because of all of this Who Do you put on? Who Do you listen to when you need to feel inspired? Wow there's so many folks on this direct a chance to rapper. I love chance the rapper because he uses his activism in in a very you know powerful way of you know getting resources to folks getting people engaged comment. I love comment He he just made everything he's the best he's the Best Cardi B. I love parts in the political process. And you know reaching a whole different set of folks in many others would be able to There's a laundry list of folks that I listened to and of course I would be remiss if I didn't give a shoutout to Chuck D People. Tease me all the time. 'cause public enemy was one of the first groups ivory started the follow back in the day. And to the you know so this particular moment you know chuck and arrest them are still killing it. Still Educating people and still letting people know that you know you have to fight out except for Flavor. Flav but will leave what they're all right. Mustafa Santiago Mustafa Santiago Ali. It has been a pleasure. Thank you so much for taking the time today. Thank you thank you. Y'All say less than and remember the we can help folks move from surviving to thriving and that's it for another episode of Go West Young podcast. I've got to say as bleak as these times. Are I really needed? A shot of optimism like that. Thanks so much again stuff. Santiago Ali as well as Patrick Dueling from the Western Slope Conservation Center. I do appreciate all of.

Mustafa Santiago Mustafa Santi Paris chuck president White House Environmental Justice Movement MTV Santiago Ali IDC Andy Smith Western Slope Conservation Cen Flav Patrick Dueling
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"It's important to me that I create representation around the diversity that exists in the environmental sector. And so when I was able to reach Michael Charles Through Ohio. University's indigenous native American Student Association. I was ecstatic. It's been extremely important for me to find individuals from various backgrounds. And it's been especially important for me to make sure that the various voices from the native American community and indigenous community are heard because our society has historically excluded their voices. And it's not right and it's not fair. I'd like to try to change that somehow. Through this podcast. We have so much more to learn from indigenous native American practices especially with regards to respect for the earth through this process. I have been educating myself about native American tribes and the history of the indigenous and environmental movements. I will be sharing these resources on instagram. So please join US AT BREAKING UNDERSCORE. Green underscore ceilings against breaking underscore. Green underscores ceilings. Getting back to our excited and humbled to have Michael on the podcast is because he took the time to talk to me about his journey to becoming involved in the Indigenous Youth Environmental Movement representing native American tribes at the UN and COP. Three the Michael is the neck or a Navajo. He's currently pursuing his PhD in Chemical Engineering at Ohio State University. His Research Explores finding innovative technology. Solutions that promote sustainability without jeopardising economic competitiveness. I was interested in learning about how Michael's interest in environmental sustainability defined his academic journey and his role as an organizer and leader with an indigenous youth. Groups focused on environmental justice. We talk about how standing rock and idle. No more inspired him to get involved in the Environmental Justice Movement. He also to share his perspective on the power of indigenous environmental movements based on his experience and where improvements can be made. We also talk about the role. He sees himself playing as a native American in bringing indigenous knowledge culture and values into the national environmental and climate policy agenda. This conversation has humbled and inspired me and I hope you feel the same way too when you listen to Michael Story. I hope you enjoy so. We'll start off with introductions because I believe you said that typically what you do is do introduce yourself in your native language and then translate for us. So let's go with that day Michael Charles Shea Bill Again. Initially has she pushes chain bill. Ghana Anneli so hello. My Name's Michael I just introduced by kind of family to or my clan system So what I explained was basically on my mom's side of the family. She's European or Villa Ghana or white similar words in our language that on my Dad's side his mother's side we come from the salt people and then on his dad's side we come from the Mexican Navajo clan. Okay well thank you for explaining that. I think it's really a beautiful way for. I think human beings to just say introduce themselves in US thinking to myself. I should start doing bud. Just introduce myself and my language and I think it's it's a way to kind of preserve so it's a great idea. So you know as you mentioned part of your heritage is is Navajo and it made me a little bit curious. About how your identity as Nava who has shaped your perception around nature and since much of the conversation? This podcast focused on environmental issues. I thought that would be a great place for us to kind of start to talk about your background. Your identity is in a sense. That sounds great. I think a lot of growing up. I'm Kinda grew up in what we call a as an urban Indian or someone who kind of grew up in more of a either off reservation or kind of a city area yet. I didn't really in the city so I moved away from Arizona. What I was pretty young family up to Colorado and we were living Kinda just in the foothills of the mountains for awhile and not any place I would call a city. There's about five thousand people in in our town limits and then the other place we lived after that was fifteen minutes down. The road had about seventy thousand so never really was living in city. But I think one thing that was interesting was how much kind of my experience growing up as DNA or as Navajo kind of relied on my trips back and forth between where I live with my parents then. Kinda visiting our family on the reservation and one thing I think was funny. I don't think I ever realized I hadn't really been on vacation. That wasn't for visiting family back on the reservation or like a sibling soccer tournament. Those are like the only time we left at at and I. I think it's interesting because for a really long time. Kinda Kinda grew up where my culture was an is very place based thing but for a long time it meant that I only was deny or Navajo when I was back home. Where like around the rest of my family was when? I was at my grandma's house listening to the language in in hearing all around me. It's when we got up and made the fire start the day to make sure that the house was warm and it was kind of in those simple practices that you do when you're back home that really kind of built who. I wasn't what I understood is meant to be DNA Navajo or even on a broader scale digits. But I don't think I really carried much of my culture with me are understood what that meant when I left our family down there and so I think a lot of that started developing once. They moved away from home once. I went off to college when try Undergrad in New York. I think that played a big role of trying to figure out my experience with nature. How much of that was through my cultural lens or just through being a young kid who loved being outside and and exploring but it definitely developed more from a world really cool. It's beautiful and I can run around and nature gave me a lot of Catholic. Recreation gave me a lot of ways to kind of be by myself in and walk around and I've always loved kind of running and hiking and that was definitely one thing that kind of always find me outside but it wasn't necessarily too much more than the recreation of the outdoors and I think a lot of the development that I've had around kind of my relationship to nature has been trying to really understand not just from our Culture Navajo but from all the other indigenous peoples in communities that have welcomed since I've left home. I think I've learned a lot about the spirituality in the relationship between ourselves in Earth really tried to focus on. What does it really look like to have a relationship with the beans around me with understanding really how Earth has provided for us in our people over our histories? I think that's really kind of shaped a lot of how I view nature and has released switched around from. This is something that's really beautiful to look at and to enjoy in terms of running around and just exploring Shifted to out of. I really understand the land as history and then the story tells yet does tell the story of the people who were here and the ways that we should live from that yeah. There's something that you said earlier on about. How do you know when you had more contact with your family and with your people innocence? Like your tribe innocence. You thought less about it. I guess because you were exposed to it often and then when you leave home you think more about sort of your identity and what it means in this new environment and I feel like I can relate to that because you know growing up in Kenya rather I grew up mostly around the Indian community inside. I didn't really think so much about the history of Indians in Kenya or like in India and learn about that stuff but I think once I came to the US. I was more hyper aware. And more curious to learn about the Indian culture and about South Asians and also the history of South Asians in Kenyon in Africa in former British colonies and then just speaking to your experiences of being in nature and being curious about it. That's something I think. A lot of youth appreciate and love nature and so it's sort of like free range for them and I think that's the best age to to have anyone exposed to nature and build an appreciation for it. So that's kind of that's beautiful. There's also this one elements that you kind of mentioned is you know you are. You would call an urban Indian so you Kinda had a duality in your experiences where you would go to visit your family on the reservation as often as you could but then you also lived in outside of the reservation are think you know like regular Not Regular I don't know how to define it but like a more westernized culture right. Did you recognize that there was a duality in how you live your life and if you did than how did you navigate between both those cultures because your mother is you mentioned? European? Your DOT is native American. So that was at home as well. Yeah I think one thing. That's pretty I guess. Relevant or interesting in that sense was kind of just the way that we think about kind of what culture is and I think for sure like I didn't grow up thinking like wow. I didn't think about like the words mixed race or like that. Duality of what it looks like when I was back home in Colorado or with my family in back home to where we're really from in Arizona on a reservation and it's the fact that when you grow up I feel like you're learning culture as kind of a practice and not really as a base of knowledge or yeah. You don't really thinking like oh. These are all stories. I'm supposed to learn or this language is something I should be memorizing right now or really paying attention to never really thought about that as a kid it was more. I'm back home in these hills are kind of our families from and I'm just GONNA run around in the third. 'cause I really like to explore space in? I remember like sledding. On all these like hills that are basically just read sand and coming in just completely dirty and and I would always get in trouble because I had to basically just be like host off. You never knew how much water was kind of hard to come by in that area. So you're just Kinda that kid who didn't really think about anything just ran off and then your mom comes back and yells at you. Grandma throat starts throwing water on you but I think it's funny that that was just kind of normal. I never thought about that and then I would just go back to school back as the only native kid I think my me and my siblings were the only native kids in that whole school that we grew up in. And you just didn't really think that other kids did other things differently. He just didn't really think about it. How cool your family went on vacation to and you never really thought that like for their spring break they were out of beach in Florida or something. You're in the desert..

Michael Earth US Indigenous Youth Environmental Arizona Colorado Michael Charles American Student Association Michael Charles Shea Bill Environmental Justice Movement Kenya Ohio Michael Story Ghana soccer Villa Ghana Ohio State University Florida Nava
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Environmental policy act all of them because he had no choice because people had shown up in numbers large enough to make a difference ten percent so good thing they aim for so let's get on it thank you well so I'm gonna ask you to one last question and then we'll we'll call it a night so we've talked we've touched on some of the aspects that are the most discouraging about climate change we've touched on a lot of the aspects that give us a lot of hope and we're all going to go home tonight and were in the next couple days we'll hear something that may bring back the despair people feel about climate change so when you to feel that when you read something that makes you worry what do you think about I think about hazel Johnson the mother of the environmental justice movement and how for forty years she fought and pushed on the south side of Chicago for real change to happen I think about them Smith one of the greatest organizer's that we had in this country I think about Dr Beverly Wright who was at exit of your university and then Delhi university and was there and the cancer corridor between New Orleans and baton Rouge but I also think about the folks who lived in those communities who have been there since slavery was over and dealt with all kinds of this tremendous challenges and still each and every day getting up and contained a Porsche and fight so I remember those voices than those five hundred plus communities that I've worked in I remember the whispers of the elders who when I first started this work as a teenager telling me to never give up on and to continue to be authentic and to continue to push for so when I see these challenges that we are faced by I hear their voices I still see their some of their faces and I know that's the reason we got to continue to go forward and you know I also think about the folks who were in this country who were in slavery and how people probably told them that they would never be free and how taking those lessons and now people tell us that will never be free from fossil fuels and I know that just like that was untrue and there was work that had to happen and there were partnerships and coalition so I had to come together to help people be free from from bondage how will also be able to break the bondage from fossil fuels.

hazel Johnson Chicago Smith Dr Beverly Wright Delhi university New Orleans forty years ten percent
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Environmental policy act all of them because he had no choice because people had shown up in numbers large enough to make a difference ten percent is a good thing to aim for so let's get on it thank you well so I'm gonna ask you to one last question and then we'll we'll call it a night so we've talked we've touched on some of the aspects that are the most discouraging about climate change we've touched on a lot of the aspects that give us a lot of hope and we're all going to go home tonight and were in the next couple days we'll hear something that may bring back the despair people feel about climate change so when you to feel that when you read something that makes you worried what do you think about I think about hazel Johnson the mother of the environmental justice movement and how for forty years she fought and pushed on the south side of Chicago for real change to happen I think about them Smith one of the greatest organizer's that we had in this country I think about Dr Beverly Wright who was a big savior university and then Delhi university and who is there in the cancer corridor between New Orleans and baton Rouge but I also think about the folks who lived in those communities who have been there since slavery was over and dealt with all kinds of just tremendous challenges and still each and every day getting up and contained a Porsche and to fight so I remember those voices than those five hundred plus communities that I've worked in I remember the whispers of the elders who when I first started this work as a teenager telling me to never give up on and to continue to be authentic and to continue to push for so when I see these challenges that we are faced by I hear their voices I still see their some of their faces and I know that's the reason we got to continue to go forward and you know I also think about the folks who were in this country who were in slavery and how people probably told them that they would never be free and how taking those lessons and now people tell us they will never be free from fossil fuels and I know that just like that was untrue and there was work that had to happen and there were partnerships and coalition so I had to come together to help people be free from from bondage how will also be able to break the bondage from fossil fuels.

hazel Johnson Chicago Smith Dr Beverly Wright Delhi university New Orleans Porsche forty years ten percent
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:16 min | 2 years ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here now when you think of racial injustice, you may think of housing or the criminal Justice system, but there's also an environmental Justice movement. Few decades old now born out of studies showing communities of color and poor white are more likely to also be home to hazardous waste sites. And landfills in nineteen ninety the EPA began looking at the environment through the lens of race and class. President George H W Bush created an office of environmental Justice at the to listen to local concerns funnel grant money into local projects, President Clinton declared environmental injustice violation of the Civil Rights Act that thinking stalled in the George W Bush administration picked up again under President Obama. But now President Trump's fiscal year. Twenty twenty proposed budget would cut EPA funding by thirty one percent. The biggest cut of any federal agency. Doctor Robert Bullard has been watching this history. And is a part of it. He's now a distinguished professor of herb. Urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University. Now in a few minutes, we're going to go micro and here from an environmental Justice or environmental racism activists in Saint James, but we start with Dr Bullard, welcome. Thank you. Well, you are often described as the father of environmental Justice. I would say that maybe they should ask your wife is the mother too because heart of the started for you in the nineteen seventies. When she was bringing a lawsuit and ask you to help. That's correct. I was asked to collect data four a lawsuit that she had filed that was challenging the location of municipal landfill predominantly black middle class community here in Houston, and I had ten students in my research methods class at Texas Southern University. And we did that study in nineteen seventy nine undefined that five out of five landfills in Houston were in black neighborhoods, six out of eight incinerators in black neighborhoods. I mean, it just the stats just kept coming. Well, you know, you can't get any more perfect than five out of five. That's bad enough thousand what we found is that over forty years from the thirties up until nineteen seventy eight eighty two percent of all the garbage dumped in Houston was dumped in black neighborhoods and more broadly found city owned smelters located in black and Brown neighborhoods in Dallas, Alabama on the largest hazardous waste facility and a town that was ninety five percent black. Explain why historically this happened. I mean, we understand our history, and we understand the segregation of people of color in impoverished areas. But it also has to do with power that usually these areas are run by white politicians. Well, if you look at the case of Houston, it was a black middle class neighborhood of homeowners. And if you talk about where locally on wanted land uses such as landfills incinerators, they generally follow the path of least resistance and historically. African Americans in south were not given the right to vote. They couldn't voice their opposition in a way that would influence stop needs facility. And so it was a pattern that's tantamount to environmental racism. Well, then as you continue on again, if people are living in areas, and they're politicians that people making decisions about that area are not living there or are maybe not truly representing them. They may end up as you said with these decisions being made somewhere else about where they live. That's correct. And it was a nine hundred ninety one when Dr Benjamin Chavis at the United church of Christ pulled together a dozen of us to plan the first national people of color environmental leadership summit in Washington DC, and we developed seventeen principles of environmental Justice at that summit in ninety one. And the first principle is that people must speak for themselves, and that's only fair just and equitable. So what do you think has to happen now specifically when? It comes to environmental injustice. Well, when we look at the assault on environmental regulations, and protection, it's basically an assault on us. And I think climate change is one of those things that make that really make this real. And so we have to all work on these issues. I'll talk to you. I gotta ask you everyone. White black Brown is now threatened by climate change. I wonder if there's a part of you saying, well, you know, if you only hadn't written it off as a problem, just, you know, for blacks and people of color in the poor while, you know, this this whole idea of finding out discovery, and translating that inflammation. So that people can can see it for themselves. It's like their few people arguing with whether or not they believe in gravity, gravity is not something that you believe in real what keeps me going in this movement is the fact that every social movement that has been successful as had a strong youth and student components that to me gives me hope. And also make sure that keeps us mystic data Robert Bullard distinguished, professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University. Dr thank you so much. My pleasure. Let's bring in Travis London. Now, a member of rise Saint James community advocacy group fighting pollutants from oil and gas industries in Saint James, Louisiana, activism, something he kind of fell into family members worked for DOW Chemical he's concerned about an expanding CF industries ammonia plant. He also opposed the bayou bridge pipeline which cuts through parts of Louisiana and Travis. I understand you're right. Smack in the middle of this eighty five mile stretch. They are known as cancer alley is mail. Yeah. This runs from Baton Rouge to New Orleans, and it's got something like one hundred and fifty plants and refineries. Look you and others fought the bio bridge pipeline had some successes. There was a stay. But ultimately, the construction was approved by a judge does that. Feel like you and others have failed because the pipeline was built oh, not necessarily in the sense. 'cause we bought a bigger coalition. Raise a lot of awareness in regards the pipe myself, how unsafe the all compared to any other transportation of oil and gas, and we show a high of a big environmental impact with those incidents rather than the ones on roads here. In other words, more incidents when pipelines than incidents carrying the same kind of product in trucks on the road. Just Malka see when always feel from a pipeline to the water system. Dad, definitely hard to clean up the various incidents across the United States with the people that did the by bridge pipeline. There's this oriented all Ohio ING, Pennsylvania stuff like that. They will harder clean up. Look there's a lot of statistics to back up just how much pollution hazardous material. There is there in cancer alley where you are. But what do you say to people who say building a pipe? Line produces jobs having plants produces jobs. Most of the times the job they do have they often they give into people out of state, rather instinct, and what not health that Sam sentimental value for our community. Like, we we'll Travis London. You've got four kids, and I'm sure you're worried about their health. Some would say why don't you move all? I still believe they the community 'cause there'd be saying. So I bought a into my town about c- of industry is being dodgers mind producing plane in the world. So they're really trying to focus on on creating fertilizer with ammonia. So they kind of sound like the crazy Duff cousin of Macedo. You're saying you brought you brought attention to a plant with the ammonia industry kind of flagging a little bit. They're turning the fertilizer, you're saying, and that's your even more concerned about that. And they also produce plastics in all argon. So all the beagle. Plane expansion are we all know fischel ill David making some of the stuff a place in sampling. We know you organized a memorial for people in your area who passed away from cancer. Do you know a lot of people? And are you able to draw a line from these cancers to living in cancer alley? My own family, for instance, going after what's he was working for dial. He died from best thing was cancelled where he died in two thousand one or two and this was his bestest poisoning. Yes, ma'am. I have my teacher. She Daffron cancel it had three hundred people immune to that will close to that on divest ship potato council, which kind of hurt me. Well, so what are you fighting now Travis what what was your goal? Now. I is dead. All I do is John lot of different organizations of may show. People understand their water in needed for anything that you do cause some communists had been Z goes into the water busying all the Kim. They mess with the mind econ Conrail, which get kids all low cognitive skills to make sure I've heard you. You're you're saying that there's a facility that's washing things with the chemical benzene. But then that goes into the water system and then kids drink that. And you've made the. Connection between that and their cognitive abilities their thinking, and so this is information that you are trying to bring to people. Yes, man. I show people. How watercress bring about like d different issues when looney Travis London again, a member of rice, Saint James the community advocacy group in Louisiana Travis we wish you the best of luck there. And thanks so much for talking to us about it. And thank you to all the talk about it. I'm Marco werman. The world is people books were everything to me. I turn to books to deal with the feeling of being an outcast, and I particularly turn to fantasy because in places like narnia and Middle Earth. I wasn't a scared. Little Brown kid. I was brave and strong. And I was never afraid..

Doctor Robert Bullard Houston Texas Southern University environmental Justice movement Louisiana Travis London distinguished professor EPA office of environmental Justic President George H W Bush President Trump President Clinton assault Saint James Twenty twenty George W Bush
"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"environmental justice movement" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"This is Ellen Lola's earned for her turn earlier this week, Madison, socialist, alternative hosted a discussion on socialism and feminism Minnesota activist ginger Johnson led the discussion on topics such as taking the movement for socialism forward. And why is a socialist analysis in strategy necessary Jensen explained what she hopes will happen through holding. These types of discussion. How do we build a sustained struggle around winning real aim for working middle class women? Who are I think moving into action not just around a fight against sexism? But broadly, speaking on how to have a better life, many women right now in the wake of taverna and people like Brock Turner being let off the hook for sexual violence are seeing that there is a different set of rules for the elites then for the rest of us. And so having this conversation and another opportunity to have that type of discussion about what type of movement as possible increase in direct action such as the Los Angeles teachers strike. And other activism around the country can be seen as a positive step forward growing labor upsurge in the US sphere headed by heavily female workforce's, including nurses, and teachers and teachers revolt last spring, and as we're seeing with red Brad continue in LA in California. It's been a revolt against years ambitious, and essentially sexist campaigns on behalf of the right that sought to blame teachers for society problems, really they need better pay they need resources the classroom, and that this is really fundamentally about being able to not only do their job be able to teach children in a way that reflects on our society of the whole Jensen expanded on how the teachers strike fits in with other movements, including the women's movement and the labor movement we can point back to phases of metoo. If you will you initial pay was much more focused on storytelling in a Laker sexual assault or sexual harassment. What we're seeing it might not be directly connected with teachers struggled with the workers with the McDonald's workers and people seeing strike action as a tool and for being more than just sort of broad or abstract sexism, it's very calm. Treat seen in people's paychecks essentially being especially in teaching all are being blamed for the problems at the lack of healthcare or lack of well-funded public education. And that's really just not the case. They're calling out. The fact that capitalism and really really passing the US has been running privatization program is just trying to make more money off of public resources that really everybody needs the midterm elections signalled possibilities that could focus on support for the working class, particularly working class women a lot of the fightback against Trump and Republican attacks the reactionary nature of the current federal administration a lot of that flowed through the election in the mid tournaments. And I think that what we see in congress right now with a cardio quite has and others is a reflection of hope, I also think that there's going to be kind of greater aspirations more waves on these leaders that are inspiring the left wing Democratic Party to deliver more Jensen elaborated on many of the reasons for the rise in the acceptance of socialism as an alternative to capitalism war people in society. Are struggling to make ends meet right now. More people are seeing rising housing costs standing in the way, they eat in their paychecks. Or, you know, something like fifteen is getting eaten up in a neoliberal approach to housing, many major cities across the country. A lack of access to healthcare. The fact that we're looking at one point five trillion dollars in student debt while we have three billionaires, and then you have to own more wealth than about him half of the US population. How can we possibly famous? I think also what we're seeing with the environment is extremely striking. And it's because there's a recognition that we are reaching a point where we're just not going to have a planet anymore to be able to fight over and the prophets of a few are the driving force behind the potential destruction of the majority of people on earth getting people together and organizing from the ground level is what Jensen sees that is needed to make changes organizing from below and fighting with those in solidarity. They have you same interests the radicalizing layer of union workers BQ communities. Immigrant activist environmental Justice activists, you know, all of this to me is the fight overall for social that needs a majority over passage enough, you how do we both fight and run candidates from the movement to really carry forward and really fight in these very unfriendly. Spaces for working class people to win games at the same time. What does it mean to connect with a fight for Medicare for all or a fight to ensure we defend union rights? How do we wake up these gender and racial Justice fights with workplace actions environmental Justice movement, and all of this because I think it's gonna be a United approach that will fundamentally I think when these types of games we see that kind of solidarity was usually see victories. Ginger Johnson Johnson is a socialist feminist organizer radical housing Justice advocate and a member of socialist alternative, socialist alternative led the successful fight to win a fifteen dollars an hour. Minimum wage in Minneapolis Jensen. Also ran for Minneapolis city council last year, especially highlighting rent control, affordable housing in taxing the super rich. She narrowly lost the election by less than one hundred votes. I'm Ellen lawless earn for her turn..

Jensen US Minneapolis Jensen Ginger Johnson Johnson environmental Justice movement ginger Johnson LA Ellen Lola Minnesota Minneapolis Brock Turner Ellen lawless McDonald Madison congress Democratic Party California assault Trump