28 Burst results for "Environmental Defense Fund Fund"

"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:35 min | 2 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Is Reefer day. Yeah. We've a man. It's cool day here instead of pain. Terms of temperature 47 degrees windy that feels like about 35. Wind blowing study 23 gusting, almost 42 hands on the wheel. When his two hands on the wheel. You have to put the chronic down. You want to tap out the joint. Put it in the ashtray. Don't forget it. Was there. Two hands on the wheel. 47 degrees today and windy humidity. 37% Winifred 58 forecast high 35 overnight 60 tomorrow and Thursday with a chance of precipitation on Thursday. 62 on Friday. 70 Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Cool day today, though, especially with the wind blowing feels like about 35 right now. 20th Day of April 47 degrees, the actual air temperature right? Good afternoon Santa Fe. All right. First half hour is Open for your phone calls. Comments. Thoughts, Emails emails. Richard Santa fe dot com. Phone number You want to call in five? Oh 5424. Well, 60, we will talk to the senior vice president of the Environmental Defense Fund, Mr. Mark Brownstein at 1 30. We'll talk to.

Mark Brownstein 47 degrees Environmental Defense Fund Monday Saturday Sunday 37% Friday Two hands two hands Thursday Reefer tomorrow Winifred 23 Richard Santa 58 60 today 5424
Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

"Okay. So we've all seen greenhouses interviewed domino olen for example who runs the greenhouse at george mason university in virginia about how her facilities providing food and even spices to the university's food service and see greenhouses with just flowers like it were states and other properties and now we see cannabis plants being grown in greenhouses. But what about greenhouses on a commercial scale and ones that recycle water do not use toxic. Fertilizers or get more out of the acreage than tenting and outdoor farm would right. Well that's what my guest today says there novel. Indoor farm will actually do so. Let's find out how it works. I'd like you to meet jackie. Roberts chief sustainability officer at ap harvest. Jackie has been in the sustainability spaces. I said for probably twenty five years including in the same role chief sustainability officer at the carlisle group which is investment company and as senior director of the environmental defense fund. Or where. I first met her probably about ten years ago. I think it was right. She earned all her degrees from yale. Smart cookie that she is including a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering and to help them manage degrees one from the yale. School of management and the other from the school of the environment without further ado welcomed green captions radio jackie. And thank you for joining us. I'm so excited. Thank you down. It's great to be here. Oh you're welcome. you're welcome. Congratulations on your new role at app harvest. Give us an overview of the indoor farms. How does app harvest actually work. Where they you know. where is it located. I chance in appalachia but give us a little more details. You know kind of what you're growing give us give us the proverbial thirty thousand foot view app harvest. I think is a really unique company in that are core product which is healthy vegetables is combined with a very sustainable climate. Resilient way of growing those vegetables and we're doing it in appalachia where the opportunity for job growth and economic development is really appreciate The the core product is a chemical pesticide free In in our first large greenhouse which you can see a picture of in my background but at sixty acres for those who can't see it Is a growing tomatoes and chemical pesticide free. Gmo free because the way we can grow in a closed system enables us to use biological pest approaches to control pests and disease and also a lot of trained workers and other interventions that can prevent outbreak. So we you know as a mother with three children knowing that what's coming out of our greenhouses is zero. Residue is a real attribute that i value. But how we grow it in your introduction spoke to it is we are very climate resilient in their storms that the that recently hit we had some employees that had trouble getting to work other people had to pitch in. We had one employee show up on their tractor to make sure they could get to work But you know we really did incredibly well in terms of being resilient. We had all the things we needed. We were harvesting on time stuff was getting out to the markets and it was a real testament to this strategy as an important part of the mix of different types of agriculture and When when we're growing We are able to use one hundred percent rainwater. We have a system of irrigation. That is set up where the rainwater is captured on the top of our sixty roofs it stored in a retention pond. And then we bring it into the greenhouse with a little bit of filtration through sand and you'd be late and that water re circulates. We don't ever a released anything into the atmosphere. The nutrients are put into the water and stay in the water until we need to add more. We can measure very precisely. It's a space where a has really enabled us to do very precise measurements and the plants. Exactly what they need. We do Nanotechnology with the water. Because bringing more oxygen into the water enables the plans to absorb the nutrients even better but all of that is is a closed system. And you know when when. I started in chemical engineering. The reason i went into chemical engineering is a wonderful professor. Who said if you care about environmental problems you should study chemical engineering because you learn how system works and where all the pollution comes from and how it's released to the environment

Domino Olen Carlisle Group Environmental Defense Fund Jackie Appalachia George Mason University School Of Management Roberts AP Virginia
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:59 min | 6 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. In a few weeks off shore oil drilling is set to begin in the Caribbean, just 150 miles from the Florida Coast. President Trump recently signed an order extending a ban on drilling in US Atlantic waters. But in the Bahamas, small company has received permission to start exploratory drilling. You're one of the country's most important marine sanctuaries. NPR's Greg Allen reports from Miami. The Bahamas Petroleum Company is headquartered not in the Bahamas, but the United Kingdom. It has offices in the Bahamas. More importantly, has leases on potential oil fields covering four million acres in waters between Andras, the nation's largest island in the north coast of Cuba. And right now we're faced with a drill ship that is currently crossing the Atlantic. On beheaded for the Mohammed That's Casuarina McKinney Lambert with the Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation. A few weeks ago, the Bahamas Petroleum Company announced that a high tech drill ship would arrive in Bahamian waters this month to drill for oil. The company didn't environmental impact assessment and received approval from the Bahamian government. McKinney Lambert says the company has tried to reassure critics are stressing that this is just an exploratory well. But she notes. The deepwater horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico a decade ago, was also exploratory drilling. Exploratory well could be even more dangerous than extracted well, so we're very concerned about that. On the potential for a large bill, but we're also concerned about the day to day operation. DPC says. The drilling site will be 90 miles from a national park on Andros Island. It's also not far from where Sean leading operates a fishing lodge and unequal tourism business, leading says the National Park includes the largest estuary in the Bahamas. An incubator for marine species that's important to the entire Caribbean. Not only is it going to damage my business is going to damage the fisheries is going to damage the airline industry. It's kind of it's a domino effect, You know, a coalition of businesses and environmental groups are islands. Our future has gathered more than 50,000 signatures on a petition asking the Bahamian government Cancel all oil exploration licenses and ban offshore drilling. If there's no response, the group says it will take legal action to block the drilling. BBC has declined requests for interviews. Big question is who respond If there's a major spill eight years ago, when Cuba was preparing to drill exploratory wells in its waters, the U. S. Coast Guard and Cuban authorities worked out a detailed agreement on how they would coordinate the response. So far, The Coast Guard hasn't said what its role will be if there's a spill in the Bahamas Jorge Pignon, head of the Latin American and Caribbean energy program at the University of Texas, Is the Bahamas doesn't have the resources or expertise to respond to a major spill. So it would be the United States that would have to come on. Take care of the remediation take care of stopping the spell. S O. Certainly We need something in paper that says who's going to be in command? The possibility of an oil spill isn't a problem just for the Bahamas. Exploratory well is located just north of Cuba and close to the Gulf Stream. Dan, widow with the Environmental Defense Fund, says an oil spill would be a disaster for the entire region because of the prevailing currents. It's likely that it would first ricochet off of Andros Island and then up to the southeast coast of Florida could also the effect Cuban waters and Cuban Reza's well, everything is connected. Eight years ago, Cuba's attempts to look for oil came up empty. Even so, industry experts say the geology indicates there should be oil reserves there. If this effort is successful in the Bahamas, it will increase the pressure to drill elsewhere in water, Soft Cuba and maybe even the coast of Florida. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami.

Bahamas Bahamas Petroleum Company Cuba Bahamas Reef Environment Educa Casuarina McKinney Lambert Bahamian government Andros Island Greg Allen NPR Florida Coast Caribbean Florida Andras National Park U. S. Coast Guard
California mandates all new vehicles be zero-emission by 2035

All Things Considered

01:05 min | 9 months ago

California mandates all new vehicles be zero-emission by 2035

"Order order that that will will prevent prevent the the sale sale of of new new gasoline gasoline powered powered vehicles vehicles in in California California starting in 2035. The move is part of the state's aggressive agenda to address climate change. KCR W. Gillom has more on what this means for drivers. In L. A County alone, There are more than 6.5 Million registered autos. Governor Newsome is banking on California's massive volume to convince car manufacturers to make the switch to zero emission technologies in the next 15 years were 50% of the market in the United States, so the adaptation is significant in this state. It's grown exponentially. Over the last number of years. More models more choice for consumers coming out and hopefully lower prices. While 2035 is the deadline for all new cars and light trucks to be zero emissions, heavy duty trucks and big rigs need to make the switch by 2045. This order bans the sale of new gas powered vehicles so Californians will still be allowed to drive and resell their old fossil fuel power vehicles. The environmental defense Funds head Fred Krupp tells the AP. Newsome's order will both cut pollution and position the state to be a hub for manufacturing zero emissions vehicles. California marijuana

California California Governor Newsome Fred Krupp California Environmental Defense Funds AP Marijuana W. Gillom United States
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:57 min | 9 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KCRW

"On case, or W called covering climate. Now we're going to explore how online sales have exploded since the pandemic began. A lot of physical stores are closed. People are generally trying to avoid coming into contact with other people, so that means a lot more packaging. To get that baby Oh facemask ship to your house. All of that excess packaging is just part of the problem, According to Bowman, Brown West, She's a senior manager at the Environmental Defense Fund focusing on corporate sustainability, she says. This is a moment of opportunity for online retailers to be more transparent. About how their products are made. Welcome the program. Hi. Thank you for having me great to have you. Well, let's begin with the packaging. There is a lot of it as we are all pretty much well aware. Every day, it seems many of us are receiving packages, cardboard boxes, plastic airbags. Inside those boxes to fill the space. Is that pretty much a nightmare scenario as Faras sustainability goes Yeah. I mean, it's definitely made that issue of waste and trash more visible or all of us. Even before the pandemic, the US was the number one trash producing country in the world. You know, we generate 40% of the world's waste so packaging Now as we're doing more shopping online during the pandemic, it's become more kind of in our face if you will, the toll that packaging plays. But with our work, we also are trying to shine a spotlight on the fact that it's not just about packaging. It's also about the products themselves and the environmental toll that consumerism takes on the planet. So what is it that you're most concerned about when it comes to the actual products? Well when it comes to products when it comes Teo that whole world of consumerism were ultimately responsible for 60% of greenhouse gas emissions and upwards of 50 to 80% of land material and water use. And so those are you know, those are big impacts that everyday products can have on the planet. And then in addition to that, what we've now learned to is that consumer products also are one of our leader exposures to talk that chemicals. And so from the health and from an environmental standpoint, we have to think about climate impact. You have to think about health impact. You have to think about materials impact as well. When you're talking about a threat to human health in products. What specifically? Are you referring to? So, for example, there are key fast chemicals, which are sometimes called the forever chemicals because of how long they persist in the environment on and these chemicals are usually used as Water repellant hair stain repellent so you can find them and not only in packaging materials, but also in products like clothing. And then they're also other types of chemicals, like take Falaise, which have been shown to have an impact on our endocrine system that he's kind of chemicals can show up in products like personal care about us. That we use on and around our bodies every single day. Oh, my gosh. And so do our. Those chemicals listed on the packaging of these products themselves. I can We know if we're ingesting these chemicals, they are sometimes on personal care products. Sometimes they might be hidden in ingredients that are simply labeled as fragrances. And when you go beyond Tio no bigger types of products. There's a lack of transparency in terms of what are the ingredients in those type of product, So I'm talking about things like China China, for example, or just toys on so 11 thing that we really pushed for when we talk about the kind of role that e commerce retailers in play in terms of leveraging their influence with product manufacturers, is to increase that transparency to consumers at point of sale about what's in products and also about The impact that products have on our climate or on water. But why would they do that voluntarily, because wouldn't that dissuade people from buying the products? I don't think so. I think that what it could do is really make it easier to find product and manufacturers that are trying to create sustainable products. There's always there's already been a large growth in the number of consumers who want to buy a sustainable products to the size of that market of sustainable purchasers is expected to grow up $150 billion by 2021. So there is already that urge from consumers and it it grows as you As you move down towards millennials and Gen. Z there that urge from consumers to want to buy products that are better for them better for the planet. But what's missing? Is that ease at finding that information, making that information more accessible so that when we're doing our comparison shopping, it's another piece of information similar to Being the price or the dimensions of a product or the other features of a product. It just becomes another teacher, another source of information as we're making those decisions about what we want to bring into our homes. So in the meantime, what should a regular consumer D'oh? You know, A lot of people don't want to go into stores They want order online. But of course they want to be sustainable, Teo and you know not over consume or by products that are harmful. What are your recommendations? Great we'll definitely we recommend to consumers to use their voice to show that they want this information that they want this to be easier for them to find. You know, there's already consumers are starting to become savvy about which brands they could particularly shop from. But There's only so much information that they confined on their own. So one thing that we did recently at the end of the summer is we put out a vision of what this could look like What this shopping experience could look like for consumers to excite consumers, but also cos About making this easier, and it's on interactive prototype costs of stain Abi that we put together that presents ah vision of that future of e commerce where that type of environmental information is at your fingertips. And so we're hoping that with this prototype that helps consumers be able Tio racer voices about that what they want when it comes to shopping online. And Spurs the companies to meet that demand. Right. But I mean, obviously, what's best for the planet is if people bought less overall, right? Yeah. I mean, definitely. We want We're growing planet are growing on species, and we also need cos Tio put more effort into be limiting and minimizing the environmental impact of product that they produce. Boa Brown West is a senior manager at the Environmental Defense Fund, where she focuses on corporate sustainability. But.

Environmental Defense Fund senior manager Teo US Tio Bowman Falaise Spurs Brown West China China Abi
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:16 min | 10 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hot or GE. And by the listeners of cake. Going to be hot today, and it's a spare the air look for temperatures from the eighties to about 107 degrees. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Not for the first time, The Trump administration is rolling back and Obama era environmental regulation. This one is aimed to cut climate warming methane emissions from oil and gas operations. By getting rid of that rule. The administration says it wants to help drillers. But NPR's Jeff Brady reports that some big oil companies argued against changing the rules. The announcement was delivered in Pittsburgh in the heart of Pennsylvania's gas drilling region. In 2016 the state voted for President Trump, but polls show it leaning Democratic this year. Thes rules or promise is kept by the Trump administration and president Trump himself to the energy industry. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says Thie Obama era methane rules were illegal and re sending them fix is a mistake. Methane is a concern because when it escapes unburned, it's a greenhouse gas that is more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide. At least for the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. The EPA says the oil industry is the largest source of methane leaks. But Wheeler says the old rules were duplicative and burdensome because some states and the industry already have programmes to reduce methane emissions industry already has more than enough incentive to capture methane without reporting requirements and other obligations. This is because methane is the key constituent of natural gas in a valuable commodity and announcing the proposed rules last year, the agency said the changes would save the industry up to $19 million a year in compliance costs. A significant concern for smaller drillers is that down the road, the Obama era regulations also would have applied toe older wells drilled before 2015. With this change. That requirement goes away. Oil industry trade groups praised the new EPA regulations. Environmental groups are critical. Peter's Al's Alice with Environmental Defense Fund, there's no scientific basis for the action of the administration is taking The action's opposed by a wider range of stakeholders, among them big oil companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and Shell. They worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than coal. President of Shell in the US called the rollback, frustrating and disappointing and said her company will continue its program to reduce methane emissions. While the says the new regulations will not increase methane emissions Environmental Defense fund disputes that we estimate that the administration's action will increase methane pollution by about 4.5 1,000,000 tonnes per year. Zazzle says that's equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from 100 coal fired power plans. His group plans to sue the Trump administration over these changes that could lead to years of legal battles. Even a scientist say time is running out to avoid the worst effects of climate change. There's one way this rollback could be short lived, though. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats gained control of the Senate, this change and others the Trump administration finalized recently could be reversed. Jeff Brady NPR news This is NPR news. California report is up next first, though it's the 5 86 80 interchange.

Trump administration President Trump Thie Obama EPA NPR News Jeff Brady Environmental Defense Fund Administrator Andrew Wheeler president NPR Joe Biden Steve Inskeep Zazzle
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:25 min | 10 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Not for the first time, The Trump administration is rolling back and Obama era environmental regulation. This one is aimed to cut climate warming methane emissions from oil and gas operations. By getting rid of that rule. The administration says it wants to help drillers. But NPR's Jeff Brady reports that some big oil companies argued against changing the rules. The announcement was delivered in Pittsburgh in the heart of Pennsylvania's gas drilling region. In 2016 the state voted for President Trump, but polls show it leaning Democratic this year. Thes rules or promise is kept by the Trump administration and president Trump himself to the energy industry. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says Thie Obama era methane rules were illegal and re sending them fix is a mistake. Methane is a concern because when it escapes unburned, it's a greenhouse gas that is more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide. At least for the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. The EPA says the oil industry is the largest source of methane leaks. But Wheeler says the old rules were duplicative and burdensome because some states and the industry already have programmes to reduce methane emissions industry already has more than enough incentive to capture methane without reporting requirements and other obligations. This is because methane is the key constituent of natural gas in a valuable commodity and announcing the proposed rules last year, the agency said the changes would save the industry up to $19 million a year in compliance costs. A significant concern for smaller drillers is that down the road, the Obama era regulations also would have applied toe older wells drilled before 2015. With this change. That requirement goes away. Oil industry trade groups praised the new EPA regulations. Environmental groups are critical. Peter's Al's Alice with Environmental Defense Fund, there's no scientific basis for the actions of the administration is taking The action's opposed by a wide range of stakeholders, among them big oil companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and Shell. They worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than coal. The president of Shell in the US called the rollback, frustrating and disappointing and said her company will continue its program to reduce methane emissions. While the EPA says the new regulations will not increase methane emissions Environmental Defense fund disputes that we estimate that the administration's action will increase methane pollution by about 4.5 1,000,000 tonnes per year. Zazzle says that's equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from 100 coal fired power plants. His group plans to sue the Trump administration over these changes that could lead to years of legal battles. Even a scientist say time is running out to avoid the worst effects of climate change. There's one way this rollback could be short lived, though. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats gained control of the Senate, this change and others the Trump administration finalized recently could be reversed..

Trump administration President Trump EPA Thie Obama Environmental Defense Fund Administrator Andrew Wheeler NPR News president Steve Inskeep NPR Noelle King Jeff Brady Joe Biden
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good morning. It's 6 46 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Not for the first time, The Trump administration is rolling back and Obama era environmental regulation. This one is aimed to cut climate warming methane emissions from oil and gas operations by getting rid of that rule. The administration says it wants to help drillers. But NPR's Jeff Brady reports that some big oil companies argued against changing the rules. The announcement was delivered in Pittsburgh and the heart of Pennsylvania's gas drilling region. In 2016 The state voted for President Trump, but polls show it leaning Democratic. This here, thes rules or promise is kept by the Trump administration and president Trump himself to the energy industry. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says the Obama era methane rules were illegal and re sending them fix is a mistake. Methane is a concern because when it escapes unburned, it's a greenhouse gas that is more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide. At least for the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. The EPA says the oil industry is the largest source of methane leaks. But Wheeler says the old rules were duplicative and burdensome because some states and the industry already have programmes to reduce methane emissions industry already has more than enough incentive to capture methane without reporting requirements and other obligations. This is because methane is the key constituent of natural gas in a valuable commodity and announcing their proposed rules last year, the agency said the changes would save the industry up to $19 million a year in compliance costs. A significant concern for smaller drillers is that down the road, the Obama era regulations also would have applied toe older wells drilled before 2015. With this change. That requirement goes away. Oil industry trade groups praised the new EPA regulations. Environmental groups are critical. Peter's Al's Alice with Environmental Defense Fund, there's no scientific basis for the action of the administration is taking And the action's opposed by a wide range of stakeholders, among them big oil companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and Shell. They worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than coal. President of Shell in the US called the rollback, frustrating and disappointing and said her company will continue its program to reduce methane emissions. While the EPA says the new regulations will not increase methane emissions Environmental Defense fund disputes that we estimate that the administration's action will increase methane pollution by about 4.5 1,000,000 tonnes per year. Zazzle says that's equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from 100 coal fired power plans. His group plans to sue the Trump administration over these changes that could lead to years of legal battles. Even a scientist say time is running out to avoid the worst effects of climate change. There's one way this rollback could be short lived, though, if Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats gained control of the Senate, this change and others the Trump administration finalized recently..

Trump administration President Trump EPA Obama Administrator Andrew Wheeler NPR News president Environmental Defense Fund Steve Inskeep NPR Noelle King Zazzle Jeff Brady
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:48 min | 10 months ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KCRW

"By getting rid of that rule. The administration says it wants to help drillers. But NPR's Jeff Brady reports that some big oil companies argued against changing the rules. The announcement was delivered in Pittsburgh in the heart of Pennsylvania's gas drilling region. In 2016 the state voted for President Trump, but polls show it leaning Democratic this year. Thes rules or promise is kept by the Trump administration and president Trump himself to the energy industry. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says the Obama era methane rules were illegal and re sending them fix is a mistake. Methane is a concern because when it escapes unburned, it's a greenhouse gas that is more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide. At least for the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. The EPA says the oil industry is the largest source of methane leaks. But Wheeler says the old rules were duplicative and burdensome because some states and the industry already have programmes to reduce methane emissions industry already has more than enough incentive to capture methane without reporting requirements and other obligations. This is because methane is the key constituent of natural gas in a valuable commodity and announcing the proposed rules last year, the agency said the changes would save the industry up to $19 million a year in compliance costs. A significant concern for smaller drillers is that down the road, the Obama era regulations also would have applied toe older wells drilled before 2015. With this change. That requirement goes away. Oil industry trade groups praised the new EPA regulations. Environmental groups are critical. Peter's Al's Alice with Environmental Defense Fund, there's no scientific basis for the actions of the administration is taking The action's opposed by a wide range of stakeholders, among them big oil companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and Shell. They worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than coal. President of Shell in the US called the rollback, frustrating and disappointing and said her company will continue its program to reduce methane emissions. While the EPA says the new regulations will not increase methane emissions Environmental Defense fund disputes that we estimate that the administration's action will increase methane pollution by about 4.5 1,000,000 tonnes per year. Zazzle says that's equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from 100 coal fired power plants. His group plans to sue the Trump administration over these changes that could lead to years of legal battles. Even a scientist say time is running out to avoid the worst effects of climate change. There's one way this rollback could be short lived, though. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats gained control of the Senate, this change and others the Trump administration finalized recently could be reversed. Jeff Brady NPR news This is NPR news. And this is Casey era W. Every home cook has that summer dish, but how to.

EPA Trump administration President Trump Jeff Brady Administrator Andrew Wheeler Obama president Environmental Defense Fund NPR Joe Biden Zazzle
Trump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era Restrictions On Methane Emissions

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 10 months ago

Trump Administration Rolls Back Obama-Era Restrictions On Methane Emissions

"Today the trump administration rolled back another environmental rule. This one was aimed at reducing climate warming methane emissions. The oil and gas industry is the largest source of those emissions in the US and get some big oil companies wanted to keep the rule in place NPR's Jeff Brady's covering this story. Jeff Hi, Ari. Why did the Obama Administration create this rule in the first place about methane emissions back in two thousand, sixteen it there's a lot of concern about methane. It's the main ingredient in natural gas and when it's burned, it's cleaner than other fossil fuels. But when it escapes into the atmosphere unburned safe from a leaky valve at a well drilling site, it's a very potent greenhouse gas it. Has More than eighty times the climate warming power of Carbon Dioxide over the first twenty years it's in the atmosphere. So under the Obama Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency required oil and gas companies to monitor and limit methane leaks, I to newer wells, and eventually to thousands of wells installed before twenty fifteen Also, that's by some oil companies. especially smaller ones oppose the rule they said. It's too costly. Now, the trump administration deciding with US companies and rolling back the requirement it says that they'll save those companies up to about nineteen million dollars. A year in compliance costs is the flip side of that cost saving an acceptance that methane emissions are gonNA rise. Yeah. Yeah. you know the the administration echoes and industry argument says oil companies have an incentive to stop. Methane from leaking because that's the product that they sell, and the industry already has a voluntary program to reduce methane emissions The administration also says the Obama EPA rule that they say it was duplicative they say methane can already be regulated under other rules but environmentalists methane is such a problem that it needs special attention. Here's a Peter Zahle South with the Group Environmental Defense, fund? Reducing methane emissions. Is One of the fastest whammos, low cost and most effective ways that we can combat climate change in the near term, and he says, there are side benefits to that old rule that the Obama administration had had passed because it also reduces other pollution that harms people's health. That's what we would expect to hear from an environmental group. But explain why some big oil companies also want to stick with the twenty sixteen rule even if it does cost the money to comply. Yeah and these are companies names we recognize Exxon Mobil BP shell they have a lot invested in natural gas and they worry if methane leaks continue to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than say coal the president of Shell in the US Gretchen Watkins told us in a statement that she finds it frustrating and disappointing. The Administration is rolling back these regulations, her companies and others plan to continue their efforts to reduce methane emissions and some. States also have their own programs underway. So states and big companies are still focused on stopping these leaks is the trump administration's robot going to have much of an effect. It likely will especially because there won't be that requirement to go back and stop leaks at older wells Environmental Defense Fund calculates. The effect would be about the same as adding greenhouse gas emissions from one hundred coal fired power plants every year by rolling back these these these regulations. But there are two caveats here. One is the rollback will be challenged in court and second if Joe Biden wins in November and Democrats take control of the Senate, this nothing rule could be reversed again NPR's Jeff Brady thank you. Thank

Obama Administration United States Jeff Brady NPR Environmental Defense Fund Jeff Hi Group Environmental Defense Joe Biden Environmental Protection Agenc Shell Peter Zahle South Obama Epa
Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

"A growing number of companies have announced plans to tackle climate change and it is not just companies with eco-friendly reputations. Npr's Camilla Domino reports that. These companies are responding to pressure on multiple fronts. Helping the planet is good for business. That's what Elizabeth Sirkin. The Environmental Defense Fund has been telling corporate leaders. We can't exist as people and we can exist as businesses without clean air clean water a stable climate. She started delivering that message. Twenty years ago it was so fundamentally obvious to me. I really felt like business would just get this. She figured CEO's would cut emissions governments would set new climate policies and she didn't need to get a new job. I never thought that this many years later I would still be doing. This turns out helping. The planet did not seem like the obvious move too many. Ceo's but there are signs of a shift. More companies are now promising to cut more carbon and to do it more quickly. And there's an acceleration in the number of companies setting so-called science based targets in line with the global agreement. The Paris Accord Kevin. Moss runs the Center for Business Sustainability at the World Resources Institute. It's a small fraction of the overall proportion of businesses. But it's lodge impactful companies like Guo. Mott's Light Target Light Hilton Hotels. So what changed while the effects of climate change are becoming clearer not as a future risk but something happening right now at the same time solar and wind energy keep getting cheaper and there's more pressure from investors and from customers from some governments. There might be some more surprising sources of pressure to like kids. Here's Elizabeth Sirkin again. I hear from business leaders all the time today that you know their kids come home and say what are you doing dad? This makes a difference. Employees are increasingly influential to Cam. Kim runs an APP. Called Blind. Tech workers can talk to each other about their workplaces and he says they're increasingly discussing issues like climate change. People talk a lot of compensation of course and the work culture but I think this is a whole new segment in a survey half. His users said companies climate policy affects whether or not they want to work their employees investors customers science. All of that played a role in Microsoft's recent decision to go beyond carbon neutral and pol more carbon dioxide out of the air then. The company admits but chief Sustainability Officer. Lucas Java says there's another factor too. He says it's helped to frame this as an accounting problem. And that really is what I see. Flip executives mindsets around is to just talk about this in terms that they understand talking about a carbon budget quantifying. Exactly how much companies emit and how much they'll need to cut at the end of the day. What companies are really good at doing is making decisions based on numbers of course setting carbon budget is one thing sticking to it is another and some experts say there could be a danger in relying on big corporations to drive the fight against climate change. Chilanga Baker is a professor at Northeastern University who studies the social justice dimensions of transition away from fossil fuels she says communities especially vulnerable and marginalized communities should have a say in the fight against climate change and feel the benefits of a switch to green energy. I'm just not sure if I have the faith given that you know. Corporations are very concerned about expenses and profits that they would really think about something that may add cost but that may be more just Baker says commitments from companies can definitely be powerful but she says government policy can make sure. Vulnerable populations are protected. She's not the only one who looks at these voluntary commitments and sees a need for regulation after all some companies taking action is nowhere near enough to stop climate change Elizabeth's Durkan who spent two decades urging companies to act. She's asking them to do more than just cut their own emissions. It's really critical to engage. The policymakers corporations from BP to Pepsico say they support a price on carbon sturgeon says companies. That really want to lead on climate need to put money towards advancing those policies Camille Domino ASCII NPR news.

Elizabeth Sirkin NPR CEO Lucas Java Camilla Domino Environmental Defense Fund Chief Sustainability Officer Chilanga Baker KIM Mott Center For Business Sustainabi Paris Microsoft Moss CAM Pepsico
Large Parts of Pacific Ocean Reopened for Trawling

Environment: NPR

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Large Parts of Pacific Ocean Reopened for Trawling

"Decades of overfishing destroyed much of the fish stocks off America's west coast hardest hit were species known as groundfish trawlers dragged up in their nets in the year. Two thousand thousand large parts of the Pacific Ocean were declared disaster zones and close to trawlers devastating the industry now nearly two decades later fish stocks. It's have rebounded and come new year's Day. Thousands of square miles of ocean will reopen. It's a success story. Being celebrated by both fishermen and environmentalists mental. Ists who worked together to bring back the fish Brad petting her is a longtime trawler. Captain who operates off the coast of Oregon. He worked the seas. When Rock Fish Sole Ole and perch were abundant basically had industry that arose bringing up to two hundred two hundred and forty million pounds of fish across the docks and that was dropped probably by quarter interesting a couple of years after the government declared the area a disaster zone conservationist fishermen and fish processors worked through council to save the fish and the the fishing industry initially the different groups? Were at loggerheads says petting her. Who served on the council? But they worked out a plan. Fish quotas were cut. Dramatically trawlers colors went from pulling in nine million pounds of fish down to one hundred thousand pounds per year. It put many out of business. It was just. It was a bad bad environment No one's making money. It was a dark time would be the best way to put it. Those fishermen who stayed in the game had to change how they fished their nets dragged in unwanted wanted fish and sea life that had to be tossed overboard. Discourses probably anywhere from twenty to forty percent depending on the species and really no one one of that bottom trawlers crawlers modified their nets to allow small fish to escape they avoided rocky areas. Where fish breed that their nets could permanently damage and they stuck to quotas that are strictly monitored server or a camera on the vessel assures that the Fisher accounted for? And there's no discards happening that that uh-huh or being seen and so really. We got a science right early on chance Chad. The regional director for the Environmental Defense Fund Ocean Program says as a result fish stocks rebounded decades earlier than expected. He called the efforts a conservation homerun according to Judd. It's the biggest environmental story that no one knows about and now you

Pacific Ocean Environmental Defense Fund Oce America Oregon Ists Regional Director Judd Brad
Environmental group plans satellite launch to monitor methane

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Environmental group plans satellite launch to monitor methane

"Natural gas consists mainly of methane seen a potent global warming pollutant to help hold companies accountable for letting methane pollution escape to the atmosphere. The Environmental Defense Fund is doing more than lobbying. Legislators it's sending a satellite into orbit that will allow us to look at every single major oil and gas facility around the world multiple times per week. EDF President Fred Crop says these facilities often have malfunctioning equipment or pipes that allow methane ethene to leak. Many of these problems can be fixed and the repairs often pay for themselves because they help reduce the amount of gas. That's wasted the International. The National Energy Agency reports that companies can eliminate almost half of their methane pollution at no net cost but Krupp says by and large companies have not taken adequate action. You have to monitor this in. The industry so far has not been monitoring for this portion. So idiot has partnered with an aerospace company to build a satellite that will locate and monitor leaks. He says companies will know where the problems are and the public can hold them responsible

Environmental Defense Fund EDF Fred Crop National Energy Agency Krupp President Trump
Not All Hydropower Is Climate Considerate

60-Second Science

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Not All Hydropower Is Climate Considerate

"Solar wind hydropower. These renewable energy sources are all much better for the climate than fossil fuels right well yes for wind solar but it turns out that the picture for hydropower power is more complicated than we think. A new study by the Environmental Defense Fund analyzed the climate impacts of one thousand five hundred hydropower facilities disabilities across the globe. That accounts for about half of hydropower generation worldwide the researchers looked at whether facility behaves as greenhouse. US guests sink or as a source to figure this out. The invested all the different components that help determine hydropower facilities greenhouse gas emissions. There's so many factors that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower but essentially the majority of greenhouse gas emissions arise from the reservoir itself as vegetation and soils are submerged under water in the dam that is used for the hydropower generation Elissa Arco a senior climate scientists at the Environmental Defense Fund and Co author of the study as submerged vegetation decays it releases methane missing or co two the larger the surface area of the reservoir the more greenhouse gases that are going to be emitted from that reservoir. You're also the temperature plays a role as well how warm the reservoir is will affect how much greenhouse gases are produced and emitted from the reservoir through their analysis on her co author. Steven Hamburg also with Environmental Defense Fund Fund discovered that the climate impacts of hydropower. Run the gamut the good news. Is that some facilities perform just as well as wind and solar but shockingly rocking Lee more than one hundred facilities are actually worse for the climate than fossil fuels the studies in the Journal. Environmental Science and technology does cleaning. Doesn't mean we should forget about hydropower. But we just need to be careful to make sure that we have climate benefits. There are a lot of situations where hydropower our can be on par with wind and solar. So it really depends on the accessibility.

Environmental Defense Fund Fun United States Environmental Science Elissa Arco Steven Hamburg LEE The Journal
U.S. environmental groups sue over Trump auto emissions move

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. environmental groups sue over Trump auto emissions move

"A group of environmental organ. since the suing the trump administration for its decision to revoke California's ability to set its own tail pipe emission standards we get details from NPR's Nathan rocked the trump administration's decision to end California's auto emissions waiver under the clean air act broke nearly fifty years of precedent and like most of the administration's many many regulatory rollbacks the move drew quick criticism and promised lawsuits this lawsuit against US department transportation by the environmental defense fund Sierra Club and other environmental organizations asserts that the administration's move is arbitrary and capricious contrary to the law and unwarranted by fax nearly two dozen states are making similar claims the challenges could make their way to the US

California NPR Nathan Sierra Club United States Fifty Years
U.S. environmental groups sue over Trump auto emissions move

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. environmental groups sue over Trump auto emissions move

"A group of environmental organizations is suing the trump administration for its decision to revoke California's ability to set its own tail pipe emission standards as NPR's Nathan rot tells us twenty three other states filed a similar suit last week the trump administration's decision to end California's auto emissions waiver under the clean air act broke nearly fifty years of precedent and like most of the administration's many many regulatory rollbacks the move drew quick criticism and promised lawsuits this lawsuit against US department transportation by the environmental defense fund Sierra Club and other environmental organizations asserts that the administration's move is arbitrary and capricious contrary to the law and unwarranted by fax nearly two dozen states are making similar claims the challenges could make their way to the US Supreme

California NPR Nathan Rot Sierra Club United States Fifty Years
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Engine company affiliates price and coverage match is limited by state law dean business report some people might see it as a few grains of rice and they're gonna bowl but added all of globally and it turns out rice farming could have the same detrimental effect on global warming in the short term as twelve hundred average sized coal power plants according to the New York based advocacy group the environmental defense fund that means the grain is just as damaging over the long term as the annual carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels in Germany Italy Spain and the UK combined as the sheer size of the staple foods carbon footprint becomes clearer to scientists companies including the maker of uncle Ben's rice and old international the world's second biggest rice player are starting to source more of the grain from farms that aren't flooded the widespread cultivation techniques that releases methane gas into the atmosphere rice is the staple food of hundreds of millions of Haitians and by far the most polluting grain meeting twice as much of the harmful gases this week that's the Bloomberg green business report I'm Bob mon thank you thank you for this great honor as CEO of this company I couldn't be happier with our accomplishments this year we achieve double digit growth we lost key personnel but we didn't miss a step I want to take a moment to thank one of our key partners serious executives when I first heard of serious I was a little skeptical what is an interim accepted if when they told me one executive at one day a week can help us get double digit growth I was shocked I didn't even know that was possible and here we are twelve months later and Sirius will continue to be one of our key partners for years to come because regardless of the problems that show up in our business they always have an executive solution ready.

New York UK Ben CEO executive Sirius Germany Italy Spain Bloomberg twelve months one day
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on Latino USA

"Answered truthfully, except for ten was, I did not name no name after Jim Ribas killed in Alabama nineteen sixty five no one was ever held to account. Finally, the full truth comes out. No. It's white lies from NPR. We're back when we left off anti-oil advocates had one in a fight to shut down oil wells in a residential neighborhood in south Los Angeles. Now we're going to hear why going up against the oil industry isn't so easy. And they don't takes us back to the story. For Niagara, and her mom, shutting down a few oil wells across the street from where they live is one thing, but they had a much bigger goal in mind. Lawn of Los Angeles city hall. We're having a rally on behalf of sand delay so we can tell city council members to vote. Yes, on the twenty five hundred foot health and safety buffer zone. The twenty five hundred foot buffer zone. He's to create a law at either city or state level. That mandates a half mile buffer zone between drill sites in places like schools, residences playgrounds or hospitals right now about nine hundred thousand people in California live within a half mile, an active oil or gas. Well, this is, according to the environmental defense fund what a challenge to passing allow like this is that to do, so you have to go up against the oil industry. And I happen to get an opportunity to speak with a Representative of the oil industry, myself and the L A basin. If you draw half mile radius circles around all productions, you would and all production. That's rock Ziamon. He's the CEO of the California independent petroleum association. When you think of oil, companies, you probably imagine giant corporations but many of the companies drilling LA are actually small some even family. Run up rations Zerman represents about four hundred of these independent oil and gas producers. He argues that the buffer zone that now yearly and her mom one ac- is short-sighted. It would definitely shut down nearly all on gas production in Los Angeles. And those lost barrels would simply have to be imported from foreign countries, primarily Saudi Arabia, obviously, in California. We operate under the strictest environmental rules and regulations in the world. And if we were to outsource our oil, and import it from the Middle East, we would simply be trading are strict environmental rules for their very loose environmental roles, and that would harm the environment. But then there's a more pressing issue, which is what got community advocate. To mobilize in the first place. The impact oil drilling is having people's health in two thousand eighteen a report released by the Los Angeles County department of public health from that oil and gas operations close to residential neighborhoods is a major risk factor..

Los Angeles California CEO Los Angeles County department Jim Ribas Middle East Saudi Arabia Niagara NPR Alabama Representative twenty five hundred foot
Israeli fires at Palestinians at Gaza protest

Pacifica Evening News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Israeli fires at Palestinians at Gaza protest

"In their distribution systems. The result of a decision made by the California Public utilities commission on Thursday, methane is a pollutant and a potent greenhouse gas linked to climate change. Tim O'Connor with the environmental defense fund says right now the leak or vent about six billion cubic feet of gas a year into the atmosphere more than that massive blow out in southern California almost three years ago every single year we are more gas knitted during the research candidate Astor into these new sets of rules are going to reduce the leakage across the board. O'connor says before. Utilities only had to fix the type of leaks that are a threat to public safety.

California Public Utilities Co Tim O'connor California Astor Three Years
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KSRO

"Or even delivering air, quality benefits in Low income communities and communities of color She says that most analysis on pollution is, done on the state as a whole but several, areas have much higher, rates of emissions environmental defense fund, director Tim O'Connor says transportation in California He's still increasing and poses risks to public health I think a lot of us could get behind. This, story Tom team of UC riverside scientists is going to get almost two and a. Half million, dollars. In federal grants over the next five years to, study ways of slashing mosquito populations yeah. There's one way by using genetic modification to disrupt the reproductive. Cycle of, female mosquitoes UCR entomologist sir rave ROY says. That one million, people die worldwide every year from diseases transmitted by mosquitoes and he acknowledges that expecting widespread elimination of mosquitoes is unrealistic he says a significant decline in. Their population is realistic and you know I've done a little reading on this subject, just to see if there would be any sort, of fallout if there, were no mosquitos in the world In terms of the yeah exactly of the ecosystem turns out there wouldn't be no no All creatures across the board hate. The, -squitoes. Yeah yeah and so I am all for that, research Oh it's nothing more irritating it's six eleven at k. SRO. Good morning to you Michael it always happens when you least expected?.

sir rave ROY Tim O'Connor UC riverside Tom team director California Michael five years
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KTRH

"Of price gouging during the emergency charging as much as eight dollars ninety nine cents a gallon now those businesses mostly in north texas and san antonio they're going to have to pay up nearly one hundred seventy thousand dollars in restitution our news time now is six thirty two well it's going to be a big day on monday the talk about the opening of the on the supreme court and this president well meantime while he's waiting to make that announcement on monday he's also been quietly going about changing all of the judiciary in ktar cla saunders is live with that one hundred forty two open spots seventeen percent of all federal judicial positions are open but former harris county prosecutor rachel hooper told us democrats in the senate have been slow to confirm trump's nominees nominated one hundred thirty four men and women to the bench to the federal bench and forty two of those nominations have been confirmed yeah the rate of confirmations thirty percent thirty percent behind the average pace of every president from carter to obama but hooper says at the end of the day is the changes to the judiciary that will be what trump is remembered for this is trump legacy and i think he is off to a good start in his nomination and who is being confirmed supreme court pick to replace the retiring anthony kennedy is scheduled to be announced on monday okay meantime all oddsmakers are weighing in on it too after meeting with several of the candidates so apparently the president has now called his list down to four front runners look for president trump to announce his supreme court nominees similar to how he did it last year with neil gorsuch a primetime event at the white house followed by an aggressive pr and sales campaign from the west wing the nominee will head to capitol hill on tuesday or wednesday to sit down with senate majority leader mitch mcconnell in senate judiciary chairman chuck grassley those meetings kickoff what will be several weeks of sit downs with senators who will vote on confirmation the white house wants to see a hearing in september and a quick votes the nominee can be in place when the supreme court returns in october karen travers abc news the white house also in washington it is is the deputy andy willer now taking over for scott pruitt as epa administrator at least acting administrator pruitt has resigned he's facing more than a dozen federal investigations into his behavior while running the department not as policy his behavior the president of that left environmental defense fund says his group is going to keep a close eye on the successor now on wheeler we expect andy we were to do the same thing as pruitt was just out of the limelight the fact of the matter is andy we were has had a career as a lobbyist for the coal industry meaning protesting his policy and speaking to reporters aboard air force one president trump says scott pruitt did quote an outstanding job inside the epa our news time six thirty five labor department reporting that more people are unemployed than expected departments that two hundred thirty one thousand americans filed first time claims for unempl benefits last week the unemployment rate expected to hold steady though at three point eight percent when june numbers are released in about an hour according to the us department of education seventy percent of high school graduates go on to college the more than half of them won't survive beyond their first year education expert jean burke says a whopping fifty five percent of college freshmen drop out after that first year she suggests parents keep a close watch for warning signs it's going to be a good indicator is a greater slipping the first year that either their partying too much not show up for class or just not being able to handle the whole experience can handle being an adult suddenly burke says a spiraling costs of a college education struggles with a daunting workload lead a lot of students to drop out before earning a degree no mom and dad there to tell you what to do every step of the way and the teachers don't care if you show up mom and dad maybe having prepared you for right exactly experts say a.

thirty percent one hundred seventy thousand d fifty five percent seventeen percent seventy percent eight dollars eight percent
Trump says he believes U.S. Representative Jordan's denial of ignoring sex abuse

Jim Bohannon

02:08 min | 3 years ago

Trump says he believes U.S. Representative Jordan's denial of ignoring sex abuse

"In for joe bartlett the group that removes lead from gasoline and help right the clean air act is reacting to the resignation of epa chief scott pruitt president of the environmental defense fund fred krupp says there's reason to celebrate but he's still concerned opposing scott pruitt's nomination was the first epa nominee we'd ever opposed in our history so we're thankful that he's gone but we're gonna watch like an eagle what successor does pruitt was facing sixteen different ethics investigations before resigning yesterday crump believes president trump is determined to dismantle the epa any fears that the next administrator will pursue the same goals officials in thailand say a former tiny baby seal died while trying to help rescue twelve boys from a flooded cave water pumps for going around the clock rescue workers trying to get water levels low enough so the boys could be safely taken out abc's james longman is there for the latest we traveled to a cave about fifteen minutes from where the boys are trapped to get a look at what they face as you go further when you've got jagged rock face murky water it gets worse as we move deeper into the cave assist gets narrower and narrower it's cold tampa smells i mean these cates being in here for so long in these conditions kind of unimaginable at the camp exhausted diva's going back and forth in shifts six thousand six hours out this one says a grueling effort to save those boys another former ohio state university wrestler says ohio congressman jim jordan new eighteen doctor was molesting athletes back when jordan was an assistant coach for the team brian shook reports fortythree year old shawn dailey says he was too embarrassed to report the incident directly to jordan when he wrestled for the team but jordan regularly took part in conversations about the doctor's behavior congressman jordan has repeatedly denied knowing of the team doctors abuse brian shook nbc news radio donald trump's former personal lawyers hiring bill clinton's former lawyer michael cohen has hired lanny davis to help them fight a federal probe.

Shawn Dailey NBC Jim Jordan Ohio Ohio State University Thailand Fred Krupp Lanny Davis Michael Cohen Bill Clinton Donald Trump Congressman Joe Bartlett Brian Jordan Cates Tampa James Longman Administrator Crump
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from npr news in washington i'm shay stevens epa administrator scott pruitt has resigned the move follows months of ethics investigations into his lavish taxpayer funded travel and security arrangements and lisa condo owned by the wife of a lobbyist pruitt also faced a lot of criticism for rolling back regulations aimed at slowing climate change which he doesn't believe is caused by humans for a crop is president of the environmental defense fund he's concerned about pruis legacy i think his legacy is behind demoralized epa because he's undermined epa's mission at every turn made a whole series of decisions that foul the nation's air and the water president trump is praising pruitt's work after accepting his resignation jeopardy epa administrator andrew wheeler a former mining lobbyists will serve as acting epa chief until pruitt's replacement is named president trump is urging voters to retire democratic montana senator jon tester november as jackie yamanaka of yellowstone public radio reports trump has a beef against tester over a confirmation vote earlier this year trump continues to defend former white house doctor and his former secretary nominee ronnie jackson previously he called on tester to resign over the release of allegations of misconduct by jackson and it brought that message to a campaign rally in great falls and that's probably why i'm here because i won montana by so many points have to come here a reference to the fact he won montana by twenty points in two thousand sixteen trump appeared on behalf of republican state auditor matt rosen dale who faces tester on the november ballot for npr news i'm jacky yamanaka in great falls montana indiana's attorney general curtis hill is being urged to resign over allegations of sexual misconduct indiana public broadcasting's brandon smith reports that the pressure is coming from the governor and legislative leaders three legislative staffers and a state lawmakers say republican attorney general curtis hill groped them at a party in march they brought the accusations to legislative leadership in may an outside investigation initiated by those leaders ended in june caucus leaders republicans and democrats had a conversation with hill earlier this week but didn't call for his job at the time some democratic lawmakers later did and public pressure mounted now governor eric cole command republican legislative leaders say hill should not continue to serve as attorney general they say they believe his accusers and would fire him if they could hill has adamantly denied the allegations and rejected calls to resign for npr news i'm brandon smith in indianapolis wall street stocks closed higher led by gains and technology and healthcare shares the nasdaq composite index rose eighty three points the dow jones industrials gained a hundred and one on asian market shares are mixed higher until kio this is npr news you a secretary of state mike pompeo says he'll be looking to fill in some details on commitments during his north korea visit this week pompeo was following up on the june twelfth summit between president trump and the north's leader kim jong un he was speaking to reporters during a refueling stop thursday in japan on his way to young it'll be pompeo's third north korea trips in april a new european union law will require travelers to hand over about ten dollars and some personal information for permission to enter the block from brussels teri schultz reports at the rules mirror a system that's already in use in the us people who don't need a visa to travel to europe which includes american citizens will now have to undergo an online screening before they can enter the eu officials say by asking questions about identity travel plans criminal records and previous presence in conflict areas they can prevent dangerous individuals from coming into the block the us has required europeans to go through a so called electric system for travel authorization since two thousand nine the eu says applicants will be processed virtually automatically but if potential travellers names come up in security databases or the admit previous felonies are unusual travel histories they'll need to be checked manually that could take a month anyone refused entry under the new system will have the right to appeal for npr news i'm teri schultz in brussels japanese meat say authorities are taking precautions against any retaliation for the executions of doomsday cult leader shoko asahara and several followers hora was on death row for masterminding the deadly nine hundred ninety five sarin gas attack on the tokyo subway this is npr news in washington support for npr.

washington shay stevens scott pruitt npr administrator ten dollars
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"And you kind of went in deep in the stories of people who were doing things a little bit differently unexpectedly for who think they are generations of ranchers and farmers and fishermen who really woke up to a different way of doing things can you tell us how you sort of got inspired to write this book and create this movie and how you pick the characters and tell us about that well so i've worked at environmental defense fund for fourteen years and we make a practice of working with large scale food producers we kind of break the the green mold in that way and that's both because we understand that to make change at scale you have to work with these large scale players as as you point out in your in your writing agriculture is the single biggest impact that the humans have on the planet arming and ranching food production is the thing we do with the greatest impact on the planet it uses half the half the terrestrial planet is devoted to ranches and farms it uses seventy percent of freshwater produces a third of greenhouse gas and so if you really wanna get at the environmental crisis you have to get food and and at food at scale and there are people all over who break this mold who are doing a really terrific job and so i knew about these people through my work at eighty f i decided to set the book in the mississippi watershed and i wanted to set it there partly because it maps perfectly onto red state america so again getting this idea that this doesn't divide politically the way you think it does but also because tofu eating hippies california oregon but also because the you know it's drains almost half of the united states and its where so many of our natural resources and especially our food comes from where most of our meat comes from it's where the that whole grain belt is where most of our.

united states mississippi california oregon seventy percent fourteen years
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Trump administration to stop delaying an obama era rule to limit methane emissions from oil and gas development details from wyoming public radio's cooper mckim the bureau of land management waste prevention rule is back in effect it restricts flaring and leaking from oil and gas projects the courts analysis found the interior department did not provide enough reasoning to delay implementation this is the fourth time the trump administration has failed to limit the rule john goldstein is with the environmental defense fund beer again the court has ruled that the fax support these waste production standards that the vast majority of westerners in the vast majority of voters in wyoming support or methane restrictions are now in effect and interior department proposal is up for public comment i would take away key elements the obama your rule for npr news i'm cooper mckim afghanistan's defence ministry says taliban militants killed at least eighteen soldiers today in suicide bombing at an hour me outpost in western far province at least one person died and several others were wounded in another suicide attack today and helmand according to a provincial spokesman and the islamic state group is claiming responsibility on its website for another deadly attack today in kabul the un security council is set to vote today on a proposed 30day humanitarian ceasefire for syria kuwait in sweden introduced a resolution and projected russia's attempts to amend it you and rights groups say more than four hundred people have died in the eastern gouda region sincere reinforces stepped up their campaign on rebels there earlier this month i'm shea stevens npr news in washington.

john goldstein obama afghanistan un security council kuwait sweden russia shea stevens washington wyoming npr taliban helmand kabul syria 30day
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"And you know at the at the state level we've had some really good leadership and senators udal and heinrich representatives michelle lose hunger shannon and then ray um luhan has been you know really stand up leaders on this issue um you know michelle lu hunger shen stood up on the house floor at posing some amendments to the budget that would have prevented these rules from being implemented and senator udal has been a leader and in among the delegation in um you know writing sign on letters and showing how important this is to our state so it will be a really important question for gubernatorial time we were one side but also on the legislative things those than some interesting progress for example um senator benny shindo and go passed in two thousand fourteen the memorial that asks office uh of uh the oil conservation division i'm to gather data about then thing and flaring um that goes on in lands around new mexico and was able to get some good data from uh from uh secretary mcqueen's office on not um you know some of our partners at the environmental defense fund uh did a really interesting report looking at how much money is being lost in the state per land tight so um you know for example the state land off this has the opportunity um two two potentially work with the legislature to be able to charge um some royalty he's off loss methane on on state land um so as we face budget challenges in our state um we have to really insist that the industry as long as they're gonna be here um does their work in the right way and then and the best possible way but we also have to look at the fact that you know it's a it's a real boom and bust market when you're depending on fossil fuels and and look towards renewable energy and move ourselves away from fuels that harm our health and our mer our communities in our fine kabila fivewoman rio grande chapter director sierra club cooked camille of the lawsuit could be filed by whom and by how soon by win the.

senator udal benny shindo mexico mcqueen renewable energy sierra club ray um luhan michelle lu the house senator secretary director
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on IOT Podcast

IOT Podcast

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on IOT Podcast

"Um from oakland which we generated in in partnership with google and the environmental defense fund awesome and so what was the result of the study the study generated one of the largest state effect on urban air pollution ever assembled and the results were there were were two dimensions to the results one it demonstrates that our approach is highly scalable highlyeffective and costeffective to generate high resolution naps of air quality and it also showed us that airquality is much more variable than anybody had ever expected so you can have the best airquality and the worst our quality on the same block and that's really important for decisionmakers you know whether it urban planners or our health insurers or citizens to understand how they are affected by air pollution you really need highly granular highly localised information and uh and we've proven that we could do it with our platform and with this methodology awesome so let's dig into some of the tech here just for fund just for funds these sooner you guys have this you called it the environmental intelligence monitoring platform so is that just a sensor is that a cloud service what is it our environmental intelligence platform is a fully integrated she'd i cut from sensor to backend data management system to the algorithms that makes sense of the data coming off of the sensors to the management system to manage all of the remotely deployed sensors to the digitalization software and the analytics so it's a fullyintegrated end to end stack and the reason that it's lee integrated that we really see this as a massive signal processing challenge and what we're trying to do is capture signals about what's in the environment and turn it into information that we can use and that platform can be deployed and multiple settings it can be deployed indoors in buildings it can be deployed outdoors on stationery cutting so think quite pools think the tops of buildings and it can also be deployed on moving vehicles and be able to generate insight from the censors at highly granular un resolutions that haven't been possible before.

oakland google data management
"environmental defense  fund" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"environmental defense fund" Discussed on KOMO

"Was about usrussia relations and arranged by the russian ambassador the bank says no he was a private business discussion this has conflict of interest written all over it i think it's a huge problem for kushner to be in a situation where as white house portfolio essentially allows him to have liaison with all sorts of corporate and financial institutions the russian banker gorkov could answer many of the questions the fbi in congress are asking but as of now he's trying hard to stay out of the spotlight giving us squat in russian he was called off makalu estonia kushner continues to hold a top secret clearance and work in the white house his lawyer sale he be glad to testify before congress and after any crush abc's brian ross meanwhile fired fbi director james comey will testify in a senate hearing next thursday connecticut democratic senator richard blumenthal explains won't be important to hear from call me during that hearing in his words whether he will confirm the accounts that have been reported very reliably incredibly about donald trump's demand for loyalty the pledge of loyalty that he asked committee give comey will appear in an open hearing of the senate intelligence committee is expected to testify about reports that president trump urged him to back off the investigation a former national security advisor michael flynn colmey will also be asked about trump's claim that the fbi chief assured him he was not being investigated in the russia probe environmental in science group say president trump's pullout from the paris climate accord will cost the us in prestige and jobs environmental defense fund says the us might sit as well put up a closed for business sign a union of concern scientists calls the police threat to every american health and future prosperity komo news time five four thirty nine going to church may help you live longer a new study finds middle aged adults who go to church synagogues mosques and other places of worship reduced their mortality risk by fifty five percent researchers at vanderbilt university studied data collected by the cdc and also found that those who attend religious services are less stressed lead author says a key factors that churches are places where people can find social support.

connecticut vanderbilt university komo paris russia michael flynn colmey advisor president richard blumenthal senator kushner senate james comey director senate intelligence committee donald trump brian ross abc congress fbi fifty five percent