40 Burst results for "Environment"

The Real Challenge of Card Counting Might Not Be What You Think

Nudge

01:31 min | 5 d ago

The Real Challenge of Card Counting Might Not Be What You Think

"The real challenge with card counting isn't counting the cards. It's making the casino think you're not counting cards. And this is tough. See, the human brain is a prediction making machine. The human brain is constantly anticipating and making predictions about what will happen next based on past experiences and patterns. This predictive ability that all of us have allows us to navigate the world around us and make decisions in real time. All of us experience this. When we watch a ball being thrown, our brain predicts where the ball will go and how we need to move to catch it. When we walk down a familiar street, our brain predicts what we'll see next based on our past experience. If we see something unexpected, such as a construction site, our brain registers that as a break in the prediction. When we taste food, our brain predicts what the flavor will be. If the flavor is unexpected or different from what we predicted, our brain registers the difference. When something unexpected or novel happens, our brain detects a prediction error essentially. This is why we often notice things that are out the ordinary or unusual, such as a car driving down the wrong lane on the road, a person wearing an unusual outfit, or a casual gambler who suddenly ups his bet by £500. Our brains are constantly monitoring the environment, comparing it to our predictions and detecting when there is a

500
Fresh update on "environment" discussed on Crypto Banter

Crypto Banter

00:09 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "environment" discussed on Crypto Banter

"It'll be a reactionary decision. She wants to step away from a bit, process and let her thoughts come back. Not a bad idea. Like guys, if the market bounces now, you'll make maybe 20, 30%. That could be a trade for the traders, but it isn't good to make long -term decisions based on temporary emotions. That quote can be applied to like every facet of life, but it's a very good quote, actually. Don't make permanent decisions based on temporary emotions. It's good for crypto and it's good for life. It'll stop me making shit decisions in life in general, I think as well. Sometimes I have to remind myself of that quote. Lady of crypto says, my thoughts, Bitcoin is close to the low put on June 5th. If it breaks, alt will continue to freefall. I would say she's right here because as I mentioned before, due to the exaggerated price movement of alt versus Bitcoin, Bitcoin to continues decline here. It's barely dropped and alt have already gotten smacked. If it goes down to 24, what happens to alt? They probably get absolutely pummeled even further. I doubt alt start reversing versus Bitcoin for no reason. That would be illogical for me to suggest, so I do think that can happen. She says, someone might know something we don't, if the rumor will filter through to us soon. I don't think this is true. It could be the case there's news, but I think the general reason for the dump today was Robinhood. It forced sales on a few alts. Obviously, the US securities, so the SEC's lawsuit against Binance and Coinbase that called these tokens securities put pressure on the altcoin market. You're seeing that lead to a liquidation cascade and the market's also kind of on the edge for a few reasons. One, it's on the edge in terms of the macro environment. Everything's shaky from a macro perspective. It isn't just crypto so altcoins are an easy thing to de -risk.

Mark Levin Calls Out Sunny Hostin for a Discussion on 'Racism'

Mark Levin

01:45 min | Last week

Mark Levin Calls Out Sunny Hostin for a Discussion on 'Racism'

"But listen to this sunny Houston He ignores systemic racism in America I'm mister producer I want you to contact her people at the view and ask her to come on the program Well we can have a short discussion About America and racism Okay I'm quite certain None of these people will come on the show So maybe she will In the clarence Thomas syndrome look at the hatred Look at the hatred That's why the view only exists because what is it ABC Syndicates of mister produce something like that So in other words ABC one of the major corporations in the world I guess it's is it still part of Disney I guess it is So it's the same corporate environment And so these people at ABC and Disney they provide a platform Like this these are haters These are nasty people It's like over at MSNBC They're provided a platform by Comcast Who rips you off every month By Comcast And they bring us the joy reeds of the world There's nothing joyful about joy Reid She's a nut Fact she's worse than a nut She's a bigot Am I humble opinion

ABC America Comcast Disney Houston Msnbc Reid Thomas
Fresh update on "environment" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:10 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "environment" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"Well there has been a you know very pronounced movement to have a crypto companies based outside the United States and so I think it is it is different than the way the US treated the internet itself where all large internet companies based in the US that's it that's a bad thing I mean because that is is like what San Francisco's all about now well and I'm gonna go back to go ahead not and and look we have a couple of recent data points they're just recent data points but foreign governments are using the blockchain to issue sovereign debt as a test case and and if they're doing that they're thinking you know have do we have an efficiency assisting technology and enhancing technology here and you're seeing governments support that question support the answer to that question I think we ought to be doing that too. We're seeing it now today with AI as well. we kicked Well off the conversation today I'm saying you know let's look at climate what's going on and you said like we need to have global operation in order for anything to be productive and get done correct? Yes. And it's the same thing with crypto and blockchain. why But are you worried about the climate Carol? Because I'm going to be living in the metaverse. No because we go outside of New York City where 10 % of all you know United States financial activity have a problem for the economy and for my daughter. Real quickly because we only have about a minute left 30 seconds on how used to the broader market environment right now. There's mixed data. Yeah so I still think that you know have rates to be high for longer than most people think. There's no working age person that's traded in a rising rate environment and so we all keep thinking oh it's just buy the dip buy the dip and there was a 42 year yeah there's a 42 year bull market rates there might be a you know four or five year bear market rates and it impact might interest rate sensitive sectors like stocks real estate and that's why I do think it's nice because it's not interest rate sensitive saved you 25 seconds outlook broad macro we continue to be surprised to the upside and we should ask ourselves why. That was former SEC chairman Jay Clayton along with Pantera Capital's Dan Morehead with me and Matt Miller. Coming up we'll hear from another event participant who offered a stark assessment of current market conditions. PJM CEO David Hunt is coming up next. You're listening Bloomberg to Business Week. This is Bloomberg. Bloomberg Radio on demand and in your podcast feed. On the latest edition of the Bloomberg Business podcast Week a conversation with former SEC chairman Jay Clayton and Dan Morehead CEO at Pantera Capital on the SEC widening its pursuit of crypto and its lawsuits against Coinbase for the first time ever. Crypto is really a technology. It's blockchain technology distributed ledger technology that manifests itself in many products. I believe that ten years from now there will continue to be blockchain based products. I expect that blockchain or some transformative technology like it will come to the traditional financial system and we're gonna see that. I think we should be looking to accommodate that and at the same time there

How to Describe Our National Security Position: 'Prudence'

Mark Levin

01:57 min | Last week

How to Describe Our National Security Position: 'Prudence'

"Best defines what our national security and our defense and military posture should be What one word He read liberty and tyranny chapter ten you know What is it Prudence It's not an ideological thing When it comes to the security of the United States prudence and so chapter ten is entitled self preservation Not defense not national security and liberty tyranny it's entitled self preservation That's the goal The conservative believes that the moral imperative of all public policy must be the preservation and improvement of American society So I love it when I'm lectured about this As I wrote about it it's almost 20 years whenever it was Similarly the object of American foreign policy must be no different The founders recognized that America had to be strong politically economic culturally and yes militarily To survive and thrive in a complex ever changing global environment Not only in their time but for all time History bears this out After the revolution Revolutionary War the founders realized that the confederation was inadequate to conduct foreign affairs Since each state was free to act on its own There could be no coherent national security policy because there was no staining army in each state ultimately was responsible for its own defense The nations economy was vulnerable to pirates who were terrorizing transatlantic shipping routes and by the way taking the men who worked on those ships into slavery And bring him into the central part of Africa And of course the British and Spanish empires were looming threats

Africa America American British Revolutionary War Spanish Almost 20 Years Chapter Ten ONE TEN The United States
Fresh update on "environment" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "environment" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Search charities. Inflation is running hotter and returns cooling are down. Is your financial plan primed for a changing environment? Every week we discuss the latest financial trends and what investors need to know about them to learn more about the impact of higher prices and how to become a better informed wise investor. Listen to the Investor Wise Show at thewiseinvestorgroup .com or find us on your favorite podcast app. Traffic

Our National Security & Defense Position Should Be 'Prudence'

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Our National Security & Defense Position Should Be 'Prudence'

"I have never preached that America shouldn't get involved in every war and every battle every corner of the earth That would be stupid Forever wars they call them I suppose It's hard to know how long a war is going to last before they end The Revolutionary War was of forever war I suppose But that doesn't mean you don't believe in national security and intervention When the time is right at what word best defines What our national security and our defense and military posture should be What one word He read liberty and tyranny chapter ten you know What is it Prudence It's not an ideological thing When it comes to the security of the United States prudence and so chapter ten is entitled self preservation Not defense not national security and liberty tyranny it's entitled self preservation That's the goal The conservative believes that the moral imperative of all public policy must be the preservation and improvement of American society So I love it when I'm lectured about this Because I wrote about it it's almost 20 years whenever it was Similarly the object of American foreign policy must be no different The founders recognized that America had to be strong politically economic culturally and yes militarily To survive and thrive in a complex ever changing global environment Not only in their time but for all time History bears this out After the revolution Revolutionary War the founders realized that the confederation was inadequate to conduct foreign affairs Since each state was free to act on its own

America American Revolutionary War The Revolutionary War Almost 20 Years Chapter Ten Liberty ONE The United States
Fresh update on "environment" discussed on Odd Lots

Odd Lots

00:12 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "environment" discussed on Odd Lots

"How much do these like long cycles sort of correspond with like essentially ideas that are invoked? You have to wonder whether the direction of causation. Richard Russell, who's a marvelous technician and thinker about markets who was no longer with us, was the author of the epigraph, Markets Make Opinions. And this, I think there's something to the idea that phases of economic life, whether they be markets or a nine to five world of actually producing things, as it were, that the background music of enterprise kind of conjures ideas. I'm not sure if ideas cause that. Maybe they might. Well, these ideas are recurrent. I mean, I'm told that generation, what comes after Z? I don't know. Whatever my daughter, I don't know. I've got to find out what that is. They're socialists, apparently. So, we'll reinvent that one again. I've given you a very poor answer to an excellent question, Joe. That's all right. Well, just on the notion of these long -term cycles maybe starting to shift, it does feel like previous decades were about sort of lower interest rates. And during those previous decades, we basically built the financial system around the assumption that government bonds are the safest thing out there. Super safe. Super safe. Government bonds, the yields don't move around that much. And yet, in the previous year, we have seen big question marks around the safety of government bonds and the stability of yields, which have resulted in a few things breaking to your earlier point. We saw troubles at the bank. The Fed reporting an accounting loss on its own balance sheet. What does it mean for the financial system as we move into potentially a higher rate environment or a higher vol environment for rates? I think one of the ideas that has sustained markets over the past called generation is the idea of Federal Reserve competence, the notion that people at the Fed know what they're doing and can make things happen. They are weathermakers in finance and they're responsible for the great moderation. They're responsible earlier for Paul Volcker is mastery of the inflation problem. So I think that the Fed will be revealed as a bunch of well -intended people who are involved in a kind of pseudoscience and people will wake up one day and say, I noticed that my weather app is accurate for a day or two, but out 10 days, I wouldn't bet my dog's life on it. And yet we listen patiently, even reverentially The economists at the Fed talk about what's going to happen next month or next year. They know nothing. I The future is a closed book. The screenwriter named Goldman, Butch Sundance, Ken and others, such great. And he said, apropos of Hollywood's forecasting and building. Nobody knows anything simply in Goldman, correct, correct as the fashion of future. The difference is that the Fed thinks it knows something. Coming up next, we take a closer look at the current state of markets with the legend Jim Grant. You're listening to Odd Lots on Bloomberg Radio. Also make sure to subscribe to Odd the Lots podcast on Apple, Spotify, and anywhere else you get your podcasts. I'm Joe Weisenthal. I'm of your energy, increase your concentration, and receive up to $200 while learning how. Call or text now. This new stress management program is part of a black health and resiliency project. Sound too

Is the FBI Lowering Standards? Former Agent Steve Friend Explains

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | 3 weeks ago

Is the FBI Lowering Standards? Former Agent Steve Friend Explains

"In the last couple of years, and I don't know the answer to this. Has there been a more radical type agent that you've started to work with or versus some of the kind of 30, 40 or 50 year olds that have been around for 20 years? Or are they radical as well? Is the actual individual agent, the rank and file changing within the FBI at all? I think it is, but would you have to understand is the environment in the FBI is not really consistent across the board. You have the headquarters very political dominion. And then you go out to the field offices, all the headquarter cities, and those can also be very political because the leaders managers are not really leaders who run those offices, go back and forth to headquarters in Washington so often. And then you have the rank and file agents who are just like myself, just want to keep their head down and work their cases. And those tend to be your cops. Those are the ones who want to put the bad guys in jail. But unfortunately, at least even in my time in the FBI, the hiring practices were altered. They reduced physical fitness standards. They've gone out and tried out of their way to recruit intersectional candidates to take positions. And to me, it was just, it's been a problem. It's been a lot of objection for many of the agents because take something like physical fitness. You don't have to be an Olympic athlete to be an FBI agent. But that's the only test along the way. And for me, it was a four year process to get hired. That's the only test I knew the answers to ahead of time. And that sort of indicated a character quality as somebody who was willing to put goals forward and achieve those goals. But now that's not being met, and they're just really looking for people who are willing to go along to get along to reach that GS 13 salary, make a $130,000 and don't rock the boat.

13 130,000 20 Years 30 , 40 Or 50 Year Olds FBI Washington Four Year The Last Couple Of Years
Fresh update on "environment" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:09 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "environment" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Good ranchers .com that's good ranchers .com promo code Kirk. This father's day treat the dads, you know, to the ultimate grilling experience. Their chicken is better than organic by giving the best fed pasture raising and providing a high quality living environment. Their beef is all USDA prime or upper choice. And the two is highest grades of beef they can receive. Every piece is hand trimmed, perfectly aged and individually wrapped to bring you the best 15 % of beef this country has to offer. Plus for a limited time, save $30 on your box when you use promo code Charlie..

The Astonishing Dilemma Crushing Society

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:09 min | 3 weeks ago

The Astonishing Dilemma Crushing Society

"The country is not having a good weekend. The world is not having a good weekend. And it's a dilemma. We have to somehow compartmentalize our life to have happiness. Because if you, if you only think about what the destruction being wrought on our country, by people called progressives leftist environmentalists, the people who are trans activists, it's astonishing, it's actually a world that nobody expected. I have so much to report to you on that. I'll tell you, we are really in for some serious stuff. The electrical grid can not support the demands being made with the because of the environmentalists, the use of environment to crush society. That's what it is. That's all every leftist movement is. It is the use of a group to crush society.

Kelly Clarkson responds to report accusing her daytime talk show of being a toxic workplace

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

Kelly Clarkson responds to report accusing her daytime talk show of being a toxic workplace

"Kelly Clarkson says she wants to maintain a healthy and safe work environment after accusations arise that her daytime talk show is toxic. The response by the talk show host and singer on Instagram follows a Rolling Stone report that includes allegations made by 11 current and former employees complaining about being overworked and underpaid on the Kelly Clarkson show, and also called their work traumatizing in the report the anonymous employees called Clarkson fantastic, but producers, monsters, Clarkson says it's unacceptable. People feel this way. She loves her team. There's always room to grow. So we'll now include leadership training for all senior staff, even herself. I'm Julie Walker.

11 Clarkson Julie Walker Kelly Clarkson Rolling Stone
Savanah Hernandez Reports From Ground Zero of the El Paso Border

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:47 min | Last month

Savanah Hernandez Reports From Ground Zero of the El Paso Border

"Savanna Hernandez is on with me, TPUSA, front lines, reporter extraordinaire from the border. Savannah, great to meet you, where are you right now, exactly? I mean, currently in El Paso, Texas on the American side of the border and what you see are seeing behind me is the world that is, again, protecting us from all of the illegal crossing from water to Mexico. Okay, so you're right there. I'm seeing some border barrier behind you. Is that one of the ones with the big gaps within the barrier where people can just kind of funnel through right there. There's border gaps that you see all the time. So there aren't really border gaps in this area, but what I want people to understand about the way that this is set up is that the wall in El Paso is basically set up at the edge of the city, but there is a bunch of federal land on the other side. So those migrants are still very easily to cross over from Mexico into the United States and then once they're in the United States they're getting processed. We just can't see it as easily because it's on the other side of this wall that border patrol will not allow us to go past. So El Paso is getting overwhelmed, all their shelters. They're calling it one of the biggest humanitarian crises that we've ever seen. What are you seeing on a humanitarian level? Because the footage has just been unbelievable in terms of trash in terms of people coming up that are just clearly just worn down, filthy, they've been through hell trying to get here because they think they can get in and stay here. There seems to be a narrative the left is missing. Absolutely, when I got here on Tuesday, that's exactly what the scene was. When you walk the streets of downtown El Paso, you would see piles of trash boxes of opened uneaten food that were attracting a lot of animals. They were unused clothing on the ground. The streets reek of urine and there are human feces just scattered throughout downtown, so it is not a clean environment at all.

American El Paso Mexico Savanna Hernandez Savannah Tpusa Texas Tuesday The United States
Is College Really Necessary for Success?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:05 min | Last month

Is College Really Necessary for Success?

"Before I take your word for it on NATO, I'd like to know, you have any background where did you where did you go to college? No one, for all they know, I didn't go to college. Fascinating. You're right. Isn't that interesting? You never heard of that. I know that. You think that interesting? I never thought that when I was listening to you for the first time. That's right, where did I go? Right, well, thank you. But putting the compliment aside, that's that's the point. Right. You earn their respect. You're either intelligent or not that intelligent. You're even make sense, or you don't make sense. So I try to tell this also to young people like you try and I don't think it registers, but you're not judged by that the day you leave college. You better be damn good at what you do or bye bye. Yes. No, I totally agree with you. I do think there are certain environments like Goldman Sachs. That's right. In the beginning. The pecking order matters. In the beginning. Totally, yes. After ten years certainly it doesn't.

Goldman Sachs First Time Nato Ten Years
Aztec Network Introduces Hybrid ZkRollup

Ethereum Daily

00:46 sec | Last month

Aztec Network Introduces Hybrid ZkRollup

"And paradigm releases its Artemis MeV bought library. I'll do some more from eth daily starts right now. Aztec network introduced its road map for a hybrid ZK rollup. A layer two network that supports both public and private smart contract executions. The hybrid ZK rollup includes an unspent transaction output or UTXO system that supports not only value transfer, but also any arbitrary data, such as entire smart contracts, Aztecs composability with both public and private state environments, enables function calls between public to public, public to private, private to public and private to private

Aztec Aztecs Both Artemis Mev Two Network
The DAME Tax: Government's Extortion Attempt on Crypto Miners

The Breakdown

01:49 min | Last month

The DAME Tax: Government's Extortion Attempt on Crypto Miners

"Let's start with the latest anti government sentiment. This, of course, came in the form of dame. Now dame, for those of you who missed my show on it, was the digital asset mining excise tax, and it was announced by the council of economic advisers for The White House on Tuesday. Their Twitter thread announcing it says crypto mining is a process for validating transactions among holders of crypto assets. While crypto assets are virtual, the energy used is very real and imposes substantial costs for context crypto mining in the U.S. is estimated to use more energy than all computers in the United States. Crypto miners tap large amounts of high polluting energy even reviving previously defunct fossil fuel facilities to power their operations. But even when miners use existing clean power, they're still less available for other uses, which in turn raises prices and increases overall reliance on dirtier sources of energy. Crypto miners intense and volatile power consumption can also push up electricity prices and make local electrical grids riskier as a result of increased strain on equipment, service interruptions and safety hazards, and there is little evidence of benefits to local communities in the form of employment or economic opportunity and research has found that minor increases in local tax revenue are more than offset by increased energy prices. Some states and localities are beginning to address the issue but to ensure that crypto mining is not simply pushed from one local community to another. There is also a role for national policy. Ultimately, the primary goal of the dame taxes for crypto miners to pay their fair share of the costs imposed on local communities and the environment. So as you can tell just from that announcement, this is a pretty aggressively positioned thing. And of course, bitcoiners saw right through it. Many viewed this not as a serious policy attempt given that it would have to go through the appropriations process in Congress, but just an attempt at extortion. Bit pain rights, those of you confused about how the U.S. system of government works. They have no intention of banning Bitcoin mining.

Tuesday United States Congress U.S. The White House Twitter One Local Council Of Economic Advisers
Biden's DAME Mining Tax Is an Attack on Bitcoin

The Breakdown

01:53 min | Last month

Biden's DAME Mining Tax Is an Attack on Bitcoin

"Of the things that bitcoiners have held a lot of stock in over the last 6 months is that as much as it has seemed like there has been a coordinated effort targeting the larger crypto industry. Bitcoin has seemed a bit more immune. Even the arch nemesis SEC chair Gary gensler repeated recently in front of Congress that Bitcoin was in fact a commodity, a claim he would not make for Ethereum. Now to be fair, he said that it was a commodity because that was the assessment of a previous SEC, not really a full throated endorsement, but nevertheless. Still, some bitcoiners have warned that it felt like there was another shoe to drop. That it wasn't like there were a bunch of Bitcoin maxis running the banking infrastructure or the Biden administration who were just targeting the rest of the crypto industry but ignoring Bitcoin. wrote about it in the context of privacy. He said, I feel like the Bitcoin community isn't giving enough thought to how we're building things that won't be targeted by regulators. We've seen some clear lessons in the broader crypto Ethereum community with opaque and tornado cash, the Aztec shutdown and the implementation of the travel rule in Europe. Governments hate privacy and will try to destroy anything that enables 100% privacy. As a consequence, every regulated crypto company will drop privacy tools like a hot potato. Now another obvious area that could be targeted when it comes to Bitcoin is the environment. Washington's attentions have of course been on the systemic risks to the banking system that some people argue crypto represents. That's understandable given the failures of signature bank, silvergate bank. Silicon Valley bank, et cetera however, even as that has been happening state regulators have been much more focused on Bitcoin mining. Last year, for example, New York passed a moratorium on licenses for new Bitcoin miners, or for the approval of license extensions for minors that already had licenses unless they were using 100% renewable energy.

Gary Gensler Europe Last Year 100% Congress Aztec SEC 100% Privacy New York Biden Administration Silvergate Bank Silicon Valley Washington Energy Last 6 Months Bitcoin Over Ethereum
Deadly heat waves threaten older people as summer nears

AP News Radio

01:07 min | Last month

Deadly heat waves threaten older people as summer nears

"With heat waves. Now arriving earlier, linked to climate change, emergency officials are warning of the danger to older people. It's estimated more than a third of the U.S. heat deaths every year can be attributed to human caused global warming, and there's been a big rise in scores of U.S. cities where people might not have air conditioning or extreme heat is rare, last summer in the greater Phoenix area there were 77 deaths overall, and most were linked to days of 99° heat. Researchers say people over age 60 are increasingly at risk of dying from heat related causes. That's especially true for people of color. Most communities do offer cooling centers and pass out bottled water when the temperature soar. But doctor Aaron Bernstein at Harvard center for climate health and the global environment says it's important people check on the elderly during heat waves, providing personalized attention. He says most older people and those in ill health are not likely to summon a taxi or an Uber to bring them to a cooling center. I'm Jackie Quinn

Jackie Quinn 77 Deaths Aaron Bernstein Last Summer More Than A Third U.S. 99° Heat Uber Phoenix Every Year Over Age 60 Harvard Center For Climate Hea Environment
Bermuda's Premier Talks Crypto Regulation

CoinDesk Podcast Network

02:04 min | Last month

Bermuda's Premier Talks Crypto Regulation

"Whole gangs here, closing out consensus last day down in Austin, Texas. Now, doing some good interviews on this show, and you may know that yesterday we had a real live alpaca, but that alpaca has nothing on our next guest. He is the premier of Bermuda. Please welcome premier David Byrd to the stage, everybody. So welcome. Thanks for being here. I know you have a main stage session, a bit later today. So we're gonna get you warmed up. You can try out some materials, some good bits. We'll see what we can do. All right, so Bermuda has been in the digital asset game for a minute now. I gotta ask you. The Bahamas look a major black eye with the FTX implosion. You're saying that you have the regulatory framework that could prevent something such as that. But I want to get your personal take on your reaction to that implosion in November. Well, I think it was unfortunate. It was unfortunate for the persons who lost money. It's unfortunate for all of those persons who were lured in. But the fact is that it just speaks to the importance of making sure that you not only have a strong legal environment, but you actually are doing the regulation, which is necessary to prevent things, because it harms the overall industry. And it caused a lot of pain for a lot of persons. And so from that perspective, for us, we were regulators very strict. So from that perspective, we haven't had any challenges like that in Bernoulli. So operationally, what's the lesson? Is it proof of reserves? Is it the separation of client and customer funds? What are the actual takeaways that you're using from FDX to inform your approach going forward? The only thing is that regulators have to be strong. They have to make sure that they're actually doing what they are supposed to be doing. And I think that's what we do in Bermuda. So no one comes from you to escape regulation, our regulation is very tough. Our companies will say the BMA is firm, but fair. But from that aspect, if you have strong and proper regulation, that has actually been enforced, you can avoid things like that.

BMA David Byrd November FDX Yesterday Austin, Texas Bernoulli Bermuda Bahamas Alpaca Later Today FTX
Who Could Replace Tucker Carlson on Fox?

The Trish Regan Show

02:22 min | Last month

Who Could Replace Tucker Carlson on Fox?

"News is going to have a little bit of a problem here because they've got to kind of make sure that the viewers don't totally desert them. I mean, you look at the ratings from the other night and MSNBC is doing pretty well newsmax is doing pretty well. There's a lot of places to go as we know in the splintered media environment where you can come directly to a personality straight to a personality straight here to Trish Regan, for example, or should Tucker decide to do his own thing. And I think he'd be smart to do so. You'll be able to go directly to him. So there's a whole new opportunity for you as a consumer. And I think younger people certainly get this. And older people are starting to get it as well. But let's just say, I were running things at Fox News right now, first of all, it never would have gotten to this, but if I were suddenly in charge, who would I put in? Who would you put in for that matter? Send us a comment. Let us know who your first choice would be as a host for the show. We've been assembling names because by the way, some of you have already been saying this, Brian kilmeade, of course, stepped in for Tucker, tough spot to be in. I think for him, you know, the first night and everything. But he's well regarded at the network. So Brian kilmeade, he's on the list. Jesse watters. Jesse watters came up as a producer under Bill O'Reilly. He used to do waters world or he'd go out and ask these crazy questions and kind of basic stuff actually like basic civics. Who did America fight in the Revolutionary War? The French? He's very much a conservative. And so he's somebody who could step into the slot. Piers Morgan is over there. He's part of the whole Fox system right now. He's very, very liked by the Murdoch family. Certainly by Rupert Murdoch, appears to it. He's got a British accent, so I don't know how that goes down. Can I say that? You're being agent. I'm just saying. If that's a fact. It's a long time ago. But hey, you know what, Steve Hilton, he's on the weekend. He's got a British accent. Maybe it works. Mark Stein, he's got an accent. I think some kind of Canadian accent, but he used to fill in a lot for Tucker. And he's kind of eccentric and he's got neat ideas. So he's another possible contender. I'm going to throw Candace Owens in there because we don't have a woman. Women. Nobody's mentioned a woman and I don't know how deep the bench really is for conservative women over there. They've got Laura Ingraham who does a great job. And then you got, I'm just going to put his name in the ring because he is a guest on the show today. You got a guy named Vivek Rama Swami, who's

Steve Hilton Mark Stein Rupert Murdoch Laura Ingraham Brian Kilmeade Trish Regan Murdoch Bill O'reilly Vivek Rama Swami Tucker Jesse Today Msnbc FOX Revolutionary War Fox News First Choice First Night British America
Did Abby Grossberg's Lawsuit Play a Role in Tucker's Fox Exit?

The Trish Regan Show

01:13 min | Last month

Did Abby Grossberg's Lawsuit Play a Role in Tucker's Fox Exit?

"Else, though, going on, meanwhile, Maria bartiromo, wonderful, wonderful woman. I worked with her both at CNBC. And then, of course, at Fox. Maria bartiromo had a producer named Abby grosberg and Abby, then later went over to work on Tucker Carlson's show, and Abby sued as this dominion thing unfolded, alleging that there was a ton of discrimination that there was a ton of sort of harassment, the environment that she was working in was highly problematic on Tucker Carlson's show. So in that discovery process, you wonder if more things came out. I mean, we know already. You've seen some of the texts that went back and forth. Tucker didn't seem to have a whole lot of faith in management, and he was complaining that management was so bad that we're going to take the whole place down because they didn't really understand where the viewer was at, et cetera, et cetera. One wonders if more stuff came out in that discovery process for this other lawsuit that might have just been enough for the Murdochs to say, okay, we really don't want this guy here anymore. Not only do we want not want him, we don't want his producer, Justin wells. So they sent both of them packing. It's honestly just shocking. And I think it's unfortunate because it didn't need to get to this.

Abby Maria Bartiromo Abby Grosberg Cnbc FOX Both Tucker Carlson Tucker Justin Wells Murdochs ONE
Assault Case Dismissed Due to Lack of Injury Under NY Law

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:19 min | Last month

Assault Case Dismissed Due to Lack of Injury Under NY Law

"New Yorkers worry about the surge in major violence since the pandemic. But small quote unquote violence has also exploded, creating an environment of fear. Isadora Acosta, an architect, was between business meetings march 8th around noon. After one near a Columbus circle, I don't know, I don't know what that means after one the near Columbus circle. She stopped at Whole Foods to get groceries and hopped on an M 7 bus to drop them off at her upper west side home. If it's doable, I would always choose the bus over the subway, she says, because there's been so many subway crimes in the middle of the day. Acosta took a seat behind a man. Without any prior interaction, the man, who she estimates, was in his 50s, started hitting me. I was completely shocked. He slapped her several times with both hands. He was mumbling words. Acosta didn't understand. I said to him, I'm sorry, I don't know what I did. A woman helped her leave the boss at the next stop. A custom filed a police report. The police asked her if she wanted to press charges, and she said yes. It seemed to me that everything was leading towards some follow-up, she says. Yet when she called to inquire on progress, the NYPD told her the case. Was inactive. With no exclamation. The New York police department does not dispute this account. A cost of 16 year old son Emilio fears the police are an investigating because the district attorney has stopped prosecuting such cases. Something a family friend detective told them. Since there was no blood. Most of us think hitting someone is assault, but unless a person sustains an injury under New York law hitting someone is just harassment.

Acosta Emilio Isadora Acosta Nypd 50S Both Hands New York Whole Foods 16 Year Old Columbus Circle ONE Pandemic March 8Th Around Noon New York Police Department New Yorkers M 7
Theories Swirl Around Tucker Carlson's Sudden Fox Departure

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:01 min | Last month

Theories Swirl Around Tucker Carlson's Sudden Fox Departure

"Continuing my discussion of taka Carlson and his sudden and somewhat shocking departure from Fox. Well, a theory about this is that Tucker is being sued apparently being sued by somebody for creating a hostile work environment, the accusations seem kind of vague. Mostly it seems to be the fact that taco just kind of rounded up his staff and subjected them to various red pilling exercises and this was supposedly very disturbing to this individual. In any event, it's hard for me to believe that that is in fact the real explanation. True, it's coming on the heels of the dominion settlement, but unless there's something far more to all this than we know. That seems to me to be a dubious explanation. Another explanation that's been reported in a merely passing this along is the idea that Tucker was angered Rupert Murdoch by going down the January 6th road. Now, if this is true, and if either a Rupert Murdoch or the Murdoch family was upset about this, that shows that foxes in serious trouble. Why? Because they're taking mainstream topics of genuine public interest and certainly of intense interest on the right topics like election fraud, what really happened in 2020. What happened in 2022 and say Arizona. The continuing tragic plight of the January 6th defendants, the real abuses of judicial process and procedure, the corruption of judges, the ruthlessness of the prosecution, penalties, out of proportion to the offenses, solitary confinement for months, in some cases, years before trial, all of this is going on. It's an outrage, it is of deep concern to many Republicans and conservatives, and if the Murdochs are like, well, this isn't going to be off limits at Fox. Well, that's going to be very bad, that's a very bad comment on Fox itself.

Tucker Rupert Murdoch 2020 January 6Th FOX 2022 Arizona Murdoch Taka Carlson Murdochs Republicans
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

07:56 min | 11 months ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"One just landed on me. The birds and the bees. Oh my goodness, we have just come up a very steep ladder into Paradise. This is amazing. A few weeks ago, I visited biologist and beekeeper, Noah Wilson rich. On a rooftop covered with wildflowers and trees, right in the middle of Manhattan. Okay, so where do we go to find the house? Okay. So we are going to walk past these bronze sculptures, and there are four beads in the corner. So follow me, we're going to make our own pathways. This is growing up. Can you just see how odd it is to be talking to you, surrounded by a cloud of bees? And not being fearful or running. I feel like we've got like a bee soup swimming around our heads. You said it was going to be calming, and it kind of is. There you go. You have to vibe with it. You know, everything we do. I mean, okay, so Noah, we had to come up. We had to take the subway. And then we had to come up this flight of steep ladder. We're in Manhattan. Somebody who maybe doesn't know you might think, why go through all this trouble, why not just put these hives in a beautiful field in New Jersey? I did not set out to become an urban beekeeper at all. I was living in the city of Boston going to graduate school nearby when I needed to get more beheads for a research at the time developing vaccines for bees. And I just began to notice that these were dying outside of the city and they were thriving inside the city and on the higher up rooftops as well they were doing better. So we need to have beehives here on a rooftop in Manhattan instead of the fields of New Jersey because they're dying there. This is where they're thriving in the future. You've likely heard that bees are in trouble for many reasons, including climate change and pesticides. Noah's company best bees collects data from hundreds of honeybee hives that they install and maintain in cities across the U.S.. This research, he says, is helping biologists better understand how to protect all kinds of bee species. We can start to see which behaves are thriving, which behaves are not on this network and then ask questions about the habitat, which so far seem to really converge around the habitat hypothesis that as with this rooftop, the more plant diversity around a beehive, that seems to be the leading explanation for YB has a thriving. Yeah, I'm just wondering, as an expert in bees, as you look around, what are you looking for? What are the indicators that you want to see? So what I'm looking for in a healthy bee population is safety. First and foremost, are these bees just doing their own thing? Are they ignoring humans as they should? These are vegan. They should go to flowers and come back. That's really it. So far, does it look good? It looks amazing so far. These four behaves are thriving. I know from our database also when our beekeepers visited recently that we've done everything to make sure that the bees have a healthy queen, she's laying eggs, they're starting to make honey. And we're working with bees that are already in the environment, and that's a beautiful thing for sustainability. So some behaviors will notice these bees are kind of having a multiply and survive. That is the goal of every organism. Yes, the goal of bees is to make more bees in an evolutionary biology perspective, the goal of humans is to make more humans, and that's what organisms do. We pass our genes to the next generation. Maybe as a child, you first heard reproduction referred to as the birds and the bees. But your parents probably didn't teach you about pollination or insect intercourse or eggs hatching. So today on the show, we investigate the birds and bees quite literally. We'll learn how feathered creatures and various insects breed, what can get in their way, and if linking their mating rituals to ours is ever a fair comparison. Which brings us back to biologist Noah Wilson rich, who says humans have made honeybees essential to their own survival. So bees are this universal pollinator. They bring over 70 fruit and vegetable crops that we humans rely upon for healthy nutritious food. They bring nuts, you know, crunchy almonds, sour lemons, tart apples, they are responsible for over a $100 billion to the global economy every year through this pollination service. They even support the cattle and dairy and cheese industries through their role of pollinating hay and alfalfa. And there are 20,000 species of bees, worldwide, hard at work, pollinating, not just crops, but also plants. And so whether they're pollinating crops or plants around the world, they're providing an really important ecosystem service that we rely upon every day in our daily activities. So we started the show visiting beehives right here in New York City. And you have said that these honeybees are doing better in urban areas because of the habitat. Talk me through how you came to that conclusion because it's a bit surprising. Yeah, so we were looking at the three main hypotheses for what's killing bees. That's the starting point and understanding what saving them. So the main three killers of bees are agricultural chemicals so that includes pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, anything that's designed to kill off some intricate part of this relationship between plants and pollinators. So that's one, the second is diseases of which bees are affected by many pests and pathogens. So two was disease and three is habitat loss. Meaning they're just aren't enough flowers out there to facilitate good nutrition for pollinators. Now, nutrition is just as important for bees as it is for humans. For bees, it helps them to better metabolize pesticides, which they can do, and also to better withstand disease. So that's how habitat loss relates to the first two. Leading killers of bees. Now flipping those a little bit, what's saving bees? We were looking at the areas where bees were thriving and where they weren't on our network of beehives here. So these are beehives at home gardens and business rooftops across the United States. And we wanted to test to see if the areas where bees are doing great, had less pesticides. Did they have less disease? Or was the habitat better? And we found that an urban area is there are up to 8 times more plant species for bees to pollinate compared to their nearby rural and suburban areas. Here's Noah Wilson rich on the Ted stage. So we're finding out now that in rural areas, there are a 150 plants on average in a sample of honey. That's a measure for rural. Suburban areas, what might you think do they have less or more plants and suburban areas with lawns? That look nice for people, but they're terrible for pollinators. Suburbs have very low plant diversity. So if you have a beautiful lawn, well good for you, but you can do more, you can have a patch of your lawn. That's a wildflower meadow to diversify your habitat to improve pollinator health. Anybody can do this. Urban areas have the most habitat, best habitat, over 200 different plants. We have for the first time ever support for the habitat hypothesis. Spring honey and provincetown is from privet. What's privet? Hedges. What's the message? Don't trim your hedges to save the bees. Move to the summer honey, which is water lily honey. If you have honey from provincetown right here in the summer, you're eating water lily juice. In the fall, sumac honey, we're learning about our food for the first time ever. And now we're able to report if you need to do any city planning, what are good things to plant?

Noah Wilson Manhattan Noah New Jersey swimming Boston United States New York City Hedges
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"It's snakes its way down Pakistan. And it's canals help irrigate the fields that feed the country's 220 million people. Fishermen have enjoyed its bounty for centuries. But as NPR's DIA Hadid recently discovered on an expedition down the Indus, climate change and overuse are threatening the river and the millions who rely on it. The Indus expedition 2022 team began their journey, rafting down the glacial melt of the Himalayas, where the Pakistani portion of the river begins. It was like I was feeling it. That's wajahat Malik, a filmmaker who's been leading a team of environmentalists and adventurers. They want to raise awareness about the Indus, a river that's rarely traversed. We need at the tail end of their journey in the country's south. The Indus has long been a source of prosperity, but hardship seems everywhere. As we head to the riverbank the first thing we see are men feeling tankers from a pipe extracting water. It's nazir's tone. Like many people here, he goes by only one name. Bells on his tank a jangle. To attract customers when he drives into a nearby town. He says people who don't have water in their taps and demand is strong. It's been hovering around a 116° for weeks now. But this water is only for people who can pay for it. We settle into rubber dinghies at the Pakistani navy has led the expedition alongside a few armed seamen for security. This stretch of the river has long been a redoubt for bandits and fugitives. I'm handed a life jacket. How do I get this on? We get going. And it's clear, I don't need it. Because we keep running a ground. The water is only like two feet deep here. So we'll have to drag the boat to the deeper channel. And then go on to the other side. Dams up the river have long reduced the float to this lower stretch of the Indus. This year there hasn't been much rain or snow melt to replenish the waters. Something scientists say will happen more frequently as the climate keeps changing. And as we motor on, we see another problem, pipes everywhere, extracting water. Many here are controlled by powerful families who steal it to irrigate their fields. As we navigate the boat back to a deeper part of the river, we hear gunshots. We just had to show us and the guards on our boats. We just got shot at by the guy over there. Those guys there, yeah? We can see two guys standing on the bank. They fired some shots earlier at the bow. A gunman keeps his weapon trained on us as we motor away. The team think it's abandoned, perhaps he thought we were part of an arrest raid. We passed dusty mountains, scrub and goat herders, and it's so hot we stop and jump in. Malik the filmmaker and I stand in the water to chat, and he tells me that in Pakistan 75 years. There are like about 5 recorded expeditions. There was the first expedition in 19 52. The last one took place in the 90s sometime. Some of its geography, the river is hard to navigate its initial stretch as it emerges through Himalayan gorges. Further down, there's dams that break up the flow. And yet, the Indus is Pakistan's artery. I think there is a disconnect. They are not very many big cities along the river. Especially the urban population. So for them, a river is something which is, you know, a way. Far enough to not think about the river, but close enough that it's become a dumping ground. The sewage of the cities and the towns, the chemical waste, we saw all these marble factories and they were pouring all their junk. Malek says this is why this expedition and his film is important. I want Pakistanis to know that river Indus, it's the lifeline of Pakistan. It gives us bread. I mean, it nurtures us our fields and it is everything to us. Soon afterwards, we trudge onto the riverbank, and we meet under Rashid a fisherman. He's repairing his net by the water. His thin with gaunt cheeks, there's a few fish in his bucket. He says he makes a few dollars a day, and he considers himself lucky. Jobless. They are hungry. They don't have enough food. He says. There's not enough water for the fish to thrive. And downstream in the village of Gödel, the kennels that farmers use to irrigate their crops are mostly dry. Jabari is a 75 year old farmer, but he's now looking for work in the local bazaar for a dollar, 20 a day. Because he can't plant his wheat, corn or rice. He says he's got no choice. He's hungry. But across the road, there are green fields. Jabbar says a landowner hogs the only available water to irrigate his rice paddies. Instead, the villagers hand pump brackish water to drink. Ciabatta nephew Al medine says they've long suffered at the hands of powerful landowners. But climate change is making their lives harder. It's getting hotter. The rains come less often, and he fears his fellow villagers at the tail end of this damaged river. We'll start. Do you have a deed NPR news on the Indus? Hey, it's Gregory Warner from the podcast, rough translation. Many of us think we can't share our stories of failure until we've hit success. As Silicon Valley type of conversation is always, let's talk about failure because it's cool to talk about it. How entrepreneurs in Mexico City are offering a different way to talk about failure. Listen to at work, the series on NPR's rough translation. This message comes from NPR sponsor, YouTube. It starts with Meredith's desire to change careers and grows into a successful farming business, Meredith learned how on YouTube..

DIA Hadid wajahat Malik Pakistan Pakistani navy nazir NPR Himalayas Himalayan gorges river Indus Malik Malek Rashid Al medine Jabari Jabbar Gregory Warner Silicon Valley Mexico City
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"At making cancer history dot com. Summertime is fast approaching, that means more bugs, but a new study from the United Kingdom shows a dramatic decline in the number of flying insects, 60 percent since 2004, while fewer buzzing biting bugs may appeal to some people, it could spell environmental disaster in the future. Matt shardlow is the CEO of bug life, a conservation group, which conducted the study. He joins us now. Thanks for being with us, mister Charles. Hello, thanks for having me very much. Please help us understand that number and the perspective 60% drop over 17 years. I mean, 60% of our wildlife effectively, because invertebrates absolutely critical to ecosystem health. Support our wildflowers through pollination, fertilize the soil through burying dung and other matter into the ground. They keep our rivers clean. And they provide the food to all the other animals that we see in the countryside. So losing 60% of them just 17 years is a pretty big crisis. And what are some of the reasons for why it may have happened? Well, it's a bit complicated because we're dealing with thousands of flying insects here, but we think that there's some clear patterns in that data. So we're seeing bigger impacts in the southern parts of the UK and that's where the habitats are most fragmented and also where climate change is starting to hit most already. May I ask how do you get the data? It can't be easy to count flying bugs. Absolutely difficult. What we've done here is built on a scheme that was first piloted by the Royal Society protection of birds actually in the UK. In 2004, and they got their members to go out and clean their number plates on their cars, drive a journey, record that journey, and then count the numbers of insects that had hit the number play to the car. Number plates are licensed plates in the UK. Yeah, that's right, yeah. We've updated that a bit and bug life, which is the insect conservation charity in the UK. And Kent wildlife trust, which is a local wildlife charity. We have both put together a new app, so that it's much simpler, but basically the principle is the same. What would be necessary to reverse the decline or is it too late for that? It's never too late. Really, what we need is repair to the landscape. So we need connectivity. So what we're promoting in the most cost effective way to do this is to put stepping stones a wildflower rich habitat back into the countryside. So you create corridors across the landscape where you're restoring the sorts of habitats that those invertebrates need to move. And if we can get them to move again, start so that they can actually adapt and respond to climate change, then they've got a chance of surviving climate change. If we don't adapt our landscapes in this sort of way, then they're in real trouble. Mister shardlow this summer when some of us feel a bug buddy at the back of our neck and begin to go like that, should we think twice? Well, you're not going to damage the population by doing that. So these aren't the sorts of things that we need to worry about when we're talking about the health of the environment. That is about habitats, maintaining the quality of habitats, getting a better distribution restoring habitats, and also making sure that landscape is safe generally. And that's reducing things like light pollution that we know is impacting on moths and lots of other invertebrate populations, reducing the other pollutions, particularly pesticides, and the neonics, which we've banned over in the EU and the UK because they damage bee populations. That is something that in America should be banned tomorrow. It's outrageous that they're still using the index when we know that they're damaging bee populations. The CEO of bug life in the UK, thank you so much for being with us, sure. Thank you very much. Reveal the economic patterns all around us. While you swipe right and left, understand money better with the indicator, one of NPR's daily podcasts. More voices, all ears, NPR podcasts..

UK Matt shardlow bug life mister Charles Royal Society protection of bi Kent wildlife trust Mister shardlow cancer EU America NPR
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Whether it's a hike in the Woods or a walk down a tree lined street, research has found that getting out into nature can lead to better health and boost your mood. But there's a learning curve to getting comfortable outside. Here's Gabrielle Horton with an encore presentation from NPR's life kit. For me, being outdoors often stirs up images of lush green forests or snowy slopes. But smaller moment in nature like walking my dog around the neighborhood or even listening to a rain sounds playlist before bed have been just as valuable. And they don't require the time, money or physical mobility of a big trip. And that's something that scientists mean quo has been studying for years. Nature includes everything from capital N beautiful spectacular untouched wilderness all the way to a window box or having a view of squirrels from your office window. So it makes sense when being describes nature, more like a multivitamin, which leads us to our first takeaway. Get your daily dose of nature and experience a range of emotional and cognitive benefits. If we get our breaks or even our micro restorative moments through the view outside, we recover some capacity to use that mental muscle. So we can do things that are hard to do. And we can do them more easily and less painfully. And the cool thing about nature is that you don't have to be outdoors to experience its wonder, not to mention, getting outside might not be accessible for a whole host of reasons. So that leads us to our next takeaway, bring nature into your world. That might include caring for House plans or a pet, or maybe it looks like logging onto virtual aquarium tours and social media games. Herpetologist Aaron McGee created hashtag find that lizard for this very reason. Find that lizard is a game that I run every Wednesday and essentially I post a photo of a lizard camouflage and it's natural environment and people have to find the lizard in the photo. They don't have to go outside. As you start playing your way through nature, you might realize that you want to share those experiences with others. So that's our next takeaway. Find your adventure crew. It's a practical.

Gabrielle Horton NPR Aaron McGee
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"The devastating human cost of Russia's war in Ukraine feels headlines and news stories every day. Back in early March though, hundreds of international law and environment experts signed an open letter warning of the risks the conflict posed to the environment in Ukraine and Europe. Kira muffin is one of its lead authors. He's president and CEO of the center for international environmental law. And he joins us now to talk about how this dimension of the war is playing out. Welcome. Thank you for having me. So Russia invaded Ukraine two months ago, what do we know about the environmental impacts of the conflict since then? One of the important things to understand about the environmental consequences of war is that they are human consequences in another form and they are often difficult to discern and that can be very long-lasting. It's really important to recognize that eastern Ukraine were much of the conflict has occurred is highly industrialized. This means that there are petroleum refineries and chemical plants. And as we've seen too clearly, Ukraine has nuclear installations around the country. And so the risks are enormous. We've seen fires add a nuclear facility. We've seen a tax and missile striking ammonia pipelines and chemical plants causing releases of highly toxic substances. Even beyond this, there are enormous impacts on agricultural lands as lands are mined as unexploded ordnance and munitions accumulates on the cropland. And we've even seen attacks and military operations in wildlife refuges and protected areas. The thing about war is that it's very difficult to get information. So are these instances being tracked, some nonprofit efforts have been undertaken to track that. But it's extraordinarily difficult. It's important to recognize that one of the environmental consequences of war is that the people who are protecting land who are managing water safety infrastructure are unable to do their jobs or they're doing it in the midst of live fire zones, often what we find is in the wake of the war, that's when we begin to count the true environmental cost of the operations. You mentioned, obviously, the nuclear reactors, which is a huge concern. Is that the biggest area of concern when it comes to the environment? If a disaster were to occur at one of the 15 active reactors, you could have impacts that not only affected the local area and Ukraine as a whole. But the wider European region. And as we saw with the Chernobyl disaster, these impacts can last years to decades. And that speaks to one of the other indirect consequences of this of this invasion, is that if the U.S. and Europe respond to Russia's invasion by simply replacing Russian and oil and gas supplies with new infrastructure to import oil and gas from other places, what we could see is that this has a long-term impact on the global response to climate change. In a time of war, obviously, the focus is on people hiding in bomb shelters running for their lives, so many people are losing their lives. Why do you feel it's important to focus on the environment, I guess from what you said before, you feel like this is also a part of the human damage. It is absolutely part of the human damage. And one way to look at it is that the environmental consequences of war are simply consequences in human impacts of war that can continue long after the shells have stopped exploding long enough after the bullets and the guns have ceased. And so when we talk about the environmental consequences of war, what we're really talking about is simply the impacts of war on humans and on the places where they live in another more protracted and often more insidious form. Carol muffet is president and CEO of the center for international environmental law. Thanks so much for speaking with us. Thank you very much. Reveal the economic patterns all around us. While you swipe right and left, understand money better with the indicator, one of NPR's daily podcasts. More voices, all ears, NPR podcasts..

Ukraine center for international envir Kira muffin Russia Europe U.S. Carol muffet NPR
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Renewable energy is a key tool for fighting climate change. But building the infrastructure to produce, say, wind or solar power can sometimes run into legal roadblocks, like laws aimed at protecting the environment. Darien Woods and Adrian ma from our daily economics podcast the indicator explain. So Adrian meet the Indiana bat. That's a bat. It is this cute little bat found in the midway. It's Brown, it's found in caves. I didn't know that bats could tweet. That's adorable. And look, as an endangered species, it's in decline. And the reason I bring it up is because in 2006, there was this proposed wind farm in Ohio, 70 wind turbines, this big project, local neighbors didn't like the idea of these towering turbines being so close to their land. And they sued the wind turbine company for all kinds of things, but one particular complaint stuck. They said that the turbines might hurt the bats about 5 of these bats might die every year after colliding with the turbines and after years of legal fighting and courtrooms all around the country. The wind farm company eventually gave up. The project was abandoned in 2019. And that is great for the Indiana bat, but not so good for wildlife and other parts of the world threatened by climate change, not to mention the hits the economy from more floods and droughts. There is a long list of challenges to wind and solar power facilities. JV rule is a law professor at Vanderbilt university. JV says we've created all kinds of laws and regulations that allow people to challenge big projects like train stations, solar farms, and wind farms. And that includes environmental laws. And that's great for getting local input and helping preserve communities, local landscapes, endangered species, but given the urgency of climate change, JB says this is a problem. And there had to be a better way. So eat paired up with another law professor, James saltzman, and they did what law professors do best. Right. So we're putting this issue in play, and we think it needs to be seriously discussed. One idea that has allowed a lot of renewable energy projects to get built is in Texas. The state built a one stop shop for renewable energy permitting. And the key difference with this new direction here is that Texas overrode local laws that might block the projects, including environmental laws. It was an amazingly efficient process for getting that infrastructure on the ground. Not without controversy. JB says the federal government could take a similar approach. After all, he says it does have the power to kind of make exceptions for a particular project, so they don't have to comply with every single regulation. Do we need some broader and more fundamental overhaul a reform of this system? But if you talk to environmental groups like the nature conservancy, they're not advocating for a large scale rewrite of laws. For one thing, that could be used as a political opportunity to strip away environmental protections completely. Instead, they want changes like a faster pathway for green projects or improving initial site selection to avoid sensitive areas in the first place. Also more federal funds to speed up decision making. So as this sort of nip and tuck, tweak it here to get their version of environmental reform is going on. JB ruled, the law professor, he is seeing ice shelves break off in Antarctica, right? He's seeing historic heat waves and carbon emissions grow and grow. And he is worried that this is all going to be too little too late. Given the scale of the challenge ahead, do you feel optimistic? I'm growing more pessimistic over time. I think we're continuing to fall behind. Earlier this month, the UN issued another report that backed up JB's view. But it did say there's still time to change course. Adrian ma, Darren Woods, MPR news. Support. If you ever wonder how the world's most successful leaders got to where they are, what struggles they faced and what kept them going, there's.

Adrian ma Darien Woods Indiana James saltzman Adrian Vanderbilt university Ohio Brown Texas JB federal government Antarctica Darren Woods UN
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Are not very many rescues and underwater caves. Oh, Jill, that story is terrifying. And it makes me wonder what compels you to keep diving even after experiences like those. Well, in the discussions that I had with my husband Robert after that dive, it forced us both to reflect on why I do this. Why I go into these places and I believe we all have a calling and this is mine. It's to try to illuminate complex issues about how we are connected to our water environment. It's about sharing climate change information through my adventures because really everything we do on the surface of the earth gets returned to us to drink. Anything that happens on the surface of the earth can soak into the ground and end up in places that I swim through. So I can see the results of humanity's interactions with things on top of the earth that they might not feel are really connected with their water systems. But.

Jill Robert
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"It rains, they leach out to the plant into the soils into the water, therefore affecting any kind of life really that's in there. And also the frustrating thing for many entomologists is that they don't really affect the problem. I mean, the peak of the pest, the pest, the target pest actually comes after much of the insecticide has washed away. So you're not actually really protecting crops and crop yields haven't been shown to dramatically increase because they're used, but you are affecting bees and butterflies and other really important predator insects that would eat the pests that you're trying to keep away. So they've actually been fairly disastrous for many insects, but they are widely used. The cropland that will be planted this year in the U.S. will there be about the size of Texas in terms of the area treated by neonicotinoids. So it's a kind of pervasive problem. The toxicity of the rural environment is growing and growing. The past quarters century seen U.S. air culture become 48 times more toxic to insect life, one study found. So this kind of poison is building up and up and up in terms of in terms of the agricultural land in the U.S. and that's extremely harmful to insects. As we speak, I can imagine farmers who use these insecticides and the manufacturers of them listening and saying, wait a minute, there's another side to this story. Yeah, so there's kind of big three pesticide companies now. Buyer Monsanto subsumed Monsanto is one of them. They're the ones that make roundup. They're the ones that manufacture a lot of these neo Nixon. And their argument is, well, look, we help food production around the world if the world we didn't have these chemicals then the world would not be able to feed itself. And certainly when you speak to scientists about this point, they will concede, well yes, we do need pesticides in certain places at certain times. I mean, it's not like crops do not benefit at all from pesticides at certain moments. I think the problem has been the overlap application of them. The sheer volume of chemicals going on to fields. It's actually been disastrous for life all around all around there, but also has been unhelpful in terms of the crop itself because you just get into a cycle where you need more and more chemicals. So I think the industry tells a part of the story. It's a part of the story that's not completely incorrect, but it doesn't look at the broader picture. They also tend to talk a lot about honeybee hives. So many chandeliers that there's 90 million of them around the world. They haven't decreased, but they don't really talk about wild bees, nothing that's kind of telling because wild bees are the ones that aren't protected by humans aren't their numbers aren't replenished by humans..

U.S. leach Monsanto Texas Nixon
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"The future of the auto industry is electric. So an electric vehicle makers look to build new plants, states will go all out to whoo them. Sunbelt states, such as Georgia seen opening to chip away at the auto dominance, Michigan and the motor city have cemented for over a century. W ABE Sam green glass reports from Atlanta. Rivian is one of the hottest electric car startups. And though it's only produced a few hundred pickup trucks so far, the California company is already valued more than Ford. So when ravian saw bids for a $5 billion plant that would employ 7500 people, Georgia officials lobbied for it hard. It's a great day to be a Georgian and it's even a better day to be announced in the largest single economic development project ever in our state's history. And this month, with two of their sleek pickups behind him, governor Brian Kemp announced rivian was coming to Georgia. He called his state the economic engine of the southeast. And now world leader in electric vehicles and electric mobility. The fact is we did not get here by accident. So why Georgia? Well, there's money, lots of it. And while details of rivian's deal with Georgia aren't public yet, these bids typically include tax breaks, cheap, shovel ready mega sites, infrastructure upgrades, and workforce training. But that's not everything. The growing population and the diverse population and the younger population, that's what Midwest does not have right now. Nathaniel horde is with the Atlanta based center for transportation and the environment. He says the auto industry has a growing footprint in the southeast. Whether that's Kia here in Georgia, whether that is Toyota, Honda, Hyundai, and Alabama, BMW, Volvo and South Carolina. In all those states, union strength is pretty low. And that's enticing for lots of companies. Pat Wilson is Georgia's economic development commissioner. That has played a major factor in really the rebirth of manufacturing all across the southern belt of states. The sunbelt has attracted lots of new investment in electric vehicles, especially from startups. Tesla is building a huge factory in Texas. Georgia had already landed a big battery plan. And Wilson thinks rivian will attract more suppliers and more electric car companies to Georgia. There's a whole ecosystem that has to be created in the United States. So every time you form a piece of that ecosystem, it helps with the next one. But here's the thing. Back in September, Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer said that ecosystem, it already exists and it's in Michigan. It's time to put the world on notice that Michigan remains the center of high-tech electric vehicle production in the U.S.. Michigan alone still attracted more auto investment in the decade after the Great Recession than all the southeast states combined. And the state has scored some big electric vehicle projects. But most have been from legacy companies like GM, not the buzzy startups. So this fall, Michigan launched new programs designed to compete for those projects. Kristin G check is with the center for automotive research in Michigan. The amount of investment going on in the auto industry right now is off the charts. And every state is trying to be that future capital of electrification. While governors may claim their state will lead the electric vehicle future, G check says it's anyone's game. It's not entirely clear who owns this landscape. That's why I'm like everything's up for grabs. Whatever geographic reshuffling happens, could shape the industry for decades to come. This new rivian plant guarantees Georgia at least will be a real player. For NPR news, I'm Sam greenglass in Atlanta. It seems every holiday season nowadays, there are more and more and more Christmas movies. From Netflix to the Food Network, to hallmark. They know how to do it. They have a style. And in fairness to them, so does Law & Order. It's true. Yeah. The holiday movie machine. Next time on it's been a minute from NPR..

Georgia rivian Michigan ABE Sam green Rivian Brian Kemp Nathaniel horde Atlanta based center for trans Pat Wilson Gretchen Whitmer Atlanta Ford Kia Midwest Hyundai Volvo California Kristin G
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"The shipping industry is a Technicolor mess. Huge container ships are stuck at ports waiting to be unloaded. And as they idle, those ships are creating pollution and effort to fix this problem is not going well. Here's NPR's Jackie northam. The shipping industry's contribution to globalization has been huge. About 90% of the world's trade is transported by sea. But the cost to the environment is enormous. Every year those container ships plying the world's waterways spew about 1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide into the air, which is about 3% of all greenhouse gas emissions. For many years, the emissions were just part of the cost of globalization. Give the pun, but there's been a total sea change in the last three or four years. Simon Bennett is with the international chamber of shipping, a global trade association representing about 80% of the world's fleet. He says the shipping industry as a whole is committed to total decarbonization by 2050. Bennett says that's created an urgency amongst ship owners to meet that deadline. And ultimately, for individual shipping companies, the issue will become extension, because if you don't abide with the regulations, which are fairly strictly enforced globally, then ultimately your ship won't be able to trade. The key will be to use carbon neutral or green fuel, but that hasn't been developed yet, at least not on a commercial scale and new ships are both expensive and still designed to run on oil. But Maersk, the world's largest shipping company is taking a leap of faith. Morton bought Christensen is the head of decarbonization for the company. The situation was that nobody was producing the green view because there were no green ships. And nobody built the green ships because there was no green fuel. So we had this chicken and egg type situation. And then we decided to say, well, somebody needs to break that egg. And that's what we did. Mars recently ordered 8 enormous container ships worth more than a $1 billion that will run on sustainably produced methanol. It's reaching out to a multitude of companies to both develop the fuel and make enough of it to power the new Maersk ships. Christensen says it'll take about 350,000 tons of green methanol a year to run the vessels. Right now, the biggest challenge, honestly is to get the price down to a level where, you know, where the loss is manageable on our end because these fuels are more expensive. And our company has a fuel builder around $6 billion a year. So if you double attribute that, it's not trivial. Maersk says some of its biggest customers are willing to help shoulder the cost for a green solution to shipping. Danielle had ship at zero, an environmental coalition says retail giants can have a role to play in decarbonizing the shipping industry. If we can get these influential retail giants like Amazon, Ikea, Walmart and target to make commitments to zero emission shipping, that will send a market signal in that direction that other companies will follow. Those retail companies say they are willing to join an effort to dramatically reduce or even end shipping emissions by 2040. Hari says his group wants that to happen by the end of this decade. Jackie northam, NPR news..

Jackie northam Simon Bennett international chamber of shipp Maersk Christensen NPR Bennett Morton Mars Danielle Ikea Walmart Amazon
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Forbidding godforsaken wilderness are we in now? This, I believe is known as Central Park on the island of Manhattan. Oh my gosh. Wild and untamed? Well, I saw a pretty healthy rat 20 minutes ago. Please don't talk about our producer that way. You have made a point of getting out in the wilderness. I mean, a lot of people do without it. I grew up in a small town and that was kind of my pastime was riding my bike to the creek and going fishing with my family and building a treehouse and I guess I never got out of the habit. I need to get out and look at the creek or look at some trees to keep myself from being affected by Los Angeles traffic or too much looking at my iPhone. What do you find when you look around? What I usually find is solace, I'm not a botanist or a birder, but I greatly enjoy all of the flora and fauna. But I'd say it's more of a state of mind that I'm looking for, I can walk on a trail almost anywhere in any climate and say, what a delightful walk this is. And they're just killed three hours right and spend any money or have to shoot at anything. By the way, is that a bear over there in the tree? I don't think so. I think that's a pennsylvanian. I got a sharpened my eye. A very respectable set of Americans. And some of our best stations in the system, too, I must say. Indeed. You describe going on trips and RV. That's right. It seems to me that it is harder to get a reservation at a camping ground in your description than it is at a Michelin starred restaurant. The two are related and like many restaurants they don't apparently watch a lot of NBC comedies. You had to sleep in a cold dark van. Yeah, we didn't know how to successfully get in the first night and we were left in the cold and the dark. Yeah. I want to, I want to stop here for a moment in this rustic bucolic wilderness. With a man talking on his cell phone and people looking at their cell phones in the shade of a lovely and healthy Japanese maple. Good eye. Well, we can look out over the we've got a lagoon. This is the pond, officially. All right. And those are the green things, your ducks, right? Yep. That's a mallard couple. Oh, you were like, really good at this. Well, I got lucky that these are in my Wheelhouse. There's a lot of birds in this park that I would say. I'm not sure. Maybe some kind of chickadee? Yeah. Can I get you to look into the tree? Tell it way. What should we look for? Is the whole point not to look for something? I don't know, for me, it's part of my, I guess my therapy and my creative process is I generally don't focus in on things. Moreover, wander, there's a bit in the book about it where George Saunders and Jeff tweedy and I think these are your hiking buddy. My hiking, a famous musician, which will go and then of course famous author. That's right. So gather your celebrated artist friends and hit the trail. And what we talk about is the very solace you're asking about, is it when we step into nature? Is it nature's chaos that gives us a respite from the rectilinear lines of human construction or is it nature that has the soothing patterns of construction? Is it her organic architecture that actually is medicinal to act as a salve to the chaos of human construction? Either way, I just know that I feel a hell of a lot better after I walk in the Woods. You end this book with really a very eloquent appeal. Where essentially you say the diversity we see in nature reminds us that we need a real living vibrant multiplicity of all things in our lives. I wonder if I can get you to talk about that. We as humans will always be fallible. That's always my opener. And with that, in mind, looking at the history of just our country, it's so easy to see the amazing things we've accomplished, and it's also so easy to see the mistakes that we've made. And so that's my hope is to open our minds to that fallibility that then allows us to own those behaviors and say, okay, so we did this poorly. We did this bad, how can we do it better? Because we'll never be done evolving our civilization. Our beautiful American experiment that ostensibly on paper is designed to make an equal amount of happiness and justice for every citizen has a long way to go. So in order to achieve that, which I think is absolutely what our goal should be, we have to keep our eyes and ears and hearts open to that diversity of nature. We're living in a world where a lot of people find it hard to get into. Not just the wilderness, even public parks. Anything to be done about that. A lot of our municipalities do a wonderful job of providing green spaces. That's part of what I'm trying to encourage in my readership is to find where you can be delighted if you're in a city or a suburb. If you have trouble finding Parkland or public green space, the wonderful thing about nature is that it literally works every place. And so if you have a window sill, you can grow any number of plants you can grow herbs or tomatoes or garlic. I encourage people, something that's really fun is to plant different deciduous trees or conifers. I'm a deciduous man myself, but you can plant trees on your windowsill and grow them until they're big enough to take them somewhere and transplant. You're kidding me. No. Windowsill? Yeah, this is some hard biology I'm bringing. Wow. Well, something just occurred to me as we're standing here. I'm afraid. I love cities, okay. Sure. I'm really a Chicago and a love great cities. They're amazing. And you look at a great city and you think about would endure what decays. What survives? To be surrounded by nature to behold that is to be reminded of the cycle of forgive me life and death. Absolutely. And it's something I touch on in my book, you know, I love cities and I love nature. I would rather not be limited to one or the other. Part of the reason we have to always remain open to our fallibility is because of what you said, you know, mother nature has something else in mind for the pack of molecules that's standing here in these brown boots right now. Thank you for your time. Thank you so much for.

Central Park George Saunders Manhattan Jeff tweedy NBC Los Angeles Chicago
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Foods that are prepared by all the hands that are at that table. And i would love it to be a real real big dance able. I love the possibility of eating at chris. And annie's table because they want their farm to be honoring and producing the full spectrum of foods. That are a part of his. An anti as family. Tradition turkey and doc heirloom varieties of corn and green beans and potato grown at the margins of their food forests. Sauces of cranberry elderberry. And the plants of chris's piss ian ancestors pau persimmon chestnuts but every element will have been made possible by the next level technologies that he plans to bring into his farm. You know it's not so much that the foods of the future will be unrecognizable to us but the means by which they are grown will be potentially totally different from the way that foods have been grown in our lifetimes. That's a man too little author of the book. The fate of food what will eat in a bigger hotter smarter world. You can watch her. Full talk at ted dot com. Thank you so much for listening to our show. Today called the food connection to learn more about the people who were on this episode. Go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. Ted talks checkout. Ted dot com or the ted app. If you've been enjoying the show we would be so grateful if you left us. A review on apple podcasts. It is the best way for us to reach new listeners. Which we are really trying to do this. Episode was produced by katie monta. Leon fiona gearan. Rachel faulkner diba mohtashami and silvy douglas. It was edited by sanaa's michigan poor and james delicacy. Our production staff at npr also includes jeff rodgers matthew clue ta and harrison. Vj choi our audio engineer is daniel shchukin. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab. Louis our partners. Ted are chris anderson colin helms. Anna phelan michelle. Quint and mike. I'm newsom roti. And you've been listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

chris annie Ted katie monta Leon fiona gearan Rachel faulkner diba mohtasham silvy douglas james delicacy jeff rodgers matthew clue ta Vj choi sanaa daniel shchukin apple npr michigan colin helms harrison Anna phelan michelle rahm
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"I'm a newsom roti day. We are starting the show. Outside foraging for food searching this whole city and i finally found them locust. This is alexis. Nicole nelson. And i am a forager goes flowers. Let's go make snacks. Which is a very fun way to say. I eat plants. That do not belong to me. And i see other people to do the same thing most job title ever berries in central park. Alexis is best known on tig talk where she has over two million followers coffee and is kind of a foraging. Legend hawaiians your neighbors will probably think you for those who haven't seen alexis work. Her videos are all about her forging adventures finding cool plants teaching people all about them and then using them to cook amazingly delicious dishes rosewater. There's a lot of singing little ditties. There's a lot of fun facts and little jokes very a lot of yelling about plants and say yelling but actually it's more just like hyped up enthusiasm rate. Thank you those are much words. Some sweet happy foraging so when you forage alexis like you walk into your backyard or into a forest. What do you see that. I guess most of us don't like a supermarket basically for you. It's like disneyworld but plants and full of much cheaper food you walk in and you see this very vibrant ecosystem that like we are a part of and there's something so fulfilling about it right. You're just like i bought this out of the ground and now without saying food is a way to connect with other people. Food is away to express love. Food is a way to express creativity. I think i look into natural spaces. And i just see wonder food. It's a basic need and one of life's greatest pleasures but for many accessing nutritious and affordable. Food isn't always easy. We have nearly fifty million people that are living food insecure which means they never know winner. Where their next mill is coming from. And on top of that the ways we produce and consume food are harming the planet human population has doubled in the last fifty years and meat. Consumption has tripled. How can we produce enough good food for a growing global population. That was the best place to start was just opening up my eyes and starting to see the world around me for what it had offer. We need solutions to secure our food for the future and reconnect with the land that feeds us so today on the show. The food connection ideas from people who are taking lessons from the past and others who are experimenting with new technologies to change the way we eat for alexis nicole nelson collecting ingredients out in nature has helped her reconnect to her food. She first discovered foraging when she was just five years old. I remember gardening with my mother at the house. I grew up in and this one day stands out in my mind with me probably not helping at all and her pointing out some grass in our yard that looked different than all the other grass which until she pointed out to me. I never noticed though my mom tells me to go and break some for her. I break it and suddenly it's the air is like perfumed with garlic and she's like that is onion grass. You know how we sometimes cook with like green onions. You can cook with that too And warning if you tell the five year old that they will just start breaking plants in your yard and seeing if magical. Smells emanate from them and eating them. Yes okay so. Your mom was very into plants clearly. Did you get your love of food and gardening and the outdoors from your parents. Do you think oh absolutely so on my dad's side of the family. His mom is also of indigenous ancestry. Iroquois ancestry so he was just being exposed to food ways that some of his peers were necessarily while he was a kid while he was a teenager and my dad's excellent and the catch him and it was really this kind of coming together of the two things that i enjoyed doing with my parents. Most as a kid. And i'm very lucky to be a black kid who grew up with two black parents who were also very outdoorsy. Because not not all of us get it. There really is kind of like there's been this cultural separation between a lot of black folks and the outdoors but historically there was no separation right. And you've been studying. Just what happened. Can you explain your absolutely one hundred percent so back in especially in the south while a lot of black folks were still enslaved. There was a whole lot of kind of knowledge training between black folks indigenous folks and and a lot of the southern states and a lot of the mid western and northern states to and for a lot of people who are enslaved. The way that you beefed up like the meager meals or the scraps that you were given was often by supplementing with foraging with trapping with fish egg So that was knowledge. That was a huge part of like early black culture here in the americas after they were emancipated suddenly laws were getting put in place very rapidly about only being able to reap the benefits of land that you own and if you're newly freed odds are you do not own land now so if you can't cut in forage on public property and don't yet have private property to your name. Boom bat is a part of your life that you are not partaking in anymore and it doesn't take a whole lot of generations passing four that knowledge to just kind of follow away completely and is this true then that like when there was an opportunity to go foraging. It was kind of like well. I.

alexis Nicole nelson alexis nicole nelson Alexis americas
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Leaded gasoline was phased out in the us decades ago but as npr's camilo domino ski reports. It took until this summer for the global economy to kick the habit back in nineteen eighty. Nine public radio's go to car guys. Were making fun of a listener for buying an international harvester scout in ancient off roader. Oh yeah those are from the bronze age. Old cars were designed to run on leaded gasoline and the caller was worried about finding any. Tom and elliott's jokes that he could always just move to say venezuela because caracas still has leaded gas and all the people with those seventy five internationals and fifty six. Chevy's right a moving down there and drove the car cartoon guys went on to say you can just use unleaded gas. It's fine but there was truth behind that caracas. Joke even as rich countries where phasing out leaded gasoline a lot of poorer countries kept using it led of course is toxic. It's not part of gasoline but adding it to gas improved vehicle performance at a cost the exhaust poisoned air and soil. It was linked to premature deaths and lower. Iq's children were particularly affected back in one thousand nine hundred nine scientists jerome. Ryobu was sure that the entire world would give up leaded gas soon. I thought it was simply going to continue going down on down on down. there will be out instead. It took thirty years. Reality says rich countries sold a bunch of old used vehicles to poorer countries. People thought those old cars needed leaded gas lead was cheap so the old gasoline was less expensive and at least one company that made lead additives was bribing government officials to keep using it after years of campaigning and testing the un environment program says the last gallon of leaded. Gasoline was sold in algeria in july. Inger anderson is the head of the group the global response to latitude shows that humanity can learn from it fix mistakes we made the un says the global switch has saved one point two million lives in trillions of dollars. Each year up next anderson says is applying lessons from this battle to transition away from fossil fuels altogether camilo dominancy npr news..

camilo domino caracas Ryobu npr elliott venezuela Chevy Tom jerome us Inger anderson un algeria anderson camilo dominancy
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"At least one hundred and seventeen people have died. After severe floods devastated parts of western germany and belgium authorities have not been able to get in touch with hundreds more because mobile phone networks have collapsed and flooded areas of germany. That also means families can't track their loved ones. The rising death toll marks germany's largest mass loss of life in years as nicholson reports from berlin. Climate change has arrived in germany. These other words of federal environment minister sven schultze sent in a tweet today in response to news footage showing destruction and desperate families perching on rooftops. Firefighters in the states of rhineland palatinate and north rhine-westphalia. Say the situation remains chaotic and that electricity and cell phone networks are down south of cologne police officer patrick racial told public broadcaster a rd. The rescue services are struggling to keep up going shula. The current of the water running past the elementary school is too strong for our motorboats. We just managed to get the kids out but that was the last trip will be making over that way today. An entire district of the ancient city of trae was evacuated on thursday including a hospital and its patients. Some of whom would just out of surgery and some of the worst damage has occurred in the wine. Region of our via where entire villages have been cut off by torrents of floodwater in the town of short houses collapsed and dozens of people are unaccounted for expressing distress at the news. Chancellor angela merkel said quote heavy rain and flooding doesn't quite capture. What has happened referring to it. Instead as a catastrophe is told the doctors will feel even for one. I'm grieving for those lost their lives in this disaster. We don't know the pill yet but it's going to be high. Sometimes died in their basements. Some as firefighters trying to bring others to save and my deepest sympathy goes out to their families. Macos speaking from washington where on her last trip as chancellor she met president biden among other issues they spoke about climate change and issue now at the forefront of germany's election campaign ahead of the september vote for npr news. I must me. Nicholson in berlin..

germany sven schultze north rhine patrick racial palatinate rhineland westphalia nicholson belgium shula berlin Chancellor angela merkel cologne president biden washington npr news Nicholson
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Green signal interest in serving that said republican leaders like democrats have kept their plans close to the vest on who they'll name. Meanwhile gop leaders such as house minority whip. Steve scalise are still attacking. The idea of this panel saying pelosi should focus instead on existing congressional committee investigations into the attack. Now we should note pelosi says because the minority leader will consult the speaker on his five appointments. It's possible it's possible. She could even veto mccarthy's choices now. This language to consult the speakers also used for the republican led select committee to investigate the twenty twelve terrorist attack into benghazi but it's another reminder of the partisan times we're living in because the republicans had to know they were gonna face this more partisan route if they blocked the the original commission right. Yeah they they did and now they do. This comes more than a month after senate. Republicans blocked a move to take legislation. Creating this bipartisan nine. Eleven style commission to investigate the deadly riot and pelosi had already warned. She may take the step for a select committee if that effort failed and now republicans could face the prospect of this committee rolling out its findings close to the midterm elections. Which is something that the gop was hoping to avoid. So all of this could make for more lopsided vote today previously thirty five republicans joined house democrats to approve that outside commission plan but today that number could fall with cat co and others already warning they are voting. No npr congressional reporter. Claudia chris ellis we appreciate you thanks claudia. Thank you much all.

pelosi Steve scalise republican led select committe gop Eleven style commission benghazi mccarthy senate cat co Claudia chris ellis npr claudia
"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"environment" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Nicole burg's wheat is so short and sparse. She doesn't think that combine can reach it without eating. Rocks combines don't like dirt and rocks at all like it. They don't like to eat them. They'll get indigestion. Berg is a dry land wheat farmer in the sweeping horse heaven hills of southeast washington state. She puts out one head amid a sea of wheat. See how the we had his curled like that and then you break into it you might have some berries down here but this will be empty all empty. There's no week in inside the we'd head. The berg's aren't the only one suffering. The region is bone dry from near the canadian border. Clear to the edge of nevada and the drought is spreading west over the cascades. Jeff mardi is a drought expert for the washington state department of ecology. He says despite good snowpack it hasn't been this dry since the nineteen twenty s. You know the story of the your gatien haves and have nots. Meaning those folks who Get their water from rivers or storage are probably going to be fine For their your gatien needs but the dry land users and the folks that have cattle that depend on forage on the ranch lands. They may be more challenged looking ahead. Marty says the warming climate mean more rain for the north west but also much less snowpack that melts sooner. That could stress water supplies even more this spring. It's also been windy here. Further drying out the landscape like a blow dryer on the east end of the columbia river gorge cattle rancher. Gary has is having a hard time to recently. Sold seventy mother cows with calves at their sides. To another operator out of wyoming. They had many more good cavs in them and he hated to see them go but he has no grasp to keep them.

Jeff mardi Marty Gary six generations nevada washington canadian dos couple years columbia river this year seventy mother one head nineteen twenty s. Nicole burg Hereford southeast washington this spring one