18 Burst results for "English Country Garden"

"english country garden" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

05:55 min | 2 months ago

"english country garden" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Program is sponsored by epidemic, sound perfect music for audio and video productions. This week, we're going to be getting a hands of it does he talking gardening plant science and climate change now the artists Claude Monet of. Fame once said, my garden is my most beautiful masterpiece and. And Horticulture are certainly popular just in the UK alone at nearly thirty million people, which is about half the population regularly get that gardening gloves on to some extent or another. But with changing temperature and rainfall patterns that are predicted by climate change how gardens and vegetable patches have to adapt future Ross. Cameron is a landscape horticulture listed Sheffield University, and he works on Climate Change Mitigation his co authored a report for the Royal Horticultural. Society on this very topic Ross. Welcome to the program. What changes are we expecting or anticipating climate change will bring it's about extremes. It's about generally speaking drier summers and wetter winters in an in a nutshell some variation is North West Scotland for example, might also slightly wetter summers but it's about pulling apart those weather conditions. We're going to see drier spells for longer bro Sweater spells for longer. I guess one of the worrying aspects of it is is not the best smooth right. We're going to see a little bit more turbulence in the system. So we're going to see more oscillations. More extremes coming sometimes quite quickly after each other for a very dr period followed by Makoto every period of course, the plants that we are very fond of growing on those plants that feed us very well on not necessarily as fond of Osos changeable conditions as a weather person is. So, what might be the implications for the plants we can grow we expect the some things are just not going to be viable anymore is this the end of the English Country Garden we can deal with the weather put on the court taking the CO officer a thing, but plants can't plants very much in tune to their environment and the seasons. So the the go through periods of acclimation so they can they can adapt to grow forgiven above a chance to to run up to that drove beforehand. So these conditions are quite challenging. We're going to see plants that are traditionally maybe being grown in warmer climates they may adapt they may be useful in the garden. We missy more of those types of plants the same time I think we're also going to see plants who are just kind of generally speaking more resilient, more tolerant stress in general and trying to bring in lots of resilience. Unfortunately, they often means the plants are quite competitive quake successful already. So things we made this something's the slightly weedy. They'll be the ones that the survivors in some ways. In my case loss stinging nettles when you're talking, they're thinking about the fact that. If we do see a lot of rain all at once we get these big deluges. Is there a risk that you could end up with leaching? So the rain comes down on the soil it washes out nutrients Lego into the river, not good news facility rivers, but also not good news for the soil. So gardeners then tempted to put more fertilizer on and that gets leached as well. They could be a vicious cycle there. Yes. So we're going to be careful about how we manage gardens not tweeting too many. Chemicals onto the system we have some some allies in that we have things organic matter to the more we can. Recycle compost, recycle, horse manure always things that gardeners have been traditionally useful for improving the soil. They're actually quite beneficial here because that soil organic matter helps act as a sponge hold water when there's too much but also it helps keep that water when it gets drying provided to the plants. So all gardeners always say feet the salt to feed the plants not adage is still quite true. I think. And you mentioned water and. Keeping Water in the soil but what about keeping water not in the orbit but in things like water bonds is this all going to be about better water stewardship if we anticipate, we're GONNA have a long run of dry days and we want to grow the same plants. We just need to make sure we store up border for the bad times. We've got the good times as it were that try if a rain comes in bigger dollops, we want to capture that and then reuse it really for for garden use. Ruin Butts agree idea but we're also seeing interventions in places street in North America particularly things like rain gardens. So you actually scoped out some of the landscape where water can be held that water runs off very quickly. Your void going into the houses and the Ridge, and you collect certain places, and then that can then be used pump to irradiate farms and gardens later, or itself becomes a feature in the landscape. So it can be quite small scale. Things are actually be almost a community level the trying to capture and hold water. More on that sort of thing in just a second because I just like to play you Ross a little clip we recorded at a special dry garden this being developed at the Cambridge University panic called. It's called the dry garden because there's a hosepipe ban, a permanent hosepipe Bam here there is no water in this garden no irrigation, no watering. That's really the idea it's surrounded on all sides with these squad tall hedges those can provide shade as well. Enclosed reduces impacts of wind safe. You can reduce that win and you can provide the shade than you are providing some sort of. Climate that allows some of the plants that maybe list drought adapted to survive but then you need to think about the plantings and this comes back to selection of those plants that have their patients to dry environment. But the practical activities to ensure that water doesn't get lost in the garden are things mulching. So mulching often. Having, the surface layer of organic material balk cuttings, all mineral like gravel. All of that would use moisture loss from the soil surface. No Lawn permeable paving that allows the water to move through the landscaping doesn't result resulting if the is heavy rainfall now, we predicting more rainfall.

Ross English Country Garden UK Claude Monet Sheffield University Cameron Royal Horticultural North West Scotland Makoto missy North America officer Cambridge University Butts Bam
"english country garden" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

06:11 min | 2 months ago

"english country garden" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Radiates energy in lots of different ways. They also have characteristic mass profiles and it doesn't matter which one us. There's always essential of covid nineteen. In terms of this sort of being like a almost like a test for who's been infected, how does it compare to the other tests in terms of how quick it is how easy it is. When we started the work back in February? I wasn't terribly interested in detection cosign. sump Shen that the PC all methods for testing for the virus. Extremely, good on, it turns out as huge number tests have very large numbers of. Negatives which, of course, his bad thing for a test and we using animals Petrovsky, we have a test that he's one hundred percent sensitive that works in all minutes costing about in if they in pounds or something like that, and that is generally independent age independent news also independent severity. You everyone talks about how strange this viruses and how strange this diseases, and it's strange that the one constant is how like universally disruptive. This is two people's bodies. Yeah, the promptly number reasons for that. The most important one is this is a disease that attacks epithelial cells that line or cover services at along has a double apathy. Liam has the cells that face the AC knows has the blood vessels which are very, very close indeed. But the whole of the body is the blood vessels and there's lots of reports in the literature bounds, locking tiny blood vessels, and also major blood vessel blockage as well, and that means any organ in the body technically can be affected by covet. Jeremy, when can we expect to be able to take your test? Well you can take the test in our laboratory tomorrow but this is informally the conflicts it to a test that could really work I'm be deployed style is not necessarily long might only be eight to twelve weeks in an ideal situation. And I've been talking to lots of people who are still sick after months and months and months does does this discovery that you made give them any insight? Well, that's an interesting question. So on at the moment, we don't know enough about. What we do know is in some people that we looked at, we looked talking several months off they actually had an episode and still mapping with Co operatives who are in the hospital when we monitor people will be able to assess quantitatively whether they are going back to normal. At the moment, we can't accelerate people going back to normal but what we will be able to do is to have a better way of assessing the health of people who have covid in a long-term ORLA. Chairman Nicholson on the Corona vars conundrum, and you can read the excellent report that he's written. Detailing that work in the Journal of Proteome Research is just come out and I must declare a conflict of interest because I'm also one of the authors. Hi, Richard here from space boffins and just to tell you that unbelievably, we've just published are one hundred edition with the naked scientists and it's packed with an extended interview with the head of science. Talking about the Moon Mars and the challenges of the much delayed James. Webb Space Telescope or also joined by the UK space agencies head of human exploration, a scientist mining asteroids albeit in a very small way, and we talked to an artist to designs space mission patches. That's the one hundred edition of Space Boffins in partnership with the naked scientists. Later on, we'll be talking about what climate change means for the future of the English country. Garden. Now. Nearly two thirds of us are infected with herpes simplex virus. So viruses, this week isn't an herpes causes cold sores causes genital disease, and it can also even occasionally caused Brian Infections. The virus is real headache to treat because the infection is lifelong. This is because it hides existing just as a piece of DNA inside nerve cells, it periodically reawakens to produce painful infectious skin blisters, nola drugs that can. Control these flare ups when they happen they can't remove the viral DNA. So the problem keeps on coming back now researchers in the US developed a pair of selective molecular scissors the contract down the rogue viral. DNA inside nerve cells and chop it up destroying the virus. So at least in experimental mice, it doesn't come back. Keith Jerem herpes is really sneaky that it actually established as a form of itself. That essentially goes into cells and then falls asleep and that virus lives in the neurons nerve cells in your body, and they can come once a year once a month once a week and cause lesions ulcers than anything else and all those strikes. We him don't do anything about that sleeping form of the virus. So effectively under the immune Radovan all the time it's dormant inside cells like that the immune system can't see it. So it just gets ignored. That's exactly right. The immune system controls at once it wakes up and starts making more copies of itself and they take care of those new copies but they even the noon system doesn't do anything about that long-term sleeping form of the virus said, what can you do about it? Well we've been using this really cool technology that's been around for over a decade. Now called gene editing despite has made a DNA just like our body is and that sleeping form is actually a little tiny circle of this DNA that lives in the nerve cells and what gene editing allows us to do is basically use I think of molecular scissors that can go into a cell and they can look through all. The DNA. In that cell and look for a very specific little stretch of the letters, and if they find those letters, they make a little cut and so what we do is designed very special scissors that ignore all of our own DNA, all the human DNA but they look really hard for herpes and if they find it, then it to little cuts and so it basically falls apart and makes it go away..

herpes Journal of Proteome Research Webb Space Telescope Petrovsky US Chairman Nicholson Liam Jeremy Keith Jerem Richard James UK scientist Brian Infections
"english country garden" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

08:33 min | 2 months ago

"english country garden" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Listen. have you loud and clear? Signed and that is to say is medicine nature. I brain. The. How this is the naked scientists the show that keeps you in touch with the latest science technology medicine on Christmas and I'm Eva Higginbotham this week will the traditional English country garden become a victim of climate change will pests, diseases surge, and how will flowers and food crops and the pollinators that make them productive be effected Plus News of how dust and dandruff conspired flu and the viruses the chemical fingerprint that covid nineteen leaves on your body and self driving cars looking set to take to the road. But when. The naked scientists podcast is powered by UK fast, dot. Co Dot UK. Across the world covid nineteen is making a comeback. Boris Johnson's dubbed a second wave and the WHO have suggested that people dropping their God together with the relaxation of public health measures in many countries is translating into a surge in cases. France is seeing nearly four thousand daily cases and across Europe as a whole, the total is closed at twenty, six thousand people testing positive each day. Now, as a result of all of that people are trying to learn as much. As possible about the manner in which Corona, Vars and other respiratory infections spread so far lot of emphasis has been placed onerous spirit tree droplets, blobs of moisture that come out of the Airways when we breathe and talk and they can contain virus particles and people are wearing face coverings and they their hands to try to ward off that risk. But I school, of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York Nicole Bouvier has been testing how flu spreads among Guinea Pigs not the. Humans the Rodent fraud and she's found that respiratory droplets are indeed important but the viruses can also cling to other things which can be even more numerous as well. When humans either talk or cough or sneeze there's all kinds of microscopic particles that come out of your respiratory tract droplets of pure water proteins, bits, and pieces of dead cells most of which is is invisible. So we don't really think about it but but it's there. So presumably, Guinea pigs were doing. The same thing, and we wanted to know what exactly is coming out of them when they are infected with flu and putting flew out into the air how did you do the experiments? We put the Guinea pigs in a special cage that had a fine air filter that prevents know stuff from the environment coming in, and then we have the other side of the cage hooked up to an aerodynamic particle size or an APS and that's that's basically just a machine can. Not only count microscopic particles that can tell you how big they are, and what we're finding is that there were. Thousands of particles per second every time to get a big moved there was this big poof of particles that were being detected six to us that actually the particles coming out of the cage where associated with movement and that's when we started thinking. Well, maybe this isn't just what's coming out of the respiratory tracts, but it's just dust. So these are guinea pigs for Dandruff is that BICYC-? Well. Yeah. You know eight they are dandruff animals but so are we I mean humans slough billions of skin cells off every day but flu viruses don't grow in the skin lake grow in the nose and throat. So why is this this Dander? Another particulate matter does coming off the Guinea pigs relevant. So. What we did is we took a game egg and we infected with influenza virus, and then we put the guinea pigs in a cage and we sampled virus from the cage and from the animal's body we just took a cotton swab and dipped it in saline and swab the animals, ears in their paws and there for and the sides, the cage, and we were able to actually grow. A lot of viable flu virus from these swaps and that indicated to us that the virus was actually being spread all over itself and its environment and it kind of makes sense when you think about what you're doing all day long, which is brimming themselves and and sniffling around it makes sense that virus from their noses could be getting all over the place. Does that mean then that because? There's virus on things other than droplets coming out of the nose and throat that could be infectious to exactly. We also did some measurements where we were trying to measure exactly what was coming out just the Guinea pigs respiratory tract and what we found was that the amount of particles coming out of their respiratory tract was just orders of magnitude smaller than what was coming out of the cage when. It was sort of a wake in moving around, and so it seemed reasonable to think that maybe some of these particles from the environment that if they were contaminated with flu virus might actually be transporting the virus through the air to the they susceptible Guinea pig next door and could you infect other animals if you take those particles can you demonstrate that there is viable virus they're capable of infecting? An uninfected individual. Yes. So what we did is we took some virus and just painted it onto their for. And then we put this animal into the into the cage next to a susceptible animal and we were able to see transmission to the susceptible animal, and that suggests that particles that were conveying the virus. We're actually not coming from the respiratory tract because there was actually no virus replicating in the donor animals respiratory tract at that point do you think this is relevant to humans? Then it's entirely possible. You can sort of imagine a person who's sick in bed with the flu if they're bedsheets or their pillowcase gets contaminated and then. You know the nurse or their partner comes in the next morning and flaps the sheet to straighten it out that possibly viable flu virus could be air sliced into the air and that way, and there was actually really interesting experiment done in the nineteen forties where somebody intentionally contaminate a a blanket with influenza virus, shook it in a closed container and was able to sample alive virus from the air. So we know that this is possible to do is just something we haven't really thought about in many decades. The obvious question is that. The the new corona virus that we're all in thrall to the moment is about the same size as flu is a respiratory infection. So do think what you'll find in for flu could be considered relevant to the coronavirus will. Certainly, it's not out of the question to think it could be relevant I. think there are a couple clues that we've seen in some of the the coup-bid research so far for instance, there was a study done in China where scientists did air sampling in various areas of a few hospitals. What they found is that the highest levels of airborne virus that they could detect was in a room where healthcare workers were taking off their P P and that suggested to the authors that contaminated gowns or on its or gloves. In the process of being taken off, could be shaken or rubbed in such a way that it was releasing coronavirus into the Air I. think what we need to do is a little bit more research on what the mechanisms by which the virus gets into the air. I. Think a lot of us just assumed it's coming out of the respiratory tract directly with confidence easing and breathing talking but there may be other mechanisms at play that we need to sort of consider and systematically study. So coughs news is spread diseases but. Everything else you wearing as well as your dandruff might do to sounds like that's what we can have signed future certainly some to think about isn't it Nicole Bouvier there and the study with those findings detailed in it has just come out in nature communications. As we reported here on the naked scientists a couple of weeks ago covid nineteen is a confusing illness some doctors dubbing it the weirdest disease they've ever treated. What makes it so weird is the broad range of severity. Some people don't even know they've been infected while amongst others we know that it can be lethal. Significant numbers of people are also reporting long-term symptoms, including fatigue sensations of pins and needles, and sometimes even struggling to think clearly. So what is causing all of this scientists think that the disease may be producing long-term changes in a range of different organs, possibly because of damage to those organs during the initial illness..

flu respiratory tract Nicole Bouvier Guinea Boris Johnson Co Dot UK UK Europe Eva Higginbotham fraud Mount Sinai New York France China partner
"english country garden" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"english country garden" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And so this was Direct to your door delivery type of, you know, agriculture back in the early 19 hundreds, so in order to deliver to the customers in the East Valley, they'd cross the Salt River using Hayden's ferry. Now That is a bit of trivia that most of us don't realize when they were done with a day's worth of home to home selling. Think of that back in the day of the buggy, the wagon and the buggy. Or the wagon in the horse. Rather, they'd return empty with a successful day of selling their product and back at the riverbank. William again he was the founder. It was William Betsy Arnold would put rocks and empty containers so they wouldn't float away. Then he'd swim the team. And float the wagon and this would save another 50 cents because he already had spent 50 cents crossing over. He wanted to save a little bit of money coming back and the Hayden fairy. I mean, this was because the river was still running before we had it dammed up. So you drive across it on the Mill Avenue Bridge or Haydon Rule Bridge, but that there used to be a ferry across that river. Yes, And most a lot of these cucumbers were grown in Snowflake Taylor area. Which ties in perfectly because our Arizona Staycation is back, and our winner is going to Snowflake Taylor this weekend to stay at the heritage in Left her taking a break for a few months. For obvious reasons are Arizona staycation with Rosie on the House and Sanderson? Ford is back. We have guests that are going to tailor Arizona. In a place that is no stranger to Rosie on the house vacations because we've been there before the heritage in bed and breakfast. Craig and Joanne, Good Aryan who run the place. Good morning. Good morning. Good morning. This is one of the oldest historic homes in Arizona. Well, the house itself was built in the 18 19 a beautiful brick of Victorian pioneer home. Yeah, That's right. So when it comes to stay at the heritage in bed and breakfast, what would I be looking forward to? Well, what you'd be looking forward forward to is ah red brick building with white picket fences, green lawns and lots of roses in the garden, a bit reminiscent of an English country garden. Even an English country house, Joe and I suspect you're not from Arizona Originally just based on okay, y'all getting, of course. Of course. Absolutely. Yeah. And how long have you had the heritage in bed and breakfast? Well, we actually bought the bed and breakfast. 11 years and five days ago, we just celebrated our 11th anniversary here. Well, congratulations. That's great. That's really great. Yeah, it is. And then the inside of the bed and breakfast, all the rooms have you know that antique style furnitures? Well, they all have their own bathroom where some people When they think of a better breakfast. We have to share a bathroom. No communal bathrooms. I love it. And how about the grounds around the home? We've got a lot of lawn rose bed apple trees. People can relax in the hammock and that we hang up underneath two apple trees, so fountain in the courtyard I look at it is the perfect getaway. If you've been working from home for months, or you've been cooped up with the kids and all that you just want to get out, relax. It's the place to be a Yes, it is. And sometimes people check in and they'll say, Well, what is that to do in the area, and I'm like, Well, how about just relax and they try it and they're like, you know what? That was a good production Suddenly two days go by, just like that. Yes, but the Petrified forest is nearby Canyon Touche National Monument to is a lot to do really in the area, And then there's historical home toward to anybody's interested in that and guys. If you're listening, there's the municipal golf course and snowflakes. So you've got a chance to go hit 18. Actually, there's 27 whole Syrians. Oh, yeah, well, it's been 27 holes ever since we've been here. They did expand. They started nine and then 18 and then they had another nine. Do you play golf brake? Yes, we both. Oh, great. Have you tried all 27 holes in one day? Probably not. I'm not. Maybe I don't know that would be a long day. So for those that want to stay at the heritage in what kind of safety features have you implemented? Naturally, the way we have our BNB setup, we naturally social distance people from each other. We don't make people a one table for breakfast all at the same time, Lee, we separate people out at this time of year. A lot of people eat out outside. We don't really have a big lobby area so people don't mingle. Attend. See that just hang out by themselves outside in their room or they're off doing something. We do take some extra precautions as faras. The keys that we hand out when they turn him in. We hit him with the peroxide mixture that we've come up with. Kills anything that might be on their way. I mean, we expect people to be responsible for themselves. Take care of themselves. Really? So that's the heritage in bed and breakfast in Taylor, Arizona, which is next to Snowflake. How about a phone number and website address? Okay, well, the phone number is 9 to 8. 53633 to 2 On the West by is Heritage bash in dot net. It's a beautiful place the heritage in bed and breakfast. If you'd like to go on the next vacation with Rosie on the House, go too rosy on the house dot com. Look under the staycation tab in register. Did Rosie on the house. Our mission statement is to inform, entertain. And most important, in today's circumstances, protect the Arizona homeowner, So we want to inform you about what we're doing to stay safe..

Arizona Rosie William Betsy Arnold Snowflake Taylor Salt River Taylor Hayden founder East Valley apple English country garden Mill Avenue Bridge Ford Joe Petrified forest Haydon Rule Bridge Craig
"english country garden" Discussed on List Envy

List Envy

02:29 min | 7 months ago

"english country garden" Discussed on List Envy

"Then this the Robin I'm the Dunnock and the goldfine honesty. It's like choosing your favorite child. You Call. They've got their own qualities but the black bird to me. I guess is the Quintessential Sat. Summer afternoon southbound. All the singing in the middle of the night sound depending on what's going on But Yeah I think the BLACKBIRD is the most flutie makes me think of English Country Garden so I think yeah all lovely so my My parents have. They live in a very well. They live just just opposite a park. Which is a big old big pook Leaky Hills And it's I don't know what the task vacation is. But it's you know it's a great big swath of of land say park don't mean you know like with with a couple of swings. Yeah and they get a lot of wildlife that and they've named there does a couple of Robbins that come and sit and eat from their bird feed isn't they've given them names. I think he television Priscilla itself. Something that the people do now. I will point out that there's a wide range of bird watchers. There will be very serious. Scientific Bird watchers and there will be very very casual watchers. And it's very hard not too big word here anthropomorphized But you know. It's very hard not give them human characteristics. Bird's not the bird watchers. Well yes very humid for six. No it's very hard. You know you have these animal like when you got. Your dog has got characteristics. Part the family. Your cat has got their own characteristics. But yeah when you when you're having coming to your failures and you're you're observing them watching them seeing how they interact. It's natural to want to specify particular ones and yeah absolutely give them names. We've done that in the past as well. You know. If there's a feather out of place then that will be the identifying feature or whatever but yeah there's no right or wrong. There are some people that might be snooty about it but you know what as long as you get enjoyment out of seeing the birds. That's the important thing too right so to.

Bird flutie Priscilla English Country Garden Robbins
"english country garden" Discussed on List Envy

List Envy

02:29 min | 7 months ago

"english country garden" Discussed on List Envy

"Then this the Robin I'm the Dunnock and the goldfine honesty. It's like choosing your favorite child. You Call. They've got their own qualities but the black bird to me. I guess is the Quintessential Sat. Summer afternoon southbound. All the singing in the middle of the night sound depending on what's going on But Yeah I think the BLACKBIRD is the most flutie makes me think of English Country Garden so I think yeah all lovely so my My parents have. They live in a very well. They live just just opposite a park. Which is a big old big pook Leaky Hills And it's I don't know what the task vacation is. But it's you know it's a great big swath of of land say park don't mean you know like with with a couple of swings. Yeah and they get a lot of wildlife that and they've named there does a couple of Robbins that come and sit and eat from their bird feed isn't they've given them names. I think he television Priscilla itself. Something that the people do now. I will point out that there's a wide range of bird watchers. There will be very serious. Scientific Bird watchers and there will be very very casual watchers. And it's very hard not too big word here anthropomorphized But you know. It's very hard not give them human characteristics. Bird's not the bird watchers. Well yes very humid for six. No it's very hard. You know you have these animal like when you got. Your dog has got characteristics. Part the family. Your cat has got their own characteristics. But yeah when you when you're having coming to your failures and you're you're observing them watching them seeing how they interact. It's natural to want to specify particular ones and yeah absolutely give them names. We've done that in the past as well. You know. If there's a feather out of place then that will be the identifying feature or whatever but yeah there's no right or wrong. There are some people that might be snooty about it but you know what as long as you get enjoyment out of seeing the birds. That's the important thing too right so to.

Bird flutie Priscilla English Country Garden Robbins
Plantrama Reviews

Plantrama

05:15 min | 8 months ago

Plantrama Reviews

"Let's do a review of a couple of plants. Ellen what plant would you like our listeners to know about the plant that I am currently in love with is a particular cultivar of August dash called glowing embers and I was given a small pot of this plant? Try by the people at High Country Gardens whom I love and admire and I thought oh well this is pretty because the flowers are a a wonderful combination of sort of a deep corley orange pink with a little flush of purple in it. And it's just gorgeous. The foliage is a lovely gray. Green leaves are linear and thin. And I thought okay. This'll be pretty little. Did I know that it was also going to be a tremendous humming bird attractor and a wonderfully tasty mint in the garden? So for someone like me who wants to grow things that are both beautiful and edible turned out to be a real winner. I have since ordered three more plants. They grow to be about two or three feet tall. They they get quite wide and the flowers are prolific. It is gorgeous the hummingbirds like it better than they like the hummingbird feeder and you can cut and dry this at the end of the season in both the leaves and the flowers make a wonderful mint tea. That's just a little bit of a hint of liquorice in which you can drink as a plain T. or turn into a syrup and really up the game on your Mojo's it makes a great Mojo. Let me give a quick hint to some people who might have grown some Agosta keys in northern climates in the past For success with these plants. What I have found is first of all plant them in well drained areas. They don't like their feet wet in the winter in particular. Plant them in full Sun. They love he'd they love to be near rocks. If you've gotTA rockwall that absorbs heat. They would love that and don't cut them down in the fall. Wait until spring to cut them down. They seemed to go through the winter. Better if you haven't chopped and back in the fall well that's very interesting because I cut mine down in the fall and have for the past two years and they seem to have come back fine but in Pennsylvania or in Santa Fe in Santa Fe and here all I have is heat. Well drained soil and rock. So they're pretty much in their ideal growing conditions. Yeah see that's what I'm saying. You have the perfect growing conditions for all of the stack really and we certainly can grow them in more northern areas. But if you live in the upper midwest or the northeast don't cut it down in the winter you'll have a much greater likelihood of survival through the winter with that method. Well the plant. I want to review today. Ellen is a vegetable what a surprise. I know what a surprise. It's actually a turnip and I have two qualified this by saying two things first of all. I'm not a huge turnip fan. You know. It's not priority one for me for growing in the garden or at least it hasn't been in the past it might be now So because turnips you know often tend to be a little strong flavored. You have to use them in the right recipe and that's fine and they're good in you know roasted or in soups or whatever. But on the other hand. It's not something that I've ever rushed to take up garden space with well. This fall the burpee seed company. They did a brilliant piece of marketing. I thought because they didn't just send me a little packet of seeds with promotional material. Telling me how great this is. You know we read great reviews plants all the time but without trying it yourself. You don't know they sent me to turn up selling so you can actually see them very simard the carton turnips and they were about the size of a tennis ball. So not too huge like that. Because I don't want to necessarily commit to dinner for ten if I'm cooking. One of those huge tournaments right so I love the size there. A beautiful with just a blush of purple on the top. And the name of this. Turn-up is Silky. Sweep and I know they named that because it is smooth and silky it is sweet it is not overly turn up but it has enough of the Turnip Flavour. That you know. You're not eating an apple or you're not just eating. You know some sort of random vegetable. It is a turn up but it is sweet. It is delicious I cooked it and loved it in a in with other vegetables and some tomato sauce and eight one of them fresh just chopped up in a salad and it was delightful so I am definitely devoting garden space this year to the Silky. Sweet turn up from burpee seeds

Ellen Santa Fe High Country Gardens Pennsylvania Ta Rockwall Apple Tennis
"english country garden" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

15:27 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

"AM So excited today to be visiting the State of Tennessee as part of our fifty states of slow flowers series this this year. And I'm delighted to introduce Laura big be fought of whites creek flower farm. Hi Laura Hi Deborah. Thanks for jumping on the line with me. Happy to do it. Actually we've never met in person but we've been pen pals for awhile. Well give give me a snapshot of where you're located and a little bit about whites creek flower farm because you're more than a farm. You're also floral design studio right right. uh-huh we are in a little municipality In Davidson County Tennessee That is actually called Whites Creek. It's quite historic. It was settled back in early. Seventeen hundred And but we are within the Nashville city limits. So we're this wonderful little the rural pocket Just northwest of Nashville. In fact we're twenty minutes from downtown. That's great for you because that's probably a lot of your customers are yes they absolutely are. Yes so it's it's perfect. It's a wonderful location. What kind of acreage do have we personally own? Three and a half acres But I also grow. I'm very fortunate that my next door neighbor is a gardner. At our local Botanic Gardens teakwood gardens and she she has a big wonderful backfield about two acres that she also lets me grow on. She's just thrilled to have flowers. Grown back there and So far has not allowed me to pay her rent. It's it's been a wonderful setup and it's completely it's it's adjacent to my high tunnel so it's it's great that's crazy. I mean it's think that you have that much. Access to land in. Basically the shadows of an urban market is a dream. That's wonderful so give us a sense of what you're growing Laura And you mentioned a high tunnel so you're doing field grown as well as undercover yes. Yes in the high tunnel. I'm growing tweedy a- and and Snap Dragons Louisiana this renunciation CALOS have a row of Eucalyptus down the center. Thanks Dave dowling. That's what he recommends what I've done I'm going to grow some both perennial and Annual sweet peas in there as well so So that's all the high tunnel I look for unusual varieties of things to grow Because I'm kind of a plant NERD. Hudson Great Yeah I do I do a lot of Do a lot of unusual perennials and things and I start so far. I've I started everything from seed except the bulbs informs I bring those in but everything else I I start from because that's just such a magical process for me. What is your season? I know Tennessee. I mean it's technically the south. I don't know what your zone is. But it seems like you maybe have a longer growing period than people mighty my suspect. Yeah we're considered mid south here. We're not the deep south right we're mid south and We get crazy easy wild swings in temperature so we can be below zero in winter but we can be over a hundred in the summer so We're in zone seven. Kevin Sound seven a and Yeah we have for farmers who do row crops. We have three growing three. You can get three planting I and the season so it's pretty long starting with the like hell wars and tulips undercover and things like that February we we can start having things in February and then we also undercover. We can have Mums and Dallas and and even some flowers late into November. Wow so you're still. We're here talking on actually on Halloween. And you're still you're still running around harvesting it. Sounds he's like yes. We'll take absolutely I've got MOMS and Since sunflowers and not a whole lot else right now and I will have until tonight because my values are in the field so tonight we're supposed to get a heart brost so they will be. They will be gone tomorrow Well thanks for taking a pause to talk with me. I really wanted to get you into our our a rotation and next week is Tennessee so aubrey so who are you selling to. And how do you sell I. I'm really curious knowing your proximity to Nashville. That you're you're you're probably have a lot of different channels. Yes yes there are quite a few different channels. I started out selling to Selling to the public and farmers market and I just felt I'm a one woman show so I kind of felt like that. That was the best option for me. The and when I started my son was still An elementary school. So he's still pretty young and I didn't want to be on the road with a with a bucket route trying to go out several days a week because I wanted to be available to him so I did a Saturday morning market and that at at one point I was doing at once by myself. Oh my goodness yes other people's staffing the booth or how are you doing that now with me and my little son and my husband of course would help out in the boots you know he would help load and unload and shirt you know help with the tables and stuff like that but Yeah so that I WanNa say it got old really quick but I did love it because I'm an extrovert and I love love meeting the public and working with them but that quickly led to weddings because people would stop by my booth and they go. Oh this is just just what I want my wedding to look like. Do you do weddings. So I started doing wedding design and then that became so profitable that I finally had to let the markets go because because they were really keeping me from doing the weddings and the weddings. What were were what with really paying the bills? So the I've heard similar narratives tips from others in the Cell Towers Community who had that. That's stair step approach with initially at farmers markets and then that led to requests for a wedding design. Do you find the people. See your aesthetic and especially at the farmer's market. They don't really know what to call it. They think it's like a wildflower look which is clearly not but the air there's something that is capturing their Emotional connection to those flowers and I'm just wondering yeah look. How do you describe describe? Your aesthetic does a designer I typically call mine. I even have this verbiage on my website an an English country garden. Look that freshly gathered. It's like you just walked into an English country garden and although I grow an awful lot if natives but that that also really resonates with people especially here in Tennessee because a lot of A lot of our original Citizens since here Trace their ancestry back to England and the Scottish Isles show that really resonates with them to say English Country Garden freshly gathered third So I tend to use that although when people say wildflower They also they'll think about their grandmother's garden here. We are in the somewhat. Were World South and they think back to simpler time when their grandmothers had beautiful flowers and they could just walk out the back kitchen door and cut the flowers and put them on the table. And I think that's why it resonate so deeply with people instead of romance of the handpicked bouquet and fact that they know you. And you're the grower so love that Ryan so how. How long have you had whites creek flow or farming in what led to it? I'm just I don't think I know your story well Initially chilly I was a singer actor. Dancer both my husband and I were and lived in New York City. Just push pests us. The singer actor dancer isn't it considered a triple threat dance. He was the least of the three definitely a Singing actor Oh my goodness with forced to dance. Sometimes you performed in in In New York in the theater world I did did we. We neither one of us. We'd been there several years. And and we were both getting seen for Broadway shows but not getting booking them and I I have off Broadway away credits. And he sang at Carnegie Hall. And you know we we. We just weren't making that step up and we were in our mid thirties and We wanted to have a child so so we left New York and We had a child we moved to Orlando Afford and had a child and Are Wonderful Son Burton and then Various circumstances brought us to to Nashville. Okay and my hus-. My husband is now primarily filmmaker and animator. He still does some acting and voice work and puppet tearing he's he's really cool guy But my son had reached the age where you know. He was a lot more independent and I was like. Oh what am I going to do. It's now community theater didn't cut it for you now. You know I just know I. Yeah I was ready to move on and do something else. I was out planting roses and we had bought this property and we were just you know spending all this time mowing it. And what can we we do with this. Property is crazy and I my husband came out and I was planning roses and he said you look so happy. Why don't you do something like this? And I came inside and googled flower farmer. And that's how I found your book the fifty mile. Okay Oh my goodness wow history so that was probably around seven or eight years ago or let's see that book out two thousand twelve. Yeah Twenty Yeah Twenty Eleven two thousand twelve. Yeah right in there. Wow what a great story. I you know that. Thank you for sharing that. That's isn't that funny. What how did we ever learn anything before the Internet for one thing and look? What's happened for you? I mean I can't quite believe you're a one woman show with access to five acres curse of farming area. I mean that's intended. That's not five acres broken out. I have about a an acre broken out. Okay but the across five acres the large Garden but oh my gosh I had five acres. I just I'd never sleep. Yeah you'd have invaded Laura one of the things that I feel like since I met you and I I I remember reaching out to you when you first joined slow flowers just because I had a A an aunt in Nashville who wanted to send flowers to but of course it was January or something and it didn't work out but that's how we first connected connected personally and I remember thinking there weren't a lot of people doing what you're doing at the time in Nashville but look uh what the explosion of the local flower seen Including people who create yeah including people joining flowers in in Tennessee. I mean what what has happened. And and how. How have you witnessed? That sounds like people probably contact you when they google flower farms in Tennessee. And you pop up. Yeah they absolutely do. And I've really enjoyed. I wouldn't say mentoring but kind of meeting encouraging A lot of the young growers so any time some younger has contacted me and said Hey. Can I come look at your farm. Yup come on over because there. Is You know automate so many mistakes. You May as well learn well and under two floors contact to Erlich. How're you? How are you seeing being things? Change on the on the customer side with Flora's I don't do too much with floors I've had a few contact me But pretty pretty much all my flowers were going to. My design started just growing specifically for things that I like to design the design with So but I like talk about the collective here about our collection. Just share your news. Yeah this is exciting okay. Great we've got so many wonderful talented new growers and designers a ton of new designers. Oh and that was another revenue stream it is it while I didn't sell to Florida to brick and mortars I had a lot of designers who would come to me and it was really it. It was really a cool thing because we could share design tips. There was no like Rival rear like that. You know I mean if they got a Gig that was great because they could come by flowers. If I got a Gig you know. I'm sure they would like to have had it but you know they knew that I grew my own flowers. So it's been a really. It's a really nice community of designers and growers here so I did sell to To the designers contact me but now the demand has grown so much with all the designers and all the brick and mortar that Several growers in Middle Tennessee have banded together together and we formed a COUPLA collective while we can pool our resources and sell directly Both retail and wholesale sale. And so what what is it called. Tennessee cut flower collective. Okay Great. We'll we'll I'd like to try to get uh-huh more information on that to share with people but you currently have a website and a presence on social media and that okay good. We'll share those links than did this happen about. I remember you emailing emailing me about this when it first started within the last year right. Yeah well it I think it officially we're doing our grand opening Next next I in twenty twenty we had kind of a soft trial period. Soft opening This year and I must say it would not have happened. Happened at all if it hadn't been for misty moment from Twin rose farms down in Murfreesboro. Which is south of Nashville Right.

"english country garden" Discussed on Nerdlab Podcast

Nerdlab Podcast

21:40 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on Nerdlab Podcast

"Uh-huh yeah but for me RPG's are the pinnacle of games and even if they are not directly comparable I thought about what makes you said it's not pleasant to what is in between for you I mean just just going back to what you've identified there a few for me and I'm not a book that right down at the end of the scale and I have no problem with Stephenville these one of my favorite designers and I love ninety nine percents of these games well one hundred maybe one thousand nine hundred percent let's go to the other end of the scale on a on a euro game we try feelings very matic and it's Flam Rouge flood the fact that you ruining out of college in your deck and you become more and more exhausted it's brilliant on is extremely thematic and I would say that is a very good example of the thing Matt Euro Game I really didn't know that game but it sounds it sounds great yup for me it's all it's all about the decisions so suddenly you have decisions to make the game we not only are important decisions to make in the game book the outcome of those decisions has a realistic thing Mattie count you can actually imagine going Oh i'll tell you what I need for wood to build a shed and I'm really need that forward now because Dave's coming around tomorrow to build a shed so I'll tell you what yeah today I'm going to go to the forest and I'm going to spend all day and I'm going to work really hard and I'll get forward but then tomorrow I'm going to be fatigued to be able to do less on the next day you can going back to the immersion thing again you now feel that your character in the game and you've actually made that decision and you know if more games were like where they there was thematic explanations for the rules and the game mechanic supported it then then not you know because a lot of people assume that because I'm a Euro Gamer I don't like the Mattie Games and he's completely wrong you know it's just that most of the Games play don't have many rules in them but when they have rules if I was playing that game to describe to you and I'm hoping one of your listeners now goes often designs reading and the the rules of the game and the mechanisms in the game actually made me feel that this is a this is a real situation where you know the decision is I make are actually they matter more or less assimilation of the real world in the question really is from owners perspective is how much of the real life do you want to simulate in your game because in some ways you have to abstract your game I mean of course go to the to the forest and trump some some would there but in real life maybe your wife calls and you have to go home because your kid fall of some of the better world so you have to have to abstract the game and do you have any tips or advice for for game designers how to the sweet spot here between simulation and abstraction of of the real life well thing is with the gaming industry the Gaming Hobby as it is now there are so how many games coming out the their games which you can appeal to different target audiences I'm GonNa gain came out a few years ago called the colonists I was very surprised when the colonists came out because if you were to play the full game colonists with four players it's eight hours games don't come on take eight hours to play anymore it's a rarity and if somebody had said to me if you said to me now pool game designing it's going to be great take eight hours to play I would advise you not to do that because your target audience as it small and most people don't want a game that big in that title but there are some people that do so bearing in mind for me to give any advice it really depends I might one again where I put my work on space and get three would I might want that other people might want it the like I described choose to leave work early can only get two would or I can stay late and get full what some people might want some people might want every every day you have to draw around even card in your wife calls and your kids falling over at school and you've got to leave work and you've got to do a lot they might want the more realistic you make your game the more rules you're going to have to add and the comes a point where you just go wait a minute we've played one round of this game and he's taken us three hours because I'm rolling the dice to see with across the road without getting you can you can go crazy and yet my only advice if you need aside from the star what kind of game you want to make all you're going to make the ultimate realistic simulation of life or are you going to make a game which plays in thirty in his and once you've got your original concept then you need to play with people who are not your friends I mean that's my biggest piece of advice for any any gamers plagued with your friends well play them with your friends to see if it works but then don't listen to what they say because they're going to say it's great take independent play test groups and get feedback from other people and if you've got your your ultimate gain that you've designed and you take it to a play test weekend and nineteen out of the twenty people who give you feedback let's say the gang was too long and too complicated you need to change it you need to listen to that because otherwise what it depends on why you WanNa make the if you WanNa make again just for yourself that's fine but if you WANNA make a game that's going to be marketable you need to listen to independent advice from from third parties Yeah Yeah great thank you for the for the advice here I really like it and maybe we can we can talk more about designing games because a lot of the listeners of the show are a game design as I think we re tackle something here that that can be interesting so you talked about the difference between setting and theme so when you start to create a game came to design a game what do you need in the beginning do you do you start with the setting in mind or do you start with a theme in mind or do you start with headaches in mind and put the theme or the setting on top of that so what would be your advice eight eight eight can be all of them I mean according and to be G G I am a game designer because I did the last two major expansions apart from I wouldn't actually say I'm a game designer there isn't a the I have created designed on how published now I've been designing gains myself for like twenty years some people I would I would say the setting is not something you would start with using the definition of setting as I described only wrong which is just the world the game is played unless you have particular things I want to I want to design a game about building underwater cities right okay there you go you designing design about building a new world cities then where do you go from there do you start with the theme and work backwards or do you start with your mechanisms and work forward but before that you need to decide what kind of game you WanNa make are you designing a cooperative game are you designing a competitive game or you can he designed one that has a particular victory condition or that has victory points do you play a trading in the game do you want player interaction in the game all of these things you kind of need to decide what you want in the in the game I and although I'm not technically designed my own games republished as I mentioned I've had so many ideas for games in the past and I can talk through where the ideas came from and generally speaking they're all inspirations thing that happened to me in real life gave me an inspiration and I thought our there's a cool idea I'm going to turn that into a game an unusually as far as I get which is why publicized so for me it starts with you know the abrasion whether I'm out on a walk or I'm having shower do most of my best thinking in the shower a few years ago I was cutting the hedge in the back of our garden it was overgrowing and it was an overgrowth way too much and I'm not really a big garden I was getting really fed up of the fight was growing all the time and suddenly it happened all of these ideas about a game about gardening and how you have to maintain the garden and then I started thinking about how to shower awesome why if I have a game oh yeah and then over a over a few day period I came up with what I think is an excellent concept for game and that's as far as I go I have the concept of this game it's called English country garden every player he's trying to grow flowers in their own garden on whoever's got the best garden at the end of the month or the year wins right now that sounds really boring doesn't it well I like gardening I would probably would probably add a seasons here because the gardens look very different in different seasons yet so there's a very nice for for the autumn season so this four seasons and you'll score points at the end of each season and who got the most points at the end of the will win the day you got right here's the twist it's in the future nice okay whether control machine in the town the guy who runs the weather control machine can be bribed with various objects so what's what's going to happen I'm going to buy some strange purple seeds and I'm going to plummet them but my strange purposes needed to be cold and wet for them to grow so I will I will bribe because no the guy who works on the weather control machine he likes Formula One so I'm going to buy him a subscription to a Formula One magazine in the hope that he will alter the weather to make it cold and wet so that my plants do better now unfortunately you bowl plans that needed to be sunny and dry so your plans die because you didn't bribe him as much as me so all of a sudden we've got this this cute idea for these gardening game set in a small English village but certainly in the future a alien plum certain weather control machines and that's as far as I go I don't have any of the mechanics of the guy I have no mechanisms in the game at all I have a concept so that's that's where a lot of my ideas came from is juiced inspiration from things that are happening we then wanted to turn into games I guess for me going back to the question is where would I go next with dot game is I would now start thinking what mechanisms would were gain mechanisms work for that game to be would there be a blind bidding system where in a particular phase of the game everybody makes a blind bid to Derrick who works in the weather control machine building and whoever's got the highest bid you know but then again I hate blind bidding so would designed game that includes although blinding might be the best mechanism for that game that the thematically is the Roy Walton would I want to design again we've blind bidding when I hate finding out of the game mechanism so yeah all of those things to think about but yeah I'd have probably started next if I was to continue with our game with the mccown gang mechanisms next bull the setting came first because it was it was an idea okay that is let me throw them in yeah Mark Rosewater Design of magic the gathering all distinguish between top down and bottom up design right yeah for me this what what you described is top down design yes because you start with a specific setting in mind wild with bottom ups design you would start with the mechanic or some kind of rule in mind yeah so interesting aspect is that both designed purchase can lead to incredible magic the gathering sets yes oh two of my favorite sets in magic are instruct and cons of Turkey for example and in this is a game in which is a as in Gothic horror theme or in the Gothic horror setting if we stick with your different Yep and this was completely designed top-down okay and cons of talk on the other side was designed with the idea of having three different Ed's one large one small one and then again a large one and and this is specific thing about is is that the middle set the small one is easy late with the latch that the first or the second of the Cert lobster okay and You would never play all this together Russell this was a new way of drafting the game but it was not medic at all but both protest created very very good magic that's for me the do you think it is important to start the design principle theme in mind or do you think it can be also possible to start without setting at all you can start without setting at all I mean going by Stephan felt as I mentioned earlier my favorite designers I'm pretty sure aw Stefan has the mechanisms I I'm pretty sure he doesn't say I'm going to I'm going to try and design a game set in the city of Bruges.

Stephenville eight hours one thousand nine hundred perc twenty years three hours
"english country garden" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

13:40 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what cooked you. I'm Broccoli and thanks for listening on this. I talked to Laura. WEYMOUTH was there's a new book from Harvard Teen Coming. Out on September the tenth entitled Treason of Thorns and this so I talked to Laura about what this book about her First Book Delay Between Worlds and kind of her influences and world building so listen it so Laura what book hooked you so the very first I book that helps me is a different odd one when I was probably four or five years old because I was one of those bizarre precocious children my mom in an effort to just feed my veracious appetite for books took out the complete unabridged Swiss family Robinson Robinson from the library and read me the entire thing and it's basically just a glorified instruction manual and I absolutely loved it and it was a hey. It's still one of my favorite books. It's got plenty of problems when viewed from a modern standpoint but I absolutely loved listening to my mom read. It was one of the first books that I read on my own strangely enough once I learned how to read and then on I think my ninth birthday I got a beautiful hardcover edition of my the owner of this book and it is still my most favorite volume of anything that I own and like my most treasured book because for some reason I've just always loved this ridiculous story about with this just kind of insufferable colonial family living on this deserted island populated with just this biologically biologically improbable spectrum of animals and living this idyllic life in the middle of nowhere it is I think meant to read need realistically but actually comes off. Rather strongly is fantasy so I think that's what drew me to it in the first place. That's that's great and I don't think I've ever read the book I used to love the live Action Disney movie that old movie that they made back in the day yes. I think there's a lot more more actual conflict in the movie adaptation than there is in the book itself which like I said it's kind of just an instruction manual like there's Instructions on how to build bridges make dishes out of gourds and really almost no plot whatsoever and I just loved and still love that book and so from this from this book and this story just kind of the depth and the passion you had for it like what books for maybe this point then where you really sort of drawn ron to the most while you may have read widely. What were the ones that really were the most beloved by you. I think that that that book really as already touched on by saying that it was meant to read as realistic but came across is fantasy is what sparked my love for fantasy is a genre because that it has kind of been a defining feature of my experience as a reader and a writer even from a young age is that I went from that book to loving the chronicles of Narnia loving the Red Wall books looks loving the Lord of the Rings Loving Madeline lanes books so it was really just the foundation for a lifelong love of fantasy novels and then at what point was it at the same time that you were also creating your own stories. Yes my Berry. I finished story that I wrote was a short fiction. In third grade called nights lament and it was about a knight named Sir Paddington who goes off on a noble quest I and gets fatally wounded in the course of this question then on his deathbed laments how he wished he'd never become a night at all and that he settled down married his childhood aalto. Sweetheart Ellen and lived a quiet life. I've really just kind of continued on in that vein of writing bittersweet classic fantasy and so even as you can have moved into your teenage years that usually time where life gets a little bit busier was I was reading those still as important for you and or did it change in some way if anything I read and wrote fantasy even more in that it was an outlet and a way of escaping from just the troubled world that we live in and I really really enjoyed that aspect of it of just getting to go somewhere else where conflict resolution is still difficult but a lot of time more clear cut and more black and white so that's something that always drew me to reading fantasy and to writing it as well and was the always the dream that bs stories this writing would sometime at some point be published or we just kind of doing it for yourself. I was definitely doing it for myself and I've told the story before on twitter but what I really never considered publication even as gold I could pursue because I didn't know any writers and it didn't seem like something achievable to me until my tenth grade English class when we had a supply teacher for a month who was the very weathered grey kind of stately looking the older gentleman named Mr Stapley handed in a creative writing assignment to him and he graded it and gave it back to me and when he handed back looked in the eyes and he said in in prophetic tones Laura. If you are not published someday I missed my mark and that was the first time anyone had even suggested to me that it was something that I could do and it's just stood out in my mind ever since that moment and that was really when it first occurred to me. Oh this is something that I could pursue could pursue seeing my work in print as a goal that's great and so with that kind of elbowing will say did is that sort of what you're set in your sights on and like after high school was sort of your aim to be an author it was actually my name initially the to finish up a degree in medieval and Renaissance Studies and become a professor but then I had a quarter life crisis I dropped out of college and and I got married and had children very soon after I got married and when my oldest daughter was six months old it occurred to me that it would be very very easy to lose myself and my passions and who I am in the kind of all consuming role of motherhood and so I decided that since I had this beautiful wonderful little daughter who I wanted to serve as a role model for that I was going to be very purposeful in channeling at least some of my energy into my own MM pursuits in my own passions so that she would grow up seeing that I was my own person who had things that I wanted to achieve interests that I wanted to pursue Assu and so that's when I started writing again this time quite seriously and with the intent of Korean my work going after that goal of publication and I would imagine you it was it was obviously rooted in fantasy these early stories these early attempts. Did you a have authors at that time that you could say really inspired your writing in your storytelling. I I would say that might writing mice storytelling have always been I would say to a great degree inspired by Madeleine title angle for one rely. She's a defoe author to say that about but the way she integrates more realistic settings with fantasy the the way she incorporates poetry and her work just kind of the the humility of some of her characters something that I've always really aspired to achieve in my own work and she writes very practically about about quite relevant things I think of her book a ring of endless light which was enormously important to me as a teenager and it's about a young woman's first experiences variances with grief for first experiences with what we would now think of this depression. I those are the sorts of stories I've always striven to right and and so how many attempts at creating these stories and sending it out did it take before you got to your debut the light between world. I wrote a lot before actually querying I'd written consistently throughout. My teens probably wrote you know five hundred thousand words abandoned pro is as a teenager. I wrote one completed novel. My first completed start to finish absolutely done novel at the age of Nineteen and that's my drawer book that lives in a drawer and it will never come out. Nobody gets to see it and then after my daughter Maggie was born went ahead that a pithy of wanting to write seriously for the goal of publication I wrote wrote one novel which I queried for about a year and a half never got anywhere with and while I was clearing that towards the end of the clearing process success I wrote another book which became my debut the light between worlds and I drafted that in about four months queried it for a total of two weeks and that's the they got me an offer of represent several offers representation so now your new book comes up on September the tenth a treason of thorns and so it start talking about that and what is this book about a treason of Thorns is essentially the love child of beauty and the beast in Downton Abbey wherein a young noblewoman dwell dispossessed daughter of a nobleman who is charged with treason violet sterling returns to her our Family Home Burley House which is important in fact ascension and living entity in its own right. It's one of the five great houses of England which which are living magical beings and which oversee the good and the wellbeing of all of the English countryside and violent discovers covers that her ancestral family home Burley House is in point of fact slowly dying and it's going to be up to her to figure out how to save it and how to balance wants the wellbeing of Burleigh House with the good of the countryside which is obviously suffering as Burley sufferers and what was that initial thing uh that kind of got you started writing that the initial idea there were few things up weirdly. A lot of my ideas seem to be born on twitter probably because I spent way too much time on twitter but there's a bought on twitter which is sort of a magical religion bought in its tweets about an English country garden. Pardon that's you know but spooky and haunted and I read one of the tweets and wrote a micro fiction based on it and one of my critique partners just loved it and desperately wanted me to write a a larger version of this micro fiction so she passed her knee about that for a while and then during the same time period I read an article about highclere castle which is the Prince of Wales House in England. Just this beautiful building and one of its facades just looks like it has so much personality to it and so those two things coupled with the fact that I was also re watching Downton Abbey kind of congealed and coagulated into this idea in my head of a book in which this Manor House was itself a character and central to the plot of the book and one of the things I thought was really interesting. When I saw that you were coming out with a different book is that this second book is a sequel to the first I and a Lotta times when I've seen you know debut authors. They have these big fantasy novels. The second one is always kind of a sequel so there for the headache and all the the pressure that comes with a second book. They're still living in the same world for you. You had to create a whole Second World for the second book so what was that like as a as a sophomore release it was I think fairly similar to the experience of creating the world of the light between worlds because they are both historical fantasies so while a treason of thorns is set in a different time periods in fact alternate history history English worlds so you know I got to research the countryside and figure out how the magic system was going to play into England's history and Dan you know all those things just sort of figuring out where things overlap but I really appreciate the challenge of writing a standalone novel and of trying to encapsulate your world world in your story in a shorter form than a lot of fantasy readers are used to and I actually really liked to read standalone fantasies as well because I just you know where I've got young kids. It's hard sometimes for me to remember what's happening from one book to another and so when you're creating these worlds how much do you as the writer wants to know about the INS and outs the magic the rules all of that it before you kind of dive in..

Laura twitter writer England Downton Abbey WEYMOUTH Disney Harvard Sir Paddington Robinson Robinson ron highclere castle Burleigh House Ellen Family Home Burley House Madeleine Burley House Dan Mr Stapley
"english country garden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up in part two of the history out the troubling death of David Kelly a British scientist to been hunting for Iraqi W. M. D. also the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in nineteen ninety and I'll give you the greatest ever hold of Anglo Saxon treasure when we first saw that you'll really love naturally wildly excited it looked so beautiful the garden the girl lying down in the sand with the black lives it's about nine first a new summary BBC news with David Honda Hong Kong's chief executive Carrie lam has pledged to restore law and order as pro democracy activists trying to enforce a general strike by disrupting transport networks vowing not to resign in the face of intensifying protests she said increasingly violent demonstrations of pushing the city to the verge of a very dangerous situation in the last few minutes the Indian home minister I meet Sean has proposed to parliament's that article three hundred and seventy of the Indian constitution which confers special status on the state of Jammu and Kashmir the revoked his also propose that the state be reorganized with flat tax being coughed out as a separate administrative unit I can stand disputes India's sovereignty over the Kashmir valley weather has been a long running insurgency against Indian rule president trump has said hate has no place in the United States after two mass shootings in Texas and Ohio that left a total of twenty nine people dead he said he had spoken to his Attorney General the FBI and members of Congress about what could be done to prevent such violence his democratic opponents have accused him of inciting hate crimes South Korea has announced a plan to invest more than six billion dollars on research and development to cut reliance on imports from Japan the move comes in response to Japan's decision to impose restrictions on the export of materials vital to south Korea's manufacturing industries China's currency has fallen to its lowest level against the dollar in over a decade as hopes fade for a swift resolution of the trade war between Beijing and Washington it's breach the level of seven against the dollar a key threshold HSBC bank has announced the departure of its chief executive John flint after just eighteen months in the role saying it needed a change at the top the surprise announcement came even as HSBC posted a rise in half yearly profit BBC news welcome back to part two of the history our with Max B. isn't still to come the nineteen ninety invasion of Kuwait and from nineteen thirty nine a remarkable Anglo Saxon find in an English country garden but before that the controversial death of a British weapons expert an event which caused even deeper anxiety than that which already existed over Britain's involvement in the invasion of Iraq in two thousand and three Dr David Kelly was the expert in question he'd been on several weapons inspection visits to Iraq to try to determine if Saddam Hussein's regime had developed nuclear chemical or biological capabilities in July two thousand and three months after the decision to go to war Dr Kelly was found dead in a field Rebecca can speak as been speaking to one of the doctors who signed a letter calling for further investigation of the circumstances surrounding Dr Kelly's death tonight's the scientists at the center of the road between the government and the BBC has been found dead Dr David Kelly don't today Kelly was one of the world's leading biological warfare experts the discovery of his body on a hillside in oxygen just three days off to giving evidence at a televised parliamentary hearing shocked the nation tonight we have a profound personal tragedy wrapped up in serious criticism of the BBC foreign affairs select committee the ministry of defense and of the government as a whole the official explanation was the talk to Kelly deliberately took his own life but such was the maelstrom of public debate at the time so divided was the nation over the war in Iraq that his sudden death spot any number of conspiracy theories while Dr Kelly's widow accepted it was suicide others were concerned the normal procedures following a sudden death when not followed by the authorities among.

David Kelly scientist six billion dollars eighteen months three months three days
"english country garden" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Old and new and today we have an old friend the end today. My guest is our good friend terrier she. It's you know it's been almost too too much terry. Since <hes> the last time we did a show together that was be because it was <hes> a new year's resolution show that we did. I don't think we've been I don't think we've we've waited this long in between seriously yeah so for those of you for what what bars say that just that reminds me. The truest truism is that when we run on the job something you leaned on pick it up but when you get older and you drop something you look at it for a while and contemplate do I really need this uh-huh and you know he and you know the fact of that. It is a real truism because I will down and say do. I really need that or something. I can leave for someone else. I don't know how let related to <hes> our show back in January but I'm sure I'm sure well it. It doesn't relate to anything except it's a good story so for those of you are not familiar with Terry and is good story. He's the author of now seventeen books with the new one coming out this fall <hes> he's a sought after public speaker award-winning landscape architect of English Country Gardens Mentor too many and the he most comfortably introverted man. I know <hes> I like that comfortably introverted. Do you like that actually. Do that's a that's a great grace yeah yeah that's for your eulogy. I'm working on it now. I liked that yeah so today. <hes> Terry and I plan to talk about what what I'm referring to is one of the fastest growing phobias in in the United States and it's being called Thommo or the fear of missing out and I think what we'll do is get right into the topic bring on Hirsch and chat about the fear of missing out. You'll hirsch what's up. I'm ready hang on. Let me check my email. All we're doing this. Okay because you don't WanNa miss out on what's coming. You know it's funny. <hes> I could actually that's true. I could actually do the same thing even hosting the show face because I'm I'm. I'm in the post office today waiting in line which is what you do your waiting line in in the post office. They could places you wait in line to mail simply because that's what I'm GonNa mail something so you just wait in line to mail something but every single person and this is on my little I on which is supposed to be pretty. Progressive Aggressive advanced people on the line. Everybody's looking at the phone. I'm thinking what's roller just waiting in line. I know I know I would just talking to settle any club about that today so all I have to get something done while I'm waiting in line. I didn't get that really yeah well. How about the weight in tonight's where there's televisions? I've seen televisions in. I don't go into banks anymore. But I remember one time. I was in a bank and they had a television for the line so you could you could watch the latest Sofa voice in your state in California and get gas in a rental car and they had tell televisions in the guest pumps. I know I know they do the television it against that's that's not usually the way that question is formed but so so I got a question for you. Did you know that the acronym Foam Oh just F. O.. M. O. is actually in the dictionary as a word I I looked it up on dictionary dot Com and is defined as has a feeling of anxiety or insecurity over the possibility of missing out on on something such as an event or an opportunity as in if I say no to the Party invitation I get a bad case case of Thommo correct and and if I'm not invited I get a worse case and we'll we'll. We'll talk about that. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. I thought I don't know I yeah I mean you're GONNA launch it. In some way that just saw I just saw tedd top this week with <hes> <hes> shorts very short called the paradox of choice and and he says that we live in a world where because we have so many choices there's not three two minute really at all it paralyzes us right and I get that he talks about you know my Jews wore out so I went into by jeans and when I bought these teams there was just a pair of jeans but I went into by jeans and there was a hundred types of genes poem. I know he said just want jeans and they said no you have to try and all the jeans and he said when I just had one team I was able I was content with the fact that they weren't perfect jeans but they were gene but now that I had hundred choices or whatever I had to try them all on iphone some that by God they were great jeans but they weren't quite perfect and he said at the end I walked out after having more choices than other less satisfied that I was with my him perfect jeans last time without and without buying any new genes y'all he thought he had the by the jeans but the point is he better. There was nothing satisfying about Patty one hundred choices. Oh I know I know remember the days it was cheerios and cornflakes and that was it was all those audio I really this is a true story. I run in because I like triscuits to buy triscuits. You know there's like twelve choices of triscuits no I I all I wanNA do as triscuits the yellow box the yellow box. I love with with his best. The fear of let's see now in other words. They give you all these choices because just in case just in case something better for you so you can't walk out satisfied knowing that you missed out on something and you might have you might not have made the right choice but yet no. That's an interesting sentence that you say that way because see it's not really a that's true. It's it's about making a correct choice or an appropriate choice rather than simply game consent yes. That's crazy that that that's crazy so I'm thinking as I is is preparedness. I was thinking Komo F. O.. M. O. But then I'm thinking about you and me and all our other introverted friends we have a we have different act acronym. That's T. G. M.. Oh Yeah Oh thank God missing out because I don't WanNa be involved yeah. We're it's interesting thing that we were being <hes> <hes> fascinating thing about all the tech companies coming under sort of you know scrutiny if the fact that in and they're very they're very blunt about the fact that the programming for social media is is addict you right right it is and and we're wired that way and when that happens your not not completely satisfied and by satisfied I mean <hes> you you can't come to arresting point never and say I am here now right. I am <hes>. I don't remember ever who said that you know be here when you're here like wherever you are there yeah Yeah Mama Mama listened to me but this time of year is in other words be here right and you know I mean you know as when as when you're addicted you're not you're not. They're hard to be there because there's one is just because I wanna know read quickly what is going on and and then move on because you know what you know directly tied into what you're saying. Maybe maybe exactly what you're saying. As I was reading up on this Discu- on this subject <hes> I discovered that fear of missing out is is believed to be a strong driver ever for those who are addicted to social media which leads to what is called pathological Internet use pathological Internet use but as you said social media is designed designed to make you addicted and to make you pathological so I yeah I I know the people that that live on social media. They spend I have the friend who's WHO's sending a post you know I I don't know how I get to get a post to post today on facebook and you know facebook is just for old people now <hes> the kids don't use it but does to post today and you know sends me a picture of his backyard and I'm thinking cool. You know so what you're telling me if it's Perot people then facebook is for me is what you're saying yeah yeah except except I think it's a little bit over your head technically. I'm not quite so sure your luddite self could could manage your way through it. Actually I have a facebook page <hes> and a business pager personal page. No No rob is this page and I post my sabbath moment. which is my blog and then I do and then I I say sort of inspirational quote but it's fear missing out thing is the <hes> it's it's because my my hope team is about what does it mean to be present which means to be attentive in this moment <hes> literally only to be here? What's that mean could be here and what is it that keeps us from just being here? What's what's going on? Why is it think about this from? I'm I'm not that long ago. The super bowls are so we're watching the super bowl this. This is the the premium of that right. You're watching premium of it mean and and this is something you've been waiting for the advertisements during the Super Bowl then they even the guys the announcers for saying you don't WanNa miss the advertisers watch things. You don't WanNa miss what were happening in the future while you're at the thing you're supposed to be not wanting to Miss I. I'd it amazed me. That's the way we're wired. You'RE GONNA have to help me with that. I kinda didn't did that. I'm thinking in the advertisement is about the future and I whereas I'm not focusing the president here at the event I'm I can't I have been waiting to be at the event amid waiting to be and the advertisement. I'm supposed to watch his you. Don't WanNa miss what's coming ahead at this. This thing make sure is right and I think it wait a minute. I met the thing I've been WANNA miss. Why do I want to focus on this next thing? I go on a miss when I met thing. I didn't WanNa Miss Yeah Yeah. That's a great observation. That's a great observation. You know I was thinking I was thinking as I was pondering this. This it really is kind of a complex sub- subject and I was thinking you know there's Thommo light maybe and foam oh pathological and I'm thinking Komo light in this way and tell me if you think this is foam allied or if this is Komo pathological and it's common problem. I'm for travellers especially <hes> foreign international travelers and there is this uneasy feeling that you get if you don't see all the pertinent sites eight of the trip that you were supposed to enjoy in somehow. Your trip is incomplete if you don't see it now so as an example I'm thinking of like Peres you know what is it and you know I came up with four things you know you gotta see the Eiffel Tower the Lou the Notre Dame and Palladio for Si- <hes>. There's you know there's others that you could add to that but <hes> you know after having been to Paris few times that it really I never went back to the Eiffel Tower..

facebook Terry Hirsch M. O. Eiffel Tower Komo English Country Gardens Mentor United States Paris California tedd Patty T. G. M Thommo Peres president
"english country garden" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:13 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"It's good to be here once again this week doing one of my very favorite thing said interviewing friends old and new and today we have an old friend today. My guest is our good friend terrier she. It's you know it's been almost two too much terry. Since <hes> the last time we did a show together that was be because it was <hes> a new year's resolution show that we did. I don't think we've been I don't think we've we've waited this long in between seriously yeah so for those of you for what what I was GonNa say that just that reminds me. The truest truism is that when we run on the job something you lean down pick it up but when you get older and you drop something you look at it for a while and contemplate. Do I really need this and you know he and you know the fact that it is a real truism because I will down and say do. I really need that or something. I could leave for someone else. I don't know how that related up to our show back again but I'm sure I'm sure it's it it. It doesn't relate to anything except it's a good story so for those of you who are not familiar with Terry and his good story. He's he's the author of seventeen books with the new one coming out this fall <hes> he's a sought after public speaker award winning landscape architect of English Country Gardens <hes> mentor to many and the most most comfortably introverted man. I know <hes> I liked that comfortably introverted. Do you like that actually do it. That's a that's a great grace yeah yeah that's for your eulogy. I'm I'm working on it now comfortably as I like that yes so today <hes> Terry and I plan to talk about what what I'm referring to is one of the fastest growing phobias in the United State and it's being called Thommo or the fear of missing out and I think what we'll do is get right into the topic bring on Hirsch and chat about the fear of missing out you'll hirsch. What's it's up radio? I'm ready to hang on. Let me check my email. All Join US okay. That's good 'cause you. Don't WanNa miss out on what's coming. You know it's funny I could actually that's true. I could actually do the same thing even hosting the show face because I'm I'm. I'm in the post office today waiting in line which is what you do. You're waiting in line in the post the bigger places you wait in line to mail simply because that's what I'm going to mail something so you just wait mine the mail something but every single person and this is on my little eye on which is supposed to be very progressive advanced vegetable on my everybody's looking at the phone. I'm thinking what's wrong or just waiting in line. I know I know I would just talking to Settle Eddie that the club about that today so I have to get something done while I'm waiting waiting in line. I didn't get that really yeah well. How about the way tonight's where there's televisions? I've seen television. I don't go into banks anymore but I remember one time. I was in a bank and they had a television for the line so you could you could watch the latest soap opera voice. I was in your state in California and got gas in a rental car and they had tell televisions in the guest pumps I know I know they do the television guest osmose pack. That's that's usually the way that question is formed but so so I got a question for you did you. We know that the acronym Foam Oh just F. O.. M. O. is actually in the dictionary as a word I I looked it up on dictionary dot com and is defined as a feeling of anxiety or insecurity over the possibility of missing out on on something such as an event or an opportunity as in if I say no to the Party invitation I get a bad case of foam oh correct and and and if I'm not invited I get a worse case and we'll we'll talk about that. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. I thought I don't know I mean you're GONNA launch. In some way that I just saw I just saw tedd top this week with <hes> <hes> shorts very short called the paradox of choice and he says that we live in a world where because we have so many choices there's not freedom in it really at all it paralyzes us right and I get that he talks about you know Mike Jews wore out so I went into by jeans and when I bought these teams there was just a pair of jeans but I went in to buy jeans and there was a hundred types of genes. Oh I now he said I just want jeans and they said no you have to try and all the jeans and he said when I just had one pair teams I was able I was content with the fact that they weren't perfect jeans but they were genius but now that I had hundred choices or whatever I had to try them all on my phone some that by God they were great jeans but they weren't quite perfect. Can you say at the end I walked out after having more choices than other less satisfied had that I was with my imperfect jeans last time without and without buying any new genes your he thought he had the by the jeans but the point is he. There was nothing satisfying about having a hundred choices. Oh I know I know remember the days it was cheerios and cornflakes and that was it was all there was I read. This is a true story. I went in because I like triscuits to buy triscuits. You know there's like twelve club choices of triscuits no I I all I wanna do is triscuits the yellow box the yellow box that's love with there's no with his best to fear of missing out. In other words they give you all these choices because just in case just in case. There's something better for you so you can't walk out satisfied knowing that you missed out on something and you might have you might not have made the right choice ace but you know what that's an interesting sentence that you say it that way because he is not really a that's true. It's it's about making a correct choice or an appropriate choice rather than simply game consent yes. That's crazy that that that's crazy so I'm thinking as as preparedness I was thinking Thommo Promo f. o. m. o. but then I'm thinking about you and me and all our other introverted friends we have a we have different AC acronym. That's T. G. I.. M. Oh yeah thank God I missing out because I don't want to be involved yeah well. It's interesting thing that we were being <hes>. <hes> Um fascinating thing about all the <hes> tech companies coming under sort of scrutiny if the fact that in and they're very they're very blunt about the fact that the the programming for social media is is addict you right right it is and and we're wired that way and when that happens you're not completely satisfied and I satisfied. I mean <hes> you you can't come to a resting point never and say I am here now right. I am <hes> I don't remember who said Oh you know be here when you're here like wherever you are there yeah Yeah Mama Mama listened to me but this time of year is in other words be here right and you know I mean you know as when as when you're addicted you're not you're not dare tarred to be there because there's one is just because I wanna know read quickly what is going on and then move on because you know what you know. Drek directly tied into what you're saying or maybe exactly what you're saying is I was reading up on this Discu- on this subject <hes> I discovered that fear of missing out is is believed to be a strong driver for those who are addicted to social media which leads to what is called pathological Internet use pathological Internet use but as you said social media is designed signed to make you addicted to make you pathological so I yeah I know I know the people that that live on social media. They spend you know I have a friend. Who's WHO's WHO's sending a post? You know I don't know how I get it but I get a post. Two posts today on facebook and you know facebook is just for old people now <hes> the kids don't use it but does to post today and you know send me a picture picture of his backyard and I'm thinking cool. You know so what you're telling me if it's Perot people then facebook is for me is what you're saying yeah yeah except except I think it's a little bit over your head technically. I've really not quite so sure your luddite self could <hes> could manage your way through it. Actually I have a facebook page <hes> and a business pager personal page. No No no rob is this page and I post my saddest moment which is my blog and then I do <hes> and then I post a sort of inspirational quote but it's the fear of missing out thing. Is that <hes> it's it's because my my whole team is about what is it means to be present which means to be attentive in this moment <hes> literally to be see here. What does it mean to be here? And what is it that keeps us from just being here. What's what's going on? Why is it think about this from? I'm not that long ago. It was super bowls are so we're watching actually the super bowl this. This is supposed to be the premium of that right. You're watching premium of it I mean and and this is something you've been waiting for the advertisements during the Super Bowl then they even ah the guys the announcers divorce saying you don't WanNa miss the advertisers robots things. You don't WanNa miss what were happening in the future while you're at the thing you're supposed to be not wanting to miss. I ah it amazed me. That's the way we're wired. You'RE GONNA have to help me with that. I kind of didn't that that I'm thinking in the advertisement is about the future and I were whereas I'm not focusing on the president here. I am at the event I'm I can't I have been waiting to be at the event. I've been waiting to be and the advertisement. I'm supposed to watch his you. Don't WanNa miss what's coming ahead at this thing. Make make your right and I think wait a minute. I met the thing I've been WANNA miss. Why do I want to focus on this next thing? I go on a miss when I met. I didn't WanNa Miss Yeah. That's a great observation. That's a great observation. You know I was thinking I was thinking as I was pondering this. This it really is kind of a complex sub- subject and I was. I was thinking you know there's Thommo light may be and foam. Oh pathological and I'm thinking Komo light in this way. Tell me if you think this is foam allied or if this is Komo pathological and it's a common problem for aw travellers especially <hes> foreign international travelers and there is this uneasy feeling that you get if you don't see all the pertinent sites of of the trip that you were supposed to enjoy and somehow your trip is incomplete if you don't see it now so as an example I'm thinking of like Paris you know what is it and you. You know I came up with four things you you know you gotta see the Eiffel Tower lose the Notre Dame and the Palais Si- <hes> there's you know there's others that you could add to that but <hes> you know after having been to Paris few times that it really I never went back to the Eiffel Tower. I could care or less about the Eiffel Tower just a big hunk of steel.

facebook Terry Eiffel Tower Komo Paris United State English Country Gardens Eddie California tedd Hirsch M. O. president Perot Mike Jews Palais Si Discu
"english country garden" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"english country garden" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Better place to start? But in the heart of yours. In Munich, the city that synonymous with the October fest. That exuberant festival beer sausages music, Wilkin conviviality draws people from all around the world to the Bavarian capital. It's one of the images Mudgal mistake. Caricatures everywhere countries, Germany. I'm standing now in an image of a very different kind prints against passer and looming up around me of the numerous pillars that make up the neoclassical colonnade of the house, the house of aunt and here history has me friendly in its grasp because the house there Kunst started life in nineteen thirty seven as the house Deutsche Kunst triumphantly opened by Hitler himself to house works about selected to encourage the people of Germany to see themselves in a very particular way. It was also designed to encourage the rest of the world to see Germany in a very particular way. And I think it's fair to say even long after the end of the war people in Britain, and perhaps elsewhere struggled to see Germany except through that prism of the Nazi years from nine hundred thirty three to nine hundred forty. I five Germany changed radically. Our view of Germany hardly altered. Yet the house the Kunst stands on the edge of a vast expanse of parkland that runs along the side of Munich's is our river. This is the English garden, and it must be one of the most beautiful city parks in the world created in seventeen eighty nine and based on the model of the informally landscaped English country garden it carried with it then and now an ideal that was thought to be particularly English a respect for nature and the freedom from constraint space where people could wonder where they chose the placing in the mid nineteen thirty s of a Nazi monument on the edge of a much older English garden hints at the complexities of Britain's long relationships with Germany and somebody perhaps more unexpected in the two world wars German names everywhere in Britain were changed or abandoned centuries of close association at every level were consigned to oblivion. This throughout the two world wars remained the English garden written may become the enemy, but its traditions of the long historical links between the two countries were not forgotten. I think the October fest or the Nazi house Kunst built beside the English garden point to something else as well. The way that we have as human beings of encapsulating complex relationships histories and demotions in the simple on the concrete buildings and gardens monuments in books. Great individuals festivals. The all have the power to serve symbols representing one country in the popular imagination of another service prisons through which the people of one country see.

Germany Deutsche Kunst English country garden Munich Britain Better place Hitler
"english country garden" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"english country garden" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Well let let's let's talk about what we we all going to talk about breaks after uptown the travel but let's talk about discreet julius creeper these extraordinary pictures of beautiful the english country garden dressed as an english rose the only signs of her ordeal that she's been through being the signs of the track your to be that she's clearly had on her neck but it is it is extremely that the russians are still claiming joe still claiming that well she's either dead or she's being held against her will they wanted this proof of latin and now they've gone well they did but then they've used it as an opportunity to sort of suggest some sensitive in how she was behaving the it was a scripted pace fairplay she's been through a hell of an ordeal you'd wanna script what you're going to say at that point but they use that as an argument to suggest that she's been she's being controlled by the british and this is all part of a major plot so the poll women i mean that is a very difficult interview to give very confident to the tease i thought i presume she'd been to be fair to the russian she probably had been coached by few people around to make sure she could get through it because khushi anyone would did you make i mean there are still to be conspiracy theorist richard he would just going to say well don't trust i don't believe it but this is now russian foreign policy one one is just muddy the facts just bring some doubt about just try and say maybe it's not all ought to be seen because that's that's only have to do now they've got to believe exactly because they've got kind of autocracy on their side which is amazingly efficient and keeps everyone kind of in line and having the same view the app lewisham here is what they're exploiting because i think we're in the middle of a cold war but we haven't got cold war mindset that what is being done to us all the time whether interfering elections where they just but this is just typical them muddy the water question the facts and just leave the doubt and then there's various people who are prepared to do the heavy lifting i mean i'm cynical but right to me doesn't want to get back to.

english country garden joe
"english country garden" Discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"english country garden" Discussed on On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

"Which we think is back tie i think it would be very fitting to be i guess you know after diana military uniform meter take off some of these medals and listen up shit out put a talk song yeah exactly exactly that and of these maybe harry will put his bathing shorts on we've seen in knows what how the evenings gonna end you know but i think it's very exciting for meghan gets with to dresses as well so we know the he does things very formerly when people are windsor sandringham they change for dinner and today's like christmas day that can be up to three or four times so i would imagine this is is going to be what happens so the other things that we also know in terms of the wedding day we also know that the cake has been made by that kind of very smart baker clap tack and the flowers are going to be done by philip critic so we think that she has she's working with the of buckingham palace and windsor castle both do all the floor street in the chapel and also today great the evening venue at for which is going to be marquee and also using the grounds and the house i'm sure the go to town i'm sure invest into things for the progressives overhead floral arrangements that's right so floral arches and that real english country garden vibe i think i mean i'm very fighted about hanley sneak peak the chapel in the morning just so we can smell what it's going to be is i think it's volume i think the white golden raises peonies economic on that kind of salt on the census as you step in there as a guest it's gonna be very memorable be lovely the music of course in the in the chapel will be the choir george's chapel will have a cellist sheku can mason nineteen year old who won bbc young musician of the year in twenty sixteen we've got karen gibson and the kingdom choir they are very excited and it's great to have a gospel choir oversea in the chapel we've got the bbc national extre of wales english chamber orchestra and the philharmonia as the.

english country garden george harry meghan buckingham palace hanley karen gibson bbc wales english chamber nineteen year
"english country garden" Discussed on Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"english country garden" Discussed on Truth & Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

"Here it's so deputy fills in the plot but yeah there's a graphic sex scene in soon as it came up on the screen this french couple just up to one another on known very loudly and everyone laughed around in which was which was very charming that's that's a good cam moment yes so what's coming up what news we got today any any can gossip any headlines i guess the big thing is that the new terry gilliam film the manning killed donkey ot was it was in flux whether it was going to actually play on the festival due to a lawsuit over rights and ownership but it seems that yesterday it was cooled in favor of the festival so the film will be playing and of strange needs if gilliam himself suffering a small stroke over the weekend but apparently he's now right was rise right posted pictures of himself jumping around in in english country garden so that will be happening and actually hobby might have some contention for the pump donkey exactly yeah we've got coming up tomorrow we're going to be talking about the new pablo pollock hausky film cold war which is a romance set in kind of across europe in the again the years following the second world war and then we're going to talk about from petra by jim relentless hymie resolves maybe by directors fortnight i'm going down tonight to watch film so off the beaten path highly recommended.

manning english country garden terry gilliam pablo pollock europe jim
"english country garden" Discussed on DirtCast

DirtCast

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"english country garden" Discussed on DirtCast

"You know she does not necessarily do it them what i would want my home where specifically you know she like their big thing is like everything like their whole styles like farmhouse style with like is not really my thing because i you know georgia i love town houses in town basically like i won't like you know some molding and some you know like a little small yard in finds make some of kelly's repeat she literally grew up in a swamp right yeah that's like me being rude swamp from a ball in georgia literally grew up like the river was like thirty feet into the front yard and like sometimes the house would like the yard would flood and one time very memorably the house flooded and obviously like i love my parents house and everything my taste is like i'm much more you know an eccentric like english country garden type of my parents eternal toward you you like a townhouse what if we had like i'm just like that i was annoying child who was like but what if we had our rose garden with labyrinths like absolutely agreed what if we had a crumbling stonewall you wanted regarded and you know joystick joanna gaines this whole thing is like farmhouse chic and i see i see a barn and so the like you know take something that obviously should be a craftsman bungalow and i'm like oh art deco style and then she'll put ship lap in it and i'm like that's literally literally bar like any barn like i could walk into any field in rural georgia and like look one way look the other way and find a tobacco barn look like that if you painted it white so that's my like waiting craftsman actually makes me wanna barf she has i just watched an episode last night from the current season which is ending their final season i should say it's ending because all i mean obviously show like this could go on until we all die but she's pregnant with their fifth child which is insane to me.

georgia kelly joanna gaines english country garden thirty feet