35 Burst results for "Endo"

"endo" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

01:31 min | Last month

"endo" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

"Tip number four is use a 48 hour release on your blocks, meaning if you can't schedule them ideally, then roughly two days before you can release them in schedule anything. That way you're not going to be sitting around without anything to do. Your team can fill an appointment with 48 hours of advanced notice. But we want to leave those open or fill them ideally or leave them up until two days before because you may get a call today that the patient would like to have something done soon and it turns out that it's a rock and we can see them in a day and a half later, we can put them right in the schedule. Great way to accommodate your patients. The next tip is just a little bit of logistics. I recommend that all of our listeners work out of two rooms. So you have two treatment rooms and you have two assistants. Column number one, is your main column, or your primary column, and you'll schedule that from the beginning of the day to the end of the day with various links of appointments relative to The Rock sand and water. Column number two is your side column, remember you have a second room and you have a second assistant. And now you start to fill in your side column relative to what's in column number one. Some appointments and dentistry are captive appointments. For example, or a oral surgery, Endo, the doctor part of the new patient exam, and what I mean by a captive appointment is you can only be in run room at once. So you can't be over here in the side column because you would be taking away from your oral

Endo
"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

06:36 min | Last month

"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"One. We're working on the foundational principles in phase one, general business awareness. Do you know how to read a P and L? Do you know the difference between a P and L and an income statement and a balance sheet? If you don't, that's okay. We can teach you that in a half hour, but do you know how to analyze how a dollar flows through your dental practice? Okay, that's the first thing. Very important. Foundational principles, mission vision core values. We talked about that. Team culture. We're going to be talking about team culture for a whole hour. I believe it's tomorrow. Lots to work on as far as team culture. The number one reason that we have turnover and have difficulty recruiting level ten talent and retaining level talents in our practices is not an extra dollar or 5 or $10 per hour. It's because we lack a solid culture. A very, very tangible, very, very tangible ways to make sure that we improve that. Systemization and overhead control, so here's how that breaks down. 30% is allocated to payroll. 30% for phase one, 30% is allocated to fixed and variable expenses. 30% goes to doctors compensation. If you nail all of these, you have 10% profitability. This is a phase one practice. Okay? Okay. All right. Foundational principles. Phase two looks like this. I skipped phase two. I'll talk about phase two. This is phase three. So phase two is actually when we start to focus on what's that? Because, oh, is it out of order? No, I just skipped it. Okay. Well, good thing I know my slides like the back of my hand. Now phase two, now we're talking about now we are talking about increasing revenue, all right? So let's think about a bucket, right? If a bucket has a bunch of holes in it, this is an overused analogy. But if a bucket has a bunch of holes in it, does it make sense to continue to pour water just to keep that thing full? Or does it make more sense to take something and plug all the holes in the bucket? All right? Phase one, we're committed to plugging the holes in the bucket. Okay? It does not make sense in phase one. To continue to pour more water into the bucket, which would be increasing your clinical skill set. Bringing on a new provider. Hiring a 14th hygienist. All good things at the appropriate time. Not in phase one. Fix the infrastructure of the business first. Plug the holes in the bucket first. And then we start adding water to the bucket and phase two. Adding water to that bucket includes some of the things I just talked about. Potentially bringing on new providers, potentially increasing your clinical skill set. Maybe it now it is time to take that on for a class. Maybe it's time to take that ortho class. To keep more of that Endo in-house to start hiring potentially, specialists for your practice. That's phase two. And really, really figuring out how to be profitable in the hygiene department, which is now harder than ever. That is phase two. And then phase three, we're talking about increased revenue increasing the strategies to increase revenue. So that is more increased clinical suite, more capacity, increased providers, increased specialty services, and now is when we start talking about multiple location expansion. All right guys, so when you get to a certain level, then you pass one, two, and three, you're potentially going to be looking for clusters of practices. Maybe we're buying small groups. Maybe we're buying one, two or three at a time. If we're properly funded, we'll be able to do that sort of thing. We'll be able to go out and snatch that $2 million practice with 900,000 to a $1 million in EBITDA. Those start to look really good. But if you don't have a solid foundation, as far as your first one, two, and three practices, you're going to be duplicating a mess. Ask me how I know. My first three dental practices, I opened the second year that I was out of dental school. And I didn't even have the ability to analyze where they were as far as phases back then. I didn't know the basics of running a dental practice. All I knew was that I wanted to have ten dental practices. That was my goal at the time. And three was better than zero. And 6 was better than three. And 8 was better than 5. That's all I knew about dentistry. That's all I knew about multiple practice ownership. And I had some very sloppily run dental practices. The good news was I had great associates that I lucked into and I had incredible office managers. So because of that, I was under the delusion that I was God's gift entrepreneurship. Because all of my practices were running great because I had great office managers and their systems were in their head. I had incredible associates and they were producing like crazy. And I had nothing to do with it. So of course what you do when you have three average practices, and you think you're awesome, as you go by three more. I caution you, especially now that you know about what the average dental practice looks like is build that first practice so it looks like a black belt level practice. Your 20% profitable. So you have great systemization. So you have a great culture. You have a consistent way of recruiting new patients. All of the things that I covered really, really quickly, those things you want to integrate in your dental practice before you duplicate it to number two, three, and then 6. Master that practice and that group of practices before you grow at scale. Really, really important.

Endo
"endo" Discussed on Clubmarket Demo

Clubmarket Demo

08:27 min | Last month

"endo" Discussed on Clubmarket Demo

"Hit the stroke that I know so we can roll big hot sheets. I wish I could thank the 8, but I'm the one should still rolling the two door cut the same old bucket boy window soggy Endo. I'm in the land and you smoke with my kids up in smoke yeah that's where you lay it down up in the OAK the town homies don't

Endo
"endo" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

05:26 min | Last month

"endo" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"6 zero always let tricks know and Friends know we got that Endo. Sitting in the House up and now I'm not the butler. I'll cut you they say I can't touch this and I wouldn't catch up punk you a soccer and I let you know you do it oh boy I make dough but don't come and go for it

Endo soccer
"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

03:18 min | 2 months ago

"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Scaling and root planing, planning, or any type of burial procedure. What types of examples do you see on a daily basis of recurring denials that you have to work through? Definitely build, I mean, buildups kind of across the board almost with all insurance companies. I feel like they're all just super picky these days. But one thing I notice a little bit more than that is there's a little truth to some offices are kind of flagged in a way by insurance companies where they will deny way more of their services than some of my others. Is that because that pattern recognition? Do they never see a one surface filling? So they're like, well, this person is just tacking on an extra surface every single time. Stuff like that? Yes. Oh yes. Okay. So that is a real thing. And offices should know that. I've heard of people getting flagged for surgical extractions, people that have never done like a routine extraction in the history of their practice. And so they get flagged for those surgical so they want more proof. I've heard of that sort of thing happening with this. And being audited by insurance companies that your providers for and in network for that is a very real thing too and can be very costly. So that's more so what I notice. And in the common things too, insurance is denying build up and like you said, but yeah. Have you found it? Useful to include intra oral pictures and scans if necessary? To prove your point. For sure, especially with buildups. With buildup. Yeah, you have to show that, look, we couldn't have done this without a build up. Here's a picture of it, yeah. So, so odd. Some of these insurance companies, they deny a buildup because the tooth didn't have Endo. And then they'll also deny it tooth that did have Endo. It's like, what? I've been denied buildups post Endo. It's like, do you understand dentistry? Do you want me to leave the cotton pellet in the IRM in there? Because you're not supposed to go. It's like you almost want to be a little snippy with those appeals, but you can tell it's somebody that doesn't really know their dentistry. And they're just hoping that a percentage of people just won't appeal. Yes. Yeah, exactly. And they'll just send it back to the patient, but so internal photos for sure. And a lot of insurance companies are actually their claims processing are moving more towards like AI. So I'm just going to ask you about that. Yeah, so they want to, you know, you are checking boxes XYZ that claim is more likely to just go through. So I think kind of gone are the days of over submitting. So submitting everything under the sun notes, intramural photos, x-rays, this, that the other thing you guys and calculus, you set it in there. Put

Endo
"endo" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

04:19 min | 2 months ago

"endo" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

"And you also won't run behind in the schedule. So it's really win win to have a solid anesthesia game plan for you and the patient. So my typical flow is I'll start with a cotton swab with benzocaine and I'll put it in the area for a few minutes. And at this point, I'm making some chit chat with the patient and reviewing the procedure. And I always make sure to be careful not to put too much topical because sometimes they'll run down the patient's throat and this can be a very often overlooked part of the process because if the patient swallows a topical and they feel like their throat is numb and they can't swallow, it could be like an unnecessary ten to 15 minute situation where you have to calm them down and have them sip or gargo water. And I've been there. So I always do just enough topical and make sure it's not too runny. I also always hide the needle and I don't care how old or strong or tough some of these patients seem I hide that needle and they don't even see it's coming and I tell them to take deep breaths and inject very slowly. And if at any time if a patient is wincing in pain, then what I do is just give them a very little bit wait a few minutes and tell them that we're going to let this soak in and then we'll give you a little bit more round two and they won't feel it as much. But my workflow is pretty much the same every time, but the biggest game changer for me and my workflow is what I call the Endo ice test. And if they don't pass the icy test, no drilling. I never take a bird to a tooth unless the patient has passed the Endo ice test. And after each step in the workflow, I confirm with the Endo eyes that the patient is fully numb. And I'll use a piece of cotton from a cotton roll and I'll douse it with Endo ice and I'll place it directly on all aspects of the tooth that I'm working on. And if the patient feels any cold, then they're not numb. I'll place the cotton on there for a few seconds and tell them you'll feel pressure, but let me know if you feel any cold. And if they feel any cold, they're not numb and they'll move on and give them more local. But for maxillary teeth and all lower teeth other than molars, I usually just give with an evolution needle by. The blue tip I'll give one car feel of septica, buckle infiltration up near the apex of the teeth. If it's multiple teeth, then I'll give multiple injections. And then I wait 5 minutes and then I'll do the Endo ice test. And 90% of the time, case closed, that's all you need. But if there's still feeling the ice, then I'll give another car grill because sometimes they just need more. And I'll wait another 5 minutes. If they're still feeling the ice, then I'll do a PDL injection on buckle and palatal, which is my regular syringe. I don't use a special high force type of syringe. And I'll inject on the buckle and the palatal. Occasionally I'll have to give a paddle injection for upper teeth, but this is very rare. Lower molars on the other hand are the granddaddy of them all. And this used to be my biggest stress for years, but now I have a plan and it's so much more efficient and less stressful. I start off with a traditional yellow 27 gauge long tip needle and I give them mandibular block with lidocaine just like I learned in school. I'll wait 5 minutes and I'll check if there's signs of the chin lipping. If not, then I'll give you another block, usually a little higher or lower than my initial injection. I'll wait 5 minutes. And then give a buckle infiltration or sometimes a PDL with, again, with my regular syringe, not the legged jet. With some septic ane. And wait another 5 minutes. And during each step of this process, I'm checking with the Endo ice test. And if they're still feeling the lower molars, then my last step is the tuttle numb now technique, which was developed by Gregory tuttle. And that usually does the trick. So again, thanks again for listening to my tips. Anyone needs to reach out to me. Email me at info at the stress free dentist dot com and also check out my new book stress free dental implants. Thanks so

Endo Gregory tuttle
"endo" Discussed on ¿Dice Así? Podcast

¿Dice Así? Podcast

01:59 min | 3 months ago

"endo" Discussed on ¿Dice Así? Podcast

"No necessity. Is common DNA can be a palace. It has. It's always there can be a palava cambia perspective. You could just stop in the Endo Avery as for him. He had a significant dose of Westeros, is it persona sustainable? But almost a star ocean cristal ocean poem was a star. Kicks fan their reign. In tosses. Crystal hit Jesus. And there's a source. No Peru is a lacto, don't they are a total Cristo pero

Endo Avery Peru
Book About Clarence Thomas Is a Window Into the Mind of a Great Man

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Book About Clarence Thomas Is a Window Into the Mind of a Great Man

"We're waiting for a slew of Supreme Court decisions on a whole bunch of really important topics. In fact, there was one that came out today on religious freedom and I'll talk more about it tomorrow. But no decisions yet for abortion, no decision yet on guns. Those should all be coming in the next couple of weeks. But as we're in this kind of atmosphere of suspense, I see a very interesting article. It's an excerpt from a forthcoming book on clarence Thomas. And the book is called created equal. It's edited by Michael pack and Mark pillar. And it includes detailed interviews with Thomas, which are very kind of, well, they give you a window into Thomas's soul. And it's just very interesting to see this justice and how he's how he responds to things. And the excerpt that I've been reading goes back to his confirmation process, a very traumatic, the whole process was awful, it says Thomas. But then they ask him, was this like the worst thing that has ever happened to you? And he goes, and this is very Thomas Y, you know, I can actually tell this from knowing Thomas a little bit. I've had worse things in life. I've been blessed because I've seen worse. It was a lot worse to be hungry and not know when you are going to eat or to be cold and not know when you're going to be warm again. These people who are doing the attacking had never known anything like that. So talk about guy who was raised in rural poverty in pinpoint, Georgia, and this black guy is the target of the left rage and attack. And then he talks about the hearings, and he says, this is not an information exchange. People say things, there could be insults, slights, and nu endos, they could be an effort to unnerve you to rattle you to get you to look bad. There's a lot of this gotcha to get you to say something that leads to something else. His point is that the hearings are a kind of an orchestrated sort of trap, particularly for Republican nominees.

Thomas Michael Pack Mark Pillar Thomas Y Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Georgia
"endo" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"endo" Discussed on WTOP

"Jack The future of the 21st century economy is going to be largely written in Endo Pacific in our region You end up Pacific covers half the population of the world and more than 60% of the global GDP.

Endo Pacific Jack
"endo" Discussed on Against The Odds

Against The Odds

04:54 min | 7 months ago

"endo" Discussed on Against The Odds

"Minutes after leaving the control room, engineer, katsuya Endo enters reactor building one. He clicks his flashlight on and steps forward into a mysterious white haze. Unlike the first team, Endo and his colleague are heading down to the basement. A more nerve wracking assignment. The upper floors of the plant are better shielded from radiation by the thick concrete jacket of the containment vessel. But the concrete doesn't extend down to the basement. Their radiation detector chatters, as they descend the steps. It hovers around 600 with occasional spikes up to 900. Endo tries to ignore this as he navigates the stairs. They finally reach the basement with its high ceiling. The approach the suppression chamber, the giant donut shaped ring surrounding the bottom of the reactor. It looms above them. They climb up a ladder to a catwalk that runs above it. The vent they need to open is on the other side of the chamber. And though takes the lead, as they move forward along the catwalk. But, as they get closer to the vent, and though here's something ominous. It's his radiation detector. He glances down, and his mouth hangs open and shocked. The detector's needle is buried in the red, well past the device's limit. The radiation is so intense here. It's off the scale. Endo glances up, they're less than 25 yards from the vent. But if they get there and the vent is stuck, they'll be fried with radiation. While trying to get it open, he doesn't want to turn back. Not when they're so close. But the clicks of his radiation detector have him frozen in terror..

Endo katsuya Endo
Mitch McConnell on Ketanji Brown Jackson's Confirmation Hearings

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:08 min | 9 months ago

Mitch McConnell on Ketanji Brown Jackson's Confirmation Hearings

"Do you just expect a repeat of the Kagan hearings or repeat of the Sotomayor hearings where there are difficult questions answered, Republicans do not engage in vicious personal attacks based on rumor and you Endo and lies. And the judges confirmed comfortably is that what you expect? Yes, look, I'm not interested in what somebody may have written in justice Jackson's high school yearbook. And I think this will not be anything close to what they did to clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh. I agree. I also think that Democrats hope that some Republicans overplay their hand because they're going to get, they're going to get old. Blown out in November on a variety of reasons and they're praying that the Republicans make a misstep here. It's the conference know that. Yes, we do. We do. And I think Jackson will be treated respectfully. I think the question to be appropriate and I think you're right, I think she's highly likely to be confirmed with very few Republican votes. Because of her philosophy, not anything else.

Brett Kavanaugh Kagan Endo Justice Jackson Clarence Thomas Jackson
"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Some point he could build his own practice and wait until the cash flow catches up with the break even point. But you have to be realistic about super niche if you're going to be doing a startup because like you said, Chris, it's very risky and it's going to take a little bit more time than a general practice where you can eventually spend more time doing do. Doctor doom, you're checking your head. Oh, 100% agree. I mean, bread and butter and hygiene is what foods on the food on the table. It's what's going to pay all the bills. You're going to grow that influence in the community doing bread and butter placing maybe like a single implant here and there doing Mueller Endo pool and teeth, little soccer preservation Invisalign focus on doing the dentistry that you want to do right now well and focus on building a good business. And then, yeah, when you're ready, start to niche out, you know, whatever that may be ortho sleep all on whatever the case may be. The one point I wanted to touch based on, I mean, you know, I work in a, you know, it's not very rural anymore because it's grown so much, but relatively rural compared to Denver, but I live in Denver. So I commute 60 miles or 56 miles one way. And people always ask me, they're like, man, you're like, in the car, two hours every clinical day, like, you know, does that bother you at all? And some days, you know, you're exhausted and it does, but I would encourage everyone on this to consider a long commute because I literally will put on a clinical CE video and grant them not watching the video while I'm going, but I'm still soaking up knowledge the whole time, or I'll have a podcast on. I'll do whatever. So I'm getting extra education every single day, more so than anyone who has like a 15 minute commute. So don't worry about a long commute because you can grow your education, your influence, your leadership, whatever the case may be, that much faster by just soaking up more knowledge. And you can just buy a Tesla like doctor doon has and you can just take a nap, right? You can take an app and do all of your all of your work on your laptop as you're driving. Totally legal. Yeah. Well, at one point I had an Uber driver. And then I'd log into a hotspot and work on my computer. And then another time, then I bought the Tesla. And now I can I know.

Mueller Endo Denver Chris soccer Tesla
"endo" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"Us to move on now. That's probably one of the funniest. Suggestion end, Liz, do you recall? I did. As you nailed it because that's probably the funniest thing I've ever seen. I just love the Jeff could not compose. Every darn sentence had double untouched. And you Endo trying to turn it off. That was fun. Family showed me. Well, we have an embarrassment of riches left here. I don't think we're going to get through them all unfortunately. Jeff, we've got about 6 or 7 more feedback items. And I definitely want to wrap up with Nick's great slide show. What do you think? I think we should maybe play the slide show now. And then if we can fit any more in after that, then we'll do that. So let's do the next slide. We'll wrap it up. And it can company can go if they are ready to go. Yeah. Okay, well, it's just and we've actually sadly seen some of these slides because they're classics, but I'm not sure. Yeah. And so on the blocks of audience participation, participation. And some of that too, because watching slide change, I'm sat through many thousand with my parents and I learn how boring they can be. But these, of course, involve us. So go ahead and shout out if you see something I recognize. And you want to make it from the controlling how fast is..

Jeff Endo Liz Nick
"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"I love that question. That question is a great question. Within the first 16 months, doctor X had a complete 100% turnover for his practice. Yeah. And it didn't happen all at once. It was a little bit by a little bit. And now he has a much bigger staff. I can't wait to show you guys how this ended up. That's it for now. Thanks. Sure. Okay. So now we're in growth phase, okay? So step one continue to drive down overhead with increased revenue like I was saying. He actually was very, very fortunate because less than a mile down the road, he found a smaller practice that was producing about $350,000. And he was able to merge that into his existing practice. So that gave him I gave him a huge bump and he had enough money in savings that he was able to buy a cash. So he bought this $275,000 practice, which came with 400 patients. They were not they were not super healthy. It was a drill and fill and bloody prophy practice. When those 400 patients came over to his practice, he is able to increase his pareo percentage significantly and is restorative went through the roof. So this was very fortunate for him. And it was a great way to supercharge the growth in his practice. He also simultaneously went crazy with continuing education. He was not doing molar Endo and became proficient at Mueller Endo. You actually took doctor errand Nicholas's course another one of our black belt coaches. He started placing implants and doing all on X's. And he got his IV sedation permit. He became fully systemized. He completed his operations manual. He became obsessed with advanced data tracking and analysis. He increased his internal and external marketing and he was tracking every dollar that went out the door, making sure that his ROI was three, three to one for any external marketing campaign that he did. And then he increased his clinical suite of I said that I read. Okay. All right. So we know all about operations manual creation. So I could just kind of show you guys all the things that he put in place..

molar Endo Mueller Endo Nicholas
Amy Schumer Is Now an Endometriosis Martyr

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Amy Schumer Is Now an Endometriosis Martyr

"Welcome this morning, Amy Schumer, I mean, I think you guys know she's suffering from endometriosis very horrible, painful. Make sure periods hell, affect your fertility. We know this. We know she also had a very rough pukey pregnancy with a two year old son, gene the towels, I mean, Amy was very upfront and honest about how bad a pregnancy was and she tried having a second kid via IVF. Super tough. She didn't think she could ever be pregnant again while things didn't get any better and now Amy, who's 40, took to Instagram, and you can find any thing on Instagram. And she showed up, hey, I'm recovering in the hospital from my endometriosis surgery. They removed her uterus and her appendix. I don't know why, but so she had a hysterectomy and an appendectomy. And then once she said that all the other bold busters on parade joined in Lena Dunham who had a full hysterectomy because of endometriosis complication joined it. Even Chrissy Teigen Halsey pasma Lakshmi joined in. Thank you so much for sharing your endos story. Over 200 million women worldwide suffer from this hope you feel better. Christ.

Amy Schumer AMY Gene Instagram Lena Dunham Endometriosis Complication Chrissy Teigen Halsey Pasma La
"endo" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

"We'll go back to the brains. So this one was published. In science advances by christopher taurus and others and the papers called bird neuro cranial and body mass evolution across the end cretaceous mass extinction. The avian brain shave left other dinosaurs behind. No those poor other dinosaurs. Well we know what happened to them. I guess i left them. Behind at the end cretaceous yes extinction. They're gone so could be that. This unique brain shave in birds is why birds survived non. Avian dinosaurs after the mass extinction. Event could be. I guess well okay. That's his favorite saying based on a seventy million-year-old fossil with a nearly complete skull. Bird skeletons are fragile. So it's hard to find. Skulls early birds and relatives if the braincase has been studied in the past and it was said to be shaped like a modern birds but then details in that specimen were obscured other brains that have been studied including archaeopteryx and serie babies but that won the serie babies was not well preserved so this the orange skull helps a lot. I don't know how well the archaeopteryx skulls are preserved either because they get pretty squished when they're all lithographic e the way they could preserved. It was good enough to be able to compare the argue after twenty two this one so this year a betas is even worse. Yes real quick as a side. Note some things that may have helped animals survived the pg mass extinction include neuro anatomy the brains and feeding ecology. If you're eating something that went extinct going to be a problem. So this paper kind of looked at both. Although a lot of the focus was on the brain now birds have more complicated brains than reptile other reptiles and they may have shifted diets and evolved their jaws. Today there are two claims of modern birds. Paleo nats which include rotates flightless birds as well as these ground willing birds that look like partridges and quail but they don't fly well and they prefer to walk and run and neonates which are all other birds. There's fewer than one hundred species of paleo needs and more than ten thousand species of neonates. Yeah when i think a paleo nate's i mostly think of ostriches at e-mu yes aware they're the main ones but i guess there are smaller ones just like data stores. Everyone pays attention to the big ones. Yeah now the reason for this disparity it's possibly because neonates had better beak adaptability. It's good to have good beak adaptability. You want to speak. That's on adaptable street. It well you don't wanna be unadaptable in anyway especially around the extinction event. Yeah exactly so before. I get into the brain parts. The authors found that the jaws and pallets kind of the roof of the mouth alone. Help much probably when it came to birds surviving the extinction event. They also looked at avian body mass evolution and said that they couldn't find any patterns that showed that small body masses. The smaller birds helped extent. Birds survived so size. Didn't really have anything to do with it. Wow that's super weird. Almost all the previous studies show pretty strong correlation between bigger things going extinct and smaller surviving. So they did say this could change with future discoveries because they looked at a lot of fragmentary specimens and specimens where the filon is not well understood so hashtag me more fossils all right on to the brain parts so the team used c. t. Scans they made a partial three d. replica of the brain and endo cast and they compared it to endo casts of modern birds and more distant non avian dinosaur relatives like archaeopteryx and they found that the brain shape was more similar to archaeopteryx than to extent. Modern birds interesting. Yeah so they looked at the wall. St- w. u. l. s. t. It's a bulge in the front of the skull and they said it had a quote unquote incipient whilst quite a phrase incipient wolster. Yeah which means it was small the worst but a bigger wolf is in modern birds and the ideas. it's a feature that helped birds survive so it does make sense that it was smaller and species that did not survive the extinction event in modern birds. Living birds it's unique to birds among reptiles and it corresponds to a part of the brain. That's thought to be similar to parts of the mammalian neo cortex. That's the part of the brain for language. Sensory perception cognition spatial reasoning generating motor commands. Lots of stuff interesting in other brains look very different but they can do a lot of similar hilly. Sunburns birds can do a lot of similar tasks and puzzle solving things and very smart birds out there but they have a totally different brain structure. That does it now. There was a similar feature tentatively found in archaeopteryx but that turned out to be a tough onomic artifact. Oh interesting so i'm the happened. While it was fossilising. Yeah and the presence of a wall street has been suggested to help. Show the ability to fly elites if you're looking at it from a brain point of view in addition to all those other things pretty important little the wall stare so again because it's insidious it's smaller than the walston modern birds an atheist didn't make it through the kp boundary. Now right against the wall was too small. Oh didn't have enough. Whilst that should have been the title of their paper the organised didn't have enough wall st- then you'd have to know what a walson.

christopher taurus endo
"endo" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

The Dental Hacks Podcast

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on The Dental Hacks Podcast

"Likely weakened it your member in that scenario how long the crown have been in place for you put put a hole in it. I do remember because it was one of those scenarios or tooth is cracked and as like well You know her symptoms weren't severe severe. Let's this was a time where i prepped for the crown and put a temporary on there and said let's see what happens after yon everything was fine after a month or so. I submitted my crown on about eight months later. Terrible tooth pain so I think the time period between when it was cemented in where i accessed it was probably about eight months. I'm just guessing top of my head. That's fine. I don't expect you to remember it all the every every i just wondered since you recently revisited. This one if you if you knew happened yesterday. So the endo access one is Through the crown. And that always. I know you do a lot of i do a lot of you. Probably end up through other people's crowns not necessarily your crowned the conversation like in terms of like you know you're gonna get to keep this crown not keep this crown. Talk about like this thing might break. I mean i really don't. I probably should So the the scenario. I've said this before. I don't know if i said this to this patient. You know if she asked Hurt my crown. I probably said probably not but if it does take care of it and in this case i did take care of it. I mean i've access crowns have been you know. Find for ten or fifteen years. So you know it's it's it's unpredictable. It is i. I mean i think of a scenario where i did a one throw crown. I that had been there for. I did the of myself. You know five six years and of course it broken and the person call my office and was like you know. He was pushing really hard in the crowd. I think he broke. It was like oh man but but but you know. I didn't want to replace that for. I didn't feel like. I should have replaced that for not a and i feel like probably most people would have just use that to draw their line in the sand but man. This person had sent me a lot of business throughout the years. Now it's like. I'm not gonna die on this on this. I'm not going to die on this hill. You know worth. Yeah it's it's really not. There's a goodwill is underrated. Time and i you know i know it's i know. People who've had their knees replaced redone. Three or four times. I don't know what's happening there. Probably i would imagine that you get charged for that. I don't know why that thing in dentistry. But i just don't feel bad. So yeah i wanna i wanna make it right How about the how about the ended. Onic the fell out the ended onic failure where now you've got like a at least with the filling of the crown. It seems like you can just you know for your time and not too much of your money you can. You can take care of your problem but with the end donald problem. You're not too big into retreats. Kevin not anymore. I think so. Here's here's the solution to that in in my practice if that crown and in the endo endo failed oftentimes i will Do the extraction bone graft and place the implant and then give them the crown for free. Okay okay that's your kind of your that your yeah the way of paying forward because it didn't work out but We need to do these other. Things all depends. I might do the implant. Reduce raider extraction bone graft reduced too. But it depends on What amount of time. Failure that we're looking at right. You're not talking about the one that failed your your twelve or something like that also will say that you know having a cone beam and looking at endo your own endo and everybody else's i know is an eye opening experience so a lot of them are failing down thinking about it. Yeah well what is it Just in our good friend just a moody says was it call into his pre implant. Yes therapy because i had. I have so many in those that are doing really well. But maybe they're maybe they're not maybe they're doing well in two dimensions. Yeah okay well. Good well i guess we'll keep it that way. Sheesh a let me see what is the other review Scenario how about like a denture or something like that where the patient wasn't happy with a denture. That's no one wants with with the dentist scenario. I'm pretty quick to just cut the check in cut can cut my losses rather than brethren redoing. A bunch of stuff will drag on forever. Yeah those can get i. I know our good friend russell schaeffer would would say oh. No man hears about six different things. You could do to make this to make this work. I don't know. I'm pretty with the denture. I'm pretty quick to pretty quick to to cut some ties and move on kevin. How about how about sleep appliances or bike cards. That tell me tell you something about those. You do a lot more of both of those things i do. Yeah so. I've only had one sleep appliance. So far break and the sleeps are warranty for five years so they replaced it okay so that hasn't been too big of an issue. Really my t. Is and all that sort of stuff. Those both generally last a pretty good longtime so okay. I think the scenario with the sleep appliances the. I've had a patient who just couldn't wear it like uncomfortable germ and they just gave up basically okay. So i- refunded them their money and they just cut the check and move on. Yeah encourage them to get a c. Pap or die in their sleep..

endo endo donald russell schaeffer Kevin moody kevin
Biles Returns to Olympic Competition, Wins Bronze on Beam

Today in Focus

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Biles Returns to Olympic Competition, Wins Bronze on Beam

"I'm no scenic today. Focus how simone. Biles changed gymnastics both on and off the mat. Tamani the news of simone biles withdraw from those events last week completely stunned the world of sport and beyond you were there in the arena. Watching her compete. What was your first reaction. It was quite an unprecedented in gymnastics. The olympics is the bulan endo. It's the big event that gymnastics floor every four years and so for bios to kind of withdraw from the team final immediately. it was quite it was just. It was shocking. It initially was in sutton if it was a physical issue and then soon after that a commentator from from nbc suggested that it was mental. And you know in the mid of the meet the usa gymnastics released a statement saying that she had a medical condition. And so there's so much going on your. You're trying to figure out what's happening with simone. You're watching the team final. Which is dead on voting and the three other gymnasts. Some of them went expecting to compete in some events and suddenly they had to start doing events they hadn't even wound up for it was in the second rotation so uneven bars. The gymnast jordan shall to who is

Gymnastics Biles Tamani Simone Biles Simone Olympics Sutton NBC USA Jordan
"endo" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"Work or even having a job to combat to plays out but just speaking from my own experience getting back on atta first week i really was i just. I want to kick the tires. Mc hammer brain is on. I wanna push it and feel it is just about a reclamation reclaiming yourself is but was that i think you you want to pay the person that you would whether you want to commit an exact same way. You don't want to be made to fail lessons you're going in. You know not the same as you were and in terms of of your engine traces. How do you feel about your body now. Has it changed from coming from a place where we talked earlier. And i think whenever you find out that something isn't quite working with your body you have that sense of failure or that it's failed you. How do you feel towards it now. I know that this sort of endo's rearing its ugly head again and But has it altered. I feel like i'm putting in iowa wall. There's a much better quote and i'm gonna attributed borough it and i've had the pleasure of interviewing her and corresponding with her. Hillary man's the eight author she wrote of endometriosis because it has completely been a major part of her life and people. If you are suffering imanol beefy you because it's hard three re but some of the rising on it is the most visceral and she says everything i've achieved. I have achieved in the teeth of this disease and it was that word teeth. The i was like. Yeah you're in a voice a lot of time. I'm an impatient person. Anywhere like things to be good. I'm not to learn patients. sorry From mother is a work in progress. Safety should have gone to yoga vence. I'm an impatient person for things to be good for things to be right. Because i like things to be good for. People alight to words or high standard..

atta endo iowa Hillary
"endo" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on The One You Feed

"With some people who must have misunderstood something and it was a bunch of people from different paths and one time the zan guy was leading the meditation and calliing the bell really loud when it was time to end and then just started talking and i'm in their habit is like i take some time before even ready in and out of and i thought that they weren't very deep or you know there's some value in it and their tradition but it was jarring. Yeah you're lucky. He didn't hit you at the store. It was not as endo. And i was not devotee. So that would have been impolite would have been very. I thought that section in the book about perception was incredibly well done. I really thought there was a lot of really practical value in working with perception. And i thought you did a nice job of framing up and avoid in. Kadhamy me that i often see right and the dichotomy or the extremes i often see your some people are like the power of positive thinking only think about unicorns love and roses right or other people who say you know what doing anything to change your view and not look at the harsh reality of life is bad right and i as a middle way kind of guy find both those extremes to be off putting i'm with you. Yeah and i thought your book did a really nice job of laying that out. And i want to start by reading a small thing that you wrote as a way to get us into this discussion and you basically are talking about look perception the way we see the world is incredibly important and the thoughts that we have are really important. And you say so. Here's a key question do you cede control of these thought shifts to propagandists advertisers entertainers random events or. Do you take charge. You can't always control your circumstances of course but you can change the way you perceive and evaluate them and so i think that sets us up for look some intentional cultivation of our internal thought processes is pretty important. Am this comes back to your parable. Because in a sense by paying attention to the content of thought and exerting some control or some mastery. You're feeding the good wolf because the bad wolf is in there saying feed me feed me feed me and you know we can think of that as a negative thoughts. Are you know the devil on the shoulder instead of the angel on the other shoulder but it's also to get back to your good point about moderation if you go to the other extreme and reject what we think of as negative thoughts are disturbing thoughts first of all. It's going to require a level of vigilance that can drive you nuts because you know there's negative stuff in the world and some of those what we think of is negative. Thinking are actually very useful. Because you know we. We have negative thoughts. We think of his negative thoughts. Fear worry anger all that of the defense mechanism. It's warning us that that has to be paid attention to you. Wouldn't want to be facing some kind of danger and feel something in you. That's fearful and say oh you know just look at the sunset and then the overwhelmed by whatever danger there is and we've seen this in this last year there were you know positive..

endo
Britney Spears Criticizes 'Hypocritical' Documentaries About Her Life

Ringer Dish

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Britney Spears Criticizes 'Hypocritical' Documentaries About Her Life

"Britney spears posted a ninety second ash real to her instagram account. Yesterday you know. I just hope years as well. I think we both fear that she is not. But i have been a lot of chatter about britney as a result of the various cases that are going on and also about her conservatorship and then of course the new york times hulu special. This was sort of her post to respond to all of that and it is a basically her dancing. I have some questions about the various room. She's in jim directly addresses the fact that there are these documentaries that are you know. There's supposedly kind of rewriting the story on her trying to explain how she was like unfairly. Covered in sexual is at a young age. But they're still affecting her And she also calls out. Someone named billy be who. I didn't know who that was and i had to ask you. I was like billy bush because she says i don't actually talk to billy be at all so honestly very confused. I still don't completely understand that. But i don't know britney spears's instagram remains very very confounding an endo worthy. I can explain the billy beefing briefly which i also had see research on. But it's a former makeup artist of hers who i believe sometime earlier. This year told i believe page. Six that britney spears resolve is not responsible for the written content on her instagram. Because since the new york times hulu special there has been a lo- a lot of focus on her instagram and within that special they feed or some people who a give a lot of focus to her instagram. Even before it that i would say it was not my favorite part of that documentary. Yeah but she's been making certain elliptical references to the documentary and who speaks for her and who doesn't on instagram and this is the most direct and longest

Britney Spears Hulu Billy New York Times Britney Billy Bush JIM
Remembering The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster On Its 10-Year Anniversary

Morning Edition

02:12 min | 1 year ago

Remembering The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster On Its 10-Year Anniversary

"Years ago today, a massive earthquake and tsunami devastated northeastern Japan. Nearly 20,000 people were killed, entire towns were destroyed. Disaster triggered multiple explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, sending radioactive material into the air. It was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. The power plant was built near a town called Okemah. MPR's Cat Lawn Store went back last year. Well to show that there are only old people here, which, I guess includes me, so that's why young family would want to live here. Any school hospital or grocery store is miles away. That's resident Kazuko Endo, who launched or from that gardening outside one of oh comas, newly built homes. Over the past few years, O Koma has slowly started to open back up after sitting empty for years less than 200. People Now live in the town that used to be home to over 11,001 person and moved back to O Koma. Masato sake. He's nearly 100. The construction company he owned, helped build several of the nuclear reactors at Daiichi Cuckoo on in this town needed nuclear. We co existed with it, and I profited from it. But now look at the town will never be the same real. You quit the name the old downtown. Oh, coma is still abandoned, and Japan's government is still figuring out how to completely clean up Fukushima's damaged reactors. Alistair Gail covers Japan for the Wall Street Journal. He's gone back to the region over and over in the decades since the disaster. Gail's latest trip found a mix of massive engineering and empty streets. So I went with a colleague to the city off because then Toccata, which was one of the worst hit cities by the tsunami in 2011, it's on the northeast coast of Japan. On But you just really felt like there weren't many people around. And part of that was because of covert. But really, it's because you know, in the main part that a lot of people have just left that city.

Okemah Cat Lawn Store Kazuko Endo Koma Japan Tsunami Daiichi Cuckoo Earthquake Masato Alistair Gail Coma Fukushima Wall Street Journal Northeast Coast Gail
"endo" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"endo" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

"Yeah, So what what would give clue you into someone that they had endometriosis and when they're postmenopausal does, you know the endometriosis tend to sort of quiet down or do you off All sorts of strange things at menopause with endometriosis. I would say for the most part it quiets down. But yes, you know, I I do see a lot of endometriosis premenopausal early-stage and you know, the classic signs and symptoms of of endo are painful menstrual cramps that might spill over and become just you know, pelvic pain all the time as far as menopause goes off because you lose your hormones and hormones are what stimulate an do women tend to get better with that pain, but they can have residual pelvic floor muscle spasms. And so you got to be looking for that because if you're not looking for that, you're not going to find it and be able to treat it and so it's really important to to pick up on that especially if they had Endo when they were younger. Yeah, how do you pick up on a pelvic floor spasm? I have an exam but walk us through cuz I know so many my listeners are so proactive and they're going to like go look this up or want to know if they can figure out. Sales How would how does the clinician know if you have that? Yeah, so I would say the classic history that I hear patients a time and time again time and time again is he's hitting a ball. He can't get it. They're worried. There are some sort of tissue blockage. Why can't he get in but they go to the doctor and no no everything's open. So hitting a wall is definitely what I hear. A lot of people will say I tense up and then on exam what we do is we palpate the pelvic floor muscles and the way that I describe the pelvic floor muscles to patience is that if you think of a skeleton right and there's like the hip bone there's a hole in the middle and you would think everything would fall out but in the human body, there's a hammock of muscles that kind of Life fit.

Endo endo
Why Would the Creator of Graham Crackers Be Horrified by Them Today?

BrainStuff

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Why Would the Creator of Graham Crackers Be Horrified by Them Today?

"Harebrained steph. Lauren vogel bomb. Let's face it. One of the best things about making a campfire is making s'mores. The quintessentially american treat consisting of a toasted gooey marshmallow and a square of melted chocolate pressed between two crisp graham crackers. But have you ever wondered where graham crackers came from or where they got their name. The original graham cracker was a health food developed in the eighteen thirties. From the teachings of an american food reformer and religious teacher named sylvester. Graham who by all accounts would be appalled by what's called a graham cracker today which is typically made with refined flour high fructose corn syrup ended up dab of honey for marketing purposes instead graham's original cracker called for just wheat and gram flour a form of whole wheat flour made by grinding the endo sperm winter wheat into a fine powder and mixing it with the brand and wheat jerem it has of course texture and nutty flavor the resulting cracker contained no sugar fat and often had to be softened by soaking or boiling before eating. We spoke with new york-based food historian. Sarah weisberg johnson. She said it's funny. That of all the things that he talks about with his health reform. That's the one thing that gets widely adopted and has his name. Graham flour gets adopted by people who may not even be aware of him even towards the end of the nineteenth century and persists into some of the twentieth century. You hear about graham gems and gram bread. Cookbooks up to the nineteen forties and fifties graham. Who was not a doctor. Although he sometimes went by dr graham was horrified by the over processing and enriching of wheat flour and believed that the loss of fiber and other nutrients and white flour ruined consumer health in eighteen. Thirty seven graham published a pamphlet entitled a treatise on bread and bread making in the intro. He wrote thousands in civic. Life will for years and perhaps as long as they live. Eat the most miserable trash. The kim be imagined in the form of bread. He was basically advocating for whole-wheat homemade bread and was thus hailed by the philosopher. Poet ralph waldo emerson. As the profit of brand bread. Graham was a proponent and follower of vegetarianism founding. The american vegetarian society eighteen fifty.

Lauren Vogel Graham Crackers Sarah Weisberg Johnson Steph Graham Graham Cracker Graham Flour Sylvester Graham Gems Dr Graham New York Ralph Waldo Emerson American Vegetarian Society
Rebranding From Flexacoin To AMP Token Founder Tyler Spalding

CRYPTO 101

05:39 min | 2 years ago

Rebranding From Flexacoin To AMP Token Founder Tyler Spalding

"Was a rebrand recently from flexing coin. And it was this flexible. You know kind of collateral merchants to have very quick payments to now amp token. Is there anything material that has changed Or is it just a name men so yes endo So i guess to start off we're actually So functionally at a very high level a flexible and amp xactly sam And we also were not unhappy with a flex coin so there was never anything of us saying we want to change this or something is wrong or trying to make an improvement from like the name. Let's say It was really all about when you talk about these crypto networks or these platforms. it's what is the utility. What does this thing for like. Why does it even exist and for us. This token is truly meant to generate collateral token as very one specific utility and will remain that utility. But we ran into as we've now grown so as we've gone from completing the network and it's entirely having all function to also having literally moreland hundreds of millions of dollars collateral in our contracts as we've seen all of this growth One of the things that was. I guess we would say a little sub optimize. Let's say is. We're getting a lot larger. In terms of the partnerships the integrations we really want flex unable apps usable. All over the world right the largest margin the largest players. And what we're building. We have a very very big aspirations. For which means that even though we want this to be as democratic as possible and as many people around the world participate there's gonna be some other large partnerships that we have that people are helping us. And so you guys. Being involved in crypto Having various hardware providers or software providers. Say hey like to participate in lexa. And we'd like to own and stake these tokens because as we've talked about before. The tokens is where all of the value of crews in our network. Like there isn't a an entity that has equity. That's earning value. It's all the token network. Where we've created so all participants basically need to have this token so for them to hold it. It's a harder value proposition for people to have large sums of dollars in large organizations And using meta mask and self custody in funds that just gets a little challenging and we're trying to make this again and everyone used us and so what we really wanted was could we work with exchanges and could we work with. Let's say custody accounts and stake the tokens from those custody accounts without having to necessarily move them into a smart contract and so that was sort of the issue that we faced and we decided. That actually was solvable We had to basically invent some new technology. We re some stuff that was out there but essentially what we did was. We made yard see twenty compatible. Token that is stay stable in a smart contract without literally moving it so very similar to how something like compound has both delegation. You don't need to move your tokens anywhere. You can assign them to someone else to vote on your behalf. We've now done something. Similar with collateral tokens and that the user still maintains custody of the token what they're able to assign conditional staking rights to another third party or another Smart contract and so that was really so we developed that We jointly developed with a consensus which was really exciting for us to be able to really approach it from that perspective and creating a new token interface where people interact with best in so doing that. We citizens now great. We're really excited. We're trying to build this. Collateral token that is usable as possible But unfortunately us being crypto trying to be as decentralized as possible. We couldn't upgrade the token contract so we didn't have the admin functionality to do that so kind of meant for us to get this out in the world and get used. We had to create another token which meant swap new to take place. So we did that and now we saying all right. We'll we're trying to starting from scratch a little bit. What else would we want to optimize. So even though the token is exactly the same purpose nothing else has has changed from that perspective and one of the things on the brand inside is Many many people despite our best efforts would still come to us and ask This lexa is the payments coin. This is the coin that used to buy things with. Oh the merchants received flexible on and we heard that enough and so he said all right well. It might make a lot of sense for us to police. These brands a little bit so flex a as an entity and the network is entirely unchanged but now the collateral token powers it is called amp and we chose that name We like the engineering of patient. Our our contracts are flexible capacity on bex That provides Like trysofi or current that can provide capacities so the engines. Love back The name but it's also short pronounced people more easier right across other jurisdictions countries. Things like that so we just took the opportunity to call it something else. Based on user feedback what we had seen to make this more successful make People that's

Endo
The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

60-Second Science

02:01 min | 2 years ago

The Denisovans Expand Their Range Into China

"Like modern humans than neanderthals roamed widely throughout europe. We know this because they left behind. Extensive evidence usually bones or tools but their cousins. The denisovans our more mysterious until recently they were conclusively linked only to a single cave in southern siberia called denisova cave which lies between kazakhstan and mongolia in that cave. Scientists had found a finger bone three teeth and piece of skull which tip them off to the existence of a whole new lineage of ancient human now scientists have uncovered more of the range for the denisovans says de endo mossy lonnie of the max planck institute in germany. His team turned up evidence. The ancient humans occupied a high mountain cave on the tibetan plateau. Called by shia cave belongs to monks and -mongst things that it's a very holy place in fact among found a piece of jawbone there in nineteen eighty which has been tenuously linked to the denisovans salani and his team have now unearthed more conclusive evidence by sifting through cave sediments and sequencing the genetic evidence. The denisovans left behind. Buddy decay of people chests. Gabbing down the side like bleeding. There are coping ping could left their dna. The dna appears in layers suggesting the denisovans inhabited the cave as far back as one hundred thousand years ago as well as at sixty thousand years ago and perhaps even as recently as forty five thousand years ago meaning. The denisovans might overlapped in this region with modern humans. The results appear in the journal. Science mossy lonnie says. This method could enable more denise in detective work to this like so many caves when we have evidence of human activity but we don't have opening remain so if he can exploit to sediment can actually start to track down in segment. The denisova dini denise evans live on today in the genomes of some modern day humans from the south pacific further. Genetic work like this might give scientists more clues where early homo sapiens. I met and mixed with the elusive denisovans.

Max Planck Institute Siberia Kazakhstan Mongolia Tibetan Plateau Europe Germany Lonnie Denise Evans Denise South Pacific
Kisen Dharma Combat

Yokoji Zen Dharma Talks

07:53 min | 2 years ago

Kisen Dharma Combat

"Good morning thank you for joining us. Yesterday we completed the first part of shoe soho section in the in the buddha hall and the endo and today it will present the case and mytalk and then open it up for questions and answers so let's begin attention. Were you gate asked shweibi. What's the meaning of the ancestors coming from the west. Shweibi said going at the chin. Rest for me. Were you gave brought the chin. Rest four shweibi sri be then treated him to blow review gay remarked. Hit me if you wish but there is still no meaning in the ancestors coming from the west later. Were you asked i. What's the meaning of the ancestors coming from the west reside said. Go get the cushion for me. You gave brought the cushion to rent. Buy in rings. I treated him to a blow. Were you gave remarked. Hit me if you wish but there's still no meaning to the ancestors coming from the west later. Still when you gave was living in a temple among said osho. In former times you asked shweibi and ren's by about the meaning of the coming of the ancestor. Did they both clarify it or not. Regain replied they clarified it all right but there's still no meaning in the ancestors coming from the west. I appreciate this co on. I appreciate all the masters who have come before and those who will carry on the teachings sitting with his co on for almost three months was a rollercoaster ride. Everything is contained within it. So that when i looked into it or through it i see myself. All my attitudes and behaviors my delusional thinking my twisted karma. My determination revealed in one cohen. That's the power of this practice. Of course it comes across as tears in moods smiles and laughter self-doubt grandiose generosity kindness. It looks like everyday life. Cohen appears as everyday life. Because it is what else is there and it is magnificent and painful joyful. An undressed bubble so much to uncover and so much hiding in plain sight and i have been passed on it. This cohen is still very much a work in progress. For me like riga. I don't find answers very satisfying. It doesn't feel done. It feels like there is still something that needs clarifying. And that's okay. When i started this practice. I wanted answers. Concrete answers even if they were unsettling especially if they were unsettling. I wanted my rattled with new answers. Maybe just like you re you. Gay seems to be persistent in steadfast resolute. He is vexed by a question in seeks to answer those qualities span the centuries you lived in china from early nineteenth century to early tenth century. Apparently he left home when he was fourteen years old became a monk and then traveled a great deal. He studied with many different teachers shweibi. Ren's being two of them before eventually becoming a student of chosen ryoko founder of the soto school in china. In this cohen reggae asks shweibi what was then and still is basic zen question what is the meaning of the ancestors coming from the west the ancestor being bodey dharma. He introduced senator chan buddhism to china travelling west from india. So you gave poses this question to sweetie Be asks regain for the chin rest. This is a telltale sign that he's going to get hit with it.

Shweibi Buddha Hall Cohen Osho REN Riga China Ryoko Bodey Dharma Senator Chan India
BTS #35 Excerpt: What is the Endocannabinoidome? w/ Vincenzo Di Marzo, PhD

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

07:45 min | 2 years ago

BTS #35 Excerpt: What is the Endocannabinoidome? w/ Vincenzo Di Marzo, PhD

"Absolutely. And for those listening that maybe don't have such a technical technical background on cannabinoids science. How would you describe the concept of the Endo cannabinoid Dome to somebody? Okay. So basically, you know with the word. Oh now we make new words containing the the the prefix the suffix off to identify very large system. So we have the Janome with the metabolism. We have the proteome and so on and so forth. So the Endo the endocannabinoid Ang Ang came in a way from you mentioned before the the study that roughly mechoulam in which we collaborating collaborated on the Entourage effect. So basically what we perceived is that in what we were measuring. In fact when we were measuring endocannabinoids is that this these two molecules and under minded to a g were accompanied by dog Plethora of other compounds and this compounds this metabolites were chemically and biochemically similar meaning that you know, an undermined into a Jeep belongs to you know, mm different families of metabolites. And these are the Ennis. I'll at the moment and the and the monocyte whistles some of which were already known. In fact, even one of two thousand kids, but even longer than that before the end of cannabinoids were discovered. So the nobody knew really how these molecules were acting so Rafi in a vegetative way that this is really is his main feature is creativity and Imagination thought about this. These are accompanying molecules that are there too practical to make make the two big actors look even more important than they are so it's an Entourage or you know, when politicians go around and they take with them a lot of birth. Of the accompanying people and that that's certainly part of the of the picture but that then we started realizing that these compounds in fact do have a molecules do have targets of their own. So the endocannabinoid if you wish is is a kind of evolution of the of the Entourage effect. Molecules like the NSA little minds or the Mona Lisa started being investigated receptors were being found and and this created of course exciting but also complications because you know, the pharmacologists ended the drug developers were the therapeutic drug developers were we're thinking okay, we can we can manipulate wage levels of the end of since they are so strongly involved in pathology. We can manipulate the levels of the endocannabinoids of an undermined and 2G in order to make more of these compounds where they're needed or to reduce the amount their amount where they're produced in an excessive that manner so you can do that by manipulating the the degradation of the biosynthesis of endocannabinoids, but then when it was found that and we found we and many others that and under might has the same biochemical Pathways as other in a salad all mines which have different receptors from the cannabinoid. Just this created a strong complication. We cannot really manipulate the levels of an endermite in this way without manipulating the levels of the other previously known as entering compounds but having an identity and and in the mechanism of action of independent from the endocannabinoids of their own so they can have been a dome is basically the the the bigger System including Napoleon undermine and 2G and their main receptors which are simply one CB2 but also bought some of the other receptors foreign under my tend to agree because these are two very promiscuous molecules unlike THC. This is one major difference from between between the endocannabinoids and the plants and and happy now it's dead or at least between between the endocannabinoid and THC and then it was found that in fact, even the biosynthesis and degradation of of these 2 khong Will not be only mediated by one or two enzymes there was a redundancy of biosynthetic and degrading enzymes and and sometimes it ingredient X will not degrade enzymes because they were simply converting an undermined and 2 g into molecules which had different receptors. And this is you know, this is this may seem strange but not two people like like me off at the bioactive lipids all their life, you know, all bye-bye activities are transformed into something different and come from something different with the different biological a month or so, and then there is the containers of an under my dental legited what we call the previously the Entourage compound which have their own receptors, even though they share with the endocannabinoid the same battle synthetical Pathways. And then finally there were other molecules which have different biochemical dead. Pathways as the end of cannabinoids better nevertheless, they're not congeneres. They're not like cousins not they're not like brothers and sisters but their cousins so you have a tennis I'll amide. And in fact when we collaborated with the and with with the with the other groups, we we found that in fact particularly with the group of my coworker the late my coworker. We we found that many many compound many amino acids could make a might with fatty acids and this could create an almost incredible number of new combinations between the 10 or 15 fatty acids and 20 amino acids. So just just imagine all the permutations and and so this compounds actually exist as as the group of other brands show as also recently investigated and and so it's really we're talking now about a huge number of chemical mediators. So the endocannabinoid open their containers their analogues, which may or may have not different similar biochemical Pathways normally have different receptors dead. We we talking about the several other targets that undermined into the G have Beyond City 162. We're talking about other enzymes. So we're talking about something something about more than a 250 chemical mediators more than fifty enzymes and and receptors and some of these receptors were actually known previously like the wage channels or the or the P bars and and and the interesting thing is that you know, of course we when the end of conversation became so big Then the next question was okay. THC is the only out of 100 and more a plan cannot be known that interact with the endocannabinoid system. What about maybe maybe if you don't look only at the end of can access them, but we look at the expanded n. Can have this Summit this and maybe the other cannabinoids with interact with the endocannabinoid home, even though they don't in fact with the entertainment system. This is true to a large

Mechanism Of Action Physical Exercise Endocannabinoidome Endocannabinoid System ECS Cannabinoids THC Cannabis Vincenzo Di Marzo Endo Rafi Ennis NSA Tennis
After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

Environment: NPR

08:06 min | 2 years ago

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

"Before the earthquake before the NAMI and the nuclear disaster Japan got nearly a third of its energy from nuclear power. But after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven, the country took all of its nuclear reactors off line, which has led Japan to increasingly rely on fossil fuels and also solar power. NPR's cat ORF continues our series on recovery and Fukushima. She only endo is saying a final goodbye. To the home she once shared with her husband and three kids and for Cosima it's less than a mile from the Daiichi nuclear power plant where three reactors overheated and exploded in two thousand eleven. They left fast only taking what they could carry. Their things left nearly exactly as they were the day everything changed to coffee, Cup sit on the kitchen table her daughter's old school uniform is laid out on a bed a calendar on the wall is still flipped to March two thousand eleven. clueless you the kit ago. Muluzi. Nice. This is sad. She says this House System Nice, but we can't come back. She looks around your moon to Ni life is so different diddle do remind us. To start from nothing even less than. A totally reinvent ourselves after the disaster digging up this. She's here to give the keys to government officials. This house will be bulldozed soon and the land used as part of a storage site for radioactive topsoil scraped from the earth and the massive cleanup effort Tschumi heads upstairs. And takes one last look at the bedroom shoes to share with her husband Hitter Yuki. He died a few years ago suddenly. And then she walks back down to hand over the keys. The thing is pretty unceremonious though in reality she only says, she said goodbye to this part of her life. Disaster when her family piled into a car and drove as far south as they go to the southern tip of Japan on the island of Kyushu. Here, she's a single mom to her bubbly ten-year-old son Cagey who was just a baby when the disaster happened, he doesn't remember Shema at all her other two children are grown and live nearby, and she only has found herself within unlikely job running a small solar farm. On a big hill overlooking the tropical landscape Ma hidden is yet. She never imagined. My life would be like this guy when we first moved here, I was in my late thirties my husband was in his forties unanue issue we were like, okay. Do we get new jobs? So we decided to do this. We saw as investment for the future month on her husband worked at the Nuclear Power Plant for over twenty years and for him, the switch to solar was purposeful. He felt that nuclear power had betrayed him do on didn't He grew up really believing nuclear power was safe and then he lost his home to come see today the energy collected by these panels has allowed her to build a new life. The power is sold to the local utility company and brings in thousands of dollars a month when her husband died suddenly a few years ago she only took over the work and the family placed his grave in the center of the solar panels show me walks over to tall marblestone. Hook. With an inscription that says. Good you send do essentially remember that this family is here because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven cocoa use. A message to future generations she explains looking away device. My biggest wish is for renewable energy to take over I mean look at my old home, it's going to be a storage site for nuclear waste. We can't deal with that kind of wasted drivers go. Joey's wish might not come true though her family started their business at the right time. The price was so generous and also delegration was sold loose. So anyone can register. Naida is the executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policies. In Tokyo, he says in the early years after the disaster Japan pushed renewables to help fill energy gap left after fifty four nuclear reactors were taken off line the. Government offered big incentives, new investors, lots of people like me and her husband jumped on board to build smaller operations. incorporations rushed in to build massive solar and wind farms but also the liberation was more strict compensation dropped. It got increasingly harder for alternative energy producers to connect into the power grid edith says, this was partly due to the big utility companies trying to maintain control and the government allowing. It to happen the sitting kind of a body of to north to Laputa increase anymore, the institutions make a big difference that's Jennifer Sclerosis of George. Mason University she studies energy policy in Japan, and she says, there is technology an interest for renewables in Japan, but the bigger power companies in government need to commit if people in place do not watch to implement policies to empower the economics and the. Technology innovation then it can't happen regardless of how advanced technologies earn regardless of how good the economics look many of the major utilities as well as the Japanese government are still waiting to see if nuclear power can make a comeback and renewables just aren't that reliable yet. So in the meantime, I would assume the defaults going to import gas import coal eater agrees is the most the early sick and Not so optimistic future, but one place in Japan that is optimistic about Renewables Hookah Shema the local government here has set a goal for the entire prefecture. The third largest in Japan to be completely fueled by renewable energy by twenty forty. It's a real turnaround for a place where nuclear power ruled only a decade ago especially in the former exclusion zone near Daiichi, there are solar panels everywhere from small ones on roofs and hillsides to massive mega-farms along highways making use of land available after the disaster some of these panels are run by big developers and others are not. Lake the solar panels on farmer. She get Yuki Corneau's field. He's seventy four years old and this land has been in his family for generations he gestures around it. This is all my land, but it's nonsense. Nonsense because it's relatively useless the wind carried radioactive material here after the disaster and the government has scraped off all the topsoil in decontamination efforts. The farmers here can't really far much anymore. So small local power company came and asked sugar. Yuki if they could rent land for solar panels, he said, yes could you go I was really worried after the nuclear accident how would we get power most of his neighbors also agreed but that means everything is different. Now he says there were Rice patties all around here with tiny frogs that created a kind of soundtrack for his life now it's quiet. He misses the frogs a lot and he says, and he doesn't make nearly the same amount of money as he did farming. But She Yuki says he sees this as a necessary change. He has nine grandkids they all live far away now but they were just in town the other weekend for visit running through the fields. Suze my grandparents farmed here my parents do. But now it's time for Change I've realized it's a new season pitcher. This he says looking out over the solar panels is for future. Generations Khatlon store NPR News Fukushima Japan.

Japan She Yuki Government Daiichi NPR Japanese Government CUP Fukushima Yuki Corneau Shema Tschumi
Drug Companies Face Lawsuits From Opioid Crisis As They Respond To The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:13 min | 2 years ago

Drug Companies Face Lawsuits From Opioid Crisis As They Respond To The Pandemic

"This week, Johnson and Johnson announced a $1 billion deal with the federal government to develop a new Corona virus vaccine. It's one of many drug companies on the front lines of the covert 19 response, but many of these same firms are facing an avalanche of lawsuits for their role in the opioid epidemic. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man has been following this and joins us now. Hi bran. Hi, Stacy. Somewhere in this seems like kind of a complicated moment for the drug industry in two very different stories playing out, But first tell us where things stand with the opioid lawsuits. Yeah, eso covered 19 basically shut down the court system nationally for months, but now that log jam is breaking loose and thousands of these civil and criminal cases they're grinding forward again. Big federal trial against pharmacy chains involved in the opiate epidemic just got the green light in Ohio. And next month, a lawsuit against two drugmakers Endo and Mallinckrodt goes to a jury trial in Tennessee. I spoke with Gerard Stranz, one of the lead attorneys representing local governments. In that case, they're demanding billions of dollars in compensation from these companies. Justice delayed is justice denied, and they know that when they sit in front of a jury of the community members would have to explain their conduct. There is no explanation and they're going to have to answer for what they've done. Remember, the federal government says 1/4 1,000,000 Americans have died after taking these opioid medications, and the drug industry is still scrambling to cope with the legal and financial fallout from that. Is there a risk that that opioid look, lawsuits could destabilize or maybe even bankrupt drug companies? I mean this at a time when they are really needed to respond to the pandemic. You know, people are talking a lot about this. Some drug companies have already filed for bankruptcy because of opioids and other firm Mallinckrodt said this week they may file for Chapter 11. So there is concern that holding these companies accountable for the addiction epidemic could disrupt their ability to make these important medical products. Rebecca half a G studies opioid litigation for the Rand Corporation and the University of Michigan. All of these companies have other products as well as opioids that are used for medically necessary purposes. So the goal is not necessarily to put these pharmacies thes manufacturers these distributors out of business altogether, and that would actually be bad for public health and or the health care industry. So one thing I'm hearing Stacy's. As these court cases all move forward. There's new pressure to reach some kind of national opioids settlement that would end all this uncertainty for the drug industry. I mean, obviously, the opioid lawsuits have been a huge black eye for the drug industry. Do you think the pandemic will give them a chance to repair some of the damage to their reputations? I think that is part of the story. Right now. Johnson and Johnson is a good example. Last year Oklahoma one A half $1,000,000,000 decision against the company of the state's attorney general described Johnson and Johnson as a drug kingpin organization for its role making and selling opioids. It's terrible PR. Now the company's casting itself really differently is a public health champion. Of course, a lot of state and local governments say not so fast. They want billions of dollars from these companies before they put the opioid crisis

Johnson Stacy Mallinckrodt Brian Man Ohio Gerard Stranz Rand Corporation University Of Michigan Oklahoma Endo Rebecca Tennessee Attorney
Understanding Whats Really Underneath Your Childs Behavior with Dr. Pejman Katiraei

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:42 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Whats Really Underneath Your Childs Behavior with Dr. Pejman Katiraei

"Welcome to the brain podcast. I'm your host Droop wrote and each week my team and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel. Feel better and love more. This week's guest is Dr. Pettman Qatar Ryan Dr k as he's known to many of his patients is a board certified pediatrician who's also board certified and fellowship trained in integrative and holistic medicine. He completed his undergraduate at Ucla and then he obtained his osteopathic medical degree at Western. University of Health Sciences. He completed his pediatric residency at Loma Linda University, the famous Loma Linda. where, he stayed on as pediatric chief resident and then as teaching faculty for over four years while he founded the Loma Linda University holistic medicine clinic. Dr K also completed two fellowships integrative medicine one with the University of Arizona Dr Case. Second Fellowship wasn't Endo Bio Jeanie and thereby ginny as a European systems biology medical model, which emphasizes the use of. In the management of Neuro Endocrine, system Dr K. is one of a few physicians in the country with mastery of osteopathy functional medicine, functional endocrinology, herbal herbalism, medical herbalism, and more Dr K. is now in private practice here in lovely Santa Monica where he focuses on helping children with severe behavioral challenges incredible bio. Dr Kate Welcome to the broken being pot. Adding more LADES, you're young man, you're only forty-three. There's a lot more accolades you can add to your resume over the. Perfect job. A Mike my goal at the end of the day to help kids feel better. That's beautiful. Goal a beautiful purpose and I can't wait to dig into that in today's podcast and I wanna get into a little bit of origin story. How did you get clear and where did all the puzzle pieces aligned himself that that is your goal. You know. I think the universe was calling me. To do this. The first reason why I got into, it was for my own health up as a kid, I had pretty severe anxiety. SPENT, most of my adolescent teenage years in mix of anxiety and depression yo and. My nervous system was upside down and I couldn't really understand why I knew that I was different. I knew I experienced the world differently, but I really had no clue why you know like who would have thought that eating fast food everyday. All Day will be an issue for for your nervous system going bonkers is that what was going on? Were you eating fast food and kind of go? How is the standard American new way of life I mean college like that's what you do. Right Even I remember actually Loma Linda is a vegetarian institution. Why it's famous for being one of the hospital in the Blue Zone. The seventh day adventists. Yeah. But when I got accepted there, one of the thoughts that I had is like Oh my God. What am I gonNA do without my burgers. And that was the mindset I had going into training because I didn't know any better and what actually got me to start looking outside was during my training. I kept kept coming across these cases and I remember one very, very vividly. Twelve year. Old Guy. Severe Severe Colitis. Came in with toxic, Mega Colin were his colon had dilated to about ten centimeters, which is huge, and we did around the steroids. We did some medications for him. He got better when home. Two weeks later, I was still on service. Worse off than before and Beato, our team started the discussion and we brought in all the specialists and basically the end of the discussion was well, he's failing medications. We just need to cut out his colon literally was like he failed medications. So the next option is we just cut out this twelve year olds a lot inflammation. Something's going on. Let's just cut the thing out. because. That is the next standard of care, right. I had a lot of these kinds of scenarios where kids would show up like I remember another guy who plays soccer. He scraped his knee niece bowl up and then thirty six hours later, he was dead. You know and they were just like well, sometimes staff does unlike I've scraped my knee, I haven't died like, what was it about his system that caused him to fall apart and it was this recurring question of like these things don't add up two plus two equal in this scenario and the institution, and they're really smart people alone Linda, don't get me wrong. But the pediatric conventional training was like no two plus two equals farm like it doesn't look this way. So as it is in most hospitals and worst Western approach. Places. Because that's what people are trained in. But you were asking a different question. You're like, okay. This doesn't make sense what's really going on. Exactly. Yeah, and that is what ultimately led me to start taking courses. So I, I went to one holistic kind of course, and it was a dinky little course, but I was like, oh. My God I, you know I have found my people, the light bulbs went off and you started connecting dots. And then from there I went and did a bunch of training with Institute of Functional Medicine and the trading with the University of Arizona, and in the midst of that, I started realizing the pieces that were affecting me so like. I did the elimination diet and started feeling better and then I found myself to have MTA. And I think my initial homocysteine was sixteen when I first tested it, I'm like Jesus. So I started injecting myself with B twelve and you know I was my own best Guinea pig. And in the midst of getting interested, what also happened is Loma Linda's in didn't have anyone that was getting interested in this stuff. They're like, Hey, you wanNA, start a holistic medicine clinic and. Like. Two years of my training and there I was like all of the sudden getting handed these patients you know and I was the expert even though I basically didn't know that much. But through the process of learning and I was really really privileged to be put in a place where you know fifty year olds, I was a pediatrician fifth year olds with Severe Lupus. Land in my doorstep helped me I'm like. I don't know anything about Lupus. So let me learn so I. I spent all this time. Just researching in learning. You know any person that I could find with any material they had on the Web I was reading books listening to the videos. And I was just consuming all of this information in the midst of that. Also learning from my patients,

Loma Linda University Linda Dr. Pettman Qatar Ryan Dr K Dr K University Of Arizona Dr Case Dr K. University Of Health Sciences Severe Anxiety Dr Kate Ucla Severe Colitis Institute Of Functional Medici Soccer Ginny Blue Zone Santa Monica Lupus
Time To Rethink A Multiple License Strategy For Your Spa

Trent365

02:15 min | 2 years ago

Time To Rethink A Multiple License Strategy For Your Spa

"You have a SPA business or Business frankly any kind of business. You probably need to have some sort of license from your local authority, whether it's city or state or federal now in out case here in Malaysia. We have generally a SPA license. OF TODAY SPAS ON ORLANDO. Opening Malaysia but beauty salons are now. There are some spas that have both licenses have a SPA license and the beauty licence, so they right now our land to open when on they can only provide certain treatments, which is those beauty types of treatments manicure pedicure facial, for example they can't do message, even if I have beauty licence, but we cannot open with as spa license, and just do those beauty services at the moment. That's just not the way it works, and given the current situation, ease. In some way shape or form potentially going to continue, there might be different variations or In the future, and even if there is not the way we deal with these future types of crisis and pandemics, infections is going to be informed and maybe dictated by what we're going through right now and the way that we've reopened with certain businesses with certain licenses is a format and a formula. They will probably follow in the future so maybe right now. It's a good time to start looking at what are the licenses? Could you potentially hold for Your Business? Because if you have a multi licensed strategy given another shot then in the future, for whatever reason and Endo, similar restrictions, having a specific type of license may just. To keep some revenue coming in the door. Now. Of course you've got to look what the cost of that license is versus any potential revenue. You might learn, but the point is. It may well give you options, so go and check out what other potential business todd licenses you can have on your business. Whatever it is, that may allow you more flexibility in the event of continued or future shutdowns, lockdowns restrictions Ori. That is even today I. do think if you time and I will be back again tomorrow.

Malaysia Orlando Endo
Apple and Paramount to make a deal for Martin Scorseses next movie

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Apple and Paramount to make a deal for Martin Scorseses next movie

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Melanie and Matt. The streaming wars as you know as many people who are listeners know are underway. Hbo Max Coming out onto the field of play this week. A lot of people finding it a little including me a little tricky to figure out how to get that even though as a spectrum customer I should be able to access it but it doesn't show up on my TV. Because I have Roku so it's some people can't find it. Some people like it but we are seeing apple seeming to up its game with some big high profile deals. They are spending money. It's a little reminiscent in some ways of the Netflix strategy. Where we seen them angling for high profile expensive awards movies awards prestige movies apple is now throwing. Its hat into that ring. You know backed by the might the economic might that wealth of Apple. Yeah and this is a big project. Martin Scorsese Film. Sources are saying it's between one seventy five two hundred million dollars depending on who you believe probably will go much higher than that given scores as he's track record. It's got Leonardo DiCaprio. It's called killers of the flower moon. And this is a really really interesting play for Apple. Because you saw Netflix's get a lot of attention for the Irishman last year. Whether it was good or bad you can debate that. But it got them into the Oscar conversation in a meaningful way. They didn't walk away with best picture but they were in the game and apple will likely be in the awards game when this movie eventually comes out. What's interesting here? Is the deal structure. You've done some reporting on that because it was originally paramount. Paramount got cold feet and it ended up at apple after a bidding war. After you know it was shopped around town and this is essentially. What I think is going to happen with a lot of movies. Going forward where they get developed at the studios than the price inches up inches up inches up studios where once upon a time they might have taken a risk on a big movie from a big director are now going to get cold. Feet and income streamers just clarify something about that. Paramount is not out of this game. Scorsese has his deal there and they did release them to shop this around but they own the property the underlying novel and this is a very dark period piece set in Oklahoma in the nineteen twenties. Leo DiCaprio originally was supposed to play a good guy. Paramount was really interested in that version. Then he changed it so that he was playing a kind of a villain character and I am told that paramount felt this is now a less commercial movie with the same budget which point they did say go ahead and shop at around and there was a really long pause and apple did step up but it is still a question of a deal with paramount because it is expected that paramount will at least get some sort of a percentage at pop probably released the film in theaters. Which is what. Scorsese did not get with the Irishman with net flicks so having explained all that. Let me say I would pay money? Actually to see tensor Endo's at Netflix's sit down and explain to me. The cost benefit analysis of having spent which I think was certainly over two hundred billion dollars on the Irishman. Yes they got nominated no they. Didn't you know we? They have all the data. How many people sat through it. Did anybody subscribed because of it. It's a black box for people like us but this is this is something that apple is now saying. We're in it. We're in it in a way that will make Scorsese happy with theatrical release and ironically make paramount happy because paramount will have its name on this movie and we'll probably get a good chunk of some kind of a piece of whatever box office it generates win it can get made because we're all stuck now waiting for protocols and an insurance policies to make filming possible so we will see. I will note. This isn't the only movie they bought. They bought Tom. Hanks's movie Greyhound from Sony for supposedly around seventy million. That movie was done studios will sell as you suggest Matt with movies. That you to bring in cash right now I would say many cases. It is not a great vote of confidence. When you see these deals made in the movie itself but it will be high profile. It is Tom Hanks and for Apple. They obviously decided it was worth

Apple Martin Scorsese Netflix Leonardo Dicaprio Tom Hanks Matt Kim Masters Melanie Hollywood Oscar Oklahoma Director Tensor Endo Sony
Bitfinex CTO Paolo Ardoino on Tethers Dominance

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

07:14 min | 2 years ago

Bitfinex CTO Paolo Ardoino on Tethers Dominance

"You explain how your role has evolved between tether and embiid Phoenix and kind of wary? You currently sits. Because there's some confusion over the organizational structures. We didn't have to get into the banking and and kind of creation and asset component of it but But where do you spend most of your time on the infrastructure is on the other side or is this just a but the discrepancy? That doesn't really exist. In fact it's more just a organizational chart issue so you know I my exp- by have a really good expertise also in insecurity. So that is one of the reasons why in two thousand sixteen I was asked to stepping us with your Phoenix so I steal mine. Main role is to act An amazing team of developers in Phoenix any better debtor has less developers because most of the operations are on chain of course us well known blockchain. So the key part of my rolling Patter Is ensuring that blockchain's That we are going to has older climates that the we won't in terms of issuance redemption authorisation processes. So that is what they do in patter and also decide. The processes in which these insurance is redemption. Needs to happen so I that is I really I'm I'M BREATHE. Thorough and read annoying when it comes to security So Basically I spent quite some time design a designing All all these processes in between instead. I said I would say most of my time because I read called a lot there Old The basically I I mainly involved in mentioned engine and all the processes so I would say that I still Dimension engineered steel ninety percent me and the old that also the core service is still eighty percent me. I would say to. Let's let's talk about Tether I because it's just seen absolute explosion in volume and in new creation particularly or last quarter. So there's there's two things that I think we've talked about. One is the transition that started people. Forget only about a year ago Between Omni tether and then the RC and crx tether which are in been the case now trae USD this now traded and and And held on the theory of blockchain is Over five billion now which is larger than us DT on Omni ever was I think even units peak which round. Yeah three billion this transition. That really only happened last year. Can you talk a little bit about what ultimately led to the migration to a theorem? Might sound like an obvious question answer but but not only what led to that but also the decision making process for when to flip the switch because on the one hand. It's obvious there's a ton of develop activity. There's a ton of interest in those certainly. The capabilities are C- Tokens to salted a type of transferring creation. Like this but on the other theorem itself as a platform is certainly not ironclad from from a security standpoint and the last thing you want to have happen is any issues with the fungibility of a dollar denominated token during a chain split or a B migration do chain which is basically. What thirty two point. Oh yes so First of all the the moment when we decided to create Tighter on On the theory was really an fewer. No that was really end up two dozen seventeen. If you recall ended as seventeen was we were almost peak of bull run and the price of a bitcoin transaction enhance transactions. At some point reaches out. be five hundred dollars so of course there was. I was making money so You know people where we're kind of happy Steal the where really complain. Hard about pattern so we wear We we got a lot of complaints and other exchanges complaint that that support attacker that is issued a majority from any doubts about the costs of Of running an owning owed because ultimately you have you need to have a bitcoin a unit to bitcoin orders and an amish transaction so in endo tas seventeen we should we worked on the ethereal Michael For for her and we we deployed it. We really didn't use it and we didn't You know as a beginning to eighteen The market started accounting upbeat. And by the time we were we We wear eighty Announce Terry Theorem. It's an alternative the fees if he goes went down. Whitehall so first of all. I won't say that we never intended to migrate so we we wanted to create the diversity. We wanted to offer a way that a solution in case one blockchain guests load and knocks usable. Not So we wanted to give another opportunity to use a different blockchain. So you should. We suggest with changes to support at least to Had Our lunches so at any point in time traders can steal the funds between Between one change to another so I'd also panther was was born to to Make it easier to make faster the cross exchange arbitrage. So if you have really high fees or you have a blockchain that exploded and the commission times are ours than you lose completed the purpose of a stable corn so that is why the that is the key reason why we are blockchain blockchain so we are on Tron IUS legally than the allographs so biscuit we start to buy them and we we not weed. Dan Understood that Traders would prefer anyway Ethereal just for transactions speed and the and call general so start more predictable and Usually lower on on

Phoenix Omni Blockchain Terry Theorem USD DAN Whitehall The Market
Linda Klumpers PhD on Cannify, Cannabinoid Pharmacology, Cannabis for Pain

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

08:11 min | 2 years ago

Linda Klumpers PhD on Cannify, Cannabinoid Pharmacology, Cannabis for Pain

"My name is Linda Columbus and I am a clinical pharmacologist. I have a PhD in clinical pharmacology of Cabinets. And I've been studying cannabinoid since two thousand six. You're listening to the curious about Canada's podcasts. Everybody's Jason Wilson with. The curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again so today. I'm really really excited to talk to Dr. Linda. Trumpers clinical pharmacologist. That's been studying can have an AIDS cannabis for quite a while and then we also have a shared interest in education as well So this'll be I think a great conversation. Thanks so much Linda for being willing to take the time to come on the podcast today. Thank you for having me. Jason is really great to talk to you too. Yeah thank you. Yeah so For those that may not be So familiar with your work. I mean one thing. I'll point out is that you are the brain behind. Kfi which which is an online Quiz and also kind of data gathering tool to help point people into The direction of research around certain things related to cannabis in can avenue to try to help steer people away from all the hype and sort of hearsay Which I I like a lot but Beyond that do you mind just describing a little bit about your background and kind of what got you into studying pharmacology. And then specifically what got you into cannabis. Oh sure so. I've always been very interested in so many things. And one of those things is the brain and that's why studied neuroscience and sometimes you make decisions in life based on the things you like And sometimes she choose things based on the things. She don't like and one of the things I did not like about studying neuroscience and it's really a personal thing. I'm not trying to judge but I had a very very hard time. Working with animals The mice rats were were so cute and I said yeah a big problem with working with them. Playing with them whistle fine with mice. 'cause they bite you but rats crawl into your sleeve and stuff so so. I found it so hard to to work with them that I thought I I want to do something else. That is still euroscience related and that is actually how I got into because if you study drugs in you months actually gift consent right. Yeah exactly yes. He don't meet to decapitate them after they're done. So that was a more friendly way of Still being able to study what happens in those brain of braids hours While yeah Leaving the animals alone so that it's always a combination of things and this is just one of the of the. Yeah the topic says really important to me not working with animals and science pharmacology biology medicine. It's also interesting and with pharmacology. Newman says will come together. And Yeah exactly. Yeah and now regarding cannabis in particular. I must honestly say. There are a lot of people in in cannabis that really do this. Because of their passion for the plan their passion for cannabis. And I'm very interested in plums. I'm very interested in a pharmacology of cannabis but there. There is a lot of interesting blondes out there. A lot of interesting compounds in cannabis is one of them. There are a lot of interesting geological systems in the body. The Endo cannabinoid system is one of them. And how I how? I got to work with Cannabis actually was because In amid nolte's pharmaceutical companies were racing against each other to get the first avenue bounds on the market which was actually notes a agonised like Dat for example because that has been in the markets incident one thousand nine hundred eighty s but wasn't antagonised so a impounded binds the same places state seed us for example T T. Sta compounded cannabis. It makes you feel high but then it does the opposite effect and the whole idea behind those compound classes whilst to a fight obesity to treat addiction. And those were to go bounce it. I start working with and if you onto dusty school bugs in healthy volunteer. She will not measure anything. You will only measure something if you I activate the system and then try to block system. It's just WANNA give one single-dose and see what happens. So we activate the system giving THC and is one of the ways. I got involved in cannabis research giving t t innovations later trying to study what? Thc does on your brain how you measure that with Marai. Studying various administration methods with with cannabis so in relation five eight sub lingual oral. That is how I got into cannabis research. Yeah that's so exciting. Pharmacology is such an exciting field. Because it's like this giant puzzle to work out all of these interconnected systems that are working together to produce effects on the body. It's something that has always interested me and on different levels and have you always had a passion for that kind of thing of trying to understand what's going on in the body and I know you said you started out with neurosciences. Trying to understand what's going on with the brain but is that kind of where that comes from like even as a little kid where you kind of interested in trying to understand and. Yeah Oh yes oh definitely I love this question because yeah it is just amazing to me. I see the brain as part of the body. So if something happens in the body changes you can also find it in the brain. A very ex- yeah Good examples for example menstruate menstrual cycle in the in the period before menstruation. People feel different. Why is that now? There's this whole discussion about the the Gut. Brain Axis said the microbial. Yeah exactly so that your intestines have influence on your brain as well. So that's all interconnected behaviors ferry ferry important and interesting to me at high school. I was always fascinated by peer pressure. People also give me if I wanted to do something because everyone did it and I did and do it and they were just surprised but everyone does it now but I don't want to. Why why would I have to do that? Why I also smoke arrived. I also use Moscow our GUT my hair and and and the children for Mike loss would not always listen to me but if someone from a higher lawsuits and I was fascinated by why. Why do you care? What do people are already so influenced by peer pressure by group pressure and I think that a lot of that now has to do with the brains as well and drug skin influence your behavior. A lot of people use L. Goal to socialize because it takes away there a threshold. I do not drink alcohol personally and I've never really had a fear of talking to strangers but I recognize it is very very important in society and therefore brains behavior drugs bodies. It's always fascinated me.

Cannabis Jason Wilson Linda Columbus Canada Dr. Linda Obesity KFI Aids Newman Moscow Marai Mike Loss High School T T. Sta Nolte