35 Burst results for "Endangered Species Act"

Eastern black rail imperiled by habitat loss, sea-level rise

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 months ago

Eastern black rail imperiled by habitat loss, sea-level rise

"Many birders visit wetlands hoping to see an eastern black rail. a sparrow. sized blackbird with white spots and red is but johnson of audubon. Louisiana says this tiny bird has a big reputation for secrecy. Very few murders actually are lucky enough to have ever seen a black rail and now there are fewer to find over the last two decades. Their populations have plummeted to only about three thousand birds because of habitat loss in inland areas and sea level rise the eastern black rails that live along the coast prefer a narrow band of shoreline where the land transitions from soggy. Too dry too. Many storm surge events during the nesting season and just the general encroachment of sea level rise narrows that banned in such a way where it becomes less and less suitable to the black l. This species was recently listed as threatened under the endangered species. Act johnson says the listing highlights the need to reduce carbon pollution in order to slow sea level rise because the black rail is such a mythical and beloved species. It has a real potential for helping sound this alarm and bringing more attention to those

Audubon Johnson Louisiana
Feds to delay seeking legal protection for monarch butterfly

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Feds to delay seeking legal protection for monarch butterfly

"Despite its declining population the Associated Press has been told the monarch butterfly will have to wait several years more to receive protection under the Endangered Species Act the US fish and Wildlife Service will consider the monarch butterfly and candidate for designation as threatened or endangered but there are other species in line ahead of it Charlie Wooley who's the head of the agency's Great Lakes regional office says the monarch status will be reviewed each year a virgin see action could be taken earlier but plans now call for proposing to list the orange and black butterfly in twenty twenty four scientists estimate the monarch population in the eastern United States has fallen about eighty percent since the mid nineteen nineties while the drop off in the western part of the country has been even steeper I'm showing up there

Charlie Wooley Great Lakes Regional Office Us Fish And Wildlife Service The Associated Press United States
Trump officials end gray wolf protections across most of U.S.

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Trump officials end gray wolf protections across most of U.S.

"Today, Kate McKay's Brody Fernandez has more President Trump today is removing Grey Wolf's from the U. S Endangered Species Act. As a result, the wolves could lose protections the federal government once gave them Including its ability to track the species in the northeastern part of the state. In California, Gray wolves were protected under the state's Endangered Species Act after one pack began to explore and wander into the state starting in 2011. The decision Thursday by the U. S Department of Interior to delist the Grey Wolf from the Federal Endangered Species Act will create more difficulties for California's efforts to manage its small but growing population, according to state wildlife officials. Over the last five years, the state's wildlife agency has received $1 million in federal funds to help pay for its wolf monitoring program.

Kate Mckay California Brody Fernandez Donald Trump President Trump U. S Department Of Interior U. S
'Tiger King' Star Doc Antle Indicted For Animal Cruelty, Trafficking

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 7 months ago

'Tiger King' Star Doc Antle Indicted For Animal Cruelty, Trafficking

"A wild animal trainer featured in the popular Tiger King Siri's on Netflix has been indicted in Virginia on animal cruelty and wildlife trafficking charges, Attorney General Mark Herring said Friday. A months long investigation found that Bhagavan Doc Antal and the owner of a roadside zoo in Virginia traffic Lion Cubs between Virginia and South Carolina Antal was indicted Thursday by a Frederick County grand jury on felony counts of wildlife trafficking and conspiracy and other charge. Ages. Keith Wilson, owner of Wilson's Wild Animal Park in Winchester, Virginia, was indicted by the same grand jury on charges of wildlife trafficking, conspiracy, animal cruelty and violating the Endangered Species Act.

Bhagavan Doc Antal Virginia Wild Animal Park Attorney General Mark Herring Keith Wilson Frederick County Netflix South Carolina Winchester
US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

"The trump administration's working to change environmental rules to allow the government to deny habitat protections for endangered species if they interfere with development critics say the changes proposed by the US fish and Wildlife Service to deny protections for endangered species in areas that would see greater economic benefits from being developed could open protected areas to more energy development and commercial activities like logging it's the latest move by the trump administration to change how the Endangered Species Act is U. sed wildlife advocates say the administration's approach has put natural resource extraction and commercial development over protecting sites that are home to dwindling populations of endangered species Jackie Quinn Washington

Wildlife Service Jackie Quinn Washington United States
US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

US wildlife agency seeks to carve out areas from protections

"The trump administration's working to change environmental rules to allow the government to deny habitat protections for endangered species if they interfere with development critics say the changes proposed by the US fish and Wildlife Service to deny protections for endangered species in areas that would see greater economic benefits from being developed could open protected areas to more energy development and commercial activities like logging it's the latest move by the trump administration to change how the Endangered Species Act is U. sed wildlife advocates say the administration's approach has put natural resource extraction and commercial development over protecting sites that are home to dwindling populations of endangered species Jackie Quinn Washington

Wildlife Service Jackie Quinn Washington United States
Harris mentions Indigenous people in DNC speech

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 9 months ago

Harris mentions Indigenous people in DNC speech

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez. The Keystone Excel pipeline hit a snag earlier this year when it's water crossing permit from the US, Army Corps of Engineers was vacated by federal judge the core ask the US Supreme Court to lift that order but the high court declined the fast track permit was a problem because it did not require extensive environmental review. Now, TC energy has applied to the core as well as the fish and Wildlife Service for permits that will undergo public scrutiny Victoria. Wicks has more Transcanada or TC. Energy has applied for permits the keystone xl pipeline under the Clean Water Act t C. as requesting those permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers and from state regulatory. Agencies in South Dakota Montana and Nebraska TC has also applied to the US fish and Wildlife Service for what's called an incidental take permit under the Endangered Species Act that allows the pipeline company to harm or destroy endangered or threatened species. If the destruction is incidental to the construction operation and maintenance of the Keystone Excel pipeline the species at issue is the American burying beetle in tripp county in South Dakota and four counties in Nebraska. The other permit application to the corps of Engineers allows the pipeline to cross more than seven hundred locations that would affect wetlands and water bodies in its public announcement. The court says it will balance the benefit of the pipeline against reasonably foreseeable harm the application to. The core covers clean water act requirements under section four, zero four. Another section for a one is regulated by states, Montana is holding its own hearings but South Dakota's Nebraska's are incorporated with the federal process deadline for public comment efficient wildlife is September sixteenth and deadline to the course September thirteenth the course says, after receiving comments, it will conduct public hearings and issue its findings later for national native news I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city south. Dakota Senator Kamala Harris accepted the Democratic Party nomination for Vice President Wednesday night and her speech to the. Democratic. National Convention Harris Mentioned Indigenous People twice once when talking about how cove in nineteen has disproportionately impacted people of Color and when talking about unity. With the Joe Biden. Presidential. Administration this week the DNC native American caucus has been rallying around the party's ticket touting the candidates knowledge of Indian country issues among backers or native American congresswomen, deb Holland, and cherise. David's here's David's speaking at an event earlier this week saying the upcoming election depends on putting people in office who are strong partners for native communities be heard it already, this is going to start with as electing vice president, Joe Biden until the White House and I know when elected vice president going to continue his commitment he's already been demonstrating it during his campaign, his Minton, the communities and I know he's going to ensure that the federal government upholds promises and obligations. Treaty. Treaty, obligations to Indian country in that native voices are going to be at the table they're to be. Heard in the ice levels of our government and. That's right now native participants of the Convention have discussed a number of Indian country issues from climate change to youth empowerment, messing and murdered indigenous people cove nineteen and the native vote. Thursday's the final day of the Convention, the native American Caucus will me and bite him. We'll take the stage to deliver a speech. The Cherokee nation has lost a treasured linguist among contributions. Durban feeling wrote the Cherokee. Dictionary. Helped get Cherokee syllabi on smartphones and developed language teaching materials feeling passed away this week at age seventy four. I'm Antonio, Gonzalez.

South Dakota Army Corps Of Engineers Us Supreme Court Vice President Nebraska Joe Biden Antonio Gonzalez Tc Energy United States Senator Kamala Harris Wildlife Service Minton Montana Corps Of Engineers Wicks Democratic Party Durban Victoria
Why Does the Hellbender Salamander Need Our Help?

BrainStuff

03:42 min | 11 months ago

Why Does the Hellbender Salamander Need Our Help?

"Lauren Vogel here. A remote freshwater streams somewhere in the eastern United States the waters cool. There's a reasonably fast current, and the bottom is littered with big flat. Rocks sounds peaceful, doesn't it? What you're imagining is a perfect environment for trout, and for something else to every so often anglers who cast their lines in such places wind up catching North America's biggest salamander. This thing leaves an impression specimens measuring twenty nine inches long. That's seventy three centimeters have been documented and the beefy EST adults way forty five pounds. That's about two to two and a half kilos. These four legged amphibians have compressed heads and torsos, meaning that judging by outward appearance. It thinks someone had squished these critters flat with a rolling pin. Another key attribute is there brown to Greyish skin which hangs noticeably loose around their flanks. Early settlers didn't know what to make of. These guys baffled by their appearance. Some folks began calling them that offers devil dogs or mud devils. The species would receive. Scientific name crypto branches allegany intil eighteen. Oh! But nowadays most people know this strange salamander. The Hell Bender. Hell benders are divided into two sub species northern Arkansas and southern Missouri are the home of the endangered ozark. Hell Bender the eastern hell. Bender has a broader distribution having spread itself across the Great Appalachian region and parts of the Midwest. Though sadly, it also got conservationists worried. Some Amphibians are equally at home on land and in the water, but hell benders are more or less totally aquatic. Their skin absorbs oxygen, pulling it straight out of the water that leaves Hell Benders at the mercy of pollutants and excess silt runoff dumped into their streams by forest. Clearing projects sure doesn't help. One report published in two thousand seven by the US. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that the ozark hell bender will become functionally extinct by the year twenty, twenty six in less protective measures are taken. As Twenty nineteen. It was still classified as endangered by the US fish and Wildlife Service which said that in some good news, most populations of the hell bender. Endanger of extinction and therefore do not warrant listing under the endangered species, act. To help boost populations of the ozark hell bender. The Saint Louis Zoo teamed up with the Missouri Department of Conservation and established a successful breeding program in twenty eleven. And just last year Pennsylvania reading awareness about this wonderful species by naming the eastern Hell Bender it's official State Amphibian. Maybe such efforts will improve the Salamanders PR. There's a pervasive belief that the hell bender has venomous bite, but this is untrue. The Hell Bender wheeled no venom and spite rumors to the contrary. The Infineon's do not hurt game fish populations. crawfish make up over ninety percent of the hell. Benders Diet, other potential prey items include tadpoles, smaller, Salamanders and small fish. The creatures are most active at night. They spend their days taking refuge under submerged logs or stream bottom rocks,

Bender United States Wildlife Service Lauren Vogel North America Infineon Saint Louis Zoo Missouri Department Of Conserv Midwest Arkansas Great Appalachian Missouri Pennsylvania Official
Another round of court hearings on Keystone XL Pipeline. U.S. Oregon Senators advocate for tribal COVID-19 funds.

Native America Calling

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Another round of court hearings on Keystone XL Pipeline. U.S. Oregon Senators advocate for tribal COVID-19 funds.

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez another hearing was held last week in federal court involving the keystone xl pipeline largely centering on the reach of president. Trump's two thousand nineteen unilateral permit government. Lawyers say it allows only the one point two miles of pipeline needed to cross the US. Canada border opponents say it enables hundreds of miles of pipeline through Montana South Dakota and Nebraska Victoria wicks reports pipeline. Opponents were heartened by an order. Judge Brian Morris issued the day before the hearing in a separate but related case he found that the US Army Corps of Engineers permitted the K. XL pipeline without considering potential damage to endangered species and habitat and he ruled not see energy cannot build through approximately six hundred and eighty eight waterways along the three state route until the core has done a more thorough analysis. Sierra Club Attorney Doug Hayes explains that April Fifteenth Order Army Corps has to engage in further Environmental Review further consultation under the endangered species act before it can reissue. Nationwide permit twelve itself as also points out. There are no waterways in the one point two mile border-crossing at the April Sixteenth. Hearing an attorney for the Rosebud. Sioux tribe says pipeline. Construction will harm the tribes mineralised states. Along the pipeline's route a government attorney response that the tribe has no mineral estates in that one point two mile stretch at the border pipelines supporters say treaty violations and damage to land water and cultural sites is a problem to be addressed by state and local governments. Not The feds judge. Morris will consider granting summary Judgment to one side or the other and will also rule on plaintiff's request in light of the covert nineteen pandemic for a halt to construction that has begun in the one point. Two Mile Corridor for national native news in Victoria Wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Colvin. Nineteen relief funds need to be administered quickly to tribes say some US lawmakers as KFC's. Brian Buhl reports senators. Jeff Merkley and Ron. Wyden want stimulus aid to not adhere to population based formula. The Oregon. Democrats argue that such a formula limits tribes abilities to help their respective communities most are small scattered in rural areas where infrastructure and services are often underfunded and dated Senator Wyden the tribes have been hit very hard though from a health and economic standpoint. Christner sears a tribal council member with the confederated tribes of the Grand Ronde. He says because of pandemic measures they've had to close down their casino which was their primary economic generator a lot of uncertainty. And we feel comfortable with where we're at right now but staying closed indefinitely could have some pretty dire consequences for our travel government mercier. Says he's not sure what form direct aid from. The federal government will look like just sitting there hoping that arrived soon for National Native News. I'm Brian Bowl. In Eugene Oregon six tribes have filed a lawsuit seeking to stop Alaskan native corporations from accessing shares of eight billion dollars in treble cove nineteen funds the tribes from Alaska Washington State and Maine are suing the Treasury Department arguing. The money from the cares act should only go to travel governments and not Alaskan native corporations. Many tribal leaders across the country have raised concern. Will several leaders of Alaskan Native Corporation? Say they're following the law and intend to use the funds to address covert nineteen needs tribes had until Friday to apply for the funds which are expected to be distributed by April twenty sixth. I'm Antonio Gonzales.

Brian Morris Alaskan Native Corporation Attorney National Native News United States Senator Wyden Antonio Gonzalez Us Army Corps Of Engineers Victoria Wicks Antonio Gonzales Federal Government Donald Trump Fifteenth Order Army Corps Brian Buhl Canada Environmental Review Jeff Merkley President Trump Montana
Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

Native America Calling

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez a federal judge. Wednesday invalidated a key hermit for the keystone xl pipeline. Judge Brian Morris says a permit issued by the US Army Corps of engineers bypassed necessary environmental reviews the order says TC energy formerly trans. Canada cannot build across waterways along the pipeline route until the core does more work on the permit Victoria wicks. Has This report. Doug Hayes is an attorney for the Sierra Club one of six environmental agencies that sued the Corps of Engineers Hayes says the core used a streamlined approval. Process called nationwide permit number. Twelve that precludes public review and circumvents transparent approval processes good pipeline would cross approximately six hundred eighty eight. Different waterways rivers streams and wetlands across Montana South Dakota and Nebraska and the Army Corps of Engineers is the agency that approves those crossings in the Order. The Federal Court notes that the expediter permit is used. When a project will result in minimal damage to aquatic environments Judge Morris also notes that the core failed to consult with us fish and wildlife or national marine fisheries before determining the pipeline. Construction would have no effect on endangered species or critical habitat. Hey says the car has to do further environmental review and consultation under the endangered species. Act before it can reissue the permit. Qc energy cannot build through any of the waterways along the pipeline route until it revamped its process into related cases tribes and environmentalists have challenged permits for the one point. Two Miles of pipeline. That crosses the border between Montana and Alberta. Tc Energy has started preconstruction on that segment for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Judge. Morris is hearing arguments in those two related challenges to the keystone. Xl Pipeline. Thursday. He'll issue an order in those cases at a later date. Many tribal leaders are calling for Alaska native corporations or an sees to be excluded from funding. Set aside for tribes in the Cares Act Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. Gerald Grey is chairman of the little shell tribe of Chippewa in the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council he says Anne Siese Corporation status should preclude them from accessing the eight billion dollar tribal stabilization fund. The last good native corporations should not be getting any of the funding because they're not tribes and We just basically don't feel that you know a good idea to be doing that this week. The Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council urged the US Treasury Department to exclude an sees from the emergency funding. The Great Plains Tribal Chairman Association when a step farther calling for the removal of Tara Sweeney. As Assistant Secretary of Indian affairs. They say since she wants worked for an there's a conflict of interest at play but Shauna President of the KONIAK regional corporation says Sweeney simply following the law simply put Alaskan native corporations are eligible for funding under the cares act because we're included in the law and we're going to use the funding from the cares act to help our communities prepare and respond to the nineteen tribes in an CS. Have until Friday to apply for their slice of Betrayal Stabilization Fund. It's not yet clear how the money will be divided up for national native news. I'm Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Tribal. Police have verbally warned or issued citations to more than one hundred and fifty people on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota for violating curfew or shelter in place orders the tribes currently on a fourteen day lockdown due to a public health response to Cova nineteen. I'm Antonio

Brian Morris National Native News Us Army Corps Of Engineers South Dakota Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Trib Tc Energy Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadersh Antonio Gonzalez Montana Great Plains Tribal Chairman A Victoria Wicks Doug Hayes Tara Sweeney Corps Of Engineers Canada Federal Court Pine Ridge Reservation Wyoming Alaska
Houston: Texas Rancher Has Bone to Pick With Bone Cave Harvestman

Houston's Morning News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Houston: Texas Rancher Has Bone to Pick With Bone Cave Harvestman

"Meantime bureaucracy running amok even here in the state of Texas there's a tiny spider like bug called the bone cave harvestmen harvest moon harvest man is at the center of a Texas property owners lawsuit against US fish and wildlife John year what is been told he can no longer allow youth groups to camp on his central Texas land has been in his family for more than a hundred years chance Weldon is with the Texas public policy foundation giving the Endangered Species Act and they think the polar bears they don't think of bugs and salamanders and and different species of Cape bug and Beatles and things like that but literally thousands of species that are listed are the sorts of species yeah again this is against the fed so it's your your federal bureaucracy on elected that put in all these rules oral argument scheduled for late April

Texas John Weldon FED
Environmental groups sue to halt Alaska oil drilling after Beluga whale numbers plummet

AP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Environmental groups sue to halt Alaska oil drilling after Beluga whale numbers plummet

"Two environmental groups have given formal notice that they'll suit to protect endangered Alaska beluga whales from problems caused by oil and gas operations the center for biological diversity and the cook inlet keeper said they will sue the national oceanic and atmospheric administration for violating the Endangered Species Act by not protecting cook inlet belugas the announcement came three days after a federal agency said the population of white whales is declining faster than previously thought a spokeswoman for NOAA fisheries said by email the agency doesn't comment on pending

Cook Inlet Alaska Noaa
Environmentalists invoke belugas in effort to halt Alaska oil exploration

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Environmentalists invoke belugas in effort to halt Alaska oil exploration

"Two environmental groups have given formal notice that they'll suit to protect endangered Alaska beluga whales from problems caused by oil and gas operations the center for biological diversity and the cook inlet keeper said they will sue the national oceanic and atmospheric administration for violating the Endangered Species Act by not protecting cook inlet belugas the announcement came three days after a federal agency said the population of white whales is declining faster than previously thought a spokeswoman for no of fisheries said by email the agency doesn't comment on pending

Cook Inlet Alaska
"endangered species act" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on KOMO

"By the Endangered Species Act is blamed for years of delays on a planned road project to make it safer for kids walking to and from the school the middle school one of the Thurston county commission is making it very clear he's fed up with it hears Kamose calling Johnson Thurston county commissioner Gary Edwards tells the Olympian he's fed up with the go for being prioritized over children the most I'm a pocket go for to be exact holding up a project which was approved years ago had silicon road southeast between Pacific Avenue and Marvin road because they can't get permission from the department of interior that says that the. over is more important than the kids there's just one lane in each direction no turn lanes no crosswalks are bike lanes and it is dangerous the interior department has to approve bill the county's mitigation plan for the pocket gopher and that's been going back and forth for years the project originally scheduled for construction in twenty seventeen now a grant for it has timed out and go on to other projects Carling Johnson como news going to time nine thirty seven a group of researchers for the north west may have figured out why your cat either loves you or low zero here's couples Ryan Calvert it's a legit question that likely deserves a legit answers as Sophie Bates with science news dot com. we'll have that reputation that you know Catherine they don't really care about us that's why you see all these articles that are like does my cat really liked me and I think with this study really show the threats were kind of not giving cats enough credit for the relationships that they form a class cats really do form strong attachments with people and we kind of see that they form attachments pretty similarly to the way that humans do or even dogs in order to prove this so for use as a group of researchers at Oregon State University first look at what's called an attachment style attachment from the basically the way you form a relationship with like a primary care giver like a parent or for Pat like an older there are apparently four of these styles is one which is secure attachment and that's like. the end of that year older really comforted by their owners present so like just the fact of having their own or their parents in the room make them feel comfortable and they can go explore a new environment and then there's three times in secure which can be ambivalent which is kind of like being really clean you needing a lot of attention avoidant which is a morning and running away or hiding and then was organized which is kind of a mix of both of like seeking attention in the not really wanting it running away all right so if you so how did they do this and what do you do with what we now know about cats. I kind of looked at this they had the kittens okay. a sense they actually put them in a socialization class and half moon took this class where they you know met with other cabinet with other people learn to set and then the other half didn't take the class so they were like the control group and the front of the cats actually weren't changing their attachment style selection indicates that once a person and a cat form a bond it's gonna stay pretty consistent for the rest of their lives like I said there's a really big life changing that. how can glance at first interaction with a cactus stupor crucial for setting the tone of her relationship still unanswered how a cat is able to detect the non cat lover in the room and proceed to engage said non cat lover Brian Calvert colonia daughter time nine thirty I we're just sixty seconds away from a sports update if you're listening to the rose like you start with lows to find the top brands like first alert B. R. K. and energize first alert has been protecting homes for over six decades you can be sure you're installing peace.

Brian Calvert B. R. K. sixty seconds six decades
States sue Trump administration over weakened endangered species protections

John Rothmann

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

States sue Trump administration over weakened endangered species protections

"Seventeen states are suing to block the trump administration rules weakening the Endangered Species Act including California whose Attorney General is how the the Serra now is the time to strengthen our planet's biodiversity not to destroy it. but instead of choosing to protect the species the trump administration has decided to backslide on longstanding regulatory protections implementing the Endangered Species

California Attorney
Trophy Hunter Seeks to Import Parts of Rare Rhino He Paid $400,000 to Kill

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Trophy Hunter Seeks to Import Parts of Rare Rhino He Paid $400,000 to Kill

"A Michigan trophy hunters rare black rhinoceros skin skull and horns can be imported to the U. S. from Africa Chris payer complied for a permit that's required by the fish and Wildlife Service to import animals protected under the Endangered Species Act the trump administration says it'll issue the permit. paid four hundred thousand dollars to an anti poaching program to get permission to hunt the male rhino bowl inside in a maybe a national park there are only about fifty five hundred black rhinos remaining in the wild nearly half of those are in Namibia which is allowed under international convention to permit five male rhinos a year to be legally killed by hunters.

Chris Payer Namibia Michigan Africa Fish And Wildlife Service Four Hundred Thousand Dollars
Trump Administration Makes Major Changes To Protections For Endangered Species

Jay Talking

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Trump Administration Makes Major Changes To Protections For Endangered Species

"Administration plans to drastically weakened law protecting endangered species includes the bald eagle Adams and surprised at that the administration finalizing major changes No Way forces landmark endangered species act and they administration is making a final rule making public final overhauling the way the federal government has protections for plants and animals at risk of extinction they don't care when I care that's that's what I get off the bus right there the Endangered Species Act is credited with helping save the bald eagle as as a matter of fact the California Conder and scores of other animals and plants from extinction since president Nixon signed it into law and seventy three good nothing Nixon not good enough for the Republicans now yes Sir I said yeah I'm and I I'm not here tearing down a person or persons but our policy and instead of trying to replace everybody I would ask you to talk to the people who are in power now and may continue to be in power to please reconsider messing with this changing his environmental protections and please reconsider changing these rules on the way they think about and deal with endangered

Adams Federal Government President Nixon California
"endangered species act" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

The Daily 202's Big Idea

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

"It's the classic revolutionary song long from lima's. These anti government protesters are bringing chaos to the major international hub for a second consecutive day forcing airlines airlines to suspend check in for departing flights as the demonstrators extend their standoff with authorities have been unable to quell months of dissent thousands of demonstrators clyde in blacker occur sitting in the terminal with placards denouncing police brutality and calling for freedom on the island. They're using luggage carts as barricades blocking departing passengers arguments are erupting between passengers and protesters. Some passengers crying saying they just want to go home. Meanwhile the protesters are chanting return the i that's reference to an incident on sunday night when a young woman was shot in the eye by a beanbag round when police clashed with protesters in a subway station senior officers won't promise that this woman is not going to be charged with rioting as the summer of unrest roles on the situation asian is becoming increasingly tense statements from chinese government officials and state media in beijing have grown steadily more shrill accusing protesters of terrorism and warning of an impending crackdown in the semi-autonomous financial center. The regime.

chinese government clyde lima beijing
Trump Administration Makes Major Changes To Protections For Endangered Species

WBZ Morning News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Trump Administration Makes Major Changes To Protections For Endangered Species

"On it's seven OO five an Attorney General Maura Healey says she'll soon this is a threat lobbied the White House after the trump administration makes changes that is that will weaken the Endangered Species Act California's Attorney General is also on board in these moves come just hours after that plan is really still a green wall to the center for biological diversity says the changes cast a bulldozer to what he calls the loss of life saving protections for America's most vulnerable wildlife and he says his group is among others going to court over changes he says only serve the oil industry and other polluters the trump administration says the revisions protect species but improve the efficiency of oversight the law is credited with helping to save bald eagles and gray whales among others Allison Keyes CBS news

Maura Healey White House California America Attorney Allison Keyes CBS
Tom Udall, Nathan Ross And Lee discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Tom Udall, Nathan Ross And Lee discussed on Environment: NPR

"Next two more big changes. The trump administration is making these ones to the way it carries out the endangered species act that is the law credited with saving wildlife. If such as bald eagles on grizzly bears that these changes are the biggest revisions in decades and there has been swift backlash from wildlife groups and democratic lawmakers they warn it will be harder to protect species at a time when many face mounting threats n._p._r.'s nathan ross reports the trump administration has been working on these revisions to the endangered species act for a long time urged on by republican lawmakers and industry groups who think that the landmark wildlife conservation law has been applied too strictly talk although the endangered species act enjoys broad bipartisan support among american voters according to recent polling some view it as a tool for federal government overreach reach particularly in western states making the announcement earlier today karen but fail in a deputy solicitor at the interior department said the changes were made to provide vite greater transparency as well as to provide regulatory assurances and protection for both endangered species and who rely on the us federal and private land but failing worked as a property rights attorney in wyoming before coming to interior and has long been a critic of federal policies that she thinks go too far. Today's moves are being celebrated by industry groups from utilities to mining companies and are being roundly criticized. This is by wildlife organizations but discerning what's actually in the changes is a little more complicated the listening critical habitat. Let's see as a hundred forty pages ages. Jake lead the director for biodiversity. The environment policy innovation center is still trying to get through all of the revisions. There's more than three hundred pages in total. Unfortunately unfortunately the changes that are spread throughout the entire document. Lee says from what he's seen so far much of what's changing is administrative. It's bookkeeping other parts. Though he says has are more problematic. There are a number of changes that do we can then dangerous species for one. The administration is trying to weaken the level of protections texans for threatened species. That's not the same as endangered but for more than forty years. They've been protected the same way not anymore now the u._s. fish and wildlife service. I will determine how much protection to give threatened species on a case by case basis. Another change will require wildlife officials to consider occupied habitat. The replace plant or animal currently is before looking at unoccupied areas like place it may migrate to in the future that wildlife advocates say is shortsighted in an era of climate change as many as one million species are at risk of disappearing many within decades according to a recent u._n. Report habitat tattoo shrinking because of human development and climate impacts like rising seas in a press conference blasting the changes new mexico senator. Tom udall a democrat pointed did that out. Now is the time to strengthen the essay not cripple. There's a coalition and congress who agrees with me. We need to consider stopping. He needs regulations by any means including the congressional review act that may just be one of the many challenges facing the trump administration's revisions state attorneys general general and environmental groups are already promising to sue as well nathan rot n._p._r. News

Tom Udall Nathan Ross LEE United States Interior Department Wyoming Karen Jake Attorney Congress Director Mexico Senator Forty Years
"endangered species act" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"From ABC news. I'm Richard Cantu. Former vice president Joe Biden is now officially in the race for the democratic presidential nomination enters as the immediate front runner. President from welcomed Biden calling him sleepy Joe on Twitter and declaring CU at the starting gate the president's gonna have insults he's going to have nicknames. This one is not surprising. I think he he's looking to troll the candidates with these nicknames and hope to define them the same way that he was able to against this Republican primary Ponant and then ultimately Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen ABC news political analyst recline, a judge in West Palm Beach, Florida, sentenced fired Palm Beach gardens police officer Newman Raja to twenty five years in prison on his conviction for gunning down a stranded black motorist in two thousand fifteen movement. Raja was convicted of chasing down and killing thirty one year old drummer Corey Jones who's van at broken down after a late night gig for that Russia was convicted of manslaughter, and I agree attempted murder. Jones family demanded Raja get life in prison Raja's wife begged for leniency in the end. Judge Joseph marks. Sentenced Raja two to twenty five year. Terms to be served concurrently. ABC's Pete combs under pressure from environmentalists. The Trump administration is taking tentative steps toward protecting the giraffe under the endangered species. Act for years international, watchdogs, have warned that the world's tallest land animal is sliding toward a silent extinction. Under the students and faculty at two universities in Los Angeles are being quarantined because of the measles between the two campuses of UCLA in state, Los Angeles now over three hundred students and faculty are under quarantine because they have yet to produce medical records showing they've been vaccinated or our immune, and they were in an area around somebody with a confirmed case the fear is a two could have measles NB spreading it. Now. They're not allowed in public places. ABC's Alec stone in Los Angeles. You're listening to ABC news. Come on head. We're late Honey the car Wilson..

Newman Raja ABC Los Angeles Joe Biden Judge Joseph marks vice president Richard Cantu President Corey Jones Palm Beach gardens West Palm Beach Hillary Clinton Twitter Pete combs Florida
"endangered species act" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"I'm Richard Cantu. Former vice president Joe Biden is now officially in the race for the democratic presidential nomination. Jenner's as the President Trump welcomed Biden calling him sleepy Joe on Twitter and declaring see what the starting gate the president's going to have insults. He's going to have nicknames. This one is not surprising. I think he he's looking to troll the candidates with these nicknames and hope to define them the same way that he was able to against his Republican primary opponents and then ultimately Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen ABC news political analyst reclined, a judge in West Palm Beach, Florida, sentenced fired Palm Beach gardens police officer Newman Russia to twenty five years in prison on his conviction for gunning down a stranded black motorist in two thousand fifteen Newman Raja was convicted of chasing down and killing thirty one year old drummer Corey Jones, who's vanished broken down after a late night gig for that Raja was convicted of manslaughter, and I agree attempted murder. Jones family demanded Russia. Get life in prison Raja's wife begged for leniency in the end. Judge Joseph March sentenced Roger. Two twenty five year terms to be served concurrently. ABC's Pete combs under pressure from environmentalists. The Trump administration has taking tentative steps toward protecting the giraffe under the endangered species. Act for years international, watchdogs, warned that the world's tallest land animal is sliding toward a silent extinction. Hundreds of students and faculty at two universities in Los Angeles are being quarantined because of the measles between the two campuses of UCLA in Cal State, Los Angeles now over three hundred students and faculty are under quarantine because they have yet to produce medical records showing they've been vaccinated or are immune, and they were in an area around somebody with a confirmed case the fear is a two could have measles NB spreading it. Now. They're not allowed in public places. ABC's Alec stone in Los Angeles. You're listening to ABC news. Okay. Folks. You know, how I feel about the good people at Larry H Miller. Hyundai peoria. I mean, it's the only place I tell you to shop for a new car penalty Hughes here,.

Joe Biden Newman Raja Los Angeles ABC Newman Russia Corey Jones vice president president Richard Cantu Judge Joseph March Palm Beach gardens West Palm Beach Trump administration Trump Twitter Larry H Miller Jenner
"endangered species act" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on KGO 810

"To revamp the Endangered Species Act would gut crucial protections for threaten animals and plants deputy interior secretary David Bernhard dismissed the claims as laughable adding that interior secretary, Ryan, Zinke, and other officials respect the law and know the law conservatives have long complained that the forty five year old law hinders drilling, logging and other activities while failing to restoring native species to protected status. And a wildlife monitoring group says research has conducted since two thousand sixteen has found that people are increasingly buying and selling endangered animals on Facebook groups in Thailand, the group called traffic says researchers found increase activity among twelve Facebook groups at monitored total membership among the groups has almost doubled from two thousand sixteen to more than two hundred thousand this year. Facebook said in an E mail that it's committed to working with traffic law enforcement authorities to help tackle the illegal online trade of wildlife in Thailand and major league baseball game had to be postponed because of an unplayable field. Here's correspondent John Stolnis. The game between the Philadelphia Phillies in Washington nationals had to be postponed. Not because of inclement weather in the hours prior to the game. But because the infield dirt was so soaked from weekend reigned that it was deemed unplayable Phillies officials said the tarp was left off the field on Friday night. And that they received more rain than expected. The field was then covered on Saturday and Sunday during soaking rains, meaning the grounds crew couldn't. Work on it until hours before first pitch. The team brought in five flame throwers to try and dry the dirt in an effort to make the field playable, but it didn't work. I'm John Stolnis games. Cancelled for weird risk. It was a game council. I think in Philadelphia years ago because squirrels like eighty squirrels on the field. And he just chase them off. They try chase him. They kept running around the field. And they it was a it was a second part of double header. I forget the story videos rats, but they've had mosquitoes they've canceled games who mosquitoes and bees also hail snow hail..

Facebook Philadelphia Phillies John Stolnis Thailand secretary David Bernhard Philadelphia Ryan Zinke Washington forty five year
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"When things have run irreversibly amok John writing in Amherst back to your phone calls, Robert is calling from Portland, Maine, Robert, welcome to on point. Hi, thank you for taking my call. I believe a wholeheartedly in the Endangered Species Act. I think it's one of the greatest things the federal government has ever done, and I wanted strengthened not weakened. One of the forces behind this is the federal cattle industry out west, which actually produces very little beef like something like two or three percent of the nation's beef supply. It's not very significant, but these folks control hundreds of millions of acres of publicly owned land that they do not owned in their non native cattle are allowed to graze in areas of people saw videos of them grazing and national forests and places where they don't belong. It looks like a bad joke in their pushing out wolves and elk and all the other animals that are actually native to our ecosystems which comes back to healthy, go systems that are good for not only the wildlife, but. For people. So the fact that cattle people cattle industry originally stole this Lynn generations ago, native people, and now they're pushing out native wildlife. This is a cycle that has to be broken. What we have to do is get cattle off of public lands and make it a priority that that Lynn be healthy for wildlife and for people. By the way, when you look at the other actors that are behind gutting this or or damaging the Endangered Species Act, it's groups like safari club in the National Rifle Association that lineup with the fossil fuel companies in the mining Corp.'s. This is corporate assault on the healthy college e that we should have throughout the United States. Robert, thank you for your call to on point today, Rebecca and Jonathan. We have a couple of minutes left in the segment. I'm gonna give you each both a little bit to look at this question from your. Involvement in this issue, Rebecca. We'll start with you. I is there something that you can explain that that is not part of the constant conversation hasn't been part of the conversation for years. An intricate part of this issue that most of us don't understand. I think the idea of recovery is really often left out of the conversation. We're so focused on species listings and the consequences of those listings that we forget though overall goal of the law, and we've forget that to achieve that goal. We need to take steps that will help species. And I think if everyone focused more on recovery, we'd all have a lot more to agree on Jonathan someone myself, who is not a huge landowner and is not living amongst endangered species least source. I know tell me something about this that would not come to us would we'd not think of as we read and hear this issue being debated now and for many, many years, I think a lot of people don't realize how much they have at stake. If you care about recovering species, you should care deeply. About the incentives for private landowners to restore and improve habitat. Most endangered species depend on private land for most of their habitat. So those incentives are absolutely vital. And one of the reasons why optimistic about some of the things that happened to the Obama administration and some of the things in the current proposed reform is that they'll do a better job of aligning the incentives to landowners with the interests of species without sacrificing success. We've had in preventing extinction. Rebecca Riley is the legal director in the nature program at the natural Resources Defense Council where she focuses on legal and policy issues related to wildlife and endangered species, Rebecca. Thank you for joining us on point. Thank you. Jonathan would attorney Pacific legal foundation where he litigator, environmental and property rights cases. Thank you for joining us today. Jonathan, thank you for having you can continue the conversation and get the point podcast at our website on point, radio dot org. And you can follow us on Twitter and find us on Facebook at on point. Radio on point is produced by Annabelle man, Brian. Hards Inskeep. Eileen Imada Stefan Sonus Alison, poli James Ross, Alex Schroeder Gretchen Voss and Miriam washer with help from Caroline Anders David Marino and Kyrie Thompson are executive producers, Karen Shiffman coming up tomorrow, print your own gun on a three d. printer it sooner reality is at the end of gun control. I'm Budd Mishkin. This is on point.

Jonathan Rebecca Riley Robert federal government Budd Mishkin Lynn Amherst Maine Twitter United States Facebook assault Portland Pacific legal foundation Annabelle man Eileen Imada National Rifle Association Obama administration
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"But on the other hand, writes on the economic impact considerations because both sides can easily manipulate manipulate these studies and then you waste a lot of time that could be used for species that are in need. Thank you for your phone call. Thanks for your phone call to on point today, Rebecca and Jonathan. I wanna go back to the tone of the previous caller talking about people who are wearing sandals and. And tie-dyed shirts, which will never do again, that tone to me seem symptomatic of the the arguments from both sides or at least tone of the arguments, both sides, devout in their beliefs, no doubt, but kind of talking at each other. Do you get any sense, and we'll start with you, Rebecca, that there is any not middle ground, shall we say, but any notion of, okay, that is a serious point. We can look at that that or and it's not just all black and white. So the Endangered Species Act is actually overwhelmingly popular law eighty to ninety percent of Americans say that they support the law, and I think there's this general sense among the American people that we omit to future generations to prevent species from going extinct. Jonathan. How about your take from again, the individual landowners point of view when they hear the shouting for want of a better term between the side of environmentalists and the side of people and indistinct about industry economics and such. I think it's undeniable for that for years. The political debate has been controlled by the two extremes. People who during the Obama administration, the Bush administration, this administration, any change was accused of gutting the act and from the other extreme any change wasn't going nearly far enough, but I'm actually hopeful in some of the coverage of interiors propose reforms. There seems to be growing middle. That recognizes that there's some things we like some things we don't, but there's an opportunity here promote more collaborative conservation, I believe in giving credit where do I think that's largely due to efforts during the Obama administration to work with states environmental groups and property understa find different ways to protect species. They that the greater sage. Grass less period chicken and many others. And I think several of these reforms, I document this in a report that I wrote with perks over months ago. Several reforms forms actually allow us to have more of those type of conservation efforts. And finally start recovering species. It's a comment from our Facebook page, John Amherst rights, there's a price to pay for changing societies, profligate practices to a more sustainable lifestyle that preserves the environment. We can pay that now in measured and controllable ways like protecting ecosystems by limiting industrial agriculture practices, we know to be harmful or we can pay much more later.

Obama administration Rebecca Jonathan Facebook John Amherst ninety percent
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"They're not designed to solve this problem that we're talking about, which is how do we get species to recovery? How do we get them to that point where we can take them off the list and that's the goal of the law. That's the goal. It should be the goal of everyone here because if we take species off of the endangered species list. We no longer have to worry about these regulations. We have a common from one of our Twitter followers, which is from Hello kitty, and she writes, since when has industry ever done what's best for the environment without having been pushed to do it and any industry that currently does right by the environment only does so because of the regulations that were put into place decades ago. Jonathan again, if you take us inside the mind of a land owner or give us an example, specific example of someone who is not against the environment and has a notion of that, this is an important thing to save and yet comes upon something that is credentialing what they can do with their land. Sure. So Pacific legal foundation Dacian actually filed two rulemaking petitions, urging interior to do one of the reforms proposed varying the regulatory restrictions that apply to property based on the degree of the species face. And in one of those petitions, we focused on one landowner in Washington. These rancher. And wanted to change the way he manages his water rights to both better provide for his cattle and improve habitat for the Oregon spotted frog. But because that work required him to change the land into change when water flows through his ditches. He could only do it by running the risk that he would accidents. 'cause take take is an incredibly broad prohibition under the act. It's not just activities intended to harm or kill an animal, but also any activity that disturbs or affects its habitat. It's a really broad prohibition that can just as easily prevent efforts to help species as those intended to hurt species. Let's go to your phone calls. No here on point. Kevin is calling from Dodgeville, Wisconsin, Kevin, welcome to own point. Thanks for taking my call today. I can't think of anything more serious than taking care of the planet that we live on. And that includes all the animal all the animals and all the plants. I think it's time for change. I think what I'm seeing in my lifetime as a sixty year old man. This country has not taken care of responsibilities concerning these areas. And I applaud these people for trying to push things trying to make things better and push things through. However, I don't think administrations should be blamed for this. I every administration has different much like every done you won't. It has a different feeling a different personality and and. The thing that I really wanna bring to the point is. This can be presented to me in a in a in a situation that I'm familiar with and comfortable with. I'm much more likely to go along with it and to buy into it. But it seems like every time someone wants to talk about environmental issues, it's coming from a person of thirty five years of age, maybe with a great big long beard wire rim glasses, tie-dyed t shirt and sandals. If you want to be taken serious, you should not. You should not perpetuate that stereotype. That's a big turnoff for me and a lot of people that Kevin, but just because a person has. Sandals. Tie-dyed shirt doesn't necessarily mean they're not serious about what they're talking about. Let's go on to the next call Kevin. Thank you for your call. Jerry's calling from Dayton, Ohio. Jerry welcome to point. Hello, but. I am. I am for the EP or the environmental Protection Act or like meeting injured species on little bit nervous talking on phone. Okay. Just a conversation. Go ahead. I'm very much against any economic impact considerations because for large part, there is a subjective part to those economic analysis. I e predicting future economic events and turns and we can look at, you know, several by now Cording to predictions back when I was in high school in the late seventies oil should be on this two hundred dollars a barrel. You can look at Alan Greenspan in the housing market crash and interest rates what he said..

Kevin Alan Greenspan Twitter Jonathan Jerry Dacian Cording Oregon Washington Wisconsin Dodgeville Dayton Ohio two hundred dollars thirty five years sixty year
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You can join the conversation. Are you a landowner who's been affected by the law as it stands? How has it impacted you? What do you make of the proposed changes follow us on Twitter and find us on Facebook at on point radio joining me now from Chicago is Rebecca Riley. She's the legal director in the nature program at the natural Resources Defense Council where she focuses on legal and policy issues related to wildlife and endangered species. She's also a former trial attorney with the US department of Justice in the environment and natural resources division Nike for joining us an unpleasant Rebecca. Thank you. Bye. Also joining the conversation from Washington. Jonathan would an attorney Pacific legal foundation where he litigator environmental and property rights cases. He's also an adjunct fellow at the property and environment research center, a research institute dedicated to free market environmentalism environmentalism. So what I'm trying to say, Jonathan, thanks for joining us on point. Thank you for having me. But Jonathan, we'll start with you. Tell us what this looks like on the ground with a landowner that gets into a situation where particular species animal has been found on the land and what unfolds after that. So the basic approach we've taken over the last four decades is to impose burdensome punitive regulations on the landowner, and they've only been relatively few exceptions where the federal government estates and conservation groups work with landowners. And if you look at the results, the first approach works well with preventing species extinction. It's part of the reason why the endanger. Species Act has been so successful in preventing extinction as you. Some of the earlier people said, only about one percent of the species list by the active gone extinct. But at the same time, that approach hasn't been successful promoting species recovery, only three percent of protected species have recovered and come off the list. And what we've seen is in the rare exceptions where people cooperate and collaborate and you have states federal officials environmentalists and property owners working together to find solutions to work for everyone. You actually get that recovery. So I think that's the goal. To what extent will these reforms push us in the direction where we have more of those collaborative efforts in more recovery's without sacrificing success offending extinction, Rebecca, what's your take on what's transpired over the last couple of weeks? Did it come from out of the blue or you had some notion that this with the administration's predilection for deregulation, you knew that this was coming. Well, there's no question that the rules proposed are consistent with what we expected. The Trump administration is essentially gutting protections for endangered species. The Endangered Species Act is one of our most successful environmental laws. As you mentioned, it has helped hundreds of species recover from the brink of extinction. And I think what we can all agree on is that recovery should be the goal for everyone. Now, from our perspective, the problem that's hampering recovery is a lack of funding for years. Congress has failed to sufficiently fund the Endangered Species Act failed to fund recovery efforts. So if we can all get behind funding recovery, I think we can all win here. So in other words, it's kind of a catch twenty two. If someone who's who's fighting this or once changes, they look at the numbers and say not enough have been taken off the list, but they're not gonna from your vantage point. They're not gonna fun. And it, so that more can be taken off the list. Correct. Exactly. It takes it takes time to recover species that's on the brink of extinction and it takes resources. And if we're not dedicating the resources, we need to recovery, we're just not going to get there. Rebecca will stay with you. This is as as Jonathan has pointed out, he works with landowners and there are stories about landowners that want to have more of their their land to do with what they want, but they can't because of the act. But is that at the heart of what has transpired over the last two weeks? Or there's this really simply about the bigger picture of the oil industry and other industries using this land. This is about the bigger picture of leading industry interests, Trump endangered species protections. What the regulations are designed to do is really weaken protections across the board..

Rebecca Riley trial attorney Jonathan natural Resources Defense Coun Twitter Facebook Pacific legal foundation Chicago US department of Justice Washington attorney Congress three percent four decades one percent two weeks
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Irving the American people, and that's what I'm here to do until I leave or the American people. No one else. Let's try and get a few more calls than before the end of the segment. Nate is calling from Milwaukee Wisconsin. Nate, you're on point. Welcome. Hi, thank you for having me. I was going to save that of all the possible people to do a review. If you do, I find this administration and the current Republicans, the house of representatives among the least trustworthy people possible. You've already got from EPA, loosening rules on leading water after the situation leading groundwater after the situation we have in Michigan. These denying global warming despite the increasing fires in California, Sweden of all places and heat waves. That's killing people in Japan. So I don't think they care about he lives that don't think they care about our property, but I am animals. I mean, they have no chance if they don't care about US citizens who are suffering because problems I'm WSB, Ila let you respond. That's an outrageous comment. Completely false is there is not your opinion. But it's falls. Is there anything you talk about being in the in the administration with the Bush administration, they go into the private sector. Now back as the deputy secretary of the interior. In your current position, anything that you've learned any observation that has changed your view of this a construct of environmentalists versus business interests? Well, I, I will tell you one thing that was an important lesson that was applied here, and that is it's very important as a nominee or a political appointing win developing regulations like this that are going to have a, you know, a potentially very significant impact that you do. So in a very collaborative, a manner. And so we, we began this process by point a team experts that are both regulators within the fish and Wildlife Service and in the department of. Commerce, National Marine Fisheries service and pulling the Beck's experts from the country together to work with us on this project so that we would be fully informed by their views. And that was very clever of process. It was thoughtful process and it was all intended to put a very serious and thoughtful proposal forward. And at each age they'll be very different review. But that's sort is one of the lessons I learned at the department of the interior in the past that it is very, very important to listen and collaborate with the the true experts of these programs to end up with the best all seeing exactly what we've done here. David Bernhardt is the deputy secretary of the department of the interior MRs deputy secretary. Thank you for joining us today on point. All right. We're discussing the danger ahead for the Endangered Species Act. You can join the conversation..

Nate deputy secretary deputy secretary of the depart WSB fish and Wildlife Service US Milwaukee Irving Wisconsin EPA David Bernhardt Michigan Japan National Marine Fisheries Beck Sweden
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"During his epic, three year, four thousand mile trek out west Becky. Thank you for joining us on point. Hello bad. I'm really happy to be here. So what is your take on what's transpired over the last couple of weeks? Well, it's very concerning for all species in when I think about walls, I think that would happen when well, reintroduced into central Idaho and Yellowstone. Ninety five ninety. Six was an earmark of how successful how important in dangerous Species Act is. Both were slowly dispersing into the country from Canada, hell ever. It would have taken a long long time for their populations to reach the levels that they that they are now in the wolves that were in Idaho eventually dispersed into Oregon, where I live in, although their numbers are pretty good here we have at the last count about one hundred, twenty four. There's still a lot of habitat and areas for wolves to repopulate, especially in the southern area where I live where you live is they're open and honest discussion about the topic that people can have a, not just a revert to what we see on both sides, which has been the argument for years. In other words with landowners that you know with ranchers that you know is the subject discussed in a reasonable way. You know, I think it is. I think that has improved. I think when livestock producers especially have. Come to realize that, yeah, occasionally they may perhaps lose, you know, a cow or sheep to wolves, which for their purposes is, you know, devastating. They're not going to be put out of business. And so there is, I believe, more tolerance. In fact, I've been volunteering at a ranch in southwestern Oregon where and fortunately, three Cavs were killed by wolves in January of this year. And the rancher is really interesting guy. He actually had raised a wall, so he has, you know, it hasn't affinity for them, but he certainly doesn't want them harming his livelihood. But he was open to the idea of us coming in and doing some nonlethal measures John Steele and son who's a biologist down here with the US fish and Wildlife Service pioneered this really great program of putting up over three miles or almost three miles of turbo flattery, which is a nonlethal measure to keep holes out. The area where the cattle are. So I go out every couple of weeks of flattery is actually down now as well as the cattle are out on the grazing Lamin's. But what I've been doing and we'll do again is go out and help maintain that flattery to keep the wolves out of the area where the livestock were killed in January. So, yeah, I think there is much more of an openness than there once was here. The the gist of what we've seen for last two weeks. All part of an effort by the Trump administration to deregulate again, how would you see these bills here on the ground there? How would you see these bills changing the reality of what you do, what you're trying to do? Well, there's it's so complicated with with wolves, especially they had been listed delisted back and forth in many areas in our state walls are now currently federally listed in the eastern one, third of the state, and they're federally listed in the area where I live the western two-thirds. So we still have federal protections. We don't have state protections. Unfortunately, our governor signed off state protection for wolves in two thousand fifteen, but there's so many elements to it. One thing that's really important is the critical habitat issue that the current changes to the essay will indeed. Danger, habitat is important, you know, for the not only the species that has being looked at, but all the other species that live and disperse through these areas. They have to have those open lions. They have to have the public lands in the areas further populations to return to more normal levels. June is a volunteer, protecting gray wolves in their habitat in Oregon. She is the author of oak entitled journey. The amazing story of OR seven, the Oregon wolf that made history Becky. Thank you for joining us on point today. Thank you very much. We're talking about the recent push to roll rollback key provisions of the Endangered Species Act. You can join the conversation. Is it time to end these protections vital to keep them in place when we return David Bernhardt the deputy secretary of the department of the interior I'm Budd Mishkin this is on point..

Oregon Idaho Budd Mishkin Cavs Becky Trump administration Canada David Bernhardt Wildlife Service US John Steele Yellowstone oak deputy secretary of the depart three year two weeks
"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Lisa. Hi, thanks for having me Lisa. Why is happening now? You know, the stars are line. It's happening for the same reason that a lot of changes in regulatory policy is happening now because there is a Republican led house Senate and White House. And you know an and this is seen as the chance to get through a lot of policy measures that that conservatives have tried and failed to enact for a long time. There have been efforts to reform the Endangered Species Act for decades. You know, I spoke with Richard Pombo who I covered back in the nineties when he was in early two thousands later when he was the chairman of the in the natural resources committee, who at that time in in two thousand five had a Bill that went the farthest at anything has gone so far in an effort to revamp the Endangered Species Act. It's always been beaten back either by. Some in the Republican party who don't wanna go that far or a or a president of an alternate party who who wouldn't move forward with the with the issue. But now you know, there's, there's really an an open space for some of these changes to be made. What's the bills change? There's a lot of them. So the largest set of proposals came out from the interior department last week, and those are regulatory changes that would among other things make it more difficult to protect species from climate change that would insert for the first time. The ability to include economic analyses along with scientific ones in in deciding whether an animal or a plant is is endangered. And then there are a raft of bills and amendments that have all. Come at or close to the same time and the cumulative effects, you know, depending on how many of them pass, even if even if a good portion of them pass is a crumbling around the edges of some of the reform of the measures that have been in place for forty five years. This is always presented as the environmentalists on one side business interests on the other side oil and gas industries. Is there any reasonable middle ground here? You know, I'm not sure the, you know this, you know, one thing that you know the number of conservatives have said to me, you know, and and environmental groups dispute this, but I'll have to is that you know, look, we've tried for years to make reasonable reforms of, you know what I heard from former congressman Pombo from oil and gas industry was versions of, you know, part of this is because of an unwillingness to make any reforms over many decades. I think people who care deeply about the Endangered Species Act and the species that they protect argue that some of the changes that have been sought over the years are slippery slope towards the moment that we're in now, which is what you know what, what many of long wanted, which is a, you know, a real of ratio of of the act, the environmental. I would argue that left to their own corporations and industries would not make any changes on their own. Where would we be had pressure or this act not been in place in nineteen seventy three. And I think it's important to note that it's not just industry who's involved in this. I mean, there's a real movement of, you know, private landowners who you know who have chafed at having critical habitat on their properties and not being able to use portions of their property for farming or Mansingh, but but yes, that's that's exactly right. I mean, there's that the the concern is that if you chip away at this, the very heart of the Endangered Species Act will be lost. And the ability to save thousands of plants animals will be lost is also a compelling quote, from your story, the other day from the president of the western energy alliance who says, and I quote anyone who tries to do even modest reform is completely demagogued are both sides looking at each other, the same as they've looked at each other through the years, or is there any element of there's room to move on either side..

Richard Pombo president Republican party Lisa Mansingh Lisa. White House interior department Senate congressman forty five years
"endangered species act" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"At the sage grouse issue and try to figure out leg do we need to make give them endangered species act protection correct yeah brand on ran onto numbers and said you know what we thought we might need to but we don't well they didn't run they ran a lotta numbers but there is a lot that went into that that will get into on what it took to get to that decision but not everything was in place and that's why it's so important for our talk today about what still isn't yet in place per se in what's being considered but what led up to that were decades of research a lot of concern back of the nineties from biologist not not not not on uh ngo maga as kill negga under up to the good kiki back up one hundred fifty years oh man not not not detail of what would tell how like i know it's impossible stains in like this kind of question drives biologist nuts how many of these birds were there where were they living in how much has their habitat been reduced and how much has their numbers been reduced just so people can arsenic wow how this even came to be yep uh they are an obligation of sagebrush which means they cannot live without sage brush in their lives so you didn't have them in the easter the south earn illinois air you know the mid heart of the midwest you know so the so at the sage rao says sagebrush did so they were everywhere where there was sagebrush and at that time there were fourteen states i believe at least three provinces um that had extensive sagebrush habitat there is an estimate and i remember we talked about this 'cause you asked me if i knew where the sixty million bisons uh figure came from it was guesstimate at i'll say at bay.

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"endangered species act" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on KKAT

"Eight sixty eight t talk radio with a poll who long ago down gene napa manas japan should garbage man trying to sell evil it's unbelievable to me donald trump sparked condemnation after allowing big game hunters such as his son jesus to import the heads of elephants into the us the president overturned the ban brought in by his predecessor jacques obama 2014 personal comes despite the animal still listed under the endangered species act the us fish and wildlife service said it will be doing permits valid control fees from zimbabwe and kenya while you know what i'm talking about don't you uh let me take a couple of the very special for you it's a trail of from the film trophy a documentary that explains to you what's going on with these big game animals and what it means to you whether you hunter not in terms of the the desensitization of the human the uman race you understand what i'm saying to you jw qaisy oh i guess that's in michigan right six go ahead jail you're on the unique uh he account michigan i thought i would have your cut off at off for many years and i say vast majority of the time i don't agree with you at all but i hope and to your opinion but i'm really happy that you were addressing this issue uh with res allowing you poor taste uh tracy you know elephants why isn't such endangered species um i'm just really please e or take this on and this is jay here's the thing you should know with that i i'm not new to this subject i've long been an animal rights activist i've donated seguin to the of funds the elephants gotten worse not better so i think this is only coming up now because trump just reversed what took fifteen years to put in place trump john reversed it and i'm not going to sit here and say whatever he does is right i'm sorry some times things happen wrong in this.

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"endangered species act" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"2017 homeland security spending bills to the money's there construction is expected to begin in february so the new waiver applies to more than two dozen laws there's all these laws to prevent anyone from rebuild there's already offence there too it's a junk facts it's it's just it's a piece of chunk crap then they not even be there so the laws that are preventing the rebuilding of this fence include the clean air act okay that's a stretch yeah the clean water act the endangered species act of course the antiquities act which is a joke and the religious freedom restoration act these are all things that the left has put forward to keep anyone for rebuilding or building any walls dow that way with the written the that's what they did the religious freedom restoration are you care build that wall it's defied religious freedom you can build that wall certified the clean air act okay that's what we got for you had a whistle blower wednesday also this is another one just going for the trump administration i like this guy who's the interior secretary ryan zinke former navy seal at believe congressman from montana so montana's got all these terrible fires it's just really all these wildfires and he's he said we're doing what the past administration and the administration before that even just won't do you said we're clearing trees he said the problem is we've got all this these dead and dying trees and dead and dying vegetation which is fuel for these fires now with the past these past administration no you can't do that you don't let the firebird you can't move out trees even dead ones he said screw that remove it out the dead trees we've got to stop these fires should they're just clearing a path so that there's no more fuel for the fire to continue to bird and one might say well this this could also be in the name of shopping global warming because all at smoke in the atmosphere is definitely a pollutant that is definitely bad for one's health and i'm sure the.

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"endangered species act" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The endangered species act which there was an interesting editorial written in a small newspaper recently out west when i say out west i mean really out western idaho talking about if the endangered species act going away and some of you lifting particularly in the agricultural sector might say absolutely i sure hope so it goes away tomorrow morning and others have you might be cringing at the thought that the endangered species act will go away uh the combat i'm gonna make is that the dangerous species act if not going away but all things swing in pendulums and there is absolutely no possibility that when the endangered species act was created many many decades ago that congress intended for it to have a far reaching implications that it does today in over a period of decades depending on the administration some have tried to curb the endangered species act and others the obama administration not a political statement but the obama administration will radically expanded the reach of the environmental protection agency in see and the endangered species act so now the trump administration is trying to claw back some of those restrictions if not all of them and the general perception it i have is that things swing in pendulums we went way too far in the last eight years on what the s a should be doing and now a swinging back will it go too far the other way perhaps but it has to be given a chance to come back and find a metal so the endangered species act is not going away but the endangered species act has been overreaching overlooked pitches overrestrictive on landowners and i'm sure any of you in the ranching farming uh.

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"endangered species act" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"endangered species act" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from harvard extension school for personal enrichment and professional development courses from accounting to shakespeare extension dot harvard dive edu slash npr there's a new push to change the endangered species act about sixteen hundred plant and animal species are listed under the landmark regulation but lawmakers mostly in the west wants states to have more of a say wyoming public radio's cooper mckim reports back in niger 95 sharon taylor helped reintroduce the endangered wyoming towed in this national wildlife refuge at one point third been just sixteen of these wild foods in the spot the last of their species today let's put him taylor meals by a lake with her two daughters she picks up the brown wardi amphibian with liu rubber gloves is caitlyn's christina step back because they don't wanna step on a pillar places the towed near the water as it squeaks hop sent their goals horrible now at least endangered thanks to a thirty year collaboration between federal agencies the state nonprofits there are now about fifteen hundred wyoming toads the kind of is leading the release is with the us fish and wildlife service he says unfortunately the species still isn't close to being taken off the endangered species list as the win that might happen that is a biological question not a political question but it is often a political question to the endangered species act or esa is credited with keeping ninety nine percent of listed species from going extinct still critics contend the act is ineffective burdening local wildlife managers with excessive federal oversight and leading to endless legal battles to get species off the list.

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