35 Burst results for "Emphysema"

The Left Thinks We're Going to Get to COVID Zero

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:21 min | Last month

The Left Thinks We're Going to Get to COVID Zero

"The left thinks we're going to get to China's absurd goal of COVID zero. That's what they want when you see somebody in a car, driving by themselves with the windows shut, and they have a mask on. And they're clearly afraid, and I'm not trying to judge them. I'm just observing. You could say it's nuts to drive around in a car with a mask on. There are people who are afraid. Of COVID. And we ought to have compassion for those people. It's too bad. But listen, I'm afraid of asteroids. That's just one of my irrational fears. Americans get to have irrational fears. Maybe it's irrational fear. Maybe you're a cancer patient. Maybe you're highly vulnerable. You have emphysema. You have diabetes. You have a loved one who died a terrible death due to COVID. I get it. But that's what they're hoping for. And I hate to be the bearer of bad news. If you're one of those people, we're not going to get to COVID zero. We're not going to have COVID zero. I'm sorry. It's just not going to happen.

China Covid Emphysema Cancer Diabetes
Healthcare Workers React to Supreme Court Vaccine Mandate Ruling

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:09 min | 4 months ago

Healthcare Workers React to Supreme Court Vaccine Mandate Ruling

"It's just the dictatorial totalitarianism of it. That's what to tell somebody you can't work for me unless you have a shot in your arm. Think about that. We don't do that for anything. We don't do that, the most that I'm aware of is there are health insurers who give you discounts if you don't smoke. They give you a break on your healthcare. We don't fire people. If they're overweight, if they have emphysema, if they have cancer, lung cancer, from smoking, we don't fire people. Who can do the job? But nurses are getting fired. Healthcare workers are getting fired and healthcare workers have some of the greatest vaccine skepticism of all professions. I don't know why. I asked to nourish that yesterday, he told me it's because we know we're on the front lines. We're on the front

Emphysema Lung Cancer Cancer
There's Something Suspicious About Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for 'High Risk' Patients

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:54 min | 7 months ago

There's Something Suspicious About Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for 'High Risk' Patients

"I'm sixty one years old slightly a little bit overweight. I got ten or twenty more pounds. I'd like to lose. I don't know what kind of risk that am. I high risk. If i die of covert i guess i would have been a high risk. How many people have we heard didn't have any commodities and died of covert not everybody who dies with coverted has a bunch of pre existing conditions. Right listen to what this reporter jennifer that care. Tv in minneapolis. Saint paul says at the beginning of her report treatment only works if you get covert and you're also at high risk for severe disease. Now listen the treatment only works if you're at high risk that doesn't even make any sense. That's not even logical. It only works if you have and if you're at high risk really that's what it works so if you're low risk it doesn't work you see what they're doing. And i'm not a conspiracy theorist but do you see why the media is a trusted. Think about that. It only works these these antibody treatments. If you're at high risk and if you've got kelvin well guess what asari on like the guy on the titanic knocking over the ladies and little kids to get on the lifeboat. If i get cove in. I want the monoclonal antibody treatments okay. You gotta do now. Why don't i get that opportunity. Oh only if you're high risk will at work you see it only work. It won't work for sixty one year old. You know chubby white guys. It only works if you're like got emphysema and all kinds of other terrible health conditions.

Severe Disease Saint Paul Asari Minneapolis Jennifer Kelvin Emphysema
"emphysema" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:46 min | 9 months ago

"emphysema" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Those those changes in the lung that you described on imaging studies like chest x ray or cat scan. Yes the chest. X ray is helpful. It's a time honored to of our by specialty. In in the profession and the lungs tend to become a bit over inflated. The patient can become barrel chested. Because it's easier to get air in than it is to get us out so you're trap air within the lungs and the patients tend to lift the shoulders up and down so the chest x ray control over inflated lungs. It's quite difficult to make a definitive diagnosis of emphysema..

emphysema
Take a Picture, Tell a Story With Robert Gumpert

Photography Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Take a Picture, Tell a Story With Robert Gumpert

"This is robert comfort. Take picture tell a story robert. This is frankly an extraordinary piece of documentary making take to tell a story and in interplay between words and photographs there that powerful enough as pieces on their own but as you say together they can be far more than the sum of their parts but before we talk about that particular story. I want to start going to rewind good few years prior go back to nineteen seventy four. When you went to cover a coal miners strike in kentucky because that info audio's well tell me about it. Oh so long. It's a long story but it involves two parts. One part is the in seventy two ignite across the united states. And its some point on the way back. I found myself outside on the road running near cabin creek west virginia and as i sat there overrode waiting for arrival you could see the myers going all in their cards completely black because at that point the minds didn't really provide showers or cleaned if he saw and i thought to myself. I have to come back here primarily. Because i come out of labor fam- so two years later i had been sitting on a small sum of money. Workmen's compensation salman and i wanted. I liked to have thought of myself as a photographer. Hungrily really wasn't and i'm looking around for something to do and i talked to a a lawyer. The national lawyers guild about Some work i had done a two day trip by done take photos of former so he was in his office. He said i have to take this call. Go outside so. I wait outside and it was. It was a paper. Said summer programs for law interns in west virginia with the black one. So fish Which was sort of like an ngos. Navid advocates could black black lung association. Yeah so the black lines cold layers get slip. They get from reading too much coal dust. It's sort of like emphysema or silicosis for asbestosis round one which is protect

Robert Cabin Creek West Virginia Kentucky Myers Workmen Salman United States Black Lung Association Emphysema Silicosis Asbestosis
Man of the People

Reply All

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Man of the People

"And the story. You're about to hear it takes place in nineteen seventeen but almost everything that happens in. It feels like it could have happened this week. Basically it starts with this young doctor john. Brinkley he's just married the love of his life many and they decided to go find a place where they can just settle down. He's going to be a town doctor and then they set out for kansas because they see an advertisement that says milford kansas population. Three thousand when you doctor. And they're like okay. We'll go west. So they travel west get milford and three thousand was a typo in fact it was population. Three hundred which say it's like the middle of nowhere. There's nobody there. This is penny lane. She's a filmmaker. She made a documentary about john brinkley. Brinkley moved to milford and they set up shop. This elderly farmer named bills. It's worth comes into the office and you know after much hemming hiring kind of manages to spit out his problem. Which is that. He's a flat tire Get it get it you know and finally the brinkley's like oh. You're impotent okay. Gotcha i'm so sorry. We have nothing for that. Like modern medical science has not solved. That problem. I'm very sorry according to brinkley. What happens next is that he and the former get into small talk and they start talking about goats talking about. How goats never seem to be impotent. They're always zero. And the farmer says something to brinkley. That will change his life. he says. Gosh it's too bad. I don't have billy goat nuts and then brinkley laughs. And then after hours of brinkley's saying no i didn't learn that in medical school. That's not how we do. Things that might now work could be dangerous. The farmer infuses to leave until brinkley agrees to try to fix impotence by giving him go testicles. There's the strangest eureka moment so then of course he tries it and it works. It works according to brinkley. Brinkley tells the world that he has created the goat gland cure. Meaning he will take goat testicles. Insert them into your scrotum and you'll be healed and not just of impotence either. He says it'll cure flatulence emphysema stomach cancer. He's got a version for women which he says will cure female infertility. I talked to this redder. Pope brock who wrote a book about brinkley charlton. He said that when patients came to bring you get the surgery it was set up so that the patients would know that they were getting exactly what they paid for right so the patient was it was local anesthetic so that he could be assured that was actually getting the goat and then Many brinkley usually brinkley's wife would do the snipping on the goat. They would bring the goat balls over opened a guy up toss them in so him up and send him out so just to be clear. This surgery is bogus utterly bogus and privately. Brinkley knows this but he's extremely good. Commencing the public that he believes in what he's selling that goat gland surgery really works. It helps that he looks extremely professional. He's got a three piece suit. He's got round glasses. This neat blonde goatee. He's everybody's idea of what a smart doctor looks like. And so they start showing up at the clinic. These nervous guys ready for the surgery their own goats in tau like you bring the you want this just clutched in your arms and your pounding on the door About pretty soon he He got his own heard out back. Because it was you know was a volume business. By that point the patient would come out browse the herd and pick one the the the goat with which he felt the most connection you know whatever. He felt simpatico. That's the good he. He chose lobster at a restaurant exactly exactly exactly so. Business is booming. Brinkley has found a great scheme. Because what happens is there are men who are impotent. Who get the surgery. And because there are evidences psychological diplo cbo effect saves them and they thanked dr brinkley and for the men that it doesn't work on their generally too ashamed to say anything about it so no matter what he wins

Brinkley John Brinkley Kansas Hemming Pope Brock Brinkley Charlton Milford Stomach Cancer Emphysema John Billy Infertility Dr Brinkley CBO
Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

"Hey Everyone Danielle. Here I'm excited to get into this episode with our guest and curly will be back next week today Monica royer joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Monica Andy An organic baby and children's clothing company. Monica had the idea to launch her company literally from the hospital after she gave birth. Who've with the mission of being the most thoughtful children's brand ever created and as we'll get into entrepreneurship definitely runs in her family Monica. Thank you for joining us today welcomed skin from the couch Danielle. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Thank you. So I just WanNa say that like literally I think one of the days after I had told our team that I. Was Pregnant I had a call with Monica and I was like only slightly panicked about the fact that I was maybe a first time mom and really had no clue what I was doing and was like everyone keeps telling me I need a lay at and I don't even know what that is and Google that and Monica was like such a calming presence and literally knows this case inside a now. Thank you so much what we're is really excited to welcome people into Motherhood, in new, parenthood. So congratulations to you. Thank you. So let's start with an easy question scam your resume. To actually take back to what you can't see on link to in, which is that I came from a very hardworking family and so at the age of twelve, my mom was the manager, the ultrasound department at Good Samaritan. Hospital in Downers Grove and she's like you're gonNA start volunteering. So she went an air sign me up I was working at the front desk outpatient registration and that at fourteen she was like job permit time. So we went I started stocking the shelves at now very defunct retail store of which I. Can't even remember the name but work ethic with something was really important to my parents and so I spent all the time before I graduated from college with all of my summer jobs in the hospital. So physical therapy like you name it I worked all around the hospital when University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana graduated and I immediately got a job in the pharmaceutical industry. So I spent the first decade doing absolutely nothing related to what I'm currently doing but I worked at both Pfizer and Novartis for that decade which was. Very different from currently in that I launched. Monica. Nandy officially in July of twenty fourteen. So now this is my new baby and what I've been most recently working on what's something that we can't Google about you or look up on Lincoln I originally wanted to be a marine biologist. nine or ten old I would have told you wanted to be a marine biologist terrified of the ocean look at seeing but being in it. So that was sort of a non starter, the marine biology career, but I remained totally obsessed with like orcas. Great White Sharks in my very favorite place to travel as the San Juan islands outside of Seattle, marine, biologist, and pharmaceutical industry. This is all very, very interesting. So we're GONNA get into your family. And the support system that you've built around you. But I when I was talking to you a few weeks ago, you were talking about your mom and how her story had such an impact on you tell us about what it was like growing up in your house. What kind of expectations were there? Yeah. So my mom is an immigrant from India. She moved here from India's her dad was dying of Emphysema and some money home when she was nineteen. Years old as I have always a revered both of my parents Andy I always say that will never win the lottery because we did the first time by the parents that we got. So a massive amount of respect for both of them. But my mom, there was something about the family that she came from her family was very matriarchal in in a society in India that was much the opposite in. So my grandfather had nine children altogether the first. Five of which were girls as in India, like at that time most people wanted boys but my grandfather really cherish having girls in he educated each of them like they were boys and so when my mom came here, she came here on sheer well of the education that she had received and so education was of the utmost importance specifically for my mom mom was the only person in her family to marry outside of her Indian cultures or a dad is. Know his ancestors from European background and so my brother and I were so close growing up because we were so different from everybody else we were between world instead of fitting into any world in particular and so I think that unique experience really shaped the adults that we became.

Monica Royer Danielle Founder And Ceo India Google Downers Grove Good Samaritan San Juan Islands Pfizer Emphysema University Of Illinois Nandy Andy Novartis Seattle
"emphysema" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"emphysema" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Our phone number throughout the show will be 855 470 to 82. 855 400 savage. Well, I happen to live in Nashville, Tennessee, and that's a good place to be today to cover our top story. From Fox 17. We get the take of the Corona virus cases on lower Broadway may have been so low that the mayor's office and the Metro Health Department decided well, to keep that hush. Keep that a secret. Circle the word. Why would they do that? Emails between the merry Senior advisor and the Health Department reveal on Ly a partial picture, but what they reveal is very disturbing. The discussion involves the low number of corona virus cases emerging from bars and restaurants. And you're ready for this part. How do Now I have to you from the very, very beginning. Covert Israel. It's a virus. There are no cures for viruses, and they never go away. Viruses run their course. And here's how the courses run. You get it and you overcome it. In this case for most, you get it. You don't even know you had it. You get it, and it feels a lot like allergies and nothing more. For some, you get it. You don't feel so good. I feel bad for a couple days for very, very, very few. You get sick, You need care. And then for we don't know what the true answer is probably less than 1%. It's the final straw to a lifetime of illness. A lifetime of behavior. What does that mean? It means if you're elderly and your health is vulnerable, and you have co morbidity ease. This could be the final straw that takes shout, So it's serious for the elderly if you have COPD or emphysema or heart failure. Or heart disease. Or maybe you're going through cancer and chemotherapy or you have some other kind of an illness that gives you a immune system that doesn't function properly. It can be very, very dangerous. Now. A lot of time has passed since it arrived in a lot of things we didn't know. We now know of the things we know now. From what we didn't know they won going all the way back to January. Turns out obesity and diabetes is pretty dangerous thing to have with covert. Other than that everything is exactly as Johns Hopkins explained it when it came out. So for most get it don't even know you had it or mild symptoms for very few. You feel sick for a minute for you. You need a little care and then for a desperately small minute portion of America. Probably 1%. Along with the other comment. Co morbidity is that are in the process of taking your life. You can take it immediately. So from the very beginning, if you were looking at this from a health standpoint, you say where you get it and get better. You get it, You die or we get a vaccination or perfect the ways to treat and we've come a long way and how we treated And the vaccination is coming now. They don't even like that news, right? Is the president rushing this vaccination? Where's all that testimony about? As if the CDC has any say in when the CDC isn't making the vaccine, Fiza Rhys Advisor says it'll be out end of October or early November. The No wonder the president, saying that That's it. That's viruses, So everything else is really a reaction. To a medical concern. I was saying even back in March, while Dr Savage was saying, I mean, I don't listen every day I can't but Somewhat. Aiken, ex Ejide, He has said. From the very beginning, there's a small group of people. We have got to circle the wagons and protect, but that's not what we did. We didn't We didn't say if you're you know, like, well The protocol was if you were sick, stay home, but we don't give you anywhere to go, Did we? We closed every business. We closed your business. We made you stay home. We said if your kids were sick, they stay home from school. We didn't do that. We close every school in America. Unprecedented. We would quarantine healthy Americans. It was actually the worst thing you could do for covert. And what we failed to do. The sin of omission was not circled the wagons around those that were vulnerable and protect the few. And so we created a genocide in our nursing homes, which by the way is in this national story. Which is, by the way, the point of my whole entire opening monologue. There is nothing new News comes from the word new. There's nothing new. That's news. This is all narratives or the revelation of what we've been saying all along. Because Covad's ceased being for the majority a medical threat a long time ago. Oh, but it's always been an economic threat. It's always been a political threat, because it's always been an economic and political weapon, which is really the point. If I could cut to the chase of this opening monologue, why is it so important for blue Mayor's or blue Governors? Or blue operatives to keep Cove it alive. You're going to be hearing from the CDC director. Redfield. Why is it so important? We stay in mask you're gonna hear from Fauci. Why is it we can't get back to normal. Until well into next year. Why must co Vered stay alive? Because it's a weapon. And what you're starting to see. And what's starting to come to the surface is the proof of that Nashville is your first easiest to see, glaring and damning example. 19 e mails of these people trying to cover this up. Why Why would somebody that is the mirror of a city that is a destination city, meaning it makes its living is music City, Yusa. People from all over coming here, staying in hotels eating at restaurants going and watching live music are going to lie bars to hear live music. Why would you continue to destroy your city beyond what was medically necessary? Because it's a weapon. And a weapon is used to freeze you. A weapon is used to control you. It's because if I want to raise property taxes, 34%. I can't get the city Council to support and I can't get you to vote it in. Maybe I can use Cove it to slip it in. You know, Ah permanent tax increase for a perceived temporary medical danger. Well, that's convenient. Or maybe all of our policies like so many of the blue cities, and so many of the blue states have resulted into streets on fire, violent failed schools, unsafe neighborhoods. Anarchists on the streets stealing and that's a big story today. Reality is now you can thank Black lives matter. Riots for officially being the most costly man made damage to American property in the history of our country..

CDC Nashville America president Cove Metro Health Department Tennessee Senior advisor Johns Hopkins Health Department Ly COPD Covad city Council obesity Dr Savage Aiken emphysema
Coronavirus death rate is higher for those with chronic ills

America's First News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus death rate is higher for those with chronic ills

"New this morning U. S. government report says death rates are twelve times higher for coronavirus patients with chronic illnesses than for others who become infected Monday's report by the centers for disease control and prevention highlights the dangers posed by the conditions which include heart disease diabetes and chronic lung ailments including asthma and emphysema virus patients with chronic conditions six times more likely to be hospitalized but otherwise healthy patients the report based on one point three million lab confirmed cases from late January through the end

Asthma Emphysema
"emphysema" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"As I like to refer to it as magnets I didn't want to leave a bad I lived if you want to contact in the sap fog it's like I wear a mask everyday in order to cope I really didn't feel like socializing I mean I miss my friends and family I just kind of felt numb from the fog would not let up when I heard about a different kind of therapy figured I tried everything else when I give this a shot after green brook TMS I no longer have to hide behind a mask in the fog is lifting they took care of all the insurance stuff so that I could focus on getting better thank you thank you thank you green brook TMS has completely changed my life the preceding announcement was an account by a real green brook TMS patient see if TMS therapy is right for you go to green brook TMS dot com for the millions living with COPD breathing becomes a real struggle COPD stands for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but you may have heard of it as chronic bronchitis or emphysema over time it makes it harder and harder to breathe until you feel like you're breathing through a straw COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the U. S. it kills one person every four minutes and it took my grandmother an estimated twenty four million Americans are affected but as many as half of them don't even know it it's a race against time to spread.

COPD bronchitis emphysema
"emphysema" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Triple digit temperatures there's an excessive heat watch in effect on Sunday as we're gonna get up near a hundred and five it will completely kill the virus in Arizona but it may be a step forward towards the of an eventual peak or mitigating the damage and I'll tell you Jimmy the other thing I was thinking about this this morning the the fact that if he does play a factor in at least controlling the virus or putting it away for a period of time leads me to wonder if as this subsides at some point if we're going to go through another population boom in Arizona you know my family moved here my dad's family moved here in the thirties and forties because my great grandmother had emphysema and a lot of people are like that and I wonder we're about to go through another wave of that people saying to themselves if this is going to come back as a lot of people are predicting I'm gonna go someplace where it's warm and I don't have to deal with it quite as much well you are going to have to deal with it though because while it's on your mat outside you're gonna be spending most of your side indoors in seventy five degree temperatures because of the A. C. H. true and it's a dry environment in your house those are the combinations of the factors that combine to make up prime environment for corona virus while outside where you don't want to be anyway that's where the heat or UV rays are killing I now there's something else I think we ought to point out for those I know there's a lot of people in here in the valley who've gotten outside exercise and they've been encouraged to do that in the last several weeks as Doug governor Ducey put in place to stay at home order just keep in mind we are headed for triple digit temperatures this weekend don't do anything stupid like trying to hike without water or proper hydration or anything else that's gonna leave you and bad physical shape because you're not prepared for triple digit temperatures it also stretches our resources are first responders you have to come and help you when they need to be ready to help somebody who's dealing with the virus that's an excellent point so if you need to get out to get out of the house and exercise that's fine just please please use common sense and be careful six forty eight it's time now for entertainment news brought brought to you by bonafide Arizona's top coolsculpting provider now offering free virtual consultations visit frees me AZ dot com today.

Arizona Jimmy emphysema Doug governor Ducey
"emphysema" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on 710 WOR

"She came to me with a lung cancer right lung cancer too short of breath should emphysema a lot of people with lung cancer have emphysema smokers COPD short of breath it's pretty common she seventy one should cat scans years ago showing a mass in the long it was growing and growing and growing she got a pet scans showing positivity and well she was seen by a surgeon who want to remove part of her along and she understood that she is already short of breath and if the surgeon removes part of our long she's gonna be more short of breath should understand why the surgeon to then offer other options he didn't want surgery she didn't want chemotherapy she didn't know what she wanted until someone told us you might want to call doctor Lieberman and then we met and we met actually years ago and we talked about all the options we talked about treatment of lung cancers with non invasive treatment with low cutting and no bleeding and she was treated years ago with her treatment and why we talking about today we'll talk about it today because she came in for treatment with the follow up she was treated years ago should for this massive along she's now cancer free her tests are normal her blood tests are normal her physical exam is normal she's doing well and she's very very very very happy this is the work that we do every day at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway thirty eighth street in the heart of New York City and by the way we'll talk about myself for just a minute because a lot of people are talking and life they don't have credentials to give advice for cancer treatment or they don't really have training a lot of people say a week I work on the street or want to do this or want to do that I know Onkel Harry or aunt Edith did this and blah blah blah well that's not science that's a anecdote maybe it works for uncle Harry but it may not work for anybody else and it leads a lot of people to do bad things and a lot of women are mastectomies because aunt Edith had a mastectomy and blah blah blah well that's not science I can tell you in my experience from patients come here we talk about all the options we talk about science and medical experience and that's why I want to talk about my experience and who I am so you know who's talking on the radio because a lot of people are given advice on the radio but people who say they're doctors aren't even medical doctors Rabia doctor of weather forecasting doctor of road paving or doctor of whatever that doesn't mean there are medical doctors different kinds of doctors my mother M. D. and just to reiterate I was born and raised in Waterloo Iowa went to public school I went to university I went to medical school M. D. at age twenty five real doctor just like my brother Ted M. D. at twenty five like my illustrious son ari who's.

emphysema
"emphysema" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Don't go to work don't go to school contact the medical provider and if you're an older person while this may not change even after the government reopens you are vulnerable because we know it's a certain age we know it's a certain vulnerability so if you have COPD you have emphysema you have heart disease heart failure if you have a compromised immune system if you have diabetes this is serious now the numbers are still low that you'll get it and if you follow these you won't probably but if you do would be very serious for you or deadly that will continue you can always have this why did we have to close immediately well that's a whole other cultural crisis isn't or revealing character flaw that the government doesn't feel like you would that if you got sick you go to work anyway if your kid was sick it send it to school anyway because you can't take off work they don't trust you to be responsible your government has to do things to control you because apparently they don't feel like you can control yourself that's a big part of our taxation too isn't it we pick winners we pick losers because we don't think you'll naturally do wise things we try to incentivize you to do certain things or penalize you for doing certain things or take your money and give it to someone else who was John F. Kennedy first in nineteen sixty two that the great probably the best speech of all he said first of all when you go to work and you make money that's morally your money not the government's in the governments to decide how much you get to keep secondly we trust how you'll spend it you pay down your debt or you'll go out and buy things and if you buy things government doesn't have the final say you do and as you do companies will expand as expand they will hire more taxpayers burden less that's how you properly fund government that's how you build an economy these are all kind of moral indicators where government and think you would wash your hands your government didn't think you'd stay home they didn't think you keep your kids on so that's why it's laughable when you look at this what your children are sick keep them home you have to schools are closed if you don't feel sick stay home don't go to work we have to your work is closed but there's gonna come a point and it may not be for every age group it may not be for every county in America but most of the country has a very very low level of infection and some of this infection is good to process and build immunity that everybody that catches it is going to build an immunity but most will and that's really how you solve these things plus seasons gonna kick in and I had somebody emailed me earlier today what is the temperature have to do well everything when it's cold it's wonder you're staying in the house you're staying in the office proximity that's what we had a problem across ship that's where the problem in a nursing home so we have a problem on a crowded subways but that'll be actually when it gets warmer we distance naturally when it gets warmer the bug itself goes dormant we're going into that season as well there's a lot of data that would support the president's decision that we are now at a place well we can have a whole lot more data then hysteria some reasonable certainty versus complete and utter blindness and begin to discuss reopening now if your elderly we're gonna still circle the wagons around you in the in the in the areas of New York or maybe even Los Angeles or some of these other areas I think Seattle's kind of coming out of it right now but to Seattle to some degree you'll still circle the wagons with extra beds and making sure you get first priority on the ventilators and so on I mean there's things will do and then for the rest of us will keep washing our hands will keep social distancing will stay home when we're sick we'll keep our kids home from school when they're sick I mean that will all continue but it is reasonable for the country to re open or you're going to do worse harm and that's all the president is trying to explain in this sudden pivot the narrative of the cure can't be worse than the disease but how did the media react to that not so good we come back just yesterday during the news conference during a montage of some of the questions and I wonder semi final say of the hour if this were beginning to see a clear picture of true colors let me finish that join those.

emphysema
"emphysema" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Reopens you are vulnerable because we know it's a certain age we know it's a certain vulnerability so if you have COPD you have emphysema you have heart disease heart failure if you have a compromised immune system if you have diabetes this is serious now the numbers are still low that you'll get it and if you follow these you won't probably but if you do would be very serious for you or deadly that will continue you can always have this why did we have to close immediately well that's a whole other cultural crisis isn't more revealing character flaw that the government doesn't feel like you would that if you got sick you go to work anyway if your kid was sick it send it to school anyway because you can't take off work they don't trust you to be responsible your government has to do things to control you because apparently they don't feel like you can control yourself that's a big part of our taxation too isn't it we pick winners we pick losers because we don't think you'll naturally do wise things we try to incentivize you to do certain things or penalize you for doing certain things or take your money and give it to someone else who was John F. Kennedy first in nineteen sixty two that the great probably the best speech of all he said first of all when you go to work and you make money that's morally your money not the government's and the governments to decide how much you get to keep secondly we trust tell you'll spend it you pay down your debt or you'll go out and buy things and if you buy things government doesn't have the final say you do and as you do.

emphysema John F. Kennedy
New York confirms 2 coronavirus deaths

Bloomberg Daybreak

01:04 min | 2 years ago

New York confirms 2 coronavirus deaths

"They've been some patrons in New York City bars and restaurants got in their final rounds last night starting today officials of closed down because of coronavirus gyms in movie theaters in the city are also dark as well it is the same case in New Jersey and Connecticut it comes as two more covert nineteen deaths have been reported in New York state raising the death toll to at least ten New York governor Andrew Cuomo Roach a New York times op ed calling for president trump to use the army corps of engineers to add more medical facilities to fight the disease Cuomo later talked about it during an interview the people who are going to come in of the older people with underlying illnesses emphysema heart disease it cetera they need to Q. care we don't have those beds what I'm saying now is we've been behind this disease all along let's get ahead of it New York City is now reporting more than four hundred sixty cases of covert nineteen in New Jersey a third corona virus death has been reported with mail almost one hundred eighty positive cases in

How does the new coronavirus compare with the flu?

Dr. G Says

10:13 min | 2 years ago

How does the new coronavirus compare with the flu?

"Coronaviruses are RNA viruses they're very infectious the cousins are measles and if buyers is that cause the common cold which are also corona viruses but they're not novel corona viruses the ones that cause the common cold we've had around for years and years and when your listeners get Sniffles and you know start to cough it said Trinh and it's usually early winter or early spring this is corona virus as a rule but the novel coronavirus the corona virus of twenty nineteen is a specific mutant to which we have no immunity we've had a herd immunity from the old corona viruses that infect us and cause the common cold but we don't have any specific immunity to the new coronavirus now these viruses are very infectious so you breed on somebody and you can transmit the disease the reason you do that is because you have receptors for these viruses in your tongue the cheeks your nose your lungs and even in your heart and so when you get loaded with virus your immune system has got to fight this virus that it is never seen before so there's all kinds of new immune processes that go in which are very complicated they go into effect to try to overcome this new infection and that is primarily corona back now the which reason it's called corona viruses the covering of the virus and this is extremely small virus which can only see under the electron microscope so it's invisible to the naked eye these viruses have projections that stick out that make them look like they have a crown and that's why it's called the corona or crown virus so how does it spread and what's the life cycle like from the time of infection to win symptoms may begin to present themselves to when someone's all better yes so that's that's a good question now the problem with this virus is that you can have it and not know it when someone is exposed to somebody who's definitely infected proven infected it takes about five days at the least to show symptoms and the median time is eleven point five days so we would like to quarantine people for two weeks because we know that within two weeks you're going to show signs of the infection so that's the rule of thumb now the problem with this virus as I just said is that you can have it and not know it and about eighty percent of people that are infected with this will have something that you would consider a head cold or mildly scratchy throat and that's it nothing else and then there's twenty percent of people who may have what we in medicine call call morbidities that is either have diabetes run chemotherapy you're an alcoholic you smoke too much you have bad asthma you have COPD if you're older you have emphysema people like that that get this virus from somebody else wind up with bad kinds of rest a Tory problems lung problems and most of the deaths that occur from pneumonia and overwhelming lung infection and that's why everybody has to be checked out everybody has to be careful because we don't know who those people are that have these these glitches in their immune systems we're talking to the chairman of medicine at Saint Joseph university hospital Dr Baba heater here on I heart radio there's two other types of illnesses that a lot of people are dealing with at the moment the flu and allergies how can people tell them apart from Kobe nineteen will cover nineteen S. as Tony Fauci the head of the N. I. H. St is about ten times worse than the flu that's when you get the bad infection you'll run a high fever but you do that with the flu if you haven't been immunized you'll get muscle aches and pains you have no idea perhaps vomiting maybe some diarrhea all of these things are similar to that which you would get when you get the flu and it's extremely difficult to tell the difference but the difference is we have a vaccine for the flu and we also have a rapid test we do in the emergency room to determine whether you have the flu we can do it on site most hospitals have flu swabs in flu tests that they can do and you can get a result within an hour the allergies are very easy you don't run a high fever with allergies you you have Sniffles you do your you know your nose turns red you cough up a lot of gunk but that's not the same thing as the flu and it certainly is not the same thing as cobra nineteen you just product testing can you explain for a moment what we should know about tasks for this coronavirus and why they seem to be a bit more complicated than say a test for the flu yes so the reason they are difficult is that the testing because coronas are very common the regular garden variety coronas we have to be able to discern which one is coded nineteen there's a very complicated process which revolve is around the fact that this is a DNA virus and we do something called polymerase chain reaction on the sample that's why regular hospitals don't have at this point the capability of testing for this virus it has to go to the state health department and before that it had to go to the communicable disease center better known as the CDC you know the P. C. R. which we routinely do for things like diarrheal infections we do the PCR for tuberculosis now this has this is a test that has stream Leist as streamlined diagnosis of infections thirty years ago we don't have anything like this we would have to culture you for T. B. we would have to find out you know when your school if you had organisms that cause diarrhea now we can do the same thing for corona virus but we have to be able to produce the markers namely the R. N. A. ribonucleic acid from the virus which we can get we have to multiply that and then we have to create these little tests that will define and show us that you the patient has an antibody or that is something that really reacts with this in in what's called the polymerized chain reaction the polymerized chain reactions a little complicated to describe your listeners but suffice it to say that that's the reason we haven't had test up front really quickly we're talking to the chairman of medicine at Saint Joseph university hospital Dr Bob Lee Hida a lot of information is floating online suggestions for how people can keep themselves and their families better protected what are some practices are products that we know actually work hand washing with soap works pure rail or hand sanitizers work if you can get a hold of some we have them on the walls here I have a bottle right on my desk in front of me here I have several bottles at home and I wipe my hands down and I also get those you know those wipes we use in the gym yes things right like Jim stop if you're going to a gym in your working out with a lot of other P. people you want to really wipe the machines that I should be doing that anyhow but now you really should do that if you go to the theater you should wipe the chair down before you sit down and watch a movie and most people are going to go to theaters and movie theaters and sit with two hundred people today nor are they going to go to Broadway shows and do the same thing or flying an airplane you got a white you should have done this before corona you got to wait to see down you got to wait the tray table down and make sure that things are pretty clean because these viruses can stay on surfaces for upwards of two days and some people are saying even longer what about face masks well with my patients that have certain illnesses I make them wear face masks now the face mask they wear is the cloth face masks the N. ninety five facemask to the basement that grips around your nose and is any seamless you you you breathe through that mass but there's no leakage of air around it the regular cloth face masks does one thing it protects you from touching your face because if you handle some object that's been contaminated with the virus can you touch your face and that's a problem you'll get the infection it'll go right up into your nary's of your nose or into your mouth and everybody touches their face so we're saying we're a mask a regular cloth mask it'll prevent you from touching your face also wash your hands as much as you can and keep their hands as sterile as possible now if you are infected and you're coughing up phlegm and you're hopping up what you think maybe virus you should wear a nice N. ninety five mask or at the least the surgical mask where ever you go and frankly shouldn't go anywhere you should stay in your house don't go to the emergency room don't go to your doctor's office because you're going to contaminate everybody else that's there if you have trouble breathing or you're running a super high fever then you go to the emergency room where then you go to your doctor's office dial nine one one get an ambulance and get over there or have somebody drive you that's my advice is there anything else about this disease or outbreak do you think it's important we now I think I think there's not much we need to know right now there's very little known about the course it's going to take whether it's going to fade away in the summer or whether it's going to continue into the fall I do hope that we have a vaccine in the early fall September October time so that we can all get immunized with the flu at the same time we can get vaccinated against corona nineteen covert nineteen because that was that's the only surefire way that we're gonna be able to control this infection as you know it's it's devastating certain countries in Europe like get Lee and countries like China and and it's just been devastating to all sorts of populations especially the elderly those elderly people who were quite ill with lung disease or people who chain smoke probably even people who smoke pot you've got a big understanding that your lungs are irritated and when you have an irritated long it sets you up for roaring infection with this virus because their receptors in the long for the

Sniffles Trinh
First coronavirus-related death reported in New York

News, Traffic and Weather

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

First coronavirus-related death reported in New York

"Woman hospitalized early this month has become the first death connected to covert nineteen in the state of New York ABC's Aaron Katersky in New York has more the eighty two year old woman who died was one of the first known patients in New York City to contract coronavirus she had been hospitalized in Brooklyn since March third and she had emphysema one of the underlying conditions that made her particularly susceptible to the virus there are more than five hundred cases of coronavirus now state wide but she is the first

New York ABC Aaron Katersky New York City Brooklyn
Woman, 82, is the first person in N.Y. to die from coronavirus

Rush Limbaugh

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Woman, 82, is the first person in N.Y. to die from coronavirus

"The first person to die of coronavirus in New York was an eighty two year old woman she had been hospitalized on March third and she had an underlying respiratory condition emphysema her death was announced by governor Andrew Cuomo who said there are now more than five hundred cases of coronavirus

New York Andrew Cuomo
"emphysema" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on 710 WOR

"She has a son she has COPD she was seen by a pulmonologist at another super pooper scooper us brothers if you think I'm only talking about what I can tell there's plenty of them and will show the long knowledgeable and they tried to biopsy it and they missed and so our surgeons at this hospital want to cut out part of her lung issues worked out but this big hospitals had a CT scan showed a big mass of the left apex it was sixteen millimeters as was new she also has long scarring she has emphysema she's on oxygen oxygen they wanna cut out part of our long what happens when you're on oxygen the color part of your long you need your long for breathing your breathing is gonna be less good so she had a biopsy was very suspicious pet scan was very suspicious she was told by her doctors who is ninety nine point nine percent sure it's cancer should in a regular D. it was suspicious yeah pulmonary functions swell and by the way she's an ex smoker she quit ten years before but sad to say often the body remembers which is a great reason to stop smoking today or better yet never start this woman was using oxygen at home and was using oxygen even at rest can a sister with breast cancer the father of prostate cancer I examined her shed some crackles in the long shoes on oxygen she could barely move without oxygen scanned positive we spoke about all the options well she learned.

COPD emphysema cancer
Are Cell Phones the Cigarettes of the 21st Century?

The Ultimate Health Podcast

10:38 min | 2 years ago

Are Cell Phones the Cigarettes of the 21st Century?

"We go with Dr Joseph McCulloch Doctor mccalla. Welcome back to the podcast so great to chat with the again. Well it's great to be here Jesse. Yeah we got a lot to get into. I loved your New Book On. Ems and I love the title. Em assist perfect. My sister's responsible for that one love it. I'm sure people are gonNA love it as well as we jump in here. I think it's important to talk about how you first became aware of ems. I know for you. This has been something on your radar for about twenty years. Some curious how did you initially come in contact with them? And what was your initial reaction. Well because I've got a website that seeks to educate the public about health issues. I became aware of this a long time ago about two decades ago as you mentioned and it was pretty clear if you if you're serving the literature that this is an issue so I knew about it. I accepted that they were an issue but reluctantly chose to accept it. Fully embrace it and act upon it in a way that would protect me specifically largely because I fell prey to the deceptive campaigns by the wireless industry essentially replicated the patterns of the tobacco industry. They absolutely do work. They seek to create doubt and confusion. Which is a primary strategy and they certainly did my mind than they effectively by spinning off of many other ostensibly credible research studies. That suggested. There wasn't an issue. So pretty this doubt this lack of scientific certainty and unlike tobacco which has very clear and strong suggestions that. There's something going on here. I mean just common sense. Why would you inhale something? That's Y- smoke into your lungs. I mean it just doesn't make sense is not going to be an issue but wireless radiation. It doesn't have that at all in fact to other counters at our amazing Lee beneficial to us and that is incredibly inconvenient prize with all these tools easy access to the greatest innovation history of mankind. Which is the Internet. And it's invisible. You can't hear see it smell it so you're just never aware that you're being enveloped with these exposures with that. In the convenience aspect primarily I just shows to be remained ignorant and at ignorant but chose to embrace it in full and take measures to counteract it and I didn't really get motivated to get more serious about it until one of my mentors. Dr Klinghoffer confronted me with this. He's a clinician. For many years in sees a large number of people still in the trenches being patient some of the sickest patients in the world sees in Europe and in the US and one of his basic tenants as he refuses to see someone. Unless they're gonNA mitigate the M. F. Exposures because he knows that there's not going to get better so that to me was a giant clue and I got serious about in once I started studying it and it took me three years to compile information. This book became real obvious that this was indeed. A real threat in that the source of the confusion was the wireless industry and they're far more sophisticated than tobacco industry. Everyone knows how effective they were. I mean Jay's we had every federal regulatory agency telling us in warning of the dangers of cigarette smoking yet they still persisted for thirty years before we finally got the black box warnings and telling people very clearly authoritatively that these are dangerous and I think everyone listening most likely can remember when the four five. Ceo's of all the major tobacco industries testifying before Congress saying one that cigarettes were not addictive and to to the best of their knowledge did not cause cancer. They were lying through their teeth. It took that long and they still lied. But finally attorney generals were able to correct that in impose tens of billions of dollars in sanctions against them. And we're going to head towards a similar result with the wireless intrigued but it's going to probably take another twenty thirty forty years. I mean because the evidence is so clear and compelling once you objectively review it and before we get deep into the nitty gritty here. I think it's important. Were on the same page and to get there. Can you explain exactly what? Ems are sure mfs is an acronym is your electromagnetic fields and describes the entire range spectrum. Which can be anywhere from a fraction of a cycle per second which is called hurts too many billions of or even hundreds of thousands of billions of cycles. Per Second. Not all you must are dangerous. We've been exposed to EMS since air entire human biological history and example of those would be sunlight. Sunlight isn't enough broadly. They're broken down into two different categories. I O nizing radiation in which there is some from sunlight. Ultraviolet radiation was gives us our son Tannin. Vitamin D is actually ionizing radiation. That's when you get too much you'll get a thermal burn as dangerous. You don't WanNa get excessive something like that but obviously some as important to stay healthy. I don't think any rational human being other than a dermatologist. Which hard to classifies rational most of the time would disagree with that and we've had relatively low exposures. I mean they're earth actually emits certain very low level. Emf's Shuman Resin Sake. Seventy eight hurts or so but this is very low level but the exposures that we're most concerned about our manmade ones which didn't really exist before the late eighteen eighties or so electrical fields radiofrequency feels these were not around the planet but they started becoming more prominent even though they were around for four years at the end of World War. One they were still pretty low and if you compare the levels of a typical major exposure we're concerned with which radio frequencies which is about two to five Gigahertz Gigahertz as a billion cycles per second those are the frequency that your microwave oven runs on and your cellphone. They're almost identical frequencies. The industry uses heat thermal damage as a measure of the safety. Because it's the same for microwave. So their thought is that if it's not heating your tissue like a microwave than can't possibly cause biological damage will go back to that later. There's this broad spectrum of ems the end of world will want certain level even though ems. Were around be as we're ROTHROCK FORTY YEARS? It was still relatively low out century later. Nineteen or twenty twenty. We are literally at a billion billion times higher exposure than we were a hundred years ago. That's ten to the fifteenth. So it's hard to imagine that an increase in that type of magnitude of exposure wouldn't have some biological impact so today for example getting into the different man media mass. There's four different types. One being radio frequencies than we got magnetic fields electric fields and dirty electricity. Well Yeah. Those are the primary mimic exposures note. Nature does create radio frequencies to I mean they exist in stars amid him. I think you'll see there are out there but the really really low exposures if you were to measure them they be. I mean it almost immeasurable by most commercial equipment so the issue is not only the frequency but the amount of intensity of exposure them out of power. That's being broadcast into your tissue right. We're going to be looking at the Manmade Weinstein how we can lessen or totally eliminate the impact on the human body. You talked about the SARS and you talked about the effect of this radiation causing heat on the tissue so first of all I just want to get into the FCC here. 'cause they're the ones that are creating these guidelines and the guidelines they're creating have to do with heating tissue so let's go a bit deeper into this and talk about SARS and in the measurement that we're using here and how that works will SARS is another acronym again stands for a specific absorption. I forget the IRS Stanford but essentially it's a term used to describe how much heat is generated when you're exposed to electronic device and it's not unreasonable because it is. I says microwave transmitter. So it will vibrate your tissues as certain frequency and create. He'd and he'd can clearly 'cause biologic damage and it can be an indirect indicator of the amount of danger. That's there but by no means a direct because we know now very clearly and there's literally hundreds if not thousands of studies have proved conclusively that is not the heating damage is what we call the non thermal effects and for the longest time it. We really confused me. No one really knew or understood. What the biologic mechanism was for these. Non Thermal Effects. We just knew. That's what causes damage. We knew it was heating was very very clear was not heating the tissue and if you go abide by these standards FCC I think just adopted him from another professional agency is like International Electrical Standards Agency that they took that from and they've got these models based on but even using this flawed model they use this model that is called Sam which was patterned after a six foot. Two or four military guy was weighed about two hundred thirty pounds sale very large head and it totally different characteristics than a child. They're measuring SAR based on that model. So it's flawed and they're not measure for children also it's slugged begin with but even using that model. It's still an indirect indication because it will give you an indication of the amount of power that's being generated by that devise. But you cannot you simply cannot use. Sars is indication of the safety of your phone because it isn't other than you maybe can compare models and will lower star rating. Might be a little safer but you still need the shield yourself because exposure this will clearly increase your risk of biological damage in the most common would be cancer but you know what I call cell phones to cigarettes of the twentieth century for good reason because there's so many similarities. Not only did they wireless industry pattern their tactics after tobacco but they also in many ways are almost identical with the mechanism of the Holocaust. Har- They do not hurt you. After one exposure or exposure for a week a month or maybe even a decade it takes these is a long term chronic exposure. Where ultimately you'll succumb to the biologic damage. So this is a new experiment. Most people listening to this if not been exposed to their cell phone for more than two decades. I mean there are some but there's like no one more than three decades and debt still maybe under the window a word required exposures going to occur to encounter these side effects and you know people can smoke for four or five decades and still not have cancer now. They make succumb to other reasons. Like my mom who's longtime smoker and was confusing to see by the tobacco industry and she ultimately wound up dying from complications from COPD or emphysema. So you don't necessarily have to die directly from cancer but there's a lot of people coming down with brain cancer as and even prominent celebrities. We have two senators Ted Kennedy and John McCain who both died from brain cancer secondary to cell phone

Sars Cancer Brain Cancer Dr Joseph Mcculloch Jesse Europe United States Dr Klinghoffer Doctor Mccalla LEE Copd Congress Ted Kennedy International Electrical Stand FCC Attorney Shuman JAY
How To Make a Mass Extinction

Science Talk

09:43 min | 2 years ago

How To Make a Mass Extinction

"This episode. Not so scary but exciting citing that we're kind of in the most consequential few decades in the past few hundred million years. That's Peter Brennan. On his website. He describes himself as a placental mammal camel but he's also an award winning journalist and the author of the book the ends of the world volcanic apocalypse lethal oceans and our quest to understand understand. Earth's past mass extinctions a book that the journal Science called a surprisingly lyrical investigation of Earth's mass extinctions in New York City recently and we sat down together to talk about the book midway through our discussion. We'll take a break for a short segment sponsored by the Cavalry Prize with Stanford neuroscientists scientists Carlos shots which perhaps surprisingly has some connections with the discussion of mass extinctions. And now Peter Brandon. Let's talk about mass extinction all right. The book is really kind of a survey of the great mass extinctions in the history of our our planet. Yeah there's a reason though that you go through all that and that's related to what's happening today right. Yeah I really wrote it because I think in the popular imagination mass extinctions or what happens when big rocks from space at the planet. And I'd noticed that there was this really interesting thing. Conversation going on in the geology community over the last thirty years or so where yes and asteroids seems to have something to do with why the dinosaurs went extinct. But they're all these Older mass extinctions some of which were much more severe and almost all of them had to do with severe rapid climate change driven by changes in carbon dioxide basically atmosphere. And so I thought there was both this sort of sci-fi story about these sort of lost worlds that you might not be familiar with 'cause unfamiliar with the dinosaurs but The planet really has been a bunch of different plants over its lifetime and so if I thought that was really interesting to write about but there's also this news hook about. Hey we're starting starting to pull some of the same lovers that have been pulled in the worst things that have ever happened this time. We're pulling the levers in the past natural Rossi's of the levers rate. Yeah so in the past this has happened. It's been for the most part sort of tectonic cataclysms So when one of the mass extinctions there's some weird stuff going on with mountain building that might draw down. Co Two and plunged into an ice age but for a bunch of the mass extinctions actually are seem to be associated with these huge apocalyptic volcanic events called large provinces were just an unimaginable amount of lava comes out of the earth covering Thousands of are actually in one case three million square miles But law alone. If it comes out part of the world can't kill everything on the planet has to be you know because things on the other side of the planet seemed to be going extinct. In these mass extinctions scientists are trying to figure out what that must have something to do with the gases that are coming out at the same time. And what you see in some of the mass extinctions but if you know how to read the rocks if you're a really clever geochemists you can see that there are. These huge injections of carbon dioxide is the air from these volcanoes. And you can tell that it gets really warm. The Ocean starts to lose its oxygen and this thing called Ocean acidification. which we're doing now? which is what happens when too much co two reacts with seawater is is happening in these mass extinctions too? So it's sort of unnerving to see that you know we're not there yet but Were trending direction. Where if you go too far down that road that it can really be all breaks loose right? A lot of people have said we are in the midst of the sixth mass extinction but the scientists who talked to are a little more conservative conservative than that. Well I think paleontologists are certainly you know if you're a conservation biologist or any area and ecologist you can just see this tragedy unfolding all around to you and I'm not trying to minimize the the catastrophic damage. Humans have done to the planet. But I think it's actually. It's both worrying that we could even be in the same conversation as these mass extinctions because these are just you're turning everything up to eleven and trying as hard as you kill everything on the planet. I mean this is the the end the boundary boundary sort of condition for how hard the planet can be pushed. And we're not there yet. which the good news? We still have time to save the planet and that's really the point of that Sort of discussed in the book that you know. We're driving species extinct at a crazy rate today. But they're still time before we get to the level love you know when the asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs when these giant volcanos were happening. So there's time to save the the turn the ship around and it's sort of scary but exciting we're kind of the most consequential few decades in in the past few hundred million years. It's really up to us to to avert to avert this Scott in a mind boggling and I didn't mean to minimize what's going on right now. By saying that the scientists he spoke to her a little more conservative about whether we're in the sixth mass extinction. It's more more like you don't have lung cancer yet. You only have emphysema right so everything's cool. Everything's bad right exactly If we keep up the current rates then we'll get there for certain In the next few decades centuries to Millennia depending on how you count but we will. We'll get there for certain if we don't change their behavior and we're making the sound like a very depressing book but there's some there's some lighter moments to it. I'd say I was it has to do with your felicity as a writer actually happening out there. Scientists the funny people funny people for example. Just to since. We're trying to have a good time here. let's talk about the first time you went out the Cincinnati Rock count people and the guy. The had a name for something that you picked up. Yeah right so if you know how to read the rocks and you know what you're looking looking at. There is no matter where you are in the country. There's not a boring spot for geology And there's some great. There's a APP called rocked which you condemn on my phone and it will tell you what you're standing on basically and so no matter where you are. If you're in New England you can look up. Oh my goodness I'm on this volcanic archipelago that crashed into tropical North America. Four hundred fifty nine years ago or if you're in boulder where I am you know there's red rocks from the middle of Panja and the dinosaurs and you know there really isn't a boring or right here in New York. We're on top of UH either Cambrian stuff from the dawn of animal. Life Ocean rock or in Brooklyn. There's glacial stuff from these crazy ice ages. That happened. Not that long Ongo and there's some cretaceous stuff in Staten Island's from the dinosaurs from these big river delta. So there's an amazing story underneath your feet. No matter where you are and geology is just is sort of amazing endlessly fascinating field. That sort of tells you about these alien worlds at the planet spend before a sort of crisscrossed the country and joined up with professional geologists amend was sort of introduced these groups of amateur theologists. Who are really inspiring people because they take their own time out of their own weekends to You know just pull over to the side of the road. These unloved highway road cuts. 'cause they know that there's amazing fossils there and they're incredibly dedicated to it and I was sort of a Newbie and I joined up with him. One day to look for fossils on the side of the highway in Cincinnati because it turns out that in Cincinnati four hundred fifty six four hundred fifty million years ago It was a shallow sea and it was filled. With sort of weird things. Look like horseshoe crabs in these giant squid like things. And so it's just it's totally alien. SCIFI world infects the lends its name to a particular time because of that right. There's this thing called the Cincinnati and in the late or division period because Cincinnati is the best place in the world to find fossils fossils from this period right before this big mass extinction but I went there and I went with all these Sort of really interesting quirky people. Who Do this spare time? Just pull over the side of the road looking for fossils and we're finding lots of these things called grab delights which are these weird sea creatures that swam in these colonial homes and stuff like that not colonial homes like from I'm from New England But yes I was finding a lot of those and so I would ask people what's this and say. Oh it's a trial by. Oh it's too late and then I thought I found something and I showed it to this guy and that's what it was and he said that's a leave right I said is that good. And he said Yeah Lever Right there and he took it out of my hand and he threw it on the ground so good. Yep Ah so you you went out. With a whole bunch of different people are amateurs and professional researchers and Saul a lot of I just got back from England and I saw the white cliffs of Dover Right So the white cliffs of Dover like a really good example of a lot of stuff. You're talking talking about it's all fossils. Yeah right yeah. I think people don't appreciate that limestone for the most part is Stuff it was. It's calcium carbonate. That was sort of precipitated by sea creatures. And if you go to Indiana and you see limestone if you put under Mexico begin see it's just all a lot of it's like little Z.. Creatures and things like that and the white cliffs of Dover Our caucus fours which are the you know you see today from space in these giant swirling blue green sort of hurricanes in the ocean. And it's just plankton. And you give plankton enough time and it can build up something like the white cliffs of Dover this giant Edifice Livingston. I wants to living

Cincinnati Dover New York City Peter Brennan Peter Brandon Indiana Emphysema Rossi Saul Brooklyn Writer Staten Island Edifice Livingston England Lung Cancer Scott New England
Jonathan Blum: The Usual Uncertainties

Bookworm

09:57 min | 2 years ago

Jonathan Blum: The Usual Uncertainties

"This bookworm and today my guest Jonathon Blum. Who's book of Short Stories? Were talking about today. The usual uncertainties. Well he's one of the very few people who I heard bookworm when he was attending Santa Monica College Enj from Santa Monica College he transferred to Ucla from Ucla. He applied to and got admitted to the University of Iowa. rining program probably then is now one of the very best in the country. Among the people he worked with there were Maryland Robinson but they offered an impressive staff of writers. Here's then as now. Maryland is just retired now. This book is beyond the usual uncertainties. It's twelve stories and these are stories you've written over the last. How many years I'll just over twenty twenty years of you've stories song and I know too that you teach writing in workshops around Los Angeles? Different kinds of workshops story workshops developing character workshops working on your novel workshops workshops so tell me after this time what is the. The short story has to do well Short story seems to be a highly compressed literary form They say it has to have a beginning being a middle and an end though not necessarily in that order I think of myself more disposition as a story writer than a novelist. Maybe maybe I'm one of those people who prefers three or four minutes songs too big symphonies. Shorts story isn't short in anything having other than length. Yes one of the things that I realized as I was reading your stories is that there is a moment where the surface of the story drops away and a dream or trance of what the story is takes its poice and so suddenly you're entering another realm entirely Someone is bringing a baby right to family. How do we know how this is happening? Why this is happening? He feels like Santa Claus. Right he tells us but somehow or other. This is a dream of a story in which a baby can be delivered. Yeah by the family Oral for me without story apples and oranges. I knew that I wanted to have this man. It takes place in nineteen fifty two and he goes out to the countryside outside of Philadelphia and he brings back to Philadelphia with him. A A an unwanted gentile baby and he's going to give of it to his wife sister and her husband to adopt. They haven't been able to have they haven't been able to have a child. Yeah and so will I knew something about what was hint his interior life and what he had in mind and the happiness that he wanted to bring to his sister in on brother-in-law but I didn't know at all what was going to happen in the story. And Yeah I mean he does bring this sort of fantastic gift gift But other than that. I didn't really know where the story was going. And that's often the case. When I begin a story I may have some sense of of where could be going? But I'm I'm pretty open about it. I you know Grace Paley that line about giving your characters the open destiny of life. I really try to do that. I like them to have an open destiny of life within the story. And then I like my endings to be open to because I think characters are still capable table of behaving Unpredictably even after a story and well that story if I remember correctly that that mentions the open destiny of life story by Grace Pantley quota conversation with my father and many many of your stories are conversations with parents. That's right and in fact the first story and a young boy has has gone with his father who's adopter. His parents are divorced. He ends up going with his father for the weekends. His father has to work right and takes him to the hospital. The boy sits around waiting until the father one day says would you like to make my rounds with me and not just that shows him how how to look at an x Ray. Yes it's a pulmonologist but he does locate cancer. I mean because he's looking at chest xrays so he's looking issue Z.. Whether there's cancer or emphysema what the patient's condition is but the marvellous thing. Is that this drops away too soon. The boy is going into the rooms with the father but not just into the rooms where he knows news that a patient has terminal cancer as indicated by the title of the story. The white spot was an indication on the x Ray a cancer but the father is talking to a woman where she from Hungary from Hong Yes. Well her family's ways from Hungary actually. She grew up in the United States. But she's of Hungarian ancestry. The father is getting the Hungarian woman to tell the story. Essentially of anti-semitism in Hungary and the father is teaching the boy that that not how to be a doctor right not how to be compassionate and not how to talk to a patient about death but to show the boy that these people are used to the experience of people coming from extermination camp. Yeah the drop that I'm talking about into the trance of the dream right. The boy is being told a completely different story Ori by his father in collaboration with the Hungarian woman neither of whom know how powerful awful What they're saying is to the boy? The boy is something. Well he's an attractions he's in a trance too. You and I would say the exciting thing to me about reading your stories. I was following following the trance of the story and Song I think of this as leading the reader down the garden path into another realm of reality. Yeah I agree with what you're saying about both of those stories and I think also those stories have immigrants in common and one of the things. I think that unifies the collection is that threaded throughout there are a a number of immigrants from various places in the white spots there in from the white spot there from Russia. But you know I have a Thai emigrant I have Armenian emigrants people that make up Los Angeles. I mean Los Angeles is ten million people in Los Angeles County and three point. Five million of those are not born in the United States so I think the immigrant experiences pretty central to the Los Angeles experience. And of course you know my own family has an immigrant background as well. Well I would go further and say that the stories prove that life is strange. That what a story doesn't do is tell you you you already know in the second story. I mentioned called apples and oranges. None of these people. I know what to do with this outside the family outside the flock outside the tribe baby. Yeah but but the bringer of the baby knows right then in a few weeks it'll be like every other baby right. It will be loved. It will be cared for. It will be ideal yes and it will always be a baby of gentile ancestry. And that's something that I wanted to explore usually it's Jews who are trying to assimilate into the larger culture but this will be a baby that is going to be assimilating into Jewish culture which I just really enjoyed that aspect of the story.

Los Angeles Hungary White Spot Maryland Cancer United States Santa Monica College Enj Jonathon Blum RAY Ucla Santa Monica College Philadelphia Grace Paley Los Angeles County University Of Iowa. Robinson Writer Grace Pantley ORI
"emphysema" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For forty years and he ultimately died of emphysema probably because that that's a typical story my dad liked to say on his final illness when he was dying he said son I earned my sickness that's the way he looked well how did you look at it I agreed with a so those days maybe it was the job that killed you now Cassidy says it's more likely the lack of one that's what I think it is lack of opportunities leading to desperation leading to I don't care about my health what's it to me it's hard enough for me to make it through the day what mine trying a few will be always at night just to make me feel a little better I think it's all about that frankly and it's just so sad Appalachian has been hit especially hard by the opioid epidemic in Ohio and West Virginia have suffered the worst with the highest rates of overdose deaths alongside the roadway Poulos back roads bathrooms for gas stations restaurants the truck stop we pulled overdoses out of all those areas that's detective sergeant Randy Stuart with the sheriff's office in Belmont county Ohio since the drug epidemic started spiraling out of control Stewart is seen it terror families up going out sticking these young kids in body bags and singing out crushes the parents it's tough do you see any sign that things are turning around not to sound negative but we haven't beat us yeah no I don't even think for close from what I see on a daily basis or con in last place here hello everyone and welcome to today's smart recovery meeting for family and friends eight people have gathered in a small fellowship room at the church of the Nazarene in tiny pow hadn't point Ohio the meet weekly for support as the deal with their loved ones addictions could it get any worse the bottom it you could get any worse hello my god that Cindy more they're saying I don't think you could get any worse I have eight children one of them is deceased one of them is in jail when we speak after the support group her son Stephen has just been sentenced to life in prison after pleading guilty to murder it is sentencing he said I'd like to apologize to the victims it wasn't me it was drugs and Cindy Moore's daughter Kimberly the baby of the family and mother of two she died of an overdose in December twenty sixteen she was twenty nine when my husband went up stairs I heard it was day you better come up here and I came up there which she was late on the floor with the need to provide that for it was horrible when Cindy wrote the obituary for her daughter Kim here's what she said her mother and father found her on the floor dead from an overdose of drugs they ask that her death would not be for nothing if you are using drugs her parents plead with you to stop and get help I was mad when I wrote that I was very angry I was angry camera I was angry at the drug people I don't know if IT help anybody not bit I was honest about it.

emphysema
Vaping increases the risk of lung disease by a third

Joel Riley

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Vaping increases the risk of lung disease by a third

"Quickly for people that smoke vape the research the information about that continues to not be great to build a new piece this morning study with a warning for easing users and finds that vaping increases the risk of lung disease like asthma bronchitis emphysema chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by about thirty percent they were comparing people who smoke invades to people who never smoked or baked they say by comparison people who smoke cigarettes double the risk of chronic lung disease now those who both use traditional and the E. CIGS the risk more than triples university of California San Francisco center for tobacco control research and education actor there Stanton Glantz says ease cigarettes are promoted as harmless and they're not period CDC figures show that more than twenty seven point five percent of US high school students vape so if you got kids in the house need to have that hard talks like look we think vaping is not that big a deal but it does increase your risk of lung disease if you smoke cigarettes and your vape triples IT so again hard talk time

Chronic Lung Disease California San Francisco Stanton Glantz United States E. Cigs CDC Thirty Percent Five Percent
"emphysema" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"You can protect yourself by looking to see whether the same photo has been used in other listings and talk with the owner over the phone while the rate of people falling for this scam as low a record thirty seven million dollars have been lost so far this year Brad Ford news ninety three point one K. of BK a new study finds that people who use E. cigarettes are more likely than tobacco smokers to develop lung disease researchers at UCSF found that vapers have a thirty three percent higher risk of developing lung diseases like asthma bronchitis emphysema and pulmonary disease companies that make these E. cigarettes of course have promoted Peiping as less damaging to health than smoking tobacco cannabis in outer space it's not for astronauts to smoke KP case Brody Fernandes explained the international space station is about to get a shipment of cannabis space X. will send hemp seeds and coffee seeds on its flight in March of twenty twenty all in the name of science researchers in Colorado plan to study the effects of zero gravity to see if it will mutate or genetically alter the plants this seeds will be held in an incubator and stay in space for about a month Brody Fernandez news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. you're not going to be surprised at all by this I've not started I know you haven't started our executive producer hasn't started already used in no he shaking as I guess it started when did you start done and done over achiever I'm on all three of you all right I hopefully you are almost done with your shopping but if you are not done we're going to give you the shopping and shipping deadlines dates you needed out okay I'm here okay coming up news breaking news traffic weather respected.

UCSF Peiping cannabis Brody Fernandes K. F. B. K. executive producer Brad Ford lung diseases Colorado Brody Fernandez
New Study Links Vaping to Chronic Lung Illness in Humans

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

New Study Links Vaping to Chronic Lung Illness in Humans

"Fifteen a new study finds that Peiping can increase a person's risk of developing chronic lung diseases a study from UC San Francisco for the first time links using E. cigarettes to a significant increase risk of developing chronic lung diseases like asthma bronchitis emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary

Peiping San Francisco Lung Diseases
"emphysema" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on 710 WOR

"To what terrible manager sixty three years old he was born in Panama he came to me with nocturia nocturia it's Latimore Latin lock means night in your it means your nation it was urinating four times a night he tried medicines of Adam dizzy was unable to tolerate them it had a prostate biopsy in the past his PSA was going up one from two point two to two point nine and he came in to get checked up you just didn't understand what was going on to him you do understand as other doctors he came to me I examined him his prostate was foggy was at large he had a history of prostate symptoms and we got a new PSA it was high and he got a biopsy it was cancer so this is a man who walked into our office with prostate symptoms no known cancer and we were able to diagnose him five and a half years ago five and a half years ago I walked into my office he was diagnosed we found the cancer we are for treatment we offer all the cards to treatment he chose our treatment he wanted to be treated and he came in this week five and a half years later cancer free is PSA is zero he's in remission is urination is fine his sexual life is far in his urinary life is fine and he's very happy just the chance of the came in here about our work five and a half years ago and many men come here for check ups of their prostate many men we know in the black community this was a black man from Panama that one in six black men will get prostate cancer one in twenty three will die of prostate cancer so it's really an epidemic and of course we treatment of every race creed and color and women and children of every race and creed and color and we're talking about it to get attention so that hopefully can diagnose and treat cancers early we know that diagnose and treat cancers early means higher success rates and for this man he came in for a check up to cancer center doctor Lieberman we work them up we got the test she was not able to get them in the same wires punctually elsewhere we accept most insurances Medicare Medicaid he came to us how to find found a high PSA found the cancer diagnosed and treated him and say five and a half years later with no other treatment the hormones though kimono surgery no cutting he is cancer free and this is the work that we do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway I don't speak about an eighty year old woman this is a woman who came to be with long cancer she's a marriage has five children showed abnormal chest X. ray years ago she had a cat scan and she had a biopsy one of the big hospitals in New York and she had standard keymod standard radiation and doesn't work very well the cancer came rip roaring back she came to me with recurrent long cancers so she had lung cancer diagnosed previously it to work the standard treatment should standard came on standard radiation weeks and weeks of standard treatment and I can tell you that the standard treatment does not work very well for long cancer she came to it should tell you also more than three years ago membership a rip current long cancer when she came to us she had chemo shed radiation at the other place they were gonna Sander homes dot dot dot we stage drop we found the lung cancer with an S. U. V. that so much radioactive sugar it's picked up of twenty so it's twenty times normal the cancer measured three by three centimeters is increasing in size is increasing in intensity we offer all the options all the options June one surgery she don't wanna lose part of our a large and want to be a respiratory cripple should already had emphysema COPD she did not want to go through surgery should already had chemo Shari had radiation and you heard about our work she heard about our ability to treat and re treat cancers if standard surgery or radiation or chemo doesn't workers waters and tolerated and we treated her we could or just a few treatments pinpoint treatments radiosurgery which is so different than chemo chemo general or chemicals poisons ago throughout the body the try to poison the cancer more than the body didn't work and her kids standard radiation weeks and weeks of standard treatment weeks and weeks of treatment didn't work she was a respiratory patient should COPD emphysema or short of breath and losing part of our long probably would have made her a respiratory cripple she chose our treatment pinpoint radiosurgery from the doctor first with registered in the western hemisphere yours truly is treated more than three years ago came in this week cancer free cancer free doing well in all the other treatments failed to work should all the usual some people come into I was already at X. Y. Z. hospital they already did that he already did that already did that we hear that story every day I hear that story every day so what one a real valuation the best thing is to make an appointment call us at two one two choices two one two two four six forty two thirty seven that's really the only way we can analyze the patient is to see the patient in person with their documents we sit down we spend a lot of time with each patient getting to the bottom and offering choices that's why our phone number is two one two choices and like this lady we often find choices and possibilities the other doctors never thought about other doctors never offered other doctors never told her about that she never would have known until she came to see us at thirteen eighty four Broadway we have lots of information to send you in because you've been out to win two choices or you can come in many people come into our office because it's so convenient we're close to most subways trains and buses subways or close to us for one two three four five six AC E. N. Q. R. B. E. D. F. M. the seven S. so close to us all the trains to go to Penn station New Jersey transit passes Long Island railroad I had to Grand Central metro north and all the buses come in New York right to Port Authority these are all within really several minutes of our office I walk to these places almost every day I know this place I know the routes is very close and very convenient we made our office to be convenient for you and we are also on the radio every night at midnight W. O. R. serves lots and lots and lots and lots of time to contact us and learn I wonder about a man ninety years old he's a man who's widowed as two children were for the fire department yes cataracts you is seen by his primary doctor you had a PSA of nineteen and his doctors urged him to come here now is nine years old is in great shape Alan of domino alter sound which is negative is PSA was nineteen point one he had a biopsy showing a very high grade cancer so when he came to us all we knew was designed the with hi PSA and I examined them into rock hard large globular prostate he has a high grade cancer and of course we offer all the options now some people say well is ninety one just leave me alone what contained in my experience most people nine do you wanna live and they don't want to live with metastatic cancer they want to know what they have often of course we talk about that some people don't want to know if you don't want to know that's perfectly fine that's your business it's your life it's your decision you are the president of United States of your body and you can even come get a button you can get a campaign but we have new campaign buttons that say Dr Lieberman believes with the presidential CEO you are the president of United States of your body we have new buttons just for you there's no charge you to come in and pick up one for yourself and for your family if you want this is what we believe we believe that you have that choice and for this man who's a vital man active manned and fully impacted he's more likely to make it to a hundred or a hundred and ten than me he's already made it to ninety in good shape and this is the work we do start treatment is highly successful if you look at our day that you can see your data if you look at our data for a man with PSA ten to twenty years figure nine page nine of our book that you'll see our results for men who have PSA nine ten to twenty prostate cancer ninety percent success rate much more successful than radical surgery much more successful of breaking their peers standard radiation so for this man he's heard all the options and he learns about all the options is like you do and each person can choose themselves you can have treatment are not of treatment or how it's going to have treatment right one of the most effective treatment you one of the most effective treatment.

Panama three years sixty three years three centimeters ninety percent ninety years twenty years eighty year nine years
Air Pollution Is As Bad For Your Lungs As Smoking, A New Study Reveals

Joan Hamburg

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Air Pollution Is As Bad For Your Lungs As Smoking, A New Study Reveals

"There is this new study that found that if over the long term you're constantly breathing polluted air so let's say you live in a city with air pollution for over ten years that can irritate and inflame your lungs in a manner similar to smoking cigarettes so specifically that irritation can lead to a type of COPD called emphysema and we've long known that emphysema is associated with cigarette smoking but now we can say that it's linked to air

Copd Emphysema Ten Years
Emphysema And Thirty Year discussed on AM Tampa Bay

AM Tampa Bay

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Emphysema And Thirty Year discussed on AM Tampa Bay

"Breathing polluted air can be is bad for you is smoking a pack of cigarettes a day a new study out this week reports that people exposed to just three parts per billion over a decade at the same risk of emphysema as a thirty year pack a day

Emphysema Thirty Year
"emphysema" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Said sounds like a wish yes although Billy wheezing that implies hi there as well or emphysema and I can't help but that's the way life when something cracks me up I sound like a Weezer I can't open is that funny from gave him a cardinal lucky's it's my gift is offering you know he's the guy Kim Jong un is so fat clothing manufacturers at a change the label to one size fits most really he's got a long sleeve a uniform too yeah it's very slimming dark colors all comfortable though in the heat of summer there was one last question he after the doctor from Tucker a lot of this is speculative but quickly doctor looking at him would you be concerned if you were his physician absolutely Tucker talk about all lead to fatigue and problems with sleeping I need for special machinery and sleeping smoking on top of the old city in the all the time will lead to major health issues so he keeps chain slogan he's going to have a big problem I definitely would be concerned about his health based on what I've seen and what you have described over there is my assistant I'm hardly a physician but it was it was very very very noticeable homes body one last from a loyal listener of ours Kim Jong il is so fat they had to change his name to Kim Jong to I was seriously if it has to do some he is going to have heart issues the I've seriously I mean.

Billy emphysema Tucker Kim Jong il
"emphysema" Discussed on Far Side Chats

Far Side Chats

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on Far Side Chats

"Even at times braggadocio concerning. What he done? With Grady shamelessly admitting to the murder, and even gloating about it one with think that it would be an open and shut case that they would lock the lobster boy up and throw away the key. But things would take an unusual turn during the trial. Grady's deformity combined with his chronic liver disease due to his excessive drinking, and bad case of emphysema from his constant chain, smoking managed to get him a sympathetic verdict. And he was only sentenced to fifteen years of probation and house arrest as such he was free to return home and continue his reign of terror. In the meantime, getting divorced.

Grady chronic liver disease emphysema murder fifteen years
"emphysema" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on WTVN

"You're altering your body. Stop it. God hates it. You say, you know, I I can make a judgment on you that your alter your DNA your corrupting God's plan by putting carcinogens in your lungs and drinking alcohol, but basically changed. Yeah. I mean, that's that's a whole different. Yeah. They know about it. No, it's not a different debate. At all. You are altering your body. And you're making it weaker by smoking and drinking. I'm all. No. You are right. Yeah. Okay. You are destroying some sale. Yes. Sure. At my breaking down. Thank what God gave you. And you're basically altering your DNA altering. You're you're blinded altering your lungs. Hey, you know, promise, you your telomeres are probably shot because you're drinking, you're smoking. So wait a minute. Wait a minute. Yeah. So wait because of the by their by that telomeres, if I shot somebody if somebody twenty years ago, they got my DNA. But now that I'm smoking twenty years later, they wouldn't be able to pin me to the murder because I'm smoking my delays the same. No. You're altering your telomeres? DNA may be the same. But your telomeres are shot. The hell you are altering your DNA your altering. What makes you? Yes. I'm not often. What makes me me? Yes. You are. You are altering your body. You're altering your telomeres, which are the building blocks in your DNA to make you grow that the little Xs little flippy floppy X is that you have or called telomeres, shorten your telomeres, shorten your life span, and you could have a longer lifespan if you weren't smoking and drinking. That's what I'm saying. That's that's a. You know, the apples and oranges the difference between. Different. Okay. Okay. So let's say, for example, you keep smoking you get emphysema, and they say we can give you a long it's artificial. It'll keep you alive. Then what? That's where you're getting on the borderline of stuff getting a little funky that I'll you know. So you're getting your all great stuff that point. You. No, you alter your body. That's why they're putting an artificial longing. You..

emphysema murder twenty years
"emphysema" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"You know of saying I would do anything for you. And then you're saying all right. I need you to stop smoking cigarettes because like it's going to kill you and them saying. Yeah. Or, you know, I'll try and then lying and the rough thing I mean, this is both rough and not rough is that I can understand it from a certain perspective. I get that. He is grappling with you know, all kinds of stuff. He's been very open with me about being hooked on harder stuff before I was born flirting with alcoholism. He has sort of an addictive personality. It's not so much that it's just like any one thing, but my young life. I didn't know my dad smoked cigarettes until I turned eight and I found out and it was like right at that age where morality is super black and white, and I could not reconcile this thing that I knew like smoking cigarettes is bad therefore people who smoke cigarettes are bad people. That's my dad who is a good person. Because he's my dad smoking a cigarette. I don't know what that means is blue your little just exploded. I went to pieces and then from then and on like every year there was the same conversation. If you need to stop doing this. If I tell you enough if I'm crying enough, if I show you how much it hurts me. If I if I if I if I got friends found some heartbreaking shit at home of just contracts that I made him sign petitions that I got friends at school to sign I got his bandmates to all these people in our little community. And I remember one of his adult friends saying to me rather cavalierly at a party that we were out when I was maybe eleven or twelve he's never going to quit, and I burst into tears and had to leave the room. Like, I couldn't keep it together. Because it felt so callous at miss like I understand where he was coming from. You know, I understand that. He was trying to say this is nothing to do with you. But it has always felt like something to do with me. Because when you're a kid, it's scary. And if it's not under your control, you know, if that behavior is continuing. It must be it can't be because your parent is a fallible right point. That's not acceptable. It has to be your fault. Right. And through you can know that intellectually. But boy, the emotional stuff is like just scraping congealed bacon, grease off your soul. I don't know. It's it's it's kind of like the subtext of what you were asking from your dad was I need you to be in my life is long as possible. And that guy was saying to you. He doesn't care. No. And you know, and that his time was already limited. And it's coming back around. He's got emphysema. You know, it's like this is the thing that is damaging him, and he just won't stop. And I I met with a friend once who. Was a grown-up friend..

emphysema
"emphysema" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

"I've gotta the people in here. Lots of times, they don't know how to breathe with a microphone some of. They've got emphysema they're smokers. Don't want that sometimes breathing in breathing out leading somebody here this year real person brings out the humanity in a recording and not breathing. This is something Ryan said to me, and I've noticed this. But I didn't really put two and two together. Maybe you've noticed it too. When you don't hear breaths? It can agitate you you've probably experienced this. If you've seen somebody talking on a mobile phone in how annoying is that you sit next to somebody. He's talking on a mobile phone. You'll hear one side of the conversation. Well, that messes with your brain. That's the reason that is so annoying. If it were to people next to you talking not as annoying not just because the person is there, but because you can hear both sides of the conversation breathing very similar. It's something that we're used to hearing it's natural. And we cut it out one of the records. Ryan recently worked on with an artist named Tony Joe white. You may have heard of him. He did a song called Polk salad. Annie classic classic song. And Tony Joe just died. The album was completed before he died at just came out. It's getting a lot of attention. It's on a lot of the best of lists. That are coming out right now. It was interesting to hear him talk about recording that album. I was asking him how he did it and they recorded it in a barn. I said was the born treated treated meaning did have Pat in it that have some kind of sound of Zorkin. He said, Nope. And it was dusty and it was with old school equipment. He called it. Pro Sumer meaning like old eighties tape machines, not even digital. So it's. Raw it's rusty. It's got that funk that grit that edge. I think we could use more of that in podcasting not so much that we're trying to go back to the old days of podcast. And when people didn't know any better, they're doing what a call ramble cash is blah, blah, blah AM at the store, and it sounds like a guy in a tin cans and a string not that. But just bringing some of that humanity into it. I'm trying to do that on this audio book. So I'm excited to do that yet. It's a little bit nerve wracking. I'm used to the Sodom voice being compressed that radio sound that deep base. I mean, not really deep with me. But it's a lot less deep when you don't have this compression on it, some of the q-, it's something for you to think about we have gotten into this habit of expecting our voices to sound a certain way, the reason we've done that is because voices on radio sound a certain way, and the reason voices. On radio sounded certain ways because they're compressed in compression. That's literally what's happening for a signal to go through the air. And it's a whole lot different than radio was when it first started. We've got a lot of technologies where we don't have to do what we used to do to get a signal from tower to let's say your car or your home, but we had to compress that wave, and that's what you've got all these frequencies within a narrow band. We've got a little bit more dynamic range when it comes to podcast, and even when it comes.

Ryan Tony Joe emphysema Tony Joe white Pat Zorkin Polk
"emphysema" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"emphysema" Discussed on Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

"I've gotta the people in here. Lots of times, they don't know how to breathe with a microphone some of. They've got emphysema they're smokers. Don't want that sometimes breathing in breathing out leading somebody here this year real person brings out the humanity in a recording and not breathing. This is something Ryan said to me, and I've noticed this. But I didn't really put two and two together. Maybe you've noticed it too. When you don't hear breaths? It can agitate you you've probably experienced this. If you've seen somebody talking on a mobile phone in how annoying is that you sit next to somebody. He's talking on a mobile phone. You'll hear one side of the conversation. Well, that messes with your brain. That's the reason that is so annoying. If it were to people next to you talking not as annoying not just because the person is there, but because you can hear both sides of the conversation breathing very similar. It's something that we're used to hearing it's natural. And we cut it out one of the records. Ryan recently worked on with an artist named Tony Joe white. You may have heard of him. He did a song called Polk salad. Annie classic classic song. And Tony Joe just died. The album was completed before he died at just came out. It's getting a lot of attention. It's on a lot of the best of lists. That are coming out right now. It was interesting to hear him talk about recording that album. I was asking him how he did it and they recorded it in a barn. I said was the born treated treated meaning did have Pat in it that have some kind of sound of Zorkin. He said, Nope. And it was dusty and it was with old school equipment. He called it. Pro Sumer meaning like old eighties tape machines, not even digital. So it's. Raw it's rusty. It's got that funk that grit that edge. I think we could use more of that in podcasting not so much that we're trying to go back to the old days of podcast. And when people didn't know any better, they're doing what a call ramble cash is blah, blah, blah AM at the store, and it sounds like a guy in a tin cans and a string not that. But just bringing some of that humanity into it. I'm trying to do that on this audio book. So I'm excited to do that yet. It's a little bit nerve wracking. I'm used to the Sodom voice being compressed that radio sound that deep base. I mean, not really deep with me. But it's a lot less deep when you don't have this compression on it, some of the q-, it's something for you to think about we have gotten into this habit of expecting our voices to sound a certain way, the reason we've done that is because voices on radio sound a certain way, and the reason voices. On radio sounded certain ways because they're compressed in compression. That's literally what's happening for a signal to go through the air. And it's a whole lot different than radio was when it first started. We've got a lot of technologies where we don't have to do what we used to do to get a signal from tower to let's say your car or your home, but we had to compress that wave, and that's what you've got all these frequencies within a narrow band. We've got a little bit more dynamic range when it comes to podcast, and even when it comes.

Ryan Tony Joe emphysema Tony Joe white Pat Zorkin Polk