35 Burst results for "Emory University"

Why Mark Bauerlein Shared 'Is Atheism Dead?' With His Teenage Son

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Why Mark Bauerlein Shared 'Is Atheism Dead?' With His Teenage Son

"My guest, for this hour, is Mark Bauer line who is a professor emeritus of English at Emory university. He's an editor at first things magazine, where he hosts a podcast. He interviewed me recently about my book. And I was excited to see that I would be soon interviewing him about his book. And that soon is now the title of the book is the dumbest generation grows up from stupefied youth to dangerous adults Mark barreling welcome to the program. Thank you for having me, Eric. It was great to do that taping. We're gonna do your podcast next week at first things on the book is atheism dead, a book which I love so much. I gave to my son my 16 year old son to read a few chapters as part of his physics class. So holy cow, talk about how crazy. That's really, seriously. That's how wonderful to hear that. Because you know this when you write a book, you know, your goal is to get these ideas out into the world. So the idea that you assign some of the chapters of my book is atheism dead to your 16 year old son. That's pretty cool. I think this I think this conversation is over. I'm done, Alvin. I wanted to go out on a high note. Goodbye, ladies and gentlemen. Now you will get higher. We'll get higher. But what you see in those chapters on say The Big Bang Theory, they're going to kids are going to get that in school in their physics class, but they're not going to get the cosmological, the full cosmological implications of that cheery theory relative to faith. Yeah. Relative to eternity. And metaphysics and so what I like about the book was the total absence of any defensive note about faith. It is long past the time when people of faith need to be on the defensive for their beliefs. You meant all offenses. And you leave you lay it out in the book. We've got the goods.

Mark Bauer Emory University Eric Mark Alvin
Emory to Update Med School Curriculum to Include Climate Risks

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 9 months ago

Emory to Update Med School Curriculum to Include Climate Risks

"Climate change increases the risks of many health problems such as heat stroke and asthma despite this my peers and i as we sat in our first year medical school lecture halls. We really heard. No mention of this whatsoever. A malign laney is a student at the emory university school of medicine on their own time. She and another student studied the connections between climate change and health and they look for opportunities in their classes. Where these connections could be taught. We ended up really one by one going through every single lecture. We ever went through throughout our medical school curriculum. They developed a proposal to integrate climate change content into the standard course of study for first year medical students. For example in a class on geriatric medicine students could learn about the growing risk of dehydration and heat stroke for older adults when studying infectious diseases. They can learn. How warming affects the spread of mosquito borne diseases. Emory university approved their proposal. So faculty and students are now working together to make sure. Tomorrow's physicians are better prepared to practice medicine in a warming

Emory University School Of Med Laney Asthma Stroke Mosquito Borne Diseases Heat Stroke Emory University
The Pros and Cons of Soya Beans

Gastropod

01:38 min | 9 months ago

The Pros and Cons of Soya Beans

"The only time to my knowledge that i've ever eaten a soybean in soybean form is at amami those green pods you get as a starter at sushi restaurants which i love so young soybeans which is what mommy is is generally esteemed but once you actually had the mature bean and then you try to cook it. The results tend to be less than appetizing. Gen fu is a professor at emory university. Who studies the history of science technology and medicine in china. And she's the author of the other milk. She published under jetson but she goes by wendy her everyday life. So that's what we're going to call her. This episode wendy told us that the soybean was likely domesticated in what's now northeastern china. Right on the border with korea wild soybeans and then domesticated soybeans. They're not particularly high maintenance. They grow well in a lot of different regions and their beans which are in general. A good thing to and so people ate a lot of them. It isn't early crowd that is recognized and becomes part of what is known as the classical grains. so we know that soybean is not actually green but it was treated as sort of staple food similar to weet As well as rice it was a staple yes but it was only a staple out of necessity. Like wendy said. The mature soybean has some issues more so even than many of its fellow colleagues. It causes pretty intense gas innocent flatulence and even though like all means it's packed with protein. It also contains a chemical that means our bodies kant really process that protein but there is a way around the protein blocking problem and at least a little of the flatulence problem and that is to boil the crap out of mature

Gen Fu Wendy Jetson Emory University China Korea
Alabama infectious disease expert urges masks in schools

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 10 months ago

Alabama infectious disease expert urges masks in schools

"A number of infectious disease experts across the country are urging school systems to require the children wear masks in school Alabama is a hard hit state with the delta variant spreading rapidly at the same time youngsters are returning to school so the co director of the university of Alabama at Birmingham's division of pediatric infectious diseases says he's worried about what lies ahead urging mandatory masking in school that's also the view of Dr Indy Shane with Emory University who says children are vulnerable because they can't be vaccinated what we do know is that children can be in school basically if mitigation methods are geared to so that means universal masking masks in school have become a flashpoint across the nation some parents are demanding the protection others see it as a punitive action or harassment of their children I'm Jackie Quinn

Birmingham's Division Of Pedia Infectious Disease Dr Indy Shane University Of Alabama Alabama Emory University Jackie Quinn
Deborah Lipstadt Picked as Biden's Antisemitism Envoy

People of the Pod

02:05 min | 10 months ago

Deborah Lipstadt Picked as Biden's Antisemitism Envoy

"Alarmed by a wave of attacks on american jews tied to the recent violence between israel and hamas american jewish committee and others in may press the white house to address a glaring void in the us state department the absence of a special envoy to monitor and combat anti-semitism around the world. This week president biden. Fill that vacancy. With one of america's preeminent jewish historians and holocaust scholars emory university professor. Deborah lipstadt professor. Lipstadt joined us on people at the pod shortly after the release of her latest book anti-semitism here and now a series of letters to an imagined college student and imagined colleague. Both of whom are perplexed by contemporary expressions of the most ancient hatred. We discussed whether the world is sufficiently aware of this ever present. danger professor. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me so tell me what did inspire you to write this book wind. Did you start writing it. Was there a catalyst. The catalyst was a lot of things that happen amazingly enough now. It sounds like h industry a in two thousand fourteen. The shooting in brussels the the murderer in brussels of visitors to the jewish museum there and a lot of the anti-semitism that emerged around the war in gaza. But it was clear to me that it wasn't just related to the war in gaza that there had been enough other things happening that to just say. Oh this is all about. Gaza was a simplistic view. I wrote an op. Ed for the new york times got a tremendous amount of attention. Discussion and Finally i didn't. I thought that would be the end of it. My agent set me deborah. There's a book here. Where's the proposal. I said i have wallowed in the sewers of anti semitism and holocaust and office so much in my life. I really don't want to write about this. But he wouldn't give up. So i wrote the proposal. He presented to a publisher. They were interested in. I had to write the book. I mean a flip about that really. But as the time where i really started writing the book i would say two thousand fifteen amid to end two thousand fifteen and by that point. It was clear that the book was to me. It was clear that the book was

Hamas American Jewish Committe Us State Department President Biden Deborah Lipstadt Lipstadt Emory University Brussels White House Gaza Israel America The New York Times ED Deborah
President Biden on Asian American hate crimes, 'hate can have no safe harbor in America'

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

President Biden on Asian American hate crimes, 'hate can have no safe harbor in America'

"Biden is condemning violence against Asian Americans during his trip to Atlanta. Biden and Vice President Harris were in Georgia Friday to address growing concerns in the Asian American community about a rise in hate crimes. Biden spoke at Emory University on Friday evening and said hate can have no safe harbor in America and our silence is complicity. Vice President Harris vow that she and the president will speak out against hate crimes wherever and whenever they occur.

Biden Vice President Harris Atlanta Emory University Georgia America
Gottlieb says vaccines should offer "reasonable protection" against coronavirus variants

Atlanta's Morning News

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Gottlieb says vaccines should offer "reasonable protection" against coronavirus variants

"Cases begin to decline across the country, but a troubling number in Georgia. Double the SPS Bill carpaccio reports live on efforts to get the pandemic under control. Yeah, yeah, The nearly 180 new coronavirus deaths recorded in Georgia on Saturday is a new single day record. Race is on to get more people vaccinated. We have to get those vaccines into many, many more people before we see the decline. CBS NEWS Medical expert Dr David Vegas worries about new strains of significant concern. Over these new variants, former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb tells CBS's face the nation. He is encouraged by the vaccines. I do think that the existing vaccines are gonna offer reasonable protection against these new variants. Dr. Walter Orenstein with Emory University's Hospital of Vaccine Center tells Channel two action news People should trust vaccines are safe. Warp speed, which initially sounded like a great name has given people thoughts. Corners have been cut. Despite the variants, he says, the vaccines are more effective than no vaccine it all drug companies are already working on booster shots, which could be available by this fall.

Bill Carpaccio Dr David Vegas Georgia Scott Gottlieb Dr. Walter Orenstein Cbs News Emory University's Hospital Of CBS FDA
interview With Emily Reiser

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 1 year ago

interview With Emily Reiser

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting emily riser. She is the senior manager of innovation community engagement with the texas medical center. She supports clinicians and administrators at the tmc member institutions as well as hundreds of startups and other corporate partners engaged with tmc innovation. You guys have probably heard some of the healthcare entrepreneurs we've had out of the center. They're doing such incredible things in her previous role at emc she was a strategist for two tmc x. Cohorts she contributed to the redesign of the tmc axe program for twenty twenty and started the tmc alpha program for local innovators prior to joining tmc innovation. She led and venture a nonprofit organization supporting entrepreneurship training and company formation in the life sciences. She has directly contributed to business development projects with dozens of local life startups and supported the formation of four new companies. So her heart is totally in healthcare. Emily earned her bachelor's in biology from emory university and her phd in bio engineering from university focused on drug delivery for cancer immunotherapy. So you can imagine that. It's going to be a really cool conversation and emily Really really grateful that you Carved out some time to be with us today. Thanks for thanks for being outcast. Thank you so much saw so excited to be with today. Yeah and so you have such a cool experience right you've been in the healthcare startups and you know you've kind of gone pretty far in your formal education with bio engineering. And now you're in this area with this like incubating these cool really forward thinking companies that are changing the game. so what is it that Inspires your work in healthcare. I think a lot of us in healthcare are looking to have an impact on how patients are being cared for and that certainly inspires my work as well. And i always knew that i wanted to be in the healthcare space but didn't know how to do that while also making the most impact that i could so when exploring -nology that took me into research which you know if you can develop something that s- impacts you know thousands of people then really feels like you've done something meaningful to impact patient care but of course you have to pick something good you can spend your whole life Working on something. That doesn't end up doing that. And so i've moved more close to the patient closer to the bedside throughout my journey and now i have the privilege to work with folks that are directly saving lives. Impacting how how systems are ryan and making things easier for clinicians hospital administrators and then of course the patients to access the care that they need. So that's what. I love about my job right now. Is being able to work with somebody different kinds of people within the community you know. The house systems themselves clinicians entrepreneurs so every day is different but every single person is working toward making patient. Care better love that you're so mission oriented in that love their by two as you as you think about the work you guys are doing. Tmc is texas medical centers innovationlab. And so i think it's a good opportunity for folks that don't know about it to educate them about it but then after you tell us about it let us know a little bit more about how you're adding value to the healthcare ecosystem absolutely so the texas medical center is that's really interesting. Nonprofit organization that was started seventy five years ago through a gift from the md anderson foundation and we don't provide health care so we're not a health stem but we provide infrastructure that sits under md anderson texas children's houston methodist small herman and twenty one other different clinical institutions as. Well as you know. Other research institutions universities rice university of houston etc and so our role is to be the connective tissue and dr collaboration between and among all of the different institutions. So right now that looks like data that we publish every day around You can go to our website. I you and see how were clobbering across all these institutions to share updates on hospitalizations and other things that are relevant within our hospitals or doing a lot of work behind the scenes to try and make sure that everyone is cloud reading and and sharing best practices. And there's been a lot of really cool work coming out of that but five years ago we also started this great innovation initiative which combines space talent physical resources that all come together to provide different actors to entrepreneurs that can work with our health systems. And so it's an incubator. We have a partnership with johnson and johnson j. labs and body and other corporate partners to create density around making startups possible and always relevant tied back to the clinical application clinical outcomes. And

TMC Emily Riser Texas Medical Center Marquez Emory University EMC Emily Md Anderson Foundation Cancer Rice University Of Houston Ryan Houston Texas Johnson J Johnson
"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"In the apex. We are adam had a lot of experience with news with posted polka polka out. So we started using cdt to predict where were were to. Who's things we learned that the only thing that really seals ms valves the external skirt that in order trying to land a very short landing zone with an external skirt that's only a few millimeters. It was a little bit like blunt lending a seven forty seven on a parking lot so that the rails actually did a a little bit with that. We had modified we could change. Which would nose was was directing by falling wire. We can also change the back of the valve using a technique called pool. A was Where we could flex back particularly for those people that we had a very distance from the turnbuckle. Punctured the annual apply. So we started mixing all these things together including modification of the sapien valve in the central skirt. Try and improve outcomes. What ultimately we started noticing a lot of these patients had these very small hyper contract. Our hearts that counter yoder's enosis and all this had to be had to be dealt with in order for for tomake technically successful procedure with oracle benefit which means that the patient had to not be hurt by the procedure and be able to get up at increased their activity not to sit in the bed with the low elvia t gradient or no mine just nelson or no mitral regurgitation. The leak business has gotten considerably. Better in is also a major source of morbidity for for our patients because trans transfusion or repents transfusions of people with with hemolytic anemia. To the small pair of our leaks were very difficult to manage as as containing peel back the onion we see as part of the most challenging case that we're doing at this point ended is the valid mac in the valve in rings in the the outcomes have improved tong in which the number of patients denominator has improved a ton. There have been some larger registries following the data on these patients or trying to ultimately you see respectively. Make better outcomes for better patient selection more understanding which i think is is important but but all ultimately is all these adjuncts that have created some movement and until we get dedicated delivery system. Dedicated were still left with off shelf. Adjuncts to improve this and so we the people that are interested in this technique. But i would say unless you're prepared for for all these extras accessorising your.

hemolytic anemia adam yoder
"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Every single case and that nutrients catheter techniques. That we've described here can really provide durable treatment for mitral valve disease in these high risk. Nonsurgical patients you guys talk about triumph innovation. Just have to apply our few guides and your team for the incredible work for this patient. And just thinking through what you did so successfully you completely alter the trajectory for valvular heart disease you obliterated equity and the blood can now easily. Pass the la to the lv. It's a difference. You made i just over the course of a couple of hours in the procedure sleep and this is a situation where so many things can go wrong in procedurally and with the outcome just thinking about itself you can have valvular league mcgregor Through the leaflets. A clotting of the vowel functional stenosis potentially from a patient prosthesis mismatch got a big hole in the septum Essentially 'cause ast nino lv ot obstruction in addition to the peri procedural risks of guinea access. Putting catherine the body of on corey blood vessels and rain compare the valve in procedures in the mitral position valve valve valve in green valid mag unit all had nice paper between nineteen where they essentially showed the alvin mack procedures where the riskiest right with the lowest procedural success rate the highest shorter.

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"You deploy the valve whether it's a mitral position or the arctic position here in the mitral position you're deploying in a stable standstill angeles exactly and only those with the strongest of heart will look back at anesthesia while matt is going on and so what's our valve is deployed. It is an immediate rush to make sure that everything is properly positioned in that the blood flow through the valve annual assists. Correct in so immediately. We go to your graphic by plane in the short and long access of the newly deployed valve to make sure that it is seated. Well if you do have access to the online supplementary material you'll notice in the short access that although this is a commercially available tavern vowel. That's being used off label for the mitral valve. It's not a totally circular structure. I think that really belies. The different shape of the mitral analysts versus the arctic anyalysts lists there and then we take a look with our three d. t. e. in what we can see is that there is a well seated valve in place. We see that there is trace leaks still through the valve. That's just there because we have a wire going across it. From april rail but overall the valve is well seated. It's opening the patient is getting good blood flow through it in when we check. Continuous wave doppler through the newly deployed. Trans catheter valve. We see the patient. Now has a mean pressure gradient across their mitral valve two millimeters of mercury whereas they started the procedure with a mean pressure gradient of sixteen millimetres of mercury as just amazing the other important aspect of this like john lewis go was talking about earlier is to make sure there's no lv ot obstruction that something that we check both at the time of the procedure and with a follow up. Transfer rasic echocardiogram the next day and in the patient's trance the razek echo the next day. What we saw was fantastic flow through the mitral valve itself and trans Gradient of eleven millimeters of mercury indicating that there was no significant lv ot obstruction in patients. That get this specific procedure. It's also important for us to do a follow up. Cat scan so that we can really review the anatomy of where the valve is how it sitting in its relation to other cardiac structures and so on the follow ct of the patient. What we were able to see is that valve is once again very well. Seated in the calcified mitral angeles the tips of the struts are just poking into the septum near the lv not in mid sicily and then in some of my personal favourite pictures on the c- t. Were able to reconstruct the narrowest point of the elvia not in see visually the open cells in that trans catheter. Mitral valve open and ready to allow blood to flow through insistently and so as far as our patient is concerned. They tolerated the procedure. They were excavated immediately following the procedure and transferred to the see. Cu for monitoring overnight by the next morning they were ambulation independently in re transferred to the floor there trans-pacific echo post op day. One shooter an injection fraction of sixty percent. Mitral valve mean gradient of six millimeters of mercury in order valve mean gradient of eleven millimeters of mercury. Our patient was restarted on their home. Coupon on post op day. Two in discharged home several days later after. Their einar became therapeutic in his done very well since that time i think ultimately for us the big points. We wanted to drive home with this talk. Is that mitral stenosis. Like you said it's very difficult to manage and often affects patients who are high surgical risk. Previously we had very few good surgical options. The main option being balloon valvular plastic. The which if you have any experience with patients who undergo balloon valvular plastic is a very fleeting treatment in almost.

mitral valve stenosis sicily matt john lewis einar
"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Louis jar the wires then electrified and snared in the left atrium once snared. You've now made a wire loop around the anterior mitral valve leaflet. The wire is a long exchange link wire so it's externalised. Area of the wire is kinked. In denuded to make something. We lovingly called flying v after the famous jimi hendrix guitar. In that flying v is then re entered into the body in position the base of the a to scallop dextrose is injected which flushes away ionic blood in confines the ablation of energy of electrified wire to that flying service and once electrified it's cooled and laceration occurs in the direction of the elbow t. So you now have an anterior mitral leaflet with a mid line laceration in the amazing thing about this is because it's not electrical aspiration the valve continues to co op. So the a trans catheter. Valve is placed inside of the native mitral valve in when it's inflated the valve opens to its fleet expanded area and the native valve leaflets harmlessly slid to the side so blood flow can exist through the open strikes of the trans catheter. Heart valve and again. The supplementary cartoon online is very easy to follow following that. We also have some supplementary images show with this laceration. Looks like in the swine model of which you can see online so again. Retrograde lampoon was shown to be effective in prohibitive risk overboard but the limitation with the technique becoming more widely used was the technical complexities associated with it and that pushed us to go back to the drawing board and say. How can we make this simpler. So that it's teachable in reproducible. In patients can get the benefit of it not just a highly selected sites in the country but closer to their home and because of that we worked in made in alcohol. Anti-gay lampoon been published outcomes first seven patients in circulation interventions at integrate. Lampoon is what you'll see. Further described in this case where a single transept of punchers used to deliver two steerable sheets through which to catheters or placed in now last Still mid line. But it doesn't require you to cross the arctic using retrograde catheters in it's technically simpler to perform third variant of lampoon that has also been very effective in recently accepted for publication. Jack interventions is a technique called tip. Base lampoon so if you think about how we describe lampoon so far in both the retrograde technique in the integrate technique..

mitral valve Heart valve jimi hendrix left atrium Louis
"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Blood through that orifice in again just to reiterate how important at heart rate is in mitral stenosis allowing the ventricle to fill despite obstructed orifice and how that plays theologies really can be very challenging especially in a feb. Or if they think you're really highlighting the salient points when it came to the physiology in really highlighting the point about a coordinated each contraction. We thought it would be a good idea. Something that i think all of us benefit from is reviewing the ha sec guidelines. So we'll go through the stage how to define valve anatomy valdemar dynamics the consequences and the symptoms for mitral stenosis and again. This is from the aj an sec guidelines so beginning with stage a which is defined as being at risk for mitral stenosis for this with the anatomy we can appreciate mild valve domingo during diaz steely. There will be a normal trans mitral flow velocity usually no hema dynamic consequences or any symptoms stage b is defined as progressive mitral stenosis in. But this there is rheumatic ballots changes with cars roll fusion and diastolic dorming of the mitral valve. Let's in a planet matured mitral valve area a more than one point five centimeters square. There is increased trans mitral flow velocities mitral valve area of more than one point five centimeters squared and a diastolic pressure. Halftime of less than one hundred and fifty milliseconds. He moved dynamically. We can appreciate a mild to moderate left atrial enlargement and normal pulmonary pressure at rest with no symptoms for stage. See this is defined as as symptomatic severe mitral stenosis in this romantic ballad changes with control fusion and diastolic. Dome ing the mitral valve leaflets. The plummeted marshall valve areas less than rico to one point five that can be less-than-regal to one in cases of very severe disease. Diastolic pressure halftime is greater than or equal to one hundred and fifty milliseconds and can be great and wrinkle to two hundred and twenty in cases of severe mitral stenosis. We can appreciate severe left e. tone large man and an elevated pulmonary artery systolic pressure of more than thirty in no symptoms because these patients are classified as being a symptomatic that brings us to stage d. was defined as symptomatic severe mitral stenosis. And in this there are romantic. Bell changes with comedy fusion and diastolic domingo without leaflets and planet mitral valve area less than or equal to one point five centimeters squared. Now this can be less than one centimeter square but very severe disease..

mitral valve stenosis domingo diaz pulmonary artery atrial enlargement sec aj Bell rico
"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"So our case starts with the chief complain of shortness of breath our patient as a seventy seven year old female with the past medical. History of rheumatic valve disease both for a arctic and mitral valves status post surgical erotic valve replacement in nineteen ninety as well as a redo in twenty thirteen. At which time she had a saint jude. Twenty one millimeter. Mechanical bi leaflet valve placed. She also has heft path. Non obstructive coronary artery disease type two diabetes hypertension hypothyroidism and sick sinus syndrome. Status post duly pacemaker. Who presents us with progressively worsening shortness of breath. So this patient has a history. Of rheumatic valvular disease resulting initially in severe a arctic stenosis that required surgical valve replacement in nineteen ninety with a subsequent redo in twenty thirteen. She tolerated both procedures. But for about the past three years she's been complaining of progressive worsening in both her baseline shortness of breath as well as worsening disney on exertion. This patient was felt by our primary cardiologists. These symptoms were due to worsening. Her rheumatic mitral valve is and so in september of twenty nineteen due to moderate mitral stenosis. That time she had a mean gradient across the valve of about seven millimeters of mercury in about two plus. Mr the patient underwent shockwave balloon. Litho trixie of her mitral valve hoping for improvement in her symptoms however by january of twenty twenty her symptoms it continued to worsen and by this point arresting mitral gradient was up to sixteen millimeters of mercury in a heart rate of sixty five. Beats per minute until at this point. She was referred to the structural heart team at emory for consideration for advanced trans catheter valve therapy. As far as the patient's past medical history we already discussed. She has severe extend noces status posts sabir times to in nineteen ninety and twenty thirteen. The patient has severe hypertension hyperloop. Anemia type two diabetes and six sinus syndrome status post duly pacemaker as far as surgical history. She's had to stir nominees with surgical valve replacement as far as cardiac medications. she's on imploded. Pink tin milligrams a day hydrochlorothiazide twenty five milligrams a day lose certain one hundred milligrams a day mmatobole sucks innate or tow all xl hundred milligrams a day in his on war for anti coagulation as far as her allergies. She's to several antibiotics including penicillin. Clinton mason in vancomycin for her family history. Both her father and mother passed away at age. Eighty seven they both suffered from heart disease and diabetes and her mother also suffered from stroke. Socially the patient denied any tobacco alcohol or recreational drug use on initial presentation. Her vital signs were largely within normal limits. Temperature was thirty six point six centigrade. Her blood pressure was slightly elevated at one. Forty nine over seventy six. With a heart rate of seventy one in the patient was saturating. Ninety six percent on room air physical exam largely normal once again other than for her respiratory exam. Which did show some by basil or crackles but non labored respiration symmetrical chest while expansion in her cardiovascular exempted have diastolic murmur. That was fairly significant. Best at the apex she also had that systolic. Click from her mechanical valve. She did have sort of one. Plus bilateral pitting dima for laura extremities but most of her symptoms were last cited elements for exam including gastrointestinal musculoskeletal neurologic and psychiatric. Were all within normal limits. As far as her lapse once again largely normal sodium was one thirty three potassium as little low at three point to be winning six zero point..

mitral valve stenosis diabetes heart disease sick sinus syndrome hypertension emory hydrochlorothiazide penicillin dima Clinton mason vancomycin hypothyroidism laura
"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Affects the lives of hundreds of millions dedicated cardio nerds everywhere are working hard to fight this global epidemic. These are their stories. Welcome back hard innards. Thanks for joining us. As we tour fellowship programs across the country as part of the cardio nerds case report series produced in collaboration with the acc fellow in training section. Each episode will feature a cardiology fellowship program fellows from the program present and teach about a fascinating case and share. What makes their hearts flutter about their program. Each case discussion is followed by an e. cpr segment from a content expert and a message from the program director before we dive in. Just remember we are an independent educational platform. This podcast is not meant to be used for medical advice. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies are employers the case. You're about to hear his one hundred percent hipaa compliant we thank you for subscribing to and supporting the cardi innards. Our mission is simple to democratize cardiovascular education promote diversity and inclusion empower everyone to learn and teach from the basics to the advance while fostering wellness and humanity if you believe in the mission consider supporting us on patriot dot com slash cardio innards every little. Bit goes a long way without further ado. Let's continue on our tour with another fascinating case from amazing cardinals colleagues. Welcome back today. We are in for a real treat as we host colleagues and fellows from emory cardiovascular fellowship training program such a special case very excited dive. But before we do. Let's introduce our guests. Doctors sonali kamar. John lescoe in john ricketts folks. Welcome to the show which might introducing yourselves. Thank you for having us here. My name is sonali. Kumar and i am currently a second year. Cardiology fellow in the academic clinical research track at emory university. I am from washington. Dc went to medical school..

sonali kamar Cardiology fellow program director emory university cardinals Kumar Dc john ricketts John lescoe washington
Coronavirus Is Surging In The US

Morning Edition

07:27 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Is Surging In The US

"One, But however you define it. Corona virus in the U. S is surging. Some parts of the country air passing more restrictions to try to combat the record number of cases this as we have yet another Corona virus outbreak in the White House. NPR's Alison Aubrey is with us now. Good morning, Alison. Good morning, Rachel. So when we say the White House we mean in the orbit of Vice President Mike Pence, several aides to the vice president have tested positive for covered 19, including his chief of staff. Nevertheless, the vice president decided to keep traveling to keep campaigning. What's the reaction been to them? You know, the decision to keep his travel schedule intact was made in consultation with the White House medical unit, the spokesperson said. Yesterday and pencils office says this is in accordance with CDC guidance for essential personnel there, basically making the case he has Essential work to do, including on the campaign trail. But public health experts Rachel are really questioning this definition. Here's Josh Sharfstein of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He served in the FDA under President Obama. The vice president should be limiting interactions with others because he could be harboring the virus and he could wind up becoming infectious. And so if there are essential activities that he needs to do in person, he should take extra precautions to do those, but otherwise I think he should be staying at home. Especially given around the country, including places. Pence is scheduled to travel such as Minnesota. The viruses circulating widely, right, So let's talk about that. Alison. What do the numbers tell us about the virus right now? The U. S has been averaging about 68,000 new cases per day. This is about a 30% increase compared to just two weeks ago. In recent days, new cases have reached record levels in several states, Utah, Tennessee, Illinois in Chicago over the weekend. Stronger restrictions took effect of bars and restaurants must close earlier in the evening. This is part of a curfew in the city. Other parts of Illinois have stricter rules, too, including new limits on the number of people allowed together and Rachel. They're certainly a lot of reminders around the nation to stay. Vigil eight, right? Hospitalizations from Cove. It have been on the rice too. I mean, does that mean we're likely to see more fatalities in coming weeks? You know, probably there are still a lot of people dying about 775 people per day in the U. S. On average. That's a lot lower than the highs of last spring. Part of this can be explained by the increase in cases among younger people who are less likely to die. But Rachel there's also been an improvement in treating people in hospitals. Physician Anish Mata is an infectious disease expert at Emory University. He is also a principal investigator for the H M Death Severe trialled at Emory. Last week, the FDA gave this antiviral drug full approval. Red death, severe reduced recovery time to 10 days for 15 days and also importantly, run desecrated treated patients had less use of mechanical valve leaders and other advanced oxygen's airport techniques. Compared to patients who didn't get room disappear. Now it's important to point out Rachel. This is not a home run treatment. It hasn't been shown to significantly prevent deaths among very sick patients, but it does have some benefits and Allison doctors now have other treatments they can offer as well as from desperation. That's right. Doctors have more tools in the toolkit. Now they have You know steroids, such as Dixon Math Zone better information about when to put people on blood thinners. Overall, the death rate appears to have dropped. In fact, a new study that included an analysis of thousands of hospitalized patients found that at the start of the pandemic patients had about a 25% chance of dying. Now they have an 8% chance. So still high, but definitely improvement. Yeah, definitely So younger people, you know, you mentioned more younger people have been diagnosed with the virus. So as we start to think about Thanksgiving Is there any way Tio Tio ensure that college students don't bring the virus home as they leave for break? You know, if you have a college student coming home to you find out if they're being tested, many schools are offering or even requiring an exit test or a departure test. Just before students depart for Thanksgiving break. I spoke to David Paul Thiel, He's a professor at the Yale School of Public Health about this He says. Of course, it's easy to identify symptomatic people. But this isn't good enough. I'm worrying about the student who feels just fine but who happens to have been exposed recently and who could be heading home to visit an elderly relative. And so we don't want to be sending little ticking time bombs home for Thanksgiving. I completely agree that we need to have everybody tested within 72 hours of departure. Now. Not every school can manage this given the cost. But many campuses are offering departure test, including big schools like Ohio State and many small liberal arts schools, too. During such as families that have college age kids either, right? I mean, my own family. We're trying to figure out what we do anything. We're all trying to figure this out, right? Everyone started figured out. So what can you tell us of this boy now, Zim? Well,

Rachel Vice President White House Alison Aubrey Mike Pence FDA Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Emory University NPR President Obama CDC Illinois Chief Of Staff Yale School Of Public Health Josh Sharfstein Anish Mata Minnesota Chicago
2 justices slam court's 2015 decision in gay marriage case

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 1 year ago

2 justices slam court's 2015 decision in gay marriage case

"A dissenting statement from Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas has LGBT groups expressing concerns a new conservative court might try to reverse same sex marriage rights the High Court rejected an appeal from former Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis whose refusal to issue marriage licenses to same sex couples pave the way for marriage equality in twenty fifteen but justice Clarence Thomas wrote the majority created a problem by reading into the constitution a right that doesn't exist family law attorney Randall Kessler who teaches at Emory University says there could be a religious challenges the right set of facts about the situation where someone complains our religious liberty is affected by not being able to object to same sex marriage some LGBT groups say the court is about to become more conservative and they worry about a renewed war on same sex marriage rights Jackie Quinn Washington

Clarence Thomas High Court Kim Davis Randall Kessler Emory University Supreme Court Kentucky County Attorney Jackie Quinn Washington
Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

All Things Considered

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"In a high security prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. Two federal inmates await their executions when tomorrow the next on Thursday as they wait. Their lawyers are asking the court to intervene because they say The drugs used to kill. The inmates will cause their lungs to fill with fluid as they die, and that in their final moments, they could experience the sensation of drowning. Those fears aren't unfounded, and just a quick warning for listeners. What you're about to hear may be upsetting. In the spring of 2017 on Arkansas inmate gasped and choked as he was executed the following year. In Ohio, an inmate heaved against his restraints struggling for air and a few months after that, in Tennessee, once again on inmate gasping for air and convulsing. All of these inmates were later found to have lungs filled with fluid. Now we can't ask them how painful their executions were, whether They amounted to cruel and unusual punishment, But what we can do is peer inside their bodies. For the past two years, a team and all things considered has been investigating the autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection. We've obtained the largest collection of these autopsies ever assembled in the U. S. This collection spans decades of executions across the multiple states, and what our findings reveal is evidence of a death far less peaceful than what states promised when they adopted lethal injection decades ago. We begin the story in Atlanta, where I went in 2018 with producer Noah Caldwell to meet a doctor who made a startling discovery. Joel Zip. It works 80 hour weeks at Emory University Hospital. He's an anesthesiologist checking in on patients in the ice for you. So if temperatures is looking a little grade, and did you get to say, perhaps Mediate those? A few years ago, federal defenders in Georgia hired zip it to review a few autopsies of inmates executed by lethal injection. What I was asked The address was the blood levels of certain kinds of medications, but something else caught his eye and recognize that something was amiss. What did you see in the autopsy? So I began to see a pattern of organ failure instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death. I began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death a death associated with suffering a painful death in autopsy after autopsy. What zip it saw were unusually heavy lungs, lungs swollen with fluid, which surprised him. It's not a common finding in autopsies. It's something you'd see in cases of, say. Congestive heart failure or sepsis, neither of which were happening here. He wanted a second opinion. So he contacted a colleague at Emory, a pathologist named Mark Edgar. I said I want you to look at these documents and just tell me what you think you see here because I think I'm seeing something here. That is a surprise to me now. Zip. It deliberately did not tell Edgar what had surprised him in those autopsies. But anger. He zeroed in on the exact same thing that zip it did. Lungs filled with fluid. He noticed frothy fluid in the nose. Same word kept popping up frothy material in the main bronc I the word frothy, frothy fluid in the upper and Lower airways. What they were seeing was a severe form of a condition called pulmonary, a Dema. Presence of froth was a troubling clue because it meant that inmates were still alive and trying to breathe as their lungs were filling with fluid. Xzibit and Edgar got a few dozen more autopsies from other states just to see Was this a fluke and similar words like frothy and fluid kept coming up to describe the lungs. It was a stunning finding, because here was some physical document that could answer a question that could otherwise not be answered, which was What exactly is the experience of a dying inmate? Ziva brought these findings to federal court in multiple states. It's evidence that is now at the forefront of legal challenges to lethal injection. For the past two years, The team at NPR has undertaken its own investigation. We expanded the scope of the data significantly, we obtained more than 300 inmate autopsies through Freedom of Information Act requests. They cover executions in nine states dating from 1992 2019. And what these autopsies show is that when inmates lungs or examined after their executions, pulmonary oedema occurred 84% of the time that was consistent across states. Medical experts say these findings are troubling. Because they mean it is very likely these inmates experience the sensation of drowning or suffocation before they die, and that many inmates were not being properly anesthetized.

Joel Zip Mark Edgar Terre Haute Emory University Hospital Indiana Sepsis Arkansas Ohio Atlanta Tennessee NPR Emory Noah Caldwell Producer Georgia
Building Your Brand as a Student

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Building Your Brand as a Student

"Know one of the things you think is important is. College Age students or students in general learning. How to brand themselves right building their personal brand. Normally, we think about maybe with movie stars or. Personalities or something but let's get into this. Why do you think this is important To me without giving away the shop how they can do this. And how you can help people do it. So let's let's let's hear what we got here. It's important for so many reasons and not just for college students for even students who are at the high school level or even at the middle school level thinking about why they are going to go to college. So the why is essential? So I don't know if you're familiar with Jeff Selene goes new book WHO GETS IN AND Y. But that book I think. It came out this week and I got a chance to preview the intro chapter and one of the So the basis of the book is that he was able to. Be in the admissions office of four universities One of them was emery in Atlanta One was I forget the names of the schools, but the example is from emory. So it was him going through the admissions office seeing how they pick their classes. So not the highest Yale's in the harbor is not the highly highly selective universities, but the you know somewhat selective universities and how they make the decisions. So he told the story of you know emory university going back and forth. With various students who are interested in going to the school and one of the examples that he used was a student who was, interested in microbiology however, on the student's application, there was no indication of any clubs, any volunteer work anything at all that would indicate that this was something that the suit it was really interested in had a true commitment to. So even at the middle school or high school level is important because if you're going to a college which is competitive with going you're going to be. Competing, with other students to get in, you want to establish what your brand is student. So if you are interested in, you know the sciences or stem or something in that regard, a highly competitive major you WanNa do things at in college or in middle school so that we use some at your college application You are standing out you're doing things that shows the university that you are truly. Committed and you have a history of being committed to whatever the major is whatever the industry is while you are an undergraduate's a consistent. Thanks. So they're looking at, you know not only your essay and your sat scores in your great but they're show it. They want to see that you are. You know you've done some thought you took in some you've taken some consideration about what you want a. Major an in why this is important for you. So that's the short answer. I know that wasn't that short but that's the short answer about why building a brand is important and as you said, is some you know you think of it as a business thing or maybe you know a celebrity may think of it but it's important throughout whether you're in middle school and even when you graduate from. College. You want to establish your brand as being someone who is. Expert or Going to be an expert in. In your major or in a particular field. So that's why building plan important

Middle School Emory University Yale Jeff Selene Atlanta
Atlanta woman takes part in Emory University vaccine trial

The Weekly Check Up

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta woman takes part in Emory University vaccine trial

Atlanta woman takes part in Emory COVID-19 vaccine trial

Handel on the Law

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta woman takes part in Emory COVID-19 vaccine trial

"Is taking part in a corona virus vaccine trials at Emory University in Atlanta. Susan Hers tells Channel two action used. She doesn't feel at risk there so thorough in looking after me monitoring pretty much Everything I d'oh. So for me, it's like having angels on my side. Multiple companies in multiple countries air pushing to get a vaccine out as quickly as possible will go best. Being

Susan Hers Emory University Atlanta
High schools and colleges work to contain coronavirus outbreaks

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:25 min | 1 year ago

High schools and colleges work to contain coronavirus outbreaks

"New more detailed guidelines from the CDC among other things they address what schools should do if there is a case of covert among students or staff, they suggest rather than shutting everything down immediately for a long period of time. One option is short term class suspension cancellation of events in after school activities to give public health leaders time to determine how widespread the infections are. As college students head back to campus corona virus outbreaks at universities in at least nineteen states representing nearly fourteen hundred cases among students and staff leading to concerns about scenes like this, a large gathering of students at Penn State that prompted the school's president ask those flouting the rules. Do you want to be the person responsible for sending everyone home Mississippi's governor urging college students to be careful since eighteen to twenty nine year olds make up the highest proportion of cases there. We know that we've got a lot of work to do there. It's something that we will have to be constantly working on over the course of the next few months and while K. through twelve schools face challenges reopening in. States like Mississippi and Georgia new. York with its rock bottom covert task positivity rate is in a good position to reopen schools even. So parents have questions, governor Andrew Cuomo saying he'd had questions to the still working out with the plan would be I would have a lot of questions parents a lot of questions. This is a risky proposition no matter how you do it, and with US deaths from covid nineteen averaging more than a thousand a day for twenty five consecutive days. The CDC is now projecting nearly one hundred, ninety, five, thousand Cova deaths by September twelfth about three weeks away suggesting that staggering death rate will continue at least in the short term we are beginning I think to. Turn the tide still CDC Director Dr Robert. Redfield who estimates as many as sixty million people nationwide may have already contracted the virus based on an infection rate of ten to twenty percent says, we could soon see the number of new daily deaths begin to decline as more people follow public health guidelines like mask wearing hand, washing, and social distancing. This week. Next week you're going to start seeing. The death rate really start to drop. New cases are steady or falling in forty states but redfield warned that positive trend isn't taking hold everywhere little the mirror right now. Is Getting stuck. We don't need to have a third wave. In the heartland coronavirus cases are on the rise in states like Wyoming Iowa and Illinois with a new emory university study suggesting so-called Super Spreader events are driving transmission in rural areas. Meanwhile on the vaccine front nor country can just ride this out until we have a bucks in a new sobering reminder from the head of the World Health Organization the nineteen eighteen pandemic lasted two years. He hopes this one won't, and even if we do have the Buxin. It wouldn't end the pandemic on its own progress does not mean victory. And there is another sad sign that victory over this virus has not yet at hand. We just learned today that a six year old girl. Florida's Hillsborough County has become the youngest person in the state to die from covid nineteen.

CDC Redfield Mississippi Andrew Cuomo United States President Trump World Health Organization York Hillsborough County Florida Emory University Dr Robert Director Buxin Georgia Wyoming Illinois Iowa
"emory university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"FM to get started. Mike yesterday's Elizabeth Group in. Who is professor and Vice Chair of research at Emory University in the Department of Radiology. Interests are medically make perception. Observer, performance decision. Making. At. Human Factors. She's associate director of evaluation for the Arizona Telemedicine Program. and Co director of the southwest Resource Center. He's also the Co editor of the Journal of Telemedicine and Tele Care and editor telemedicine reports Thank you very much for that kind introduction. Sure. Yeah. So so you have been researching and contributing to making the Tele Medicine more broadly adopted for for a long time. I want do set the stage with some definitions and perhaps one of your research people to start with so. It's entitled. Clinical. Examination. Component of telemedicine telehealth 'em killed and collective health medical practices. So minutes until Housing Jimbo our practices of medicine a distance. you say components of a more traditional clinical examination are part of the telemedicine workup for specific conditions. What are some of these components and butter some of the technologies used for this now? Yes I mean obviously you cannot do the same sort of physical exam virtually as you would in person. So there are some limitations but there there's an awful lot that you can do and a lot of it depends on the sort of the setting debt you're doing telehealth in So for example, you've got to separate out the provider to provider. Type of telemedicine, where, for example, the patient goes to a clinic in their save remote area wherever they are, and at that site is perhaps a nurse practitioner and APP.

Journal of Telemedicine Arizona Telemedicine Program. Tele Medicine Co editor associate director Vice Chair of research Tele Care Co director Emory University professor Department of Radiology Elizabeth Group southwest Resource Center editor
"emory university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"emory university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Emory university's under Cholesky I just asked her what the state was doing to address racial disparities he's been most impacted by current virus we have seen an increase and are trying to test and send marketing messages to communities of color to make sure that they have access to testing so you know part of governor Kim's crowning bass task force does include people from civil rights community a very prominent African Americans who have marketing campaigns you know designed to encourage people to give mask we've seen things in K. and counties with large African American populations like the cab county for instance trying to provide free corona virus at a tool kits for citizens of the get hand sanitizer and they get face masks we're seeing stepped up efforts where historically African American churches are being enlisted to help provide free testing in communities that are largely minority we see efforts one of the hot spots is around Gainesville and particular amount of poultry processing plant which employs a lot of Latino residents and so we see stepped up efforts to reach out to those communities to make sure that people are getting access to testing that there are folks who are advocating for people making sure that they're getting information in their language and so we were seeing those kinds of efforts that's great in terms of trying to handle litigation that doesn't address the underlying structural issues that meet people of color more likely to be susceptible to this disease so we haven't addressed the question yet of why people of color are disproportionately employed in low paying service sector jobs that would one give them minimal access to health care and then also would make them more likely to have to be able to go to work if we think about sort of hospitalizations being related to that case is where you would expect that people would more be more likely to have a Q. cases of cobit nineteen and the comorbidities that are associated with that we have to ask the question about did these people have access to good healthcare and health insurance before they got sick did they have underlying health conditions that would have been exacerbated by poverty those are issues that we're going to have to tackle well after this pandemic is over and unfortunately what we're seeing is the literal manifestation of what quality does to work earlier this week there was a story in The Washington Post about people in an Atlanta suburb returning to a shopping center and they were kind of going back to normal getting their nails done grabbing drinks some not wearing masks does it suggest that Georgia might see more and one Georgia another words places that are going to go back to normal and places that won't and if so is that even sustainable one of the things that struck me as I've gone grocery shopping so this was actually in late March when I was having a terrible time finding toilet paper to a prayer in a grocery store and so I went to stores that I hadn't been to before and I remember just being shocked by the number of children that I saw in a grocery store and you know part of me wanted to be very critical of that going why are you bringing your kids to to the grocery store in some instances people may not have had a choice right they don't have childcare there wasn't a second parent in the house to be able to bring people out and do you realize the the the risks that look reckless Ted middle class and affluent people are wind up being done by well intentioned people who really does have no other choice and I think we need to sort of think about that before we actually start you noticed testing testing and judging people about what's going on but yeah I mean you know there's also certain certainly the element of just rebellion and people can't tell me what to do and cabin fever and it being nice outside and kind of wanting to you know just go out and and and try to re clean I'm a part of one's humanity and I so I think that there some people just take it taken really calculated risks well under.

Emory university
"emory university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm neuroscientist Emory University Atlanta studies the hormonal and neural changes men on the go how might these changes assista father in adapting to the challenges ahead testosterone can interfere with things like emotion regulation and impulse control and frustration tolerance and especially when fathers have young infants that are doing a lot of crying and and even screening that can be very frustrating it's probably important that they they have those capacities tax so decreases in testosterone I think are probably important in that regard do we honestly know what points a father's testosterone level drops there's a little bit evidence recent evidence that it can begin even during the pregnancy but the best evidence shows that it's definitely occurring during the newborn period there's one really nice study that was done on a large sample of Filipino man where they they follow the fathers from before they had children until after they had children and we're able to show that they're most pronounced decline in testosterone was during the newborn period so the first three months and in that sample by about a year post Natalie fathers had mostly recovered in terms of their testosterone levels it's interesting that we've done some work where even and fathers of toddlers other testosterone is still lower than what we find in non fathers other than testosterone other than other holdings it plays well we've been able to show in our work that fathers have higher levels of oxytocin than non fathers and you know of course that's a hormone that we associate with mothers but it's now becoming clear that oxytocin is also important for paternal care giving and and for father infant bonding is a great study that was done by an Israeli group where they gave fathers intranasal oxytocin and they found that under the influence of intranasal oxytocin they touch their infants more and they engaged in more social reciprocity with their intense and then what was kind of neat about this study is the inference then in turn spent more time looking at their fathers and remarkably there was also an increase in the incidence oxytocin levels even though they were never given any oxytocin and so we really think that in that case that oxytocin was triggering this kind of positive feedback cycle that facilitates father infant bonding so you know men don't experience the dramatic release of oxytocin that women do that at first and so forth but there still are changes in our data looks like about a thirty three percent increase in oxytocin and is there a benefit to dads of knowing about who these changes the the go on when they become a father for the first time I think there is I think when men for example experienced decreases in testosterone I mean they may at the same time experience changes in libido or sexual motivation and sometimes if testosterone is low enough then we'll feel even struggle with depression and so just kind of knowing that these changes are happening in their third temporary it's just kind of a normal part of the life cycle to be experiencing and I think that's that's probably helpful to know.

Emory University Atlanta
"emory university" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Okay so we're just talking about Emory University heather macdonald down there speaking and the protests the students couldn't take it they created all these groups and they had let me go back what were some of the like I don't even know these phrases they had says say spaces to watch the speech there that teaching about affirmative action and diversity all sorts of things right heather McDonald again a new book out called how race and gender pandering corrupt university and undermine our culture so get the book doesn't sound like some racist thing but regardless let's talk about what heather McDonald said because what could have been so hurtful for the students that they couldn't even do anything about it merely that M. ori students like undergraduates this is what you said I'm just reading from the article from heather she said that merely that Emory students like undergraduates across the country are among the most privileged individuals in history by virtue of their unfettered access to learning that students should try and emulate the renaissance humanist whose passion for the loss classical tradition triggered a centuries long explosion of knowledge that Emery's costly diversity bureaucracy premised on the alleged oppression of the marginalized student groups is needed that Emory is filled not with big hits but with the met well meaning faculty and administrators who want all for their students to succeed that's what she said that's what her speech was about you guys should be very privileged very grateful be honored to go to this university you have more than anybody else has ever had in human calling human history you have all the access to the knowledge so why don't you take advantage of it why don't you take advantage that's all she said he said this whole bureaucracy with diversity I feel like I'm a marginalized you feel like you're marginalized no more white people here we need a black venue over here we need an Asian venue over you when it is over there no no no no no just learn be grateful this is awesome this is so cool in your life you're young you're going to be the you're the most beautiful you're ever going to be like it take advantage of it and instead of some of it to I'm a victim really and they don't want to hear that these college kids don't even want to hear that she goes on to say that victimized the ology has now seeped in the world at large just consider the democratic twenty twenty presidential candidates fierce competition to level the most sweeping accusations of white supremacy and racism against their fellow Americans even where viewpoints that challenge campuses orthodox orthodoxies less stigmatized in the idea that American oppressive oppression certain favored victim groups would continue wreaking havoc on the public policy and civil peace center but that is once it's gone into the college campuses it's gone into the democratic debates it's gone everywhere and now that shouldn't come as a shock to we're gonna share a poll later about college campuses who they support for president you're gonna go a miles I knew this already but I'm just telling you it's amazing how many college kids support Bernie Sanders so why would it be a big shock when they come in they play the victim card why would that be why would that be right we need more people out out there like heather honestly we need people sticking up for the truth not caving in to these kids that have no idea what they're talking about but that's what you started to get at these college campuses this Cubans are running the asylum all of sudden it's I don't want to do this okay remember we've played videos two three years ago about these kids university Missouri and other places demanding the firing of faculty members just not for saying something racist just for saying oh you know what you you should go back to class number the one that said it evergreen university think up in Washington the one guy said or maybe is Oregon the one they said they would they traditionally did this day are they wanted to do the state where no white people could be allowed on the campus only black people and one of the faculty members who is a liberal raging trump supporter said no I'm coming to campus this is dumb I work here I'm paid to be here these kids pay to go to school here that segregation this is literally what the opposite of what what we've worked hard to get everybody's welcomed on campus on this day and they really don't mean to call you mother daughter and they gave him the threat nobody tried his life in the corner them in his office and we can't go on with it where's the discipline where is the get your you know four back in class we don't have it anymore the kids are running if the kids the kids get the run around make the rules up decide what they want to do it's crazy and it's crazy and nobody's going to stop it that's the worst part it just keeps going on and all I I'm telling you I will share some stories about this about the polls on the college campuses yesterday we shared the story about how many faculty members in Ivy League universities donate to Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren so it shouldn't shock me it shouldn't but it still does every time that.

heather macdonald Emory University
"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Admitted to Emory University hospital in Georgia where he's to undergo a procedure tomorrow to relieve pressure on his brain caused by bleeding from his recent falls Carter was ninety five is the oldest living US president in the latest round of transcripts from the impeachment inquiry of president trump a senior Pentagon official told house members there were legal concerns about the administration putting a hold on Ukrainian security assistance when Pentagon officials were aware security aid to Ukraine was put on hold in July lower Cooper a Deputy Assistant Secretary of defense for Russia Ukraine in Eurasia told lawmakers that deputies began to ask how it could be done in a legal fashion Cooper testified behind closed doors last month the transcript has been released along with testimony from two state department aides one of them Kathryn Croft testified a hold was temporarily put in place by budget director Mick Mulvaney because of questions about rushes reaction the javelin anti tank systems being provided to Ukraine crosses all agency supported the javelin sale this is Sherin how print on Capitol Hill another Democrat considering a run for the presidency former Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick considering making a late run that's according to people with knowledge of his decision making Patrick ruled out a run earlier this year but has since been talking with democratic operatives and donors about launching a campaign last week former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg announced that he was considering running between two and six inches of snow was falling in north Illinois forcing the cancellation of that twelve hundred flights if your call goes out where airport National Weather Service says lake effect snow will persist in northern Indiana until early tomorrow America's listening to fox news hi it's Jamie progresses employee of the month to month in a row leave a message at that hi Jim hit me Jamie I just had a new idea for our song with the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay Hey hearing from bone was what wine you say will be found coverage options to fit your budget then we just all the finger snaps will acquire goes Stephen come after they've come at Jeff yes no maybe anyway see a practice tonight I got a new there so the referee cancel the insurance company affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law take advantage of Black Friday deals going on now at low you'll find savings throughout the.

America fox lake effect New York City Massachusetts Mick Mulvaney Deputy Assistant Secretary of Pentagon US Jeff Stephen Jim Jamie Emory University hospital Indiana north Illinois Michael Bloomberg
"emory university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Now we take you to the on art bell's somewhere in time my guess is professor Courtney brown he is a tenured PhD professor at Emory University he has written a book called that terrible it does make a cosmic journey is a cosmic voyage it is a cosmic trip that's for sure and what we have done in the last in the last two hours is to establish the scientific validity of remote viewing the ability to look add a distant geographic location the ability to look at a distant person or object the ability to enter their mind the ability to read into the future seat literally into the future or the past and without without going through all of the discussion of the past two hours I will tell you if you have been listening you should be by now convinced of the scientific about reality and viability of remote viewing we have not yet talked about some of the targets that doctor brown has viewed that part is coming up I could not have done that ladies and gentlemen in my view without having established the base the scientific repeatable base of proof for the existence of remote viewing having done that and I think having done that we will indeed begin to ask about specific targets shortly I want to remind everybody just a quick note we've got the double helix crop circle the most remarkable thing.

Courtney brown Emory University professor doctor brown two hours
"emory university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:03 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Rise of anti-semitism Harry. Give us your your kind of over one Allosaurus of how serious of a problem. This is and we're going to get some calls. Well, I think this is an incredibly serious problem. We should put this problem in context, we should put this problem in the context of a worldwide phenomena of rising anti-semitism. And so if you look, for instance, at Great Britain, the leader of the labour party, Jeremy Corbyn, he is an anti Semite, plain and simple. And if we look at the New York Times, we should note that the New York Times needs to apologize. But they need to apologize for more than a mistake by a single editor or for an editorial process. They need to apologize. For more than this particular cartoon, Why's that? This cartoonist has a history a history of despicable and vile behavior. But goes back at least to nineteen eighty three. And so the New York Times continued as I understand it to employ this individual for almost forty years. And so the claim that this was a simple mistake by a single editor. I think that is nonsense. And so again, let's put this in context. The New York Times is prepared to use anti semitism win it advances. The New York Times is political agenda. We're taking your calls eight hundred six eight four three one one zero. Let's take a call here. Right. To the phones we go Linda in California on line one. Linda, welcome to jaysekulow Leyland. Go ahead. All the line just dropped again took a call. So all right. So we got a it's called a technical glitch in our phone system. What's happening is on? Sometimes we take a call. Then the phones dropped so that phone just dropped. So I will love Linda was talking about was kind of what are the action points? Here is something. Well, congress can hold its own members accountable. They're not I told you the reason not the New York Times could do something other than blaming it on a editor alone. Enter they're not. Okay. So let's let's be clear with what's not going have to know they're going to take them stiffer. And then in Europe, it's invoked to be anti-semitic. Again, we've been through this before in recent history, and appears to be the case again now, the differences, you gotta state of Israel, and you've got leadership in the United States. It's not going to tolerate anti-semitism. But I think look if you look at our nation's university campuses right now she's talking about this during the break. I mean, the fact is how many cases of we had a man, I think probably half dozen maybe more students professors that are being. Harassed because they're pro Israel or Jewish and it's okay. They think it's okay because these universities and the United Nations they have gotten away with it for years and years. We've just had you do we have. We had a recent case. Yes. Emory University Emory University had a authorize with their signature in the residential dorms for students. The of Justice Powell's students to put eviction notices up on Jewish students. Dorm rooms. With Emory seal of approval on it. Because to make them know what it feels like to be taken out of your own land. Every apologized, but have they done anything is your accountability. And how in the world did the seal of Emory University. Which by the way, it used to have. When I went there pretty high Jewish population. How did that happen? Let's go ahead and take a call back to the phones we go Bill and Wyoming Bill. Welcome to jaysekulow Bill. Thanks for taking my call. Just two quick thought wonder how many the newspapers how many editors do they have to begin with? Now my statement, which I let me just say one thing, they're the New York Times a lot, but to have the authority to pull something out of a syndication column, which is this was a syndicated cart political cartoon and put it on the opinion page of the New York Times international vision, you have to have a lot of authority, but go ahead. Yeah. I'm gonna make a statement which opposes a question to the whole panel. It seems to me that people have we have an attitude there in congress right now that if I get elected I can go up there. Stand on my soapbox and say anything horrendous and get away with it at Mike wreck. I mean, well, it depends on who you're saying it depends on who you're saying which part of your. I mean, you know, if you're a Republican, and you say something wrong, and like Steve king is a good example of it. You are stripped of your committee. They can't they can't they can't elect you. You can still run for congress, but you can have no influence in congress, and you can debate wrong or right about that. But but that is a swift move. Always by Republicans. I say always swift even when sometimes question, I'm not saying it was saying, even when it sometimes questionably swift to disempower those who've made comments who've abused their their official office to make comments which could be seen as racist. Or antisemitic or or or anything that offends the conscious of the American people to the point where we believe it's you know, as a nation. It is wrong in reprehensible Republicans are always quick sometimes criticized for being too quick to condemn their own too quick to censor their own here. No one is saying that Democrats need to remove Ilhan Omar from office. You know, what let voters decide if that district of Minnesota wants to keep electing an anti Semite. Congresswoman they can. But Nancy Pelosi doesn't have to give her powerful committee chairs like the foreign affairs committee Eliot Engel as the chairman of the committee doesn't have to go along with it. She would be her her influence would drop so dramatically if she was removed from a foreign fish community where she gets classified briefings on American foreign policy because she just be another one of the four hundred thirty five members of congress, many of which are kind of nutty honest with you many of which are pretty nutty, and you don't hear from much because of that it just kind of written off as, you know, people don't pay enough close to who they're electing. You don't have to empower. And that is why you don't see four hundred thirty five members of congress on television. You see the handful that are decided to be empowered. Now, sometimes immediate will try to take a outlier like Ilhan, Omar. And and pushed them out because it's an interesting story that gave the Nancy Pelosi's of the world an opportunity. To dismiss her as a influential member of the party. And instead they did not they could not even get a condemnation together. And so they're allowing her to continue to spread out think again. When you look at the attacks. I think it's really I breaks we weren't even on Facebook. We are running an ad concert. Tomorrow night. Which is at nine PM eastern time on Facebook jaysekulow page and the democrat party. I was watching. I was the first night of Passover if Friday Good Friday, also then it was Saturday. And let's the people are busy doing other things not always, you know, all religious things during those days, but but then Saturday again pass over then it's of course, Easter Sunday, the Democrats were out there campaigning. Like normally it was totally known for Good Friday and Saturday's beginning of Passover and Good Friday. I feel like, you know, unless you are unless you kind of Muslim extremists like Ilan, Omar. It's just become an anti religious party. Yeah. Some of that may be because even the Joe Biden types have gotten the Catholic churches said, you know, it's really not appropriate for you to be taking communion when you have these views on abortion. They said that Nancy Pelosi and other show their own religious movements. Have said, you know, you can't have this both ways you can't say as a Catholic. I believe this know life because it conception is Joe Biden says, but as a politician, I'm not going to vote that way. So I think that that anti religious sentiment also fuels these radical attacks because because you're because you see these religious people as outliers in the in the in the community instead of being the mainstream which is an America most people faith now, I'm glad that CNN condemned. I am glad that Brian seltzer went on there and said those things, but you know, it's got there's got to be more Harry than that for this to have an impact. But there's no appears to be no consequence. I think that is precisely correct. And so what we need is a bipartisan movement by both Democrats and Republicans to condemn these outrageous attacks, and it's very very important to note that these attacks continue on not necessarily only at the New York Times, but they include anti-semitism on university campuses in today's news package. There was a new story indicating that three thousand students at to Paul university sought university censure for Jason hill, a Jamaican American why because he supports Israeli sovereignty over Lance captured as a result of a war commenced by the surrounding Arab nations. These students sought to label professor hill. A racist for supporting Israel in reality. This is anti-semitism plain and simple. So it's important to note that we need to oppose with every fiber of our being what's going on at the New York Times. But also what is going on on university campuses from New York to California by we're taking a break. We're coming back with calls for you from.

The New York Times congress editor Nancy Pelosi Israel Linda Ilhan Omar Emory University New York Emory University Emory Univers labour party California Jeremy Corbyn Joe Biden Facebook United Nations Great Britain Justice Powell Europe
"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

12:40 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Allergy at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia where he continues to direct a leadership program for pastors last fall, he was a visiting professor at Yale divinity school commerce, his bachelor's degree from Erskine college. His master of divinity from Erskine feel entrepot seminary and his PHD from Princeton theological seminary, author of a couple of dozen books, including a standard seminary text on preaching. He earlier served on the faculties of Princeton, theological seminary and Columbia, theological seminary. Tom welcome today. One and happy new year. Thank you and happy new year to you, Peter. You are reportedly retired these days, but you are certainly keeping busy and you still connect with candler school of the. Algae as the director of a leadership program for pastors in the early phases of their ministry. How's how's that working in? What are you? Finding women. A marvelous experience with that. We have taken a dozen of candler best graduates from five to ten years out and given them through the generosity of the Lillian Douaumont two years of continuing education on leadership and the goal is to boost them to the next level of Civic Leadership. What sorts of responses are you getting from the pastor's? Well, what we're doing is each session which lasts three days. They have eight of them we focus on a major issue swirling in their community like healthcare criminal Justice immigration, and they're having their minds changed and more important than that. They're extending their ministries beyond the horizon of the congregation into the community. Last fall, you're a visiting professor Yale divinity school. So what did you focus on in your teaching there? I was a co teacher in the basic course in preaching at Yale. So we had the brand new newbie preachers preaching. They're very very, I I baby baby, sir. Tom we live in very divisive times with great emotion on the different sides of our society based on politics and race economic status and more let alone religion, what should preachers be doing in their pulpits in this sort of environment, and how can preaching help us get through this. Well, my old mentor Edmonds timely who preached for many years on the predecessor of day one the Protestant. Our used to say that every Sunday a preacher has to decide whether to preach comfort. Ye comfort e my people or whoa to you who are at ease in Zion. And I think for the most part we're in a comfort Ye comfort I think people are torn apart by the political divisiveness of our nation are in despair about our institutions and the damage that has been done to them and their inability to function. Well, and we need to know that God has not abandoned that we are still in. In the hands of God that comfort Ye couple years. The main message this should be preached. Well, this is not only the first Sunday of twenty nineteen. It's also a piffling Sunday in the church calendar. What does that mean? Well, it piffle actually means manifestation or or appearance, and it's generally connected in the election area with the with the passage on which my sermon is today. And that is the wise men seeing a star appear in the east and following that star to the real appearance is at the heart of that passage the appearance of the newborn king Jesus. Your sermon is based on the gospel lesson from Matthew chapter to with this story. Would you read it for us? I will the Ospel Matthew chapter two in the time of king Herod after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea wise men from the east came to Jerusalem. Asking where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? But we have observed his star at its rising and have come to pay him Amish. When king Herod heard this. He was frightened and all Jerusalem with him and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people he inquired of them where the messiah was to be born they told him in Bethlehem of Judea for. So it has been written by the prophet. And you Bethlehem in the land of Judah are by no, means least among the rulers of Judah for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd, my people Israel. Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learn from them the exact time when the star had appeared, then he sent them to Bethlehem saying go and search diligently for the child, and when you have found him bring me word so that I may also go and pay him Amish when they had heard the king they set out, and they are ahead of them went the star that they had seen at its rising until it stopped over the place where the child was when they saw that the star had stopped. They were overwhelmed with joy on entering the house. They saw the child with Mary his mother, and they knelt down and paid him a message then opening their treasure chests. They offered him gifts of gold frankencense and myrrh and having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod they left for their own country by another road. Tom. We look forward to hearing your sermon about all this. It's entitled the wrong town at the wrong time. Thank you for sharing it with us. Thank you, Peter. And if you'd like to listen again to today's program with an extended interview or read or share a transcript of Tom long sermon. Visit our website at day one dot org. We're for free printed sermon transcript, call us toll free at one eight eight eight four one one d a y one. Last fall in Washington. There was a very contentious Senate hearing over appointing a new Justice to the supreme court at one point in the hearing one of the senators on the committee lost his temper lost his cool and melted down in rage shaking his finger at the senators from the opposing party, he shouted that. They were acting disgracefully and conducting a sham process, and then he turned to the man being examined the man who was nominated to the supreme court and said to him. You're looking for a fair process. Will you came to the wrong town at the wrong time? He was speaking, of course, about Washington in two thousand eighteen but ironically, we could say something similar about the wise men in our biblical story from Matthew they came to the wrong town at the wrong time. Here's what happened in the story many years ago, some wise man living in the eastern lands of the ancient world saw an amazing sight in the heavens the rising of a new star. Or maybe it was a comet blazing brightly across the dark curtain of the firmament. And they knew that the rising of this brilliant light was assigned from the heavens, a signal that something momentous something world changing had happened. Although we sometimes sing at Christmas time as if these wise men were kings, we three kings of orient are, actually. They weren't kings at all they were almost surely philosophers and astrologers something they may have been Zorro Astrium priests. But whoever they were these wise men were shrewd observers of the night sky, those who look for signs of decisive events and clues to the future in the heavens. So Matthew tells us that just as Jesus was born they saw this new star rising in the western sky over Judea the land of the Jews using oil their powers of analysis and interpretation they determined that. This star was a sign that a new king had been born the Jews had been given a new king and the lights of heaven proclaimed it what they did not know yet was that this new king who had been born in Judea was not only the king of the Jews, but the king of kings and Lord of lords the savior of all and his name was Jesus. These wise men wanted to see this new thing that had happened and they desired to show their honor for the new king. So they set out for Judea to the west in the direction of the star that they had seen in our imaginations, we see them riding along mounted on camels. But the bible does not say how they traveled it says only where they traveled to Judea and when they got to their destination. They went immediately to the city of Jerusalem to the palace of Herod. Now, Matthew has already told us in this story that Jesus was born in Bethlehem not Jerusalem. But the wise men went to Jerusalem looking for the new king if they were looking for the real king. Well, as the Senator said you come to the wrong town at the wrong time. Why did they go to Jerusalem? When Jesus was born in Bethlehem. I think we can hear. Some wisdom about that question from a poor Christian man living in Celinda NAMI a small village in Nicaragua. Every week the priest in this village Ernest oh card now would read a passage from the bible to the people in his congregation all of them poor peasants. And then they would discuss this passage saying what they heard and what they thought when father cardinal read this story of the wise men from the east who went to Jerusalem, looking for the new king of the Jews Aidan one of these impoverished Christian said, it seems to me that when those wise men arrived, they knew that the messiah had been born. And they thought Herod knew about it. And that the messiah was going to be a member of his family if he was a king. It was natural that they should go to look for him in Harrods palace. But in that palace. There was nothing but corruption and evil and the messiah couldn't be born there. He had to be born among the people pour in a stable. What does humble Christian was saying was that the wise men simply assumed that a king would be born in power and glory born in the Royal palace. But if the wise men thought they could find the savior of the world inherits house in Jerusalem, they were in the wrong town. They had also come at the wrong time Herod, the great who was the Roman appointed king of the Jews was growing old and in his aging. He had become a mentally unstable tyrant who ruled through fear and cruelty. He was so insecure about his standing that every whiff of palace intrigue potential opposition threw him into a murderous rage. He even killed one of his wives several of his children and other members of his own family fearing that they were plotting to betray him. When Caesar Augustus heard what Herod had done to his own family. He is reported to have said about Herod. I'd rather be his pig than his son. So if the wise men have come to an aging insane and ruthless Hera the king of the Jews asking about where they can find the new king of the Jews. Will they've come to the wrong town at the wrong time, it would be like going to the Kremlin today and asking Vladimir Putin. Where's the new leader of Russia? We've come to pay him Armitage. Sure enough. Matthew tells us that the wise men when they told Hera that they were looking for the new king of the Jews rattled king Herod so badly that he shook like a leaf in the wind and the whole city of Jerusalem trembled with him. There is a church I know about that has an annual Christmas pageant now, this is not a simple event, like many other churches have with the children wearing bathrobes and coat hanger. Wire angel's wings to play the parts in the Christmas story..

king Herod Jerusalem Matthew Tom Bethlehem Judea Jesus visiting professor Peter Princeton Bethlehem of Judea Senator Washington candler school Emory University Yale divinity school commerce Yale
"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:55 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Allergy at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia where he continues to direct a leadership program for pastors last fall, he was visiting professor at Yale divinity school Tom earned his bachelor's degree from Erskine college. His master of divinity from Erskine logical seminary and his PHD from Princeton, theological seminary. The author of a couple of dozen books, including a standard seminary text on preaching. He earlier served on the faculties of Princeton, theological seminary and Columbia, theological seminary. Tom welcome today. One and happy new year. Thank you and happy new year to you, Peter. You are reportedly retired these days, but you are certainly keeping busy and you still connect with candler school of theology. As the director of a leadership program for pastors in the early phases of their ministry. How's how's that working? And what are you finding wherever the marvelous experience with that? We have taken a dozen of candler best graduates from five to ten years out and given them through the generosity of Lillian Douaumont two years of continuing education on leadership and the goal is to boost them to the next level of Civic Leadership. What sorts of responses are you getting from the pastor's? Well, what we're doing is each session which lasts three days. They have eight of them we focused on a major issue swirling in their community like healthcare criminal Justice immigration, and they're having their minds changed and more important than that. They're extending their ministries beyond the horizon of the congregation into the community. Last fall, you were a visiting professor at Yale divinity school. So what did you focus on in your teaching there? I was a co teacher in the basic course in preaching at Yale. So we had the brand new newbie preacher preaching. They're very very. I I baby baby, sir. Tom we live in very divisive times with great emotion on the different sides of our society based on politics and race economic status and more let alone religion, what should preachers be doing in their pulpits in this sort of environment, and how can preaching help us get through this. Well, my old mentor Edmonds timely who preached for many years on the predecessor of day one the Protestant. Our used to say that every Sunday a preacher has to decide whether to preach comfort. Ye comfort my people or whoa to you who are at ease in Zion. And I think for the most part we're at a comfort Ye comfort young. I think people are torn apart by the political divisiveness of our nation are in despair about our institutions and the damage that has been done to them and their inability to function. Well, and we need to know that God has not abandoned us that we are still in. In the hands of God that comfort Ye coverage is the main message, this should be preached. Well, this is not only the first Sunday of twenty nineteen. It's also piffle Sunday in the church calendar. What does that mean? Well, it Pitney actually means manifestation or or appearance, and it's generally connected in the lection area with the with the passage on which my sermon is today. And that is the wise men seeing a star appear in the east and following that star to the real appearance is at the heart of that passage the appearance of the newborn king Jesus. Your sermon is based on the gospel lesson for Matthew chapter to with this story. Would you read it for us? I will the Ospel a few chapter two in the time of king Herod after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea wise men from the east came to Jerusalem. Asking where is the child who has been born king of the Jews for we have observed his star at its rising and have come to pay him Amish. When king Herod heard this. He was frightened and all Jerusalem with him and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people he inquired of them where the messiah was to be born they told him in Bethlehem of Judea for. So it has been written by the prophet. And you Bethlehem in the land of Judah are by no, means least among the rulers of Judah for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd, my people Israel, then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared, then he sent them to Bethlehem saying go and search diligently for the child, and when you have found him bring me word so that I may also go and pay him Amish. When they had heard the king, they set out, and they are ahead of them went the star that they had seen at its rising until it stopped over the place where the child was when they saw that the star had stopped. They were overwhelmed with joy on entering the house. They saw the child with Mary his mother, and they knelt down and paid him on edge. Then opening their treasure chests. They offered him gifts of gold frankencense and myrrh and having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod they left for their own country by another road, Tom. We look forward to hearing your sermon about all this. It's entitled the wrong town at the wrong time. Thank you for sharing it with us. Thank you, Peter. And if you'd like to listen again to today's program with an extended interview or read or share a transcript of Tom long sermon. Visit our website at day one dot org or for a free printed sermon. Transcript call us toll free at one eight eight eight four one one d a y one..

king Herod Tom Yale divinity school Bethlehem visiting professor Erskine logical seminary Jerusalem Peter candler school of theology Princeton Bethlehem of Judea Yale Emory University Erskine college Lillian Douaumont Atlanta Zion Columbia