35 Burst results for "Emory University"

2 justices slam court's 2015 decision in gay marriage case

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

2 justices slam court's 2015 decision in gay marriage case

"A dissenting statement from Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas has LGBT groups expressing concerns a new conservative court might try to reverse same sex marriage rights the High Court rejected an appeal from former Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis whose refusal to issue marriage licenses to same sex couples pave the way for marriage equality in twenty fifteen but justice Clarence Thomas wrote the majority created a problem by reading into the constitution a right that doesn't exist family law attorney Randall Kessler who teaches at Emory University says there could be a religious challenges the right set of facts about the situation where someone complains our religious liberty is affected by not being able to object to same sex marriage some LGBT groups say the court is about to become more conservative and they worry about a renewed war on same sex marriage rights Jackie Quinn Washington

Clarence Thomas High Court Kim Davis Randall Kessler Emory University Supreme Court Kentucky County Attorney Jackie Quinn Washington
Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | Last month

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

All Things Considered

05:01 min | Last month

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"In a high security prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. Two federal inmates await their executions when tomorrow the next on Thursday as they wait. Their lawyers are asking the court to intervene because they say The drugs used to kill. The inmates will cause their lungs to fill with fluid as they die, and that in their final moments, they could experience the sensation of drowning. Those fears aren't unfounded, and just a quick warning for listeners. What you're about to hear may be upsetting. In the spring of 2017 on Arkansas inmate gasped and choked as he was executed the following year. In Ohio, an inmate heaved against his restraints struggling for air and a few months after that, in Tennessee, once again on inmate gasping for air and convulsing. All of these inmates were later found to have lungs filled with fluid. Now we can't ask them how painful their executions were, whether They amounted to cruel and unusual punishment, But what we can do is peer inside their bodies. For the past two years, a team and all things considered has been investigating the autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection. We've obtained the largest collection of these autopsies ever assembled in the U. S. This collection spans decades of executions across the multiple states, and what our findings reveal is evidence of a death far less peaceful than what states promised when they adopted lethal injection decades ago. We begin the story in Atlanta, where I went in 2018 with producer Noah Caldwell to meet a doctor who made a startling discovery. Joel Zip. It works 80 hour weeks at Emory University Hospital. He's an anesthesiologist checking in on patients in the ice for you. So if temperatures is looking a little grade, and did you get to say, perhaps Mediate those? A few years ago, federal defenders in Georgia hired zip it to review a few autopsies of inmates executed by lethal injection. What I was asked The address was the blood levels of certain kinds of medications, but something else caught his eye and recognize that something was amiss. What did you see in the autopsy? So I began to see a pattern of organ failure instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death. I began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death a death associated with suffering a painful death in autopsy after autopsy. What zip it saw were unusually heavy lungs, lungs swollen with fluid, which surprised him. It's not a common finding in autopsies. It's something you'd see in cases of, say. Congestive heart failure or sepsis, neither of which were happening here. He wanted a second opinion. So he contacted a colleague at Emory, a pathologist named Mark Edgar. I said I want you to look at these documents and just tell me what you think you see here because I think I'm seeing something here. That is a surprise to me now. Zip. It deliberately did not tell Edgar what had surprised him in those autopsies. But anger. He zeroed in on the exact same thing that zip it did. Lungs filled with fluid. He noticed frothy fluid in the nose. Same word kept popping up frothy material in the main bronc I the word frothy, frothy fluid in the upper and Lower airways. What they were seeing was a severe form of a condition called pulmonary, a Dema. Presence of froth was a troubling clue because it meant that inmates were still alive and trying to breathe as their lungs were filling with fluid. Xzibit and Edgar got a few dozen more autopsies from other states just to see Was this a fluke and similar words like frothy and fluid kept coming up to describe the lungs. It was a stunning finding, because here was some physical document that could answer a question that could otherwise not be answered, which was What exactly is the experience of a dying inmate? Ziva brought these findings to federal court in multiple states. It's evidence that is now at the forefront of legal challenges to lethal injection. For the past two years, The team at NPR has undertaken its own investigation. We expanded the scope of the data significantly, we obtained more than 300 inmate autopsies through Freedom of Information Act requests. They cover executions in nine states dating from 1992 2019. And what these autopsies show is that when inmates lungs or examined after their executions, pulmonary oedema occurred 84% of the time that was consistent across states. Medical experts say these findings are troubling. Because they mean it is very likely these inmates experience the sensation of drowning or suffocation before they die, and that many inmates were not being properly anesthetized.

Joel Zip Mark Edgar Terre Haute Emory University Hospital Indiana Sepsis Arkansas Ohio Atlanta Tennessee NPR Emory Noah Caldwell Producer Georgia
Building Your Brand as a Student

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

03:25 min | Last month

Building Your Brand as a Student

"Know one of the things you think is important is. College Age students or students in general learning. How to brand themselves right building their personal brand. Normally, we think about maybe with movie stars or. Personalities or something but let's get into this. Why do you think this is important To me without giving away the shop how they can do this. And how you can help people do it. So let's let's let's hear what we got here. It's important for so many reasons and not just for college students for even students who are at the high school level or even at the middle school level thinking about why they are going to go to college. So the why is essential? So I don't know if you're familiar with Jeff Selene goes new book WHO GETS IN AND Y. But that book I think. It came out this week and I got a chance to preview the intro chapter and one of the So the basis of the book is that he was able to. Be in the admissions office of four universities One of them was emery in Atlanta One was I forget the names of the schools, but the example is from emory. So it was him going through the admissions office seeing how they pick their classes. So not the highest Yale's in the harbor is not the highly highly selective universities, but the you know somewhat selective universities and how they make the decisions. So he told the story of you know emory university going back and forth. With various students who are interested in going to the school and one of the examples that he used was a student who was, interested in microbiology however, on the student's application, there was no indication of any clubs, any volunteer work anything at all that would indicate that this was something that the suit it was really interested in had a true commitment to. So even at the middle school or high school level is important because if you're going to a college which is competitive with going you're going to be. Competing, with other students to get in, you want to establish what your brand is student. So if you are interested in, you know the sciences or stem or something in that regard, a highly competitive major you WanNa do things at in college or in middle school so that we use some at your college application You are standing out you're doing things that shows the university that you are truly. Committed and you have a history of being committed to whatever the major is whatever the industry is while you are an undergraduate's a consistent. Thanks. So they're looking at, you know not only your essay and your sat scores in your great but they're show it. They want to see that you are. You know you've done some thought you took in some you've taken some consideration about what you want a. Major an in why this is important for you. So that's the short answer. I know that wasn't that short but that's the short answer about why building a brand is important and as you said, is some you know you think of it as a business thing or maybe you know a celebrity may think of it but it's important throughout whether you're in middle school and even when you graduate from. College. You want to establish your brand as being someone who is. Expert or Going to be an expert in. In your major or in a particular field. So that's why building plan important

Middle School Emory University Yale Jeff Selene Atlanta
OSHA Investigating Parking Deck Collapse In Atlanta

The Rashad Richey Morning Show

00:44 sec | Last month

OSHA Investigating Parking Deck Collapse In Atlanta

"Worker is recovering from his his injuries injuries after after a a secondary secondary collapse collapse of of a a midtown midtown Atlanta Atlanta parking parking deck. deck. Elena Elena Farr Farr Rescue Rescue Sergeant Sergeant Cortez Cortez Stafford, Stafford, explaining explaining what what happened. happened. One One of of the the beams beams on on the the upper upper floors floors pancake down to the bottom floor, which means it dropped about 10 floors down. Worker was standing on. One of those I beams when it collapsed and actually rode the concrete down. Saturday's incident followed Friday's collapse when at least one worker had to be rescued, and others were hurt. According to a lot of our rescue Saturday's collapse, Centre worker down 10 stories OSHA is investigating both of the collapse is a lot of city officials have halted all work inside the building. As the next course of action has figured out the deck is to serve as the new parking lot for Emory University Hospital Midtown. Meanwhile,

Sergeant Cortez Cortez Staffor Elena Elena Farr Farr Emory University Hospital Midt Atlanta Osha
Atlanta woman takes part in Emory University vaccine trial

The Weekly Check Up

00:28 sec | Last month

Atlanta woman takes part in Emory University vaccine trial

Atlanta woman takes part in Emory COVID-19 vaccine trial

Handel on the Law

00:27 sec | Last month

Atlanta woman takes part in Emory COVID-19 vaccine trial

"Is taking part in a corona virus vaccine trials at Emory University in Atlanta. Susan Hers tells Channel two action used. She doesn't feel at risk there so thorough in looking after me monitoring pretty much Everything I d'oh. So for me, it's like having angels on my side. Multiple companies in multiple countries air pushing to get a vaccine out as quickly as possible will go best. Being

Susan Hers Emory University Atlanta
Oakland A's announce positive virus test, game vs. Houston Astros postponed

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:09 min | 2 months ago

Oakland A's announce positive virus test, game vs. Houston Astros postponed

"In Houston Astros had to cancel our game today after someone within the A's organization tested positive for the Corona virus. KCBS is Jennifer Hodges says the ayes have not indicated if it was a player or staff member. The ayes had conducted testing for the entire traveling team and staff when the positive case was discovered. Allens that they face is making sure that the disease does not spread through the rest of the A's. Dr. Zachary Benny is an epidemiologist with the Oxford College of Emory University. He says Major League Baseball has already seen two large outbreaks, but the recent cases they did manage to get under control, so it's a little hard to know what Caused two teams have really bad outbreaks in two teams to be able to contain them. But well, we'll have to see the A's air. Now the 11th MLB team with a covert related postponement. What they need to do now is if they want to be cautious. They probably need to postpone the games for the A's for the next few days, maybe 45 days, which is what we saw. With New York Mets and with the Cincinnati Reds. Jennifer

Jennifer Hodges Dr. Zachary Benny Houston Astros Oxford College Of Emory Univer New York Mets Allens MLB Cincinnati Reds Baseball
High schools and colleges work to contain coronavirus outbreaks

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

03:25 min | 2 months ago

High schools and colleges work to contain coronavirus outbreaks

"New more detailed guidelines from the CDC among other things they address what schools should do if there is a case of covert among students or staff, they suggest rather than shutting everything down immediately for a long period of time. One option is short term class suspension cancellation of events in after school activities to give public health leaders time to determine how widespread the infections are. As college students head back to campus corona virus outbreaks at universities in at least nineteen states representing nearly fourteen hundred cases among students and staff leading to concerns about scenes like this, a large gathering of students at Penn State that prompted the school's president ask those flouting the rules. Do you want to be the person responsible for sending everyone home Mississippi's governor urging college students to be careful since eighteen to twenty nine year olds make up the highest proportion of cases there. We know that we've got a lot of work to do there. It's something that we will have to be constantly working on over the course of the next few months and while K. through twelve schools face challenges reopening in. States like Mississippi and Georgia new. York with its rock bottom covert task positivity rate is in a good position to reopen schools even. So parents have questions, governor Andrew Cuomo saying he'd had questions to the still working out with the plan would be I would have a lot of questions parents a lot of questions. This is a risky proposition no matter how you do it, and with US deaths from covid nineteen averaging more than a thousand a day for twenty five consecutive days. The CDC is now projecting nearly one hundred, ninety, five, thousand Cova deaths by September twelfth about three weeks away suggesting that staggering death rate will continue at least in the short term we are beginning I think to. Turn the tide still CDC Director Dr Robert. Redfield who estimates as many as sixty million people nationwide may have already contracted the virus based on an infection rate of ten to twenty percent says, we could soon see the number of new daily deaths begin to decline as more people follow public health guidelines like mask wearing hand, washing, and social distancing. This week. Next week you're going to start seeing. The death rate really start to drop. New cases are steady or falling in forty states but redfield warned that positive trend isn't taking hold everywhere little the mirror right now. Is Getting stuck. We don't need to have a third wave. In the heartland coronavirus cases are on the rise in states like Wyoming Iowa and Illinois with a new emory university study suggesting so-called Super Spreader events are driving transmission in rural areas. Meanwhile on the vaccine front nor country can just ride this out until we have a bucks in a new sobering reminder from the head of the World Health Organization the nineteen eighteen pandemic lasted two years. He hopes this one won't, and even if we do have the Buxin. It wouldn't end the pandemic on its own progress does not mean victory. And there is another sad sign that victory over this virus has not yet at hand. We just learned today that a six year old girl. Florida's Hillsborough County has become the youngest person in the state to die from covid nineteen.

CDC Redfield Mississippi Andrew Cuomo United States President Trump World Health Organization York Hillsborough County Florida Emory University Dr Robert Director Buxin Georgia Wyoming Illinois Iowa
"emory university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:13 min | 2 months ago

"emory university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Over 200 kids test positive for coronavirus after Georgia summer camp

Guarding Your Nest Egg

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

Over 200 kids test positive for coronavirus after Georgia summer camp

"ABC News. The CDC releasing its report on the Georgia kids sleep away summer camp that shut down after a Corona virus outbreak was Ported there in June. A lack of ventilation and Children not wearing masks appears to have contributed to the spread. Dr. Ben Lo pan, professor of epidemiology at Emory University, Atlanta, We know how this virus is transmitted. It's transmitted from person to person. People are in close contact with each other. Of the nearly 600 staff and attendees 344 tested

Dr. Ben Lo Pan Abc News CDC Emory University Georgia Atlanta Professor
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 3 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Atlanta - Jon Ossoff Self-Quarantines After Wife Tests Positive For Coronavirus

Chris Burns

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

Atlanta - Jon Ossoff Self-Quarantines After Wife Tests Positive For Coronavirus

"Jon Ossoff's says he's in self quarantine after his wife who works at Emory tests positive for Corona virus. He also says that he's been feeling sick. And was tested Saturday and is waiting for the results. Here's WSB. Cheryl Castro also says he's in self quarantine after his wife and Emory University Dr contracted the Corona virus on Saul says his wife had mild symptoms and that he's also feeling sick. Also office challenging incumbent Senator David Purdue in November.

Jon Ossoff Emory University Dr Emory Senator David Purdue Cheryl Castro Saul
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 4 months ago

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

Emory's antibody study sheds light on COVID-19 immunity

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Emory's antibody study sheds light on COVID-19 immunity

"Medical researchers continue investigating covert nineteen and are reporting a new discovery about corona virus antibodies scientists at Emory University said nearly every patient hospitalized with covert nineteen develops antibodies within six days of testing positive the researchers said the finding provides a snapshot of the body's immune response as it's happening and will help them understand to what extent the antibodies convey immunity and whether an infected person's convalescent plasma can then be used to treat others it could also help they said with vaccine development ABC's Aaron

Emory University ABC Aaron
Emory antibody study in Atlanta, sheds light on COVID-19 immunity

Clark Howard

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Emory antibody study in Atlanta, sheds light on COVID-19 immunity

"University research that that could could be be key key to to developing developing an an effective effective treatment treatment for for the the corona corona virus virus using using blood blood samples samples from from patients patients being being treated treated for for covert covert nineteen nineteen at at Emory Emory University University hospital hospital and and Emory midtown the researchers have developed a test that found nearly all had strong antibodies that attack the virus within days of testing positive the suggestion using blood plasma from patients with higher levels of these these antibodies antibodies could could be be used used to to treat treat other other patients patients more more study study study will will will will be be be be needed needed needed needed but but but but as as as as one one one one of of of of the the the the lead lead lead lead researchers researchers researchers researchers put put put put it it it it these these these these findings findings findings findings have have have have important important important important implications implications implications implications for for for for the the the the development development development development of of of of much much much much needed needed needed needed vaccines vaccines vaccines Chris Chris Chris camp camp camp ninety ninety ninety five five five point point point five five five W. S.

Emory Emory University Univers Emory
New clusters pop up; Europe debates summer tourist season

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

New clusters pop up; Europe debates summer tourist season

"The road to recovery for coronavirus patience is complicated I knew it would be a long recovery but now I'm thinking it's going to be longer than I initially thought survivor Randy Swayze in Maryland the corona virus is so new that patients can't really be sure what to expect in recovery and beyond Dr Jay Varkey is an infectious disease expert at Emory University in Atlanta you will have a large group of survivors that have an array of complications that range from the respiratory system so the lines to psychological issues are related to recovering from an acute illness he says it's not clear yet how many survivors will develop these complications I read a folate

Randy Swayze Maryland Dr Jay Varkey Emory University Atlanta
"emory university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Now we take you to the on art bell's somewhere in time my guess is professor Courtney brown he is a tenured PhD professor at Emory University he has written a book called that terrible it does make a cosmic journey is a cosmic voyage it is a cosmic trip that's for sure and what we have done in the last in the last two hours is to establish the scientific validity of remote viewing the ability to look add a distant geographic location the ability to look at a distant person or object the ability to enter their mind the ability to read into the future seat literally into the future or the past and without without going through all of the discussion of the past two hours I will tell you if you have been listening you should be by now convinced of the scientific about reality and viability of remote viewing we have not yet talked about some of the targets that doctor brown has viewed that part is coming up I could not have done that ladies and gentlemen in my view without having established the base the scientific repeatable base of proof for the existence of remote viewing having done that and I think having done that we will indeed begin to ask about specific targets shortly I want to remind everybody just a quick note we've got the double helix crop circle the most remarkable thing.

Courtney brown Emory University professor doctor brown two hours
"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

12:40 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Allergy at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia where he continues to direct a leadership program for pastors last fall, he was a visiting professor at Yale divinity school commerce, his bachelor's degree from Erskine college. His master of divinity from Erskine feel entrepot seminary and his PHD from Princeton theological seminary, author of a couple of dozen books, including a standard seminary text on preaching. He earlier served on the faculties of Princeton, theological seminary and Columbia, theological seminary. Tom welcome today. One and happy new year. Thank you and happy new year to you, Peter. You are reportedly retired these days, but you are certainly keeping busy and you still connect with candler school of the. Algae as the director of a leadership program for pastors in the early phases of their ministry. How's how's that working in? What are you? Finding women. A marvelous experience with that. We have taken a dozen of candler best graduates from five to ten years out and given them through the generosity of the Lillian Douaumont two years of continuing education on leadership and the goal is to boost them to the next level of Civic Leadership. What sorts of responses are you getting from the pastor's? Well, what we're doing is each session which lasts three days. They have eight of them we focus on a major issue swirling in their community like healthcare criminal Justice immigration, and they're having their minds changed and more important than that. They're extending their ministries beyond the horizon of the congregation into the community. Last fall, you're a visiting professor Yale divinity school. So what did you focus on in your teaching there? I was a co teacher in the basic course in preaching at Yale. So we had the brand new newbie preachers preaching. They're very very, I I baby baby, sir. Tom we live in very divisive times with great emotion on the different sides of our society based on politics and race economic status and more let alone religion, what should preachers be doing in their pulpits in this sort of environment, and how can preaching help us get through this. Well, my old mentor Edmonds timely who preached for many years on the predecessor of day one the Protestant. Our used to say that every Sunday a preacher has to decide whether to preach comfort. Ye comfort e my people or whoa to you who are at ease in Zion. And I think for the most part we're in a comfort Ye comfort I think people are torn apart by the political divisiveness of our nation are in despair about our institutions and the damage that has been done to them and their inability to function. Well, and we need to know that God has not abandoned that we are still in. In the hands of God that comfort Ye couple years. The main message this should be preached. Well, this is not only the first Sunday of twenty nineteen. It's also a piffling Sunday in the church calendar. What does that mean? Well, it piffle actually means manifestation or or appearance, and it's generally connected in the election area with the with the passage on which my sermon is today. And that is the wise men seeing a star appear in the east and following that star to the real appearance is at the heart of that passage the appearance of the newborn king Jesus. Your sermon is based on the gospel lesson from Matthew chapter to with this story. Would you read it for us? I will the Ospel Matthew chapter two in the time of king Herod after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea wise men from the east came to Jerusalem. Asking where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? But we have observed his star at its rising and have come to pay him Amish. When king Herod heard this. He was frightened and all Jerusalem with him and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people he inquired of them where the messiah was to be born they told him in Bethlehem of Judea for. So it has been written by the prophet. And you Bethlehem in the land of Judah are by no, means least among the rulers of Judah for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd, my people Israel. Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learn from them the exact time when the star had appeared, then he sent them to Bethlehem saying go and search diligently for the child, and when you have found him bring me word so that I may also go and pay him Amish when they had heard the king they set out, and they are ahead of them went the star that they had seen at its rising until it stopped over the place where the child was when they saw that the star had stopped. They were overwhelmed with joy on entering the house. They saw the child with Mary his mother, and they knelt down and paid him a message then opening their treasure chests. They offered him gifts of gold frankencense and myrrh and having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod they left for their own country by another road. Tom. We look forward to hearing your sermon about all this. It's entitled the wrong town at the wrong time. Thank you for sharing it with us. Thank you, Peter. And if you'd like to listen again to today's program with an extended interview or read or share a transcript of Tom long sermon. Visit our website at day one dot org. We're for free printed sermon transcript, call us toll free at one eight eight eight four one one d a y one. Last fall in Washington. There was a very contentious Senate hearing over appointing a new Justice to the supreme court at one point in the hearing one of the senators on the committee lost his temper lost his cool and melted down in rage shaking his finger at the senators from the opposing party, he shouted that. They were acting disgracefully and conducting a sham process, and then he turned to the man being examined the man who was nominated to the supreme court and said to him. You're looking for a fair process. Will you came to the wrong town at the wrong time? He was speaking, of course, about Washington in two thousand eighteen but ironically, we could say something similar about the wise men in our biblical story from Matthew they came to the wrong town at the wrong time. Here's what happened in the story many years ago, some wise man living in the eastern lands of the ancient world saw an amazing sight in the heavens the rising of a new star. Or maybe it was a comet blazing brightly across the dark curtain of the firmament. And they knew that the rising of this brilliant light was assigned from the heavens, a signal that something momentous something world changing had happened. Although we sometimes sing at Christmas time as if these wise men were kings, we three kings of orient are, actually. They weren't kings at all they were almost surely philosophers and astrologers something they may have been Zorro Astrium priests. But whoever they were these wise men were shrewd observers of the night sky, those who look for signs of decisive events and clues to the future in the heavens. So Matthew tells us that just as Jesus was born they saw this new star rising in the western sky over Judea the land of the Jews using oil their powers of analysis and interpretation they determined that. This star was a sign that a new king had been born the Jews had been given a new king and the lights of heaven proclaimed it what they did not know yet was that this new king who had been born in Judea was not only the king of the Jews, but the king of kings and Lord of lords the savior of all and his name was Jesus. These wise men wanted to see this new thing that had happened and they desired to show their honor for the new king. So they set out for Judea to the west in the direction of the star that they had seen in our imaginations, we see them riding along mounted on camels. But the bible does not say how they traveled it says only where they traveled to Judea and when they got to their destination. They went immediately to the city of Jerusalem to the palace of Herod. Now, Matthew has already told us in this story that Jesus was born in Bethlehem not Jerusalem. But the wise men went to Jerusalem looking for the new king if they were looking for the real king. Well, as the Senator said you come to the wrong town at the wrong time. Why did they go to Jerusalem? When Jesus was born in Bethlehem. I think we can hear. Some wisdom about that question from a poor Christian man living in Celinda NAMI a small village in Nicaragua. Every week the priest in this village Ernest oh card now would read a passage from the bible to the people in his congregation all of them poor peasants. And then they would discuss this passage saying what they heard and what they thought when father cardinal read this story of the wise men from the east who went to Jerusalem, looking for the new king of the Jews Aidan one of these impoverished Christian said, it seems to me that when those wise men arrived, they knew that the messiah had been born. And they thought Herod knew about it. And that the messiah was going to be a member of his family if he was a king. It was natural that they should go to look for him in Harrods palace. But in that palace. There was nothing but corruption and evil and the messiah couldn't be born there. He had to be born among the people pour in a stable. What does humble Christian was saying was that the wise men simply assumed that a king would be born in power and glory born in the Royal palace. But if the wise men thought they could find the savior of the world inherits house in Jerusalem, they were in the wrong town. They had also come at the wrong time Herod, the great who was the Roman appointed king of the Jews was growing old and in his aging. He had become a mentally unstable tyrant who ruled through fear and cruelty. He was so insecure about his standing that every whiff of palace intrigue potential opposition threw him into a murderous rage. He even killed one of his wives several of his children and other members of his own family fearing that they were plotting to betray him. When Caesar Augustus heard what Herod had done to his own family. He is reported to have said about Herod. I'd rather be his pig than his son. So if the wise men have come to an aging insane and ruthless Hera the king of the Jews asking about where they can find the new king of the Jews. Will they've come to the wrong town at the wrong time, it would be like going to the Kremlin today and asking Vladimir Putin. Where's the new leader of Russia? We've come to pay him Armitage. Sure enough. Matthew tells us that the wise men when they told Hera that they were looking for the new king of the Jews rattled king Herod so badly that he shook like a leaf in the wind and the whole city of Jerusalem trembled with him. There is a church I know about that has an annual Christmas pageant now, this is not a simple event, like many other churches have with the children wearing bathrobes and coat hanger. Wire angel's wings to play the parts in the Christmas story..

king Herod Jerusalem Matthew Tom Bethlehem Judea Jesus visiting professor Peter Princeton Bethlehem of Judea Senator Washington candler school Emory University Yale divinity school commerce Yale
"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"emory university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Allergy at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia where he continues to direct a leadership program for pastors last fall, he was visiting professor at Yale divinity school Tom earned his bachelor's degree from Erskine college. His master of divinity from Erskine logical seminary and his PHD from Princeton, theological seminary. The author of a couple of dozen books, including a standard seminary text on preaching. He earlier served on the faculties of Princeton, theological seminary and Columbia, theological seminary. Tom welcome today. One and happy new year. Thank you and happy new year to you, Peter. You are reportedly retired these days, but you are certainly keeping busy and you still connect with candler school of theology. As the director of a leadership program for pastors in the early phases of their ministry. How's how's that working? And what are you finding wherever the marvelous experience with that? We have taken a dozen of candler best graduates from five to ten years out and given them through the generosity of Lillian Douaumont two years of continuing education on leadership and the goal is to boost them to the next level of Civic Leadership. What sorts of responses are you getting from the pastor's? Well, what we're doing is each session which lasts three days. They have eight of them we focused on a major issue swirling in their community like healthcare criminal Justice immigration, and they're having their minds changed and more important than that. They're extending their ministries beyond the horizon of the congregation into the community. Last fall, you were a visiting professor at Yale divinity school. So what did you focus on in your teaching there? I was a co teacher in the basic course in preaching at Yale. So we had the brand new newbie preacher preaching. They're very very. I I baby baby, sir. Tom we live in very divisive times with great emotion on the different sides of our society based on politics and race economic status and more let alone religion, what should preachers be doing in their pulpits in this sort of environment, and how can preaching help us get through this. Well, my old mentor Edmonds timely who preached for many years on the predecessor of day one the Protestant. Our used to say that every Sunday a preacher has to decide whether to preach comfort. Ye comfort my people or whoa to you who are at ease in Zion. And I think for the most part we're at a comfort Ye comfort young. I think people are torn apart by the political divisiveness of our nation are in despair about our institutions and the damage that has been done to them and their inability to function. Well, and we need to know that God has not abandoned us that we are still in. In the hands of God that comfort Ye coverage is the main message, this should be preached. Well, this is not only the first Sunday of twenty nineteen. It's also piffle Sunday in the church calendar. What does that mean? Well, it Pitney actually means manifestation or or appearance, and it's generally connected in the lection area with the with the passage on which my sermon is today. And that is the wise men seeing a star appear in the east and following that star to the real appearance is at the heart of that passage the appearance of the newborn king Jesus. Your sermon is based on the gospel lesson for Matthew chapter to with this story. Would you read it for us? I will the Ospel a few chapter two in the time of king Herod after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea wise men from the east came to Jerusalem. Asking where is the child who has been born king of the Jews for we have observed his star at its rising and have come to pay him Amish. When king Herod heard this. He was frightened and all Jerusalem with him and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people he inquired of them where the messiah was to be born they told him in Bethlehem of Judea for. So it has been written by the prophet. And you Bethlehem in the land of Judah are by no, means least among the rulers of Judah for from you shall come a ruler who is to shepherd, my people Israel, then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared, then he sent them to Bethlehem saying go and search diligently for the child, and when you have found him bring me word so that I may also go and pay him Amish. When they had heard the king, they set out, and they are ahead of them went the star that they had seen at its rising until it stopped over the place where the child was when they saw that the star had stopped. They were overwhelmed with joy on entering the house. They saw the child with Mary his mother, and they knelt down and paid him on edge. Then opening their treasure chests. They offered him gifts of gold frankencense and myrrh and having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod they left for their own country by another road, Tom. We look forward to hearing your sermon about all this. It's entitled the wrong town at the wrong time. Thank you for sharing it with us. Thank you, Peter. And if you'd like to listen again to today's program with an extended interview or read or share a transcript of Tom long sermon. Visit our website at day one dot org or for a free printed sermon. Transcript call us toll free at one eight eight eight four one one d a y one..

king Herod Tom Yale divinity school Bethlehem visiting professor Erskine logical seminary Jerusalem Peter candler school of theology Princeton Bethlehem of Judea Yale Emory University Erskine college Lillian Douaumont Atlanta Zion Columbia
"emory university" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Also put your money where your mouth is too. That's that's one thing. I appreciate about wounded warrior project, especially recently, there are a lot of groups, Jerry. And you know, this too said, we gotta help veterans mental health. We gotta do it. We got to join with someone well wounded warrior project just announced one hundred sixty million dollar commitment to veterans mental health, Mike. It's incredible. What are you gonna do with this money? Well, thanks for bringing that up. I mean, really it is an extenuation of a program that's been in place already to last three years, which was honored million dollar commitment by by word project in worker network partners at Emory University program up in up in Massachusetts General operation men that UCLA in the road home program rush university sixty million dollar program. We just announced continue to provide world class individual. Mental health care. For veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan that come on with what we know where to the most commonly experienced wounds of the last seventeen years, which is traumatic. Disorder brain injury. So this announcement last week. Can significantly increase access to care and quality of care, which we know are two of the biggest challenges for warriors getting the help they need after they returned home. You know, there's been some tremendous strides in the last several years, especially when it comes to traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress, of course, that's been an ongoing problem in all wars. In government has responded. However, I'm going to get on my soapbox a little bit. You know, you all are doing tremendous work, and that's one hundred and sixty million dollars that big commitment, quite frankly. I wonder what would happen if it wasn't for an organization like the wounded warriors project. I mean with the government really come through with the kind of money needed to treat that. Yeah..

Emory University Jerry Disorder Mike Massachusetts Iraq UCLA Afghanistan one hundred sixty million doll sixty million dollars sixty million dollar seventeen years million dollar three years
"emory university" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:10 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Three question a comment about this situation referencing Emory University, as you know, an Emory University. Professor used the N word during class many students were offended by this. They protested and the news got involved with this professor apologized, and then Emory University released a statement, and it read in part, and I read this again offensive language was not part of the case law cited the use of this or any racial slur in our community is unacceptable. Commissioner Errington junior Marvin Arrington junior who graduated from Emory school of law sent an open letter yesterday and said this professor must go. Commissioner Errington, I'm reading the statement from Emory University. That says this is unacceptable, obviously, they accepted it. Right. I mean, in fact, you know, the professors statement said that he wants to make it less likely that this would occur in the future. This actually, the response by Emory University and Emory school of law actually, makes it more likely that this will occur in the future. Because all they've said is the students don't have to take his class for the next two years students can opt out of taking his class where the two years, and he's gonna take some sensitivity training. Well, all that. Does it say, okay. All you have to do is issue. An apology. You can say whatever words you want to the aim were decay were the F word. You can say whatever word you want to issue an apology, take some sensitivity, training know, if this is in fact, unacceptable if Emory University actually has a mission statement, if they actually have goals and core values statement this. This is unacceptable. And if if this is unacceptable, then they need to sever all ties immediately. Hey, thank you. Professor you've served as well. But you chose to use this word and your choice to use this word on our university is inconsistent with our core values is inconsistent with our mission statement. And we're severing all ties Commissioner you are not only in elected official. You're also a lawyer yourself a practicing lawyer at that. Let's go to the Email. You sent you sent an Email. You copied everybody on this Email, including myself and many other members of the faculty Emory University. No one took the bait. No balcony member took the bait. No, professor took the bait. Tip one. This one person responded, I think the name is William Carney. Right. And this person took the bait and responded from their official Emory University Email account. One of the responses to your E mail that said this professor must go a professor from Imrie said to you. From their galaxy, by the way. They responded and included everybody in the response and said to you, do you think it might be consistent with what I hope we taught you about due process by enquiring go professor Swire about the circumstances. And context of his remarks or do you not care about the reasons to destroy a good man's career? I hope my former colleagues would not stand by in silence. If you proceed without a fair inquiry. Well again. I don't believe that. There's any set of circumstances. I don't believe I'm not finished. Okay. This is juicy. Your responded and CC'd everybody and said as I stated dean Hughes, please provide me with an example of an acceptable. Use of the N word in a classroom setting at Emory law school question, Mark. Their silence. And then you say, do you think the use is in line with the mission statement goals and core values of Emory University and the school of law if so please expound silence. And then. Here comes good old. Professor, William Carney responding and this person from Emory University says if dean Hughes didn't know or investigate the context they shame on him. For acting so harshly. You're a lawyer who often to get information before acting. Where is your sense of decency? Now, let me go down a little bit. There's a bit of back and forth, and you then respond and say to this professor you didn't copy everyone on this response. So I cop he'd and paste it your response. So the entire group can see your response and the response from this professor was and I quote, this is a juvenile response while I have never used this word than in the classroom Paul's right there. I have never used this word in the classroom. I will continue the quote continues by saying I'm certain there must be reported cases where the word comes up and some may be in books. He says that without citing the case book, which is improper for any researcher. In addition to that, he says Secondly, why be so hypersensitive I really hate it. When people I'm so I'm provided commentary by just half to somebody uses the n word in the white guy tells you stop being so hypersensitive. Really? Okay. He's a Secondly, why be so hypersensitive many people have been called disparaging names, I've been called a GED Catholic and a m word and most Jews have heard the word and he uses the word. He puts the word here. The K word. They were McKay word, then he says, there are lots of other people in our melting pot who have experienced similar epithets, which I don't detail here. Try to get over it. And respond to it by helping people get the best education. They can as you did. I mean, damn well, I mean, that's exactly what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to help Amri. I'm trying to hold them to their standards. I'm trying to hold them to their own language. Right. And you cannot get a good education. If you think that the professor may use the N word or any the K word or any of these other racial slurs at any time, and certainly by not punishing him respond harshly the university didn't respond harshly. The only thing they said is he's gotta take a sensitivity class and students can opt out of taking his class for the next two years. How was that harsh? He wasn't suspended. He didn't lose a patriot. He just students get the opportunity to opt out of his class for the next two years. There's a level of irony here and the level of irony years. That in order for this professor to defend. The professor who used the word this professor decided to use racial slurs himself. Well, I mean, it really was a trap, right? That's why I asked him please provide me an example of acceptable using the classroom because in order to provide an example of an acceptable. Use you have to use a slur in order to do it, and he attempted to do so and he attempted to do so. But regardless of that, even if you use those word, right? He's correct people. Use those words all the time. The question is is it in line with the mission core values and goals of Emory University? And we'll Emory University live up to its standards does Emory University have any integrity itself. We got more on the other side four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three of you would like to opine four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three. I thought his response was inappropriate. Offensive and once again, marginalized the offense and the people who were offended. The professor who use the n word said, basically, I was wrong. The person defending the professor using the N word is saying he was not wrong. Okay. We got more on the other side four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three getting rid of the realist man on radio. Pesident had the same county grants ended up. And when.

Emory University Professor Emory school of law Commissioner William Carney dean Hughes Commissioner Errington official Marvin Arrington Amri Pesident Swire researcher McKay Imrie Mark Paul two years
"emory university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Well i think it all came together incrementally you know certainly the forensic evidence i thought was pivotal that being that the the handgun that was used in this case did not malfunction with working in perfectly good condition and require twelve and a quarter pounds of pressure to be exacted on the trigger in make fire i think that was in direct contradiction to what the defendant in this case has been expressing not only to the police but also to others and i think that perhaps we'll step one back to the prophet coming up with what you're gonna wear well it's it's a mandatory sentences a mandatory life sentence and so there's not much mystery about it the only question will be is what the judge might add to it but at minimum he'll receive a life sentence a non parole life sentence and one of the other things we like to say with respect to the evidence one of the things that really led us to trot start to understand that this was not an accident is the employees from emory university and we really have to think the the nurses the doctors and the staff members at emory university because once we started to talk with them and first of all what they describe to us what someone who was not grieving over the death of his wife then when they started to reveal to us the different versions of the facts certainly we started asking ourselves why is it that someone who was telling the truth with need to come up with several different versions of what happened so once we heard the people from memory and is clinton said with some of the other stuff than bob with the gun as prosecutors we hear this all of the time we we hear this term all the time the gun went off you know some people say good went off and i shot him eight times in the back so we hear that a lot and so we heard it it it makes you suspicious but then we started to see somebody other evidence which clearly said this was not an accident quarter to six here wsb i'm chris chandler in the news center and what you're listening to is.

emory university clinton bob chris chandler
"emory university" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on Science Friday

"Talk about what they found she's professor and director of the center for data science at emory university in atlanta welcome to the program vira you know i might have to plead guilty of this because there's a common perception oh i had a fly now i'm going to get sick that the they're playing he's just flying petri dish full you know stuff is that true well that's certainly something that you hear a lot in the question is is that true or is that recall bias and the answer is well we don't know because we really don't there's no organization that's keeping statistics on who's getting sick on airplanes outside of a few reported events there's maybe i don't know eighteen twenty something things that have appeared in the literature right years but you look at you actually went on the planes and look at the risk of flu transmission during across country flight what what did you find well we found that for people that were seated in either in one row in front of one row behind or two seats to either side of an infectious individual that those people were the most likely to become infected and that the people that were seated outside of that perimeter privilege of risk is what i call it we're unlikely to become sick did you headed you actually physics determine that well we assumed a certain risk of action that we got from a study of of passengers on a plane that were grounded on a tarmac in alaska for something like four and a half hours no air circulation and so we calculated risk rate from that from that report and applied it to the duration of one meter context that the passengers on our lights hat.

emory university alaska professor and director atlanta one meter
"emory university" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"The national science foundation is spending a quarter of a million dollars on a sociology study that seeks to ensure the legitimacy of women in the workplace at emory university in atlanta was awarded the project how proud they must be i am abed every their family members are proud yeah i bet the entire city of atlanta and the state of georgia are bursting with bright where the research began last thursday the study will attempt to us to understand what is required to ensure the legitimacy of female authorities what legitimacy is critical for the effective performance of authorities in workplace settings lid ellis legitimated authorities have lured support from their superiors and subordinates who accept them as appropriate and their position and are likely to comply with the requests this is good oh it's good and it makes so much harmful to how it's your federal government at work here can you in contrast let me just oh i'm sorry blaine yes there's a lot more to learn your mouth for learning in contrast authorities who are not legitimated are likely to be challenged resisted it and scrutinized sure yet have that no new whatever you said taxpayerfunded study will integrate knowledge about how fairness empower affect legitimacy in how trust is involved the stasi primarily concerned with whether women can find legitimacy in the workplace and again two hundred forty eight thousand dollars to study this pressing problem tote prep problem okay well i mean that's bizarre triple eight nine hundred thirty three 93 more pat gray unleashed is inevitable.

national science foundation emory university atlanta georgia blaine pat gray two hundred forty eight thousa million dollars
"emory university" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Michigan presentation to dig defined redeem sex between men and boys as their official as official title right here it's called pederasty kinship a d idealising core studies and uh i find this absolutely crazy in that nobody's made a statement on this publicly now let's say this didn't take place apparently took place on the ninth woman find out but if it didn't who would who would suggest something like this and somebody say oh yeah we can gauge we got a a spare room done here for the seminar woah will hook you up through the women studies department now this dirt bag as a men who put this together uh i guess he's a phd that's on emory's website emory university and romance studies graduate certificate feminist studies a mellon postdoctoral study insects and university of pennsylvania humidity's form two thousand fifteen and sixteen that'll end and i want to get more into this to that tells me that this guy's not qualified to do anything except think crazy things and then trying to foist demonises if they are uh reality seriously that's what that's all about that point let's see what uh trump bridge rob has to say rob welcomed done yards how you doing fabulous how're you doing bad were in a try we're heading over to the town hall for the governor's today and uh checking in with you thanks for what you're doing that stuff they've been listening to about michigan state that needs to be checks will michigan when i just exposes of michigan we've been doing this for awhile to not i to this day is astounds me that people still look at you them as well i'm not gonna the knowledge out over here because i want to go to the football game and i want to be part of this tough two big shot university i'm an alumni society the start turning in their rings and started yet taken their donations back and send you people have become completely insane at management level only one every penny back and if we have to crush the u of m than do it because when i just exposed here on this show is straight up evil.

emory emory university rob michigan official postdoctoral university of pennsylvania football
"emory university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on KOMO

"Emory university in atlanta have over here who create havoc on the country's economy you panic amongst people and think that that saw so that's why this needs to be taken period new security measures affect cargo flown into the us from saudi arabia jordan egypt qatar and the united arab emirates a state senate hearing was held the day were a lawmakers her proposal to abolish the death penalty komos charlie harger listen to both sides think about it right now how do you feel about the death penalty in such a divisive issue with some liberals who supported and some conservatives against it that brings us to testimony in olympia before lawmakers republican state senator marine walsh said she's against capital punishment because there are cases where innocent people are wrongfully convicted in put to death i do now lack empathy or sympathy for any of the victim's families in cases like this i want to be very clear about that watkin county prosecutor dave nick edwards supports the death penalty saying sometimes criminals commit such heinous acts it's the only appropriate punishment is extremely rare and it should be i believe that something that we should have and i believe that we really need to talk to the people as far as deciding this he thinks this is a question better left to the voters of washington state rather than the legislature charlie harger komo news komo news time 834 aaa traffic every ten minutes on the fours with mark lambah cared more sixty birthday avenue north the imply put two bothell way is closed as you kill the crews worked to remove recalled tree down powercables there seth up the tweet elbe and bought the sale of vehicle fire at the response partially blocking us drought well tires or advisers the white passes as the corby past westbound bribery space average travel times eastbound a couple of minutes faster than usual next report that beat forty four mark land geno donald has the forecast that some lingering scattered showers before the next round their real significant rain is on deck for tuesday morning we'll start to see the wet weather for the morning commute and it really ram set by midday and especially the afternoon drive home as pre pretty powerful mid winter storm comes.

saudi arabia bribery bothell washington prosecutor watkin county marine walsh senator olympia charlie harger senate Emory university geno donald corby mark lambah dave nick edwards capital punishment united arab emirates qatar us atlanta ten minutes
"emory university" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Gender inequalities what does that mean exactly i i don't i well anyways oscar nomination sex gender todd doesn't talk about discrimination it talks about inequality right which is which is it would be different if the the phrasing had included the words discrimination okay and the next part is resulting in physical sexual emotional economic or mental harm right right so it's as broadly construed both both clauses are as broadly construed as they can be and the reason for that is to allow maximum scope for interpretation with which is exactly what happened with a draw while mental harm again mental harm and and as you pointed out mental harm is not backed up by the empirical evidence apart from a posttraumatic stress syndrome like cognitive behavioural therapy would suggest that you actually can do mental good by exposing someone to objectionable ideas when they've in moderation in order to help them become less mentallyfragile scott lilla failed emory university sheriff jerry credible storm hit while he is one of the mass he's written several textbooks on cycle pathology right he knows this stuff and just this year he put out a paper where he explored the the empirical evidence around microaggressions yet and he did all of the literature he'll end microaggressions are course these innocuous actions that are deemed to be bigoted or or some her sexist it's it's of rudeness what they are actually showing a video of from tv o is what am i crowe aggression is and what he said was there is absolutely no evidence there's no evidence that microaggressions these objectionable ideas lead to mental harm he also said that the concept itself is extraordinarily illdefined we lead also if they can cross e right that was the beginning of our conversation everything is cold and while that if you make the box big enough you can put anything into it.

scott lilla oscar emory university
"emory university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Give her everything she needs for all her systems including those nutrients are missing when you have asked about and this can turn around very quickly get people with life threatening azman i had one pasture uh pastor crapload dollar from atlanta georgia he had a discussions goes back to 1991 and eleven and a half year old daughter emory university hold him she gonna die before you just twelve juice out responding arja he had uh this guy says goes back to 1991 had eleven and a half year old daughter emory university told him she was going to die before she was 12 without responding course emory university told him she'd be dead within a couple of weeks okay now thirty years later almost the she is a beautiful young woman and she was supposed to be course emory university told him she'd be dead within a couple of weeks okay now thirty years later almost the she is a beautiful young woman and she was supposed to be torn ya john go ahead hi dr i have a question for you i'm someone who had been drinking alcohol four gna hey john go ahead hi dr i have a question for you i'm someone who had been drinking alcohol two weeks every day for about fifteen years and about three weeks ago i completely stopped drinking alcohol and i was wondering even though i've gone about three we i still in general don't feel very good i have low energy by sunday one seventy okay any other issues high blood pressure diabetes arthritis no okay now the reason why i'm asking all that play one seventy okay any other issues have a pressure diabetes arthritis no okay now the reason why i'm asking all that is.

georgia emory university blood pressure atlanta thirty years fifteen years three weeks two weeks
"emory university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"See the on account of the emory university football season my alma mater yes which you really have to look for that yeah it's under the undefeated team yes undefeated season of emory university football day okay we'll just go the next steps yes let's say we have a like linear striber club tournament this morning oh i wonder where they're going to go you know you got a really want to do this site you know this time of year humanity the cold i'd like to hear from you is twenty after the hour i like to hear from you guys about what's the coldest day you ever fish now that for the sp radio network uh we had some calls a couple of weeks ago from minnesota uh and i know that's going to be colder but for the southeast o'neill's one little a tournament r r i used fish lot but not so much anymore but uh the coldest day i ever spent uh was at lake hartwill for a tournament that was in the late seventies or early '80s and we when when we went out that morning uh it was three degrees the high that day was nine while five twenty one we got to get out of here at that you're really smart today that oh yeah it was brilliant and what if you had fallen in the water outer died marta gotta get out of here for a bright this is o'neill silent anywhere o account when we return herman cane abroad more isn't the only example of what they have done this sort of thing i can't speak for all of the eight accusations against roar more from a different women but i can tell you about my situation i know full of fact that two of the three accusers receive money or a job now with no merit to the accusations but you see the liberals and a democrat don't care about troop herman cane every day eleven till noon on the wsb o'neill hearing w a joy using products that performed the best in their category i'd like to say that cda puts its money where its mouth is and guarantees its muzzleloaders to perform better than any of their competition top allied acura series rifles have more guarantees than any other muzzle over on the.

minnesota o'neill lake hartwill cda emory university football three degrees
"emory university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"See the on account of the emory university football season my alma mater yes which you really have to look for that yeah it's under the undefeated team yes undefeated season of emory university football day okay we'll just go the next subject yeah let's say we have a like linear striber club tournament this morning oh i wonder where they're going to go you know you got a really want to do this i you know this time of year you really do the code i'd like to hear from you as twenty after the hour i like beer from you guys about what's the coldest day you ever fish now that support the sb radio network uh we had some calls a couple of weeks ago from minnesota uh and i know that's going to be colder but for the southeast o'neill's one little a tournament r r i used fish lot but not so much anymore but uh the coldest day i ever spent uh was at lake hartwill for a tournament that was in the late seventies or early '80s and we when when we went out that more getting oh it wished three degrees the high that day was nine while five twenty one we got a lot out of here at the cheer really smart today that oh yeah it was brilliant and what if you had fallen in the water outer died mart i got gotta get out of here for a break this is o'neill silent he were row account when we return herman cane abroad more isn't the only example of what they have done this sort of thing i can't speak for all of the eight accusations against roar more from eight different women but i can tell you about my situation i know full a fact that two of the three accusers receive money or a job now with no merit to the accusations but you see the liberals and a democrat don't care about troop herman cane every day eleven till noon on the wsb o'neill hearing w a joy using products that performed the best in their category i'd like to say that cda puts its money where its mouth is and guarantees its muzzleloaders to perform better than any of their competition top allied acura series rifles have more guarantees than any other muzzle over on the planet see the the.

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"emory university" Discussed on Wow In the World

Wow In the World

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on Wow In the World

"Erez sort of the spinner be good to yesterday i read this crazy study led by twos scientists in georgia lena teeing a biomedical engineer at emory university and young we'd chain and mural machinist at could georgia institute of technology so i i know that of biomedical engineers scientists that helps doctor's invent new devices and tools to help them do their jobs better but i'm not as familiar with with narrow machinist it sounds like maybe someone who works with machines and the brain well asserted so the way i understand it is a neuro machine is is this scientists who works with prosthetics meaning like barred official arms and legs for people who have either lost them more were born without of them also had of their study his standings you're in the middle of a homemade flamingo suit well it didn't really a technically island you here but with these scientists noticed was that will mingle can stand for a lawyer lee really longtime on one leg so long as they even sleep standing up abbott don't lots of birds stand on one leg that they do but those make it look after the naked dan on one leg powers at a time whereas most birds have to shift from one leg to the other after awhile or just give up altogether and use old i'll say i am definitely not cut out for flamingo like this one leg thing is a workout that's the thing so when we humans and even other birds dan on one leg dicks a lot of muscle strain to hold a salmon us but flamingos these scientists discovered that they used almost no forest at all the baby plumbing those two sla there on one leg like nobody's.

Erez biomedical engineer emory university lee abbott georgia georgia institute of technolog official
"emory university" Discussed on Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"emory university" Discussed on Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

"And then he said if you want a second opinion we can mean i could sets mapuri and he did and so on that august twenty i my wife's at work i'm down at the emory university medical center another the wind shift cancer institute and they're putting the needle into the side of my face into this bump no appears and they said can we do that again and this was the pathologist malimba lewis she's i'd wasn't wild about what i saw that i pass a let's let me just do it again this fine didn't her much noise stuck the needle in again came back and said this is not good as you know it's filled with lymphocytes way she put in i'm like mortar lymphocytes in it's like another these cells that can cancer develops froman no and she said so in on all by years of experience this looks to me like nonhodgkins lymphoma we had about twenty minute talk and she said we won't know for sure until we run this one more test on this and will get back to you tomorrow so i drive home from ameri back to you know with hour's drive back to my house and uh cheryl is working she's got a an event to be at that night and she finally gets home little after ten on kinda sleeping on the sofa on how how the doctor gutted us how they just stuck a needle in narain led the results tamar a but let's go back.

mapuri emory university medical cente lymphoma ameri cheryl narain malimba lewis twenty minute