35 Burst results for "Emmett"

Judge orders halt to Trump-era asylum restrictions at border

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

Judge orders halt to Trump-era asylum restrictions at border

"A judge has ordered a halt to Trump era asylum restrictions at the border I'm Lisa dwyer A federal judge in Washington has ordered the Biden administration to lift Trump era asylum restrictions that have been a cornerstone of border enforcement since the beginning of COVID-19 The regulation was authorized under title 42 of a broader law covering public health U.S. district judge Emmett Sullivan has ruled that enforcement must end immediately for families and single adults saying it violates federal rulemaking procedures However the ruling conflicts with another ruling in May by a federal judge in Louisiana that asylum restrictions remain in place The current ruling stems from a lawsuit filed by the American civil liberties union on behalf of the silent seeking migrants Migrants have been expelled from the United States more than 2.4 million times since title 42 took effect in March 2020 I'm Lisa dwyer

Lisa Dwyer Biden Administration Covid Emmett Sullivan Donald Trump Washington United States American Civil Liberties Union Louisiana
Eric Tells Us About His Recent Trip to Lynchburg, Virginia

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | Last month

Eric Tells Us About His Recent Trip to Lynchburg, Virginia

"I was in Lynchburg, Virginia. At Liberty University, for an amazing event, Ryan helfenbein, Ryan is amazing. And he heads up the faith and freedom center at liberty. Ryan put together this conference, Sean Foyt was there, Liz Wheeler was there, Megan basham, my hero, Megan bed she's amazing. We spend time with her. Ralph Reed was, I mean, all these friends and it was amazing and lieutenant governor mark, was it Robinson, North Carolina, who's just a fighter. It was the whole thing was incredible. But I had to leave the next day because now this is the thing. I knew I was going to be in Pittsburgh because I spoke yesterday three times at grace life church pastor pastures book and Amy schaeffer invited me to speak here in Pittsburg because I was in Harrisburg. We met whatever ten days ago when I was in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. So they invited me to be here. And then I get a phone call from you, Alvin seda, telling me, hey Eric, Saturday, which was two days ago, when you're going to be in Pittsburgh, guess what's happening in that neck of the Woods. And I said, what's happening, Alban? I've been telling the people what was happening. Well, Doug mass gianno Emmett Oz and president Donald Trump were campaigning and they had a big rally in latrobe PA. Right. So we cooked up a scheme where your identical twin brother, who I believe also had a birthday two days ago. That's right. What a coincidence. That's amazing. He picked me up from the airport. And he looked so much like you that it's kind of disturbing. It's kind of like wait a minute. You're Alvin. No, you're not Alvin. Yes, you're out, but no, you're not Alvin. Who are you?

Ryan Helfenbein Sean Foyt Liz Wheeler Megan Basham Ryan Grace Life Church Amy Schaeffer Liberty University Ralph Reed Lynchburg Harrisburg Governor Mark Alvin Seda Pittsburgh Megan Virginia Robinson Pittsburg Doug Mass Gianno Emmett Oz President Donald Trump
'Change has come': Mississippi unveils Emmett Till statue

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

'Change has come': Mississippi unveils Emmett Till statue

"A Mississippi community unveiled a larger than life statue of Emmett Till on Friday not far from where white men kidnapped and killed the black teen in 1955 over accusations he flirted with a white woman Hundreds cheering and clapping some wiping away tears seeing the 9 foot tall bronze statue of Emmett Till in Greenwood Diane west grew up hearing cautionary tales about his murder We just have to be here because justice is being served State senator David Jordan who was instrumental in getting the statue says he remembers attending the murder trial in 1955 and vowing to make a difference It made a mockery of justice And I swore then that if I ever get a chance I would do my best to make my best For African American The Emmett Till statue was a short drive from a confederate monument outside the county courthouse I'm Julie Walker

Greenwood Diane Emmett Emmett Till Mississippi David Jordan Julie Walker
Community with Confederate monument gets Emmett Till statue

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Community with Confederate monument gets Emmett Till statue

"A Mississippi town is unveiling a statue of 1955 murder victim Emmett Till Greenwood Mississippi is about 11 miles from the crumbling remains of Bryant's grocery and meat market the town is dedicating a 9 foot bronze statue of Emmett Till a jaunty depiction in a dress shirt and tie with one hand on the brim of his hat In 1955 the black 14 year old from Chicago traveled to the Mississippi Delta to visit relatives and was kidnapped tortured and murdered by white shopkeeper Roy Bryant and his half brother after the man heard a story that till spoke inappropriately with his wife the teenagers killing became a catalyst for the civil rights movement the statue will be watched by security cameras nearby historical markers have been knocked down vandalized and shot the reverend Wheeler Parker junior the last living witness to his cousin's kidnapping says we just thank God someone is keeping his name out there Parker says he's glad there is interest in a story that people didn't want to talk about for decades I'm Jennifer King

Mississippi Roy Bryant Greenwood Emmett Mississippi Delta Bryant Wheeler Parker Chicago Parker Jennifer King
Apple's New Movie 'Emancipation' Is Oscar Gold

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Apple's New Movie 'Emancipation' Is Oscar Gold

"Apple held first showing Saturday for the big movie coming out with Will Smith called Emancipation Antoine fuqua, directing it, stars Will Smith as an enslaved man who recovered from a really bad whipping that nearly killed him. And then he had to go brave through the swamps of Louisiana, armed with only his wits to escape these cold blooded slave hunters and be free. So both he and fuqua made their first public comments about the film in this follow-up discussion they had for the black caucus foundation's legislative conference in Washington D.C., there's no date yet, but this is the most solid indication that the film is going to arrive for award season and it's going to be a real rough one for Will Smith after he lost his mind and smacking Chris Rock because this is the kind of movie that gets a lot of Oscar attention. And it's been really it's been really been anticipated because Apple won the rights there was a record breaking auction and they won the rights to make it, it's the stuff Oscars are made of, you know? Playing Venus and Serena Williams father that's one thing. That's a lifetime movie. Playing a slave who went through this hell? It's so different. Back in 1863, the inspiration for this movie came when there were photographs taken of this slave named Peter. And he had just enjoined enslaved, he was just joined the Union Army to help him find his family. And the photographs was seen all over the world above his back being whipped and it just galvanized everybody against slavery as it being barbaric, of course. And they were those images were a symbolic beginning to like, we started seeing Emmett Till, you know, then he got Ronde king and of course lately got George Floyd, I mean, this slave, Peter. That's the man who should have four funerals and a hologram in the night sky. Not a crackhead ex con George Floyd.

Will Smith Black Caucus Foundation Washington D.C. Antoine Fuqua Fuqua Apple Chris Rock Louisiana Serena Williams Oscar Oscars Venus Union Army Peter Ronde King George Floyd Emmett
Mississippi grand jury declines to indict woman in Emmett Till killing

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Mississippi grand jury declines to indict woman in Emmett Till killing

"A grand jury in Mississippi declined to indict the white woman whose accusations set off the lynching of black teenager Emmett Till in 1955 The grand jury determined there was insufficient evidence to indict Carolyn Bryant donham for kidnapping and manslaughter Relatives told the AP till had whistled at the white woman Historian Timothy Tyson read the now 87 year old donham unpublished memoir Her husband brought Emmett Till to her at two 30 in the morning and wanted to her to identify him that she said it wasn't him three times And then she said Emmett Till flashed me a strange smile and

Carolyn Bryant Donham Emmett Till Timothy Tyson Mississippi Donham AP Emmett
A Black church in Alabama and 32 other sites get a historic preservation lifeline

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

A Black church in Alabama and 32 other sites get a historic preservation lifeline

"Emmett tills home along with 32 other historically significant African American sites and organizations are getting preservation grants The African American cultural heritage action fund is doling out $3 million this year to make sure the sites like till's Chicago home the first black masonic lodge in North Carolina and other sites around the country some well-known others not so much aren't lost to history In 1955 till a teenager left his home to visit relatives in Mississippi where he was abducted and killed for reportedly whistling at a white woman and event that

Emmett Tills African American Cultural Heri First Black Masonic Lodge Chicago North Carolina Mississippi
"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:01 min | 5 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

"And through the whole time, there was always a webcam of the person's face over the video talking to the audience because you're there, you come for the video, you come for the entertainment and the gaming content. But you actually stay for the relationship and for the chat and for the connection. That's been a core part. That was a great part of the Justin show, the court part of Justin TV. You can talk to the people making it, and they can react to you, and you can impact what is happening on the stream in real time. So you make this available, right? And of course, this exists. There are other streaming services, but I wonder, I mean, I'm thinking of like streaming movies. Like if you started if somebody went on Justin TV and started to just like play a Disney movie, I mean, Disney would go nuts, right? And that you would be shut down instantly. Why weren't the video game companies similarly irritated by this? Because essentially, they could have said, hey, somebody's somebody's like making money off this thing that is ours, and we sell this product. Did any of the video game companies push back on it? We got some incoming requests for people who were like, hey, you're monetizing our IP. Right. And our response is always the same. You're totally right. And that's totally your IP. And if you don't want us to do it, just tell us, well, we'll turn it off, we'll tell every streamer stop streaming your game. And the reaction to that was universally the same. Wow, wow, wow, let's not be hasty because they recognize the truth that watching a movie for free on a service instead of buying the movie to watch it is a substitution for what you're doing. But watching someone else play a game is actually marketing for you because then you want to buy the game. Then you want to buy the game or you want to play the game more unit by the sequel. And it's just good for you. You can't pay for that kind of advertising. If anything, they should be paying us, which in fact, mostly they do. They buy advertising with us. So if anything, game companies would like even more exposure rather than less. Yeah. And that was actually that insight was one of the reasons I was so excited about gaming. I pushed us to go into gaming because I was like, this is the only category where we have this great IP and the people who own the IP are excited about us using it. So all right, this, this is really taking off, like, I mean, I think within a year and a half, it's got 20 million users, and was it, I mean, we're in at that point, we're investors just like banging down your door to get involved in this thing? Nope. Huh. We talked to four DVC's. Everyone turned us down. Why? What were they saying? The same thing, who's going to watch people play video games? It's a niche. It's great. You found something cool. It's an image. It's not going to get you're nearly saturated in the market already. You're going to run out of people who want to do this. It's not going to be big. I mean, they were right. It was a niche except except only a massive niche. Right, it turned out that niche was a I mean, to be honest, what are the properties I had trouble raising money? Is it vesey's go off of your own confidence? And I'm not very good at convincing myself of things that I where I feel at the truly unknown. I thought it could be big. But I didn't know how big it could get. And honestly, I've been surprised at how big it has gotten. If you'd asked me 5 years ago, how big can twitch get? I don't think I would have believed it could be as big as it is today. But I knew for sure we were onto something. And it really it felt like between Justin TV and Twitch. It felt like I'd been bumbling around in the dark, trying to like, you know, solve, solve a puzzle with the lights off, and I just turned the lights on. I was like, oh, this is much easier. And that was a really powerful experience. Yeah. And by the way, I should just mention that you were at this point, you were the CEO of Twitch. Justin was still there, but you were in charge. What was that like for you? Did you like managing people or are you good at it? I was not a good manager. Why not? I was at a difficult conversation and giving hard feedback, bad at bad at praising people when they did well. Bad at delegating effectively, micromanaging when I shouldn't be micromanaging, but then being completely disconnected on things I needed to look at. There's a whole craft to management. And I was, you name the thing that a manager is supposed to do, I did it poorly. And I remember at the beginning, our point of view on management was actually it was kind of common in the valley at the time. Why do we need managers anyway? Google had every manager has 40 reports because what are managers doing anyways? People should just like self manage and do their thing. What do you need managers? Pointless middle layer. And that's not true. Managers serve a very important function in any kind of organization that's bigger than about ten people. But that was sort of our attitude. And the result was we didn't value the coordination function. It didn't really even understand it. And so it was this process both of getting better at it, but also just coming to appreciate what is the point of having a manager and an organization at all. What does that person do for you and do for employees? Yeah. It was a big personal growth thing for me. I think becoming a manager was really helped me grow emotionally grow socially. I'm really glad I got to get the opportunity to do it. Yeah. So when you launched it, when Twitch was like the thing, it was free, right? It still is. It's free. I can go out now and watch stuff. But Twitch going to make money. I was pretty clear is going to be advertising driven. And I was very excited about the idea of getting to scale with a gaming video product and selling video advertising. And so my original plan was just advertising. And then this streamer day 9, there was a StarCraft streamer. At an event, we were talking, and he was saying how I have these people who really just love my stream, who come and hang out in the comments. And I think if you made a fan club for them, like a subscription, where they could pay $5 a month and get a badge, just so they could be a member of the club and be a supporter. I bet you'd sell a lot of those. I think we could sell a lot of them. I think you should build that. And I said, you know, that makes a lot of sense. I believe you, let's try it. So we built a beta version of it for him. And boy, did that work. It worked way better than we expected. Where people were willing to pay money to join like a club that got extra features, extra access. No, you got a badge next to your name and chat. And when you subscribed, a notification happened in chat, and he said thank you. Right. And that would and that suggests that maybe he would pay more attention to your comments. Yeah, sometimes there was a promise of that, but yeah, you sort of a sense you might pay more attention to the comments. We pretty quickly added special emotes. So you got to use special emoji that were only for subscribers that you would pay you pay

Justin Justin TV Disney vesey Google
"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:08 min | 5 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

"Could actually write your comments from the very beginning on just TV gaming all the way through when we launched Twitch and through the whole time, there was always a webcam of the person's face over the video talking to the audience because you're there, you come for the video, you come for the entertainment and the gaming content. But you actually stay for the relationship and for the chat and for the connection. That's been a core part. That was a great part of the Justin show, the court part of Justin TV. You can talk to the people making it, and they can react to you, and you can impact what is happening on the stream in real time. So you make this available, right? And of course, this exists. There are other streaming services, but I wonder, I mean, I'm thinking of like streaming movies. Like if you started if somebody went on Justin TV and started to just like play a Disney movie, I mean, Disney would go nuts, right? And that you would be shut down instantly. Why weren't the video game companies similarly irritated by this? Because essentially, they could have said, hey, somebody's somebody's like making money off this thing that is ours, and we sell this product. Did any of the video game companies push back on it? We got some incoming requests for people who were like, hey, you're monetizing our IP. Right. And our response is always the same. You're totally right. And that's totally your IP. And if you don't want us to do it, just tell us, well, we'll turn it off, we'll tell every streamer stop streaming your game. And the reaction to that was universally the same. Wow, wow, wow, let's not be hasty because they recognize the truth that watching a movie for free on a service instead of buying the movie to watch it is a substitution for what you're doing. But watching someone else play a game is actually marketing for you because then you want to buy the game. Then you want to buy the game or you want to play the game more unit by the sequel. And it's just good for you. You can't pay for that kind of advertising. If anything, they should be paying us, which in fact, mostly they do. They buy advertising with us. So if anything, game companies would like even more exposure rather than less. Yeah. And that was actually that insight was one of the reasons I was so excited about gaming. I pushed us to go into gaming because I was like, this is the only category where we have this great IP and the people who own the IP are excited about us using it. So all right, this, this is really taking off, like, I mean, I think within a year and a half, it's got 20 million users, and was it, I mean, we're in at that point, we're investors just like banging down your door to get involved in this thing? Nope. Huh. We talked to four DVC's. Everyone turned us down. Why? What were they saying? The same thing, who's going to watch people play video games? It's a niche. It's great. You found something cool. It's an image. It's not going to get you're nearly saturated in the market already. You're going to run out of people who want to do this. It's not going to be big. I mean, they were right. It was a niche except except only a massive niche. Right, it turned out that niche was a I mean, to be honest, what are the properties I had trouble raising money? Is it vesey's go off of your own confidence? And I'm not very good at convincing myself of things that I where I feel at the truly unknown. I thought it could be big. But I didn't know how big it could get. And honestly, I've been surprised at how big it has gotten. If you'd asked me 5 years ago, how big can twitch get? I don't think I would have believed it could be as big as it is today. But I knew for sure we were onto something. And it really it felt like between Justin TV and Twitch. It felt like I'd been bumbling around in the dark, trying to like, you know, solve, solve a puzzle with the lights off, and I just turned the lights on. I was like, oh, this is much easier. And that was a really powerful experience. Yeah. And by the way, I should just mention that you were at this point, you were the CEO of Twitch. Justin was still there, but you were in charge. What was that like for you? Did you like managing people or are you good at it? I was not a good manager. Why not? I was at a difficult conversation and giving hard feedback, bad at bad at praising people when they did well. Bad at delegating effectively, micromanaging when I shouldn't be micromanaging, but then being completely disconnected on things I needed to look at. There's a whole craft to management. And I was, you name the thing that a manager is supposed to do, I did it poorly. And I remember at the beginning, our point of view on management was actually it was kind of common in the valley at the time. Why do we need managers anyway? Google had every manager has 40 reports because what are managers doing anyways? People should just like self manage and do their thing. What do you need managers? Pointless middle layer. And that's not true. Managers serve a very important function in any kind of organization that's bigger than about ten people. But that was sort of our attitude. And the result was we didn't value the coordination function. It didn't really even understand it. And so it was this process both of getting better at it, but also just coming to appreciate what is the point of having a manager and an organization at all. What does that person do for you and do for employees? Yeah. It was a big personal growth thing for me. I think becoming a manager was really helped me grow emotionally grow socially. I'm really glad I got to get the opportunity to do it. Yeah. So when you launched it, when Twitch was like the thing, it was free, right? It still is. It's free. I can go out now and watch stuff. But Twitch going to make money. I was pretty clear is going to be advertising driven. And I was very excited about the idea of getting to scale with a gaming video product and selling video advertising. And so my original plan was just advertising. And then this streamer day 9, there was a StarCraft streamer. At an event, we were talking, and he was saying how I have these people who really just love my stream, who come and hang out in the comments. And I think if you made a fan club for them, like a subscription, where they could pay $5 a month and get a badge, just so they could be a member of the club and be a supporter. I bet you'd sell a lot of those. I think we could sell a lot of them. I think you should build that. And I said, you know, that makes a lot of sense. I believe you, let's try it. So we built a beta version of it for him. And boy, did that work. It worked way better than we expected. Where people were willing to pay money to join like a club that got extra features, extra access. No, you got a badge next to your name and chat. And when you subscribed, a notification happened in chat, and he said thank you. Right. And that would and that suggests that maybe he would pay more attention to your comments. Yeah, sometimes there was a promise of that, but yeah, you sort of a sense you might pay more attention to the comments. We pretty quickly added special emotes. So you got to use special emoji that were only for subscribers that you would pay you pay

Justin Justin TV Disney vesey Google
"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:29 min | 5 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

"More streamers. Et cetera, et cetera. And what could the viewer do initially? Was it passive or you were watching somebody play a game and you would see their face talking into a microphone about what they were doing or was there a chat already? Integrated it into it or you could actually write your comments from the very beginning on just TV gaming all the way through when we launched Twitch and through the whole time, there was always a webcam of the person's face over the video talking to the audience because you're there, you come for the video, you come for the entertainment and the gaming content. But you actually stay for the relationship and for the chat and for the connection. That's been a core part. That was a great part of the Justin show, the court part of Justin TV. You can talk to the people making it, and they can react to you, and you can impact what is happening on the stream in real time. So you make this available, right? And of course, this exists. There are other streaming services, but I wonder, I mean, I'm thinking of like streaming movies. Like if you started if somebody went on Justin TV and started to just like play a Disney movie, I mean, Disney would go nuts, right? And that you would be shut down instantly. Why weren't the video game companies similarly irritated by this? Because essentially, they could have said, hey, somebody's somebody's like making money off this thing that is ours, and we sell this product. Did any of the video game companies push back on it? We got some incoming requests for people who were like, hey, you're monetizing our IP. Right. And our response is always the same. You're totally right. And that's totally your IP. And if you don't want us to do it, just tell us, well, we'll turn it off, we'll tell every streamer stop streaming your game. And the reaction to that was universally the same. Wow, wow, wow, let's not be hasty because they recognize the truth that watching a movie for free on a service instead of buying the movie to watch it is a substitution for what you're doing. But watching someone else play a game is actually marketing for you because then you want to buy the game. Then you want to buy the game or you want to play the game more unit by the sequel. And it's just good for you. You can't pay for that kind of advertising. If anything, they should be paying us, which in fact, mostly they do. They buy advertising with us. So if anything, game companies would like even more exposure rather than less. Yeah. And that was actually that insight was one of the reasons I was so excited about gaming. I pushed us to go into gaming because I was like, this is the only category where we have this great IP and the people who own the IP are excited about us using it. So all right, this, this is really taking off, like, I mean, I think within a year and a half, it's got 20 million users, and was it, I mean, we're in at that point, we're investors just like banging down your door to get involved in this thing? Nope. Huh. We talked to four DVC's. Everyone turned us down. Why? What were they saying? The same thing, who's going to watch people play video games? It's a niche. It's great. You found something cool. It's an image. It's not going to get you're nearly saturated in the market already. You're going to run out of people who want to do this. It's not going to be big. I mean, they were right. It was a niche except except only a massive niche. Right, it turned out that niche was a I mean, to be honest, what are the properties I had trouble raising money? Is it vesey's go off of your own confidence? And I'm not very good at convincing myself of things that I where I feel at the truly unknown. I thought it could be big. But I didn't know how big it could get. And honestly, I've been surprised at how big it has gotten. If you'd asked me 5 years ago, how big can twitch get? I don't think I would have believed it could be as big as it is today. But I knew for sure we were onto something. And it really it felt like between Justin TV and Twitch. It felt like I'd been bumbling around in the dark, trying to like, you know, solve, solve a puzzle with the lights off, and I just turned the lights on. I was like, oh, this is much easier. And that was a really powerful experience. Yeah. And by the way, I should just mention that you were at this point, you were the CEO of Twitch. Justin was still there, but you were in charge. What was that like for you? Did you like managing people or are you good at it? I was not a good manager. Why not? I was at a difficult conversation and giving hard feedback, bad at bad at praising people when they did well. Bad at delegating effectively, micromanaging when I shouldn't be micromanaging, but then being completely disconnected on things I needed to look at. There's a whole craft to management. And I was, you name the thing that a manager is supposed to do, I did it poorly. And I remember at the beginning, our point of view on management was actually it was kind of common in the valley at the time. Why do we need managers anyway? Google had every manager has 40 reports because what are managers doing anyways? People should just like self manage and do their thing. What do you need managers? Pointless middle layer. And that's not true. Managers serve a very important function in any kind of organization that's bigger than about ten people. But that was sort of our attitude. And the result was we didn't value the coordination function. It didn't really even understand it. And so it was this process both of getting better at it, but also just coming to appreciate what is the point of having a manager and an organization at all. What does that person do for you and do for employees? Yeah. It was a big personal growth thing for me. I think becoming a manager was really helped me grow emotionally grow socially. I'm really glad I got to get the opportunity to do it. Yeah. So when you launched it, when Twitch was like the thing, it was free, right? It still is. It's free. I can go out now and watch stuff. But Twitch going to make money. I was pretty clear is going to be advertising driven. And I was very excited about the idea of getting to scale with a gaming video product and selling video advertising. And so my original plan was just advertising. And then this streamer day 9, there was a StarCraft streamer. At an event, we were talking, and he was saying how I have these people who really just love my stream, who come and hang out in the comments. And I think if you made a fan club for them, like a subscription, where they could pay $5 a month and get a badge, just so they could be a member of the club and be a supporter. I bet you'd sell a lot of those. I think we could sell a lot of them. I think you should build that. And I said, you know, that makes a lot of sense. I believe you, let's try it. So we built a beta version of it for him. And boy, did that work. It worked way better than we expected. Where people were willing to pay money to join like a club that got extra features, extra access. No, you got a badge next to your name and chat. And when you subscribed, a notification happened in chat, and he said thank you. Right. And that would and that suggests that maybe he would pay more attention to your comments. Yeah, sometimes there was a promise of that, but yeah, you sort of a sense you might pay more attention to the comments. We pretty quickly added special emotes. So you got to use special emoji that were only for subscribers that you would pay you pay

Justin Justin TV Disney vesey Google
"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

03:26 min | 5 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

"Grad school

"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:18 min | 5 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on How I Built This

"On to become a half a $1 billion business. It took Tariq farid's foresight to see that opportunity. Now, say I had another idea about 15 years ago around video games. My idea to create a website where you could watch other people play video games. You might think that's a cool idea, but very few people at the time would have agreed. A wise investor might have asked, who's going to spend hours watching other people play video games? Well, we know the rest of this story because today, video gaming is a multi-billion dollar industry and watching other people play is a huge part of that. And Emmett shear, the cofounder of Twitch, had the foresight to build a streaming platform for those fans. Last year, gamers and viewers spent one trillion minutes on Twitch. And today, it's the biggest streaming video game platform in the world, with over 30 million daily users. But the idea for Twitch was, at the time, a gamble. Emmett and his cofounders had already built a live stream website called Justin TV. And they were starting to turn it into a social media platform, but a small, tiny number of users happened to be gamers. An Emmett believed that the future of the business depended on serving them. So in 2011, he started focusing the platform on gaming and changed the name to twitch. The bet paid off, just three years later, Twitch was bought by Amazon for almost a $1 billion, and Emmett is still running the company. Now, Twitch has had its share of controversy, but Emmett has always seen it as a community, works and all, which we'll talk about. Emmett grew up in Seattle, and his best childhood friend was actually the person he would eventually create a multi-million dollar business with. Justin Kahn. We actually grew up three blocks away from each other, like right almost next door. But I didn't know him until I was 8 when I switched to evergreen elementary, where he was already attending. And yeah, we met it in second grade and became friends almost immediately. And it's amazing because you would later go on to found huge companies together and you were like met in second grade. And we were like, you know, reasonably close. Maybe not in second grade, but certainly by third, fourth, 5th grade. We'd be over at each other's houses pretty often. I think I went over to his house more often two brothers and more importantly, he had a video game system. Which my parents would not buy for me. What did he have? If I recall correctly, it was a Super Nintendo. When we were and then later other stuff. So his house was the superior house for hangout because there was more. There was more video games. Got it. Okay. So you guys went to the same elementary school into middle school, and then you went to different high schools, and then you go off to college to Yale, and he does too. You both go to the same university, your childhood friend, like your closest friend and elementary middle school. And then you both end up at Yale. Yeah, was it just coincidental? Totally coincidental. No planning there at all. Actually, Justin had been planning to go to Wharton. And kind of changed his mind at the last minute. And so that was real happenstance. And in college, I think, surely reconnect to addressing it in a deeper way. One of the really interesting things was I found I liked his dorm, just had a collection of people that I really connected with. More deeply. More easily. And so I just wound up spending a ton of time with Justin, but also with all of his roommates. I was kind of an unofficial 5th member of the room. And when you got to college, I know you studied computer science at Yale. Did you have a sense of what you thought you were going to do? Did you figure, okay, I'll get this degree and then I'll go work for tech company. I actually purposely didn't take any computer science because I loved programming already. Like I enjoyed programming a lot as a hobby. And I kind of didn't want to ruin it by making it a profession or a career. And then it got to be junior year and I'd spent freshman and sophomore year taking entirely electives whatever I wanted. And I was like, I have nothing that resembles a major. What am I going to take another 11 courses in in the next two years? And I was like, well, I know I'm good at programming. I know it's something I love. Maybe I'll try taking computer science. And I almost immediately was like, oh, well, this was silly. Not only am I good at this, but I really, really enjoy the work is fun. And so then I just took 80% computer science for the next two years and finished the major. And while you were an undergraduate and you sort of got in with Justin's kind of cohort, there was a guy named Matt fong and from what I understand at a certain point in college, he said to you and Justin maybe others, hey, we should start a business. Is that what happened? Yeah, Matt, that's a really good friend. He was one of Justin's roommates, freshman year. Matt is my most like finance oriented of my friends. And I don't mean that he's interested in money. I mean like he looks at the entire world in terms of like, what's underpriced and what's overpriced? And what should I be doing based on that today? And he looked around in college, and he said, specifically not that we should start a company, but we have better access to intellectual capital today than we ever will in the future. At a lower opportunity cost. And so we should take advantage of that, which means we should start a company. I mean, he just, did he have an idea of what? Nope, no. Wow. So when he was like a 20 year old at Yale, he was like, hey, we're at Yale, we're surrounded by all these world class professors. We have access to these amazing libraries and resources, and they're just part of our tuition. Let's use it and start a business. Yeah. Wow. I mean, just to think about that, and this is like 2004, 2005. That's pretty, you know, pretty impression. Oh, he absolutely. I mean, Matt's always been a few years ahead of everyone else, I think, and while you were a college hanging out with these guys, presumably you've all played a lot of video games together. Oh yeah, a lot. What was your game? During college, mostly World of Warcraft, which came out my freshman year and is an incredible game that I played for the duration of college. And then had to get Justin when we were starting our company right after we graduated, he had a real talk conversation with me. I think it was very fair, which is, but I think you're going to have to choose the video game or the startup, which is a world of work after the startup. And I chose the startup and quit World of Warcraft, which I think was here. I think he was right. All right, so Matt had this idea that you guys should start a company while you're in college. And what was the next step? It was like, okay, let's start a company. Yes, that sounds great. What should we do? So Gmail, I just come out. Summer of 2004. So right before our senior year. I think we all looked at Gmail and we said, this is the future of software. Like everything's going to be like Gmail in the future. I think we could all just see that. It was like having desktop software but better. And what we did was we were like, oh, well, Gmail is missing a calendar. Like there should be a outlook as a calendar. There should be a calendar that goes with a email client. And so we started building it because that seemed like the right thing to do. And it had to look back at it and there are so many things wrong with the thought process we were going through there. We didn't know who we were building it for. We didn't use calendars. We didn't talk to anyone who used a calendar. We really didn't have any idea what would make a good calendar. We weren't, we weren't heavy calendar users. Yeah. And so there's a lot of reasons why I don't think we were going to be successful, but the thing we did that was super important is we just kept grinding on it. We kept working and trying things, even

Emmett Justin Tariq farid Emmett shear Justin TV Justin Kahn Yale Twitch Matt Matt fong Wharton Amazon Seattle Nintendo Gmail
Emmett Till accuser, in memoir, denies wanting teen killed

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Emmett Till accuser, in memoir, denies wanting teen killed

"The white woman who accused black teenager Emmett Till of making improper advances before he was lynched in Mississippi in 1955 says she neither identified him to The Killers nor watered him murdered I Norman hall in an unpublished memoir obtained by The Associated Press Carolyn Bryant donham says she was unaware of what would happen to the 14 year old Emmett Till till was abducted killed and tossed in a river now 87 donum was 21 at the time her then husband Roy Bryant and his half brother JW milam were acquitted of murder charges but later confessed in a magazine interview copy of her 99 page manuscript I am more than a wolf whistle was obtained by historian Timothy Tyson Her autobiography should be taken with a good sized shovel full of salt Until relative says the memoir is proof of involvement a racially discovered kidnapping warrant issued for Donna was never served I Norman

Roy Bryant Norman Hall Carolyn Bryant Donham Jw Milam Mississippi The Associated Press Timothy Tyson Donna Norman
Was Bruce Willis Exploited by Slimy Producer Randall Emmet?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Was Bruce Willis Exploited by Slimy Producer Randall Emmet?

"As we know, as we spoke in about Bruce Willis, has retired from acting after being diagnosed with aphasia. Which is a condition that affects the brain's language and speech centers. But due to his timing, one of the last movies I'll ever see him star in is a third rate piece of shit movie called wrong place. And it's directed by who gives a shit and costar in a perfectly nice looking woman whose most recent recognizable credit was 24th billing in the 2018 YouTube red original series called step up high water. But if it's any solace, wrong place may also be one of the final credits for his producer, a guy named Randall Emmett. You know him through me. Okay, there's a big expose about him in the LA times. And Randall's been accused of all manner of unsavory behavior, including but definitely not limited to exploiting or at best willfully ignoring Bruce's declining health as the pair cranked out one razzie worthy movie after another. But if Randall drowns in the dozens of lawsuits, he's currently facing it won't be because of Bruce. Us Weekly says that Bruce's lawyer insists that Bruce continued to work well after he was diagnosed because he wanted to work. Not because some reckless idiot like Randall Emmett made him work. Randall Emmett is so toxic right now and I told you this three three four years ago what a piece of shit he is. So ahead of the, I'm so ahead I'm behind. He's toxic,

Randall Emmett Aphasia Bruce Willis Bruce Randall La Times Youtube Us Weekly
"emmett" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"Today is one of those days. Because one of the ugliest most egregious actions to ever happen in modern American history. And we're talking about a country that has a lot of ugliness on its name. Was the brutal disgusting lynching of a teenage boy named Emmett Till. Kind sweet soul. Who would still be alive today? Who would probably be a grandfather in Chicago, a great grandfather in Chicago? Whose peers whose family is still alive. Still fighting for justice in spite of the fact that this boy was lynched 67 years ago. And he was lynched, deep in the heart of Mississippi. There on summer vacation as black families throughout the country would often do, they would return south during the summer and spend time with their country cousins. And it was just a black tradition. When you had moved up to New York or Chicago or even Ohio, other places would be to go back down south and spend time with family. And learn about country life and deepen those relationships and in some ways the lynching of Emmett Till changed that tradition. And that's not talked about enough, but he was there from Chicago with his family. And they just went to a local corner store, and there was a white woman there that lied and said Emmett Till, who was a child, sexually harassed her. Said something profane to her, whistled at her a biographer has since said that Carolyn Bryant Dunham, the white woman who made that lie up, told him that she made the whole thing up. For years, for 65 years, it was always said that Emmett did whistle at the woman. According to the biographer who interviewed Carolyn Bryant Dunham, he said that she said all of that was a lie that she made the whole thing up. Whether she made it up or it happened. And of course, I don't believe it happened. She went home and told her husband and her husband's friends and family. That she was sexually harassed by a black boy at the store. And those men, with the information and intelligence, if that's what you can call it, from Carolyn Bryan Dunham, proceeded to plan and execute a lynching of Emmett Till. They took him from his family's home, and I will not repeat the brutal, horrifying things they did to him. A month later, his disfigured body, which is one of the most notorious images from the entire 20th century of America, his disfigured body was found and his mother mamie till. A brilliant courageous woman said, you know what? I'm gonna force you all to see what they did to my boy. And had an open casket funeral. The men, who murdered Emmett Till, talked about it all over town. Admitted doing it. They were all found not guilty. But one woman was never held responsible, and she still alive. And in spite of Emmett Till's family, begging and pleading. The county government, the state government of Mississippi and the federal government of multiple administrations. Including the Obama administration, including the Biden administration. The Biden administration recently said, you know what? We're not going to do anything about this. Which is the Biden administration's MO and my question is this and it's the only question I really want to press today. As some researchers just dug through some records and found this arrest warrant for Carolyn Brian Dunham, why did no one else find that? Since some researchers just found it on their own. If any of these federal investigations from the FBI from the Obama administration from the Biden, if any of you were actually serious, why didn't you find that? But she's still alive, can still be prosecuted. And here's the thing, just this very week, a 101 year old Nazi, I mean, a literal Nazi from Nazi Germany was just prosecuted. He's a 101 years old. If you can prosecute those bastards for the ugliness that they did, as you should, of course, Carolyn Bryant Dunham. And any man or woman or anybody else that participated not only in the lynching of Emmett Till but in any lynching in all of American history, if you participated in white supremacist terrorism, you should be tracked down and held accountable period point blank dot com, but I want to know. I have a question. For the Biden administration. Did you actually send anybody to look for records? Did you all just think about it and just say, you know what, we're not going to do that. I think you did. I think you're just saying, you know what? We're okay. No, never mind. We're not going to do that. That's not how Nazis are treated. But let me be very clear because I know the family of Emmett Till these people were the equivalent of Nazis to that family. They turned that whole family upside down. They turned Mississippi upside down, it was one of the most devastating catastrophic white supremacist murders in all of American history and nobody, not a single soul. Was held responsible even though they bragged all over town that they did it. And that's not hyperbole. All of their names are on public record, Google it for yourself. And after they were found not guilty, they literally did media interviews explaining what they did. And sane. Yes, Carolyn Bryant Dunham should be held responsible. Right now, immediately period. Arrest her. Arrest her then figure the rest out. That's what you should do. Take care everybody. Break it down. The great right now. I'm Tiffany Hawkins. I'm Alan boomer. And we are the momentum advisers every single week. We talk about wealth management, personal finance, and entrepreneurship. We are financial advisers by day, we're entrepreneurs by night. We're building wealth for ourselves and we want to make sure that you understand how to build wealth in your own family. Tune in for shows like is your money racist, retirement savings, investment one O one. We literally run the gamut on all the things that you need to know about financial wealth, creating a legacy for your family and really just wealth creation as a whole. What we find is that these conversations are happening, but they're not happening as much as they need to in diverse communities. And so we're bringing a new voice, a new amount of energy, and we want you to tune in. So we bring the tips, we bring the strategy, and we always bring the good news. So make sure you tune in every week to the momentum advisers, there's something for everyone..

Emmett Till Carolyn Bryant Dunham Biden administration Chicago Obama administration Carolyn Bryan Dunham Mississippi federal government of multiple Emmett Carolyn Brian Dunham mamie Ohio New York Biden FBI America Tiffany Hawkins Alan boomer Germany Google
"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:12 min | 6 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"To <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> keep in mind as <Speech_Female> we have these discussions <Speech_Female> as a <Speech_Music_Female> community <Speech_Music_Female> is <Speech_Music_Female> understanding that the change might <Speech_Female> not happen right away. <Speech_Female> It might be in <Speech_Music_Female> a year, <Speech_Music_Female> 5 years, it <Speech_Music_Female> could be another century. <Music> <Music>

"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Of this. I think some people are just reaching for answers for understanding some people think that Emmett Till moment is going to bring about a change in the minds of the people that have the power to make, you know, to change the gun laws. And I don't think that it's going to. I mean, it hasn't done it in all these years. I imagine though there's also a risk in repeatedly running images or footage or audio of these graphic traumatic instances on a loop because you don't know who's going to be seeing it and you also don't know the trauma that it's going to be causing to people who see it. Exactly. I think that's something that Ali talked a lot about when we were on our interview too, even after my story around I spoke to her and she said, these are images that she and her family are still living with. Over 60 years later. So imagine all the different outlets now that they can actually access those photos that not just her family, but other people can access those photos. That's a big deal over 60 years later that this terrible tragedy happened to a family member. And their photo is just out there on the Internet. Television was to us as to what the Internet is, social media. And up until that point the world could not see or did not know what was going on. It might have been in a magazine or a newspaper, but it was local. It wasn't gone international. It's different now. I mean, every time you turn on the TV, it's not valid. It's so many different places. There's so many times. It's like, I think maybe you do become in order to survive, maybe you do come a little bit desensitized. And I think the big thing in a lot of this that I found is so often, I think people are quick to say, well, just put the photos out there, but I think there's also that step back period that folks want to take where they have to remind themselves that their family members did not ask to be the face of gun violence or mass shootings. It was a happenstance thing for them. And so I think for her, she said that it's often comes down to figuring out why do people need to see those images. And even now, she said, you know, over all this time, she is in her 70s, and she is still haunted by those images. She doesn't even need to look them up. She says, because that image of Emmett in his casket still haunts her in a lot of ways. It was very disturbing, very grotesque. So it did have a devastating effect on me. Even now, when I see things and hear things, it still brings tears to my eyes. Because when I jump, when I do a reporter target, the tears just come, I don't know where they come from. It's not something that I have control over. So even when you're thinking about the sandy hook families, when they first caught when that people were hoping that they would release photos of their children, those families rallied with the Connecticut legislature and said, we don't want that. Look at what happened to sandy hook families. A Connecticut judge has found InfoWars host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones liable for damages in lawsuits brought by parents of children killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. The parents of several children sued Jones over his claims that the massacre was a hoax. So there's a lot of potential risk there. And I think it's very important that we look to history, but there's also something to be said about understanding that history is only a guide. It can't necessarily be the end all be all for how we make change and affect change. And it's also very easy for people who are not affected to say, oh, the families should step up, you know, their victims of this either a lynching of racialized terror or gun massacres. You should step up and be an advocate. So more of these deaths don't happen again, where sometimes the family just wants to mourn and they want to mourn in privacy. Well, and that's what I found when I was talking to Jesse Salisbury from the Emmett Till interpretive center when I interviewed him. He said, as admirable, for example, as mamie till mobley was, to have the courage and the gumption to show what happened to her son, that was still a very difficult decision for her. She made that decision, but she didn't make it lightly. And she also knew that in a bigger way as all you told me when we were on the phone the other day, she said, miss mobley really wanted her son's death to live on in infinity. So people would understand the ramifications of racial violence to understand like what hatred could look like in real time if something isn't done about it. We got a lot of positive things. I think because she released the photo and because she showed the world that's how we got a lot of our civil rights and we got a lot more people having to understanding and comment on board to fight for the rights and to fight for a lynching bill against those types of crimes. They saw a need for it. So I think it was an educating moment. It was a reality check for many as well. At the same time, you know, as mister Salisbury said, you know, you can't tell people how to channel their grief. We've seen it over the many, many years of mass shootings where you have families who become anti gun violence advocates who some of them run for Congress. I am an unwilling participant in this movement. I would not have signed up for this, but I am here today for my son, Trayvon Martin. You've seen people find ways to channel their grief. And it's also okay if someone does not wish to channel their grief in a way that puts them in the public's eye because in doing so, that means that they are susceptible to having even more members of the media, just like ourselves, asking them questions. Hoping for interviews. It just keeps putting them out there when sometimes people need space to grieve. Emmett's cousins, they said, you know, it could maybe help. But at the same time, change takes time. And they said, it took them a long time to recognize that they wanted to step up, that they really wanted to be the best stewards possible of Emmett's name of maybe till mobley's legacy and what she did at that time. So those are the big things that they've come to realize as they've been trying to do that activism work in terms of keeping Emmett's name alive. But it's tough, it doesn't come without trauma and having to, in some ways, compartmentalize some of that trauma from not only remembering how you were, where you were when you first heard that he died, but also having to relive that every single time. Yeah, and it does take time sometimes. I mean, look, just a couple of years ago, President Biden finally signed a law that bans lynching in the United States. Yeah, that was only in March. Jeez. That that happened. And it took centuries for that to even be a thing. And I think people forget how we know Congress moves very slow. Particularly if they don't feel motivated to do anything. And I think in a lot of ways, as people continue to think about how we need this Emmett Till moment, and again, as Emmett's family members said is a couple of other folks in my story said, it's not as if it's going to change is going to happen overnight, even after people see these photos. We are seeing images of police brutality and violence. We are seeing just a variety of different violence from various levels of institutions that are not necessarily affecting people so much to the point where we're changing laws and policies and systems. So I think this is another thing that Emmett's family really wants people.

Emmett Connecticut legislature Sandy Hook Elementary School Jesse Salisbury Emmett Till interpretive cente mamie till mobley miss mobley Ali mister Salisbury Alex Jones Connecticut Jones Trayvon Martin Congress President Biden mobley United States
"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:01 min | 6 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Most important is what do we do with that? You could see graphically what had been done to Emmett, then you heard the story of why this had been done to him and why it was lynched, and then that photo stuck with you after the man who did this to him were acquitted of anything to have done with the lynching. Exactly. Exactly. And that's also was another reason why there was such an outrage over what happened to Emmett, not just because of the sheer violence, but the violence committed against a child, because people are so quick to make black boys older than what they are. Or older than what they actually are. So Emmett was 14. That's still a child. And so the idea that this could happen to a child really bothered people, it obviously created a wave of grief in a wave of trauma for his own family to bear witness to that. And I think in a lot of ways, that's one of the moments that people consistently go back to as an idea of not only looking at violence, but what we need to do as a society to potentially have this major cultural paradigm shift. And that photo was one of the reasons why civil rights movement was fueled. People became so outraged that people in other states learned about what happened to him and realized something more collective had to be done. Do you think then it was inevitable that people would make the connection between Emmett Till and ovale? In some ways, yes, I think any time it comes to thinking about children, images of children, that stick with you, people think of Emmett. They think of what happened to him, and again, the shocking violence of the shooting. In a lot of mass shootings, particularly sandy hook, even, has bothered people in the last near decades since at least sandy hook happened. Columbine bothered people because those were also kids who died. Even if they were teenagers, they were still kids. There was somebody's kid. So I think that people making that parallel was an interesting one because this is one of the few times where people actually want to use history as a way to drive policy to drive change. But again, there's all these other factors, I think, that people don't often consider when saying, well, these parents should just show the photos of their loved ones and how they looked when they were shocked. I think people often underestimate the implications of doing that. And that's why I set out to really talk to Emmett Till's family. I think so often people will mention Emmett Till's name, and I saw some outlets actually mention his name. Me a little paragraph about Emmett, but I just kept reading the stories and thinking, well, has anyone actually reached out to consider how his family feels about him being brought up? Now, as it relates to the gun control debate, I think that's important that they actually have a say or have at least an opinion on what that means for them as a family because every time his name is brought up, that's a trauma for them. That image still hunts them. And what did his family say about that comparison? One of the people I spoke to for my reporting, I talked to Ollie Gordon, who is one of Emmett's cousins. I wanted to reach out to see what your thoughts are on the idea of if another Emmett Till moment is needed. That's a loaded question. I have seen that a lot as I roll through the Facebook makeup and moment of Emmett Till moment. She was 7 years old at the time when Emmett died, but she was living in the same house as him. In Chicago, then he went off to Mississippi to go visit family, and then he never came back. The people that kill him and they set out to do just that. Because he was black and because he went against the rules that they had in Mississippi at the time the Jim Crow rules. And they meant to do that to send a message to the black people to.

Emmett Emmett Till Columbine Ollie Gordon Mississippi Facebook Chicago Jim Crow
"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:45 min | 6 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"You sought out the family of Emmett Till. Why? You know, after I read all the coverage so far at the time of the shooting and I was reading about all the children who died and the teachers who died and the parents reacting and the police responds, I noticed on Twitter and just across social media platforms, people were talking about the need for the paradigm shift for how we think about gun violence, how we think about how children are impacted by gun violence. And I notice people kept saying, we need an Emmett Till moment. His body was pulled up from the tallahatchie river. It was badly mutilated and bloated. This became a large event in the civil rights movement because his mother chose to have an open casket funeral in Chicago. You know, she turned her broken heartedness into a weapon for justice and made her private Aggie. A public cause. We come not just to remember Emmett, but we come to commit ourselves in his name. To fight all the conditions, the murdered him. The conditions are still murder our children today across this country. This idea of showing the public showing the world the damage that guns can do to a small child's body. There were black people lynched before Emmett, there were black people lynched after him. What is it though about his story that continues to resonate over 60 years later after it happened? The big thing at the time is in 1955 when Emmett was killed, television was just starting to come out. There was no social media. There was no Internet. If you really wanted to get the news, you had to find your paper, find your magazine. And particularly for black folks, you really had to go to the black press to get your news. You could not rely on white led media organizations to actually cover this at a time because they too were in bed with white supremacists and white supremacy and condoned a lot of the racist violence that we saw at that time. So you really had only so many outlets as a black person to get your news to really have an understanding of what was going on other states with black people. But mamie till mobley, Emmett Till's mother said at the time, after she figured out what happened to her son after she saw what happened to her son, the way his face was brutalized and swollen and beaten, she famously said, let the world see. And she invited jet magazine, a black magazine, to photograph Emmett actually at the funeral, open casket, showing people what he actually looked like when he died. And those photos really haunted people. That was one of the first times people really saw in real time and published format what racist violence looked like. What hatred could really look like? I lost my innocence. I saw violence that I saw hatred that I had never experienced before. And for years, I walked around with a chip on my shoulder. I did all I could to try to get even. I think so often people mention Emmett's name because it resonated with them. It's been told mostly as a southern horror movie as a kind of redneck Frankenstein. I would argue this one of the few historical instances of people can point to as a collective unit and say, this.

Emmett tallahatchie river Twitter jet magazine Chicago Emmett Till mamie mobley
"emmett" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:54 min | 8 months ago

"emmett" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Ago there have been over 200 attempts to get legislation enacted But we finally stand here today Generations later To witnesses historic moment of President Biden signing the Emmett Till anti lynching bill went to law 14 year old Emmett Till was brutally murdered August 28th 1955 He had been accused of wolf whistling at a white woman Carolyn Bryant and dragged out of his great uncle's home in money Mississippi in the middle of the night where his mother made me til mobley its sent him from Chicago for the summer Several days later his brutally beaten disfigured body weighed down with a 75 pound cotton gin fan tied to his body with barbed wire was pulled out of the tallahatchie river The Lafleur county sheriff attempted to force the immediate barrel burial of Emmett Till But maybe till intervened and paid almost a year's salary for his body to be shipped back to Chicago There the funeral director refused to open the box for her to view her son's corpse give me a hammer made me told demanded he relented and allowed her to view and its mutilated remains by then the murder had sparked outrage across the nation Mamie till mobley insisted Emmett receive an open casket funeral Let the world see what I've seen she said This has made me to mobley speaking in the documentary the untold story of Emmett Louis too about what she had seen her description is extremely graphic a warning to our listeners and viewers at the end of the expert you see what made me tell wanted the world to see Emmett Till's mutilated.

President Biden Carolyn Bryant mobley Emmett Till tallahatchie river Lafleur county Emmett Chicago Mississippi bill Mamie Emmett Louis
EXPLAINER: What's behind federal anti-lynching legislation?

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 9 months ago

EXPLAINER: What's behind federal anti-lynching legislation?

"President Joe Biden is expected to sign into law the first bill that specifies lynching as a federal hate crime the Emmett till lynching act which Congress passed earlier this month enables the prosecution of crimes as lynching if they are done during I hate crime in which the victim is injured or killed the bill's sponsor Illinois democratic representative Bobby rush so the lynching is just covered in a different camouflage the rope has been replaced with a shot gun and semi automatic weapons so what could fall under the new law is the a model every killing the mass shooting at a Charleston church or the James Byrd dragging death Emmett till was a black teen killed in nineteen fifty five when it was alleged he whistled at a white woman I'm Julie Walker

President Joe Biden Bobby Rush Congress Charleston Church Illinois James Byrd Emmett Julie Walker
Emmett Till Antilynching Act Heads to Biden's Desk

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | 9 months ago

Emmett Till Antilynching Act Heads to Biden's Desk

"Their passing and the Emmett Till anti lynching act on Capitol Hill. And of course, not a single Republican is going to oppose it because you don't want to be pro lynching. Let me for the record go out on a limb here. I'm going to be bold. I'm going to really shock you. I'm against lynching. I'm against slaughtering black people. Because of the color of their skin. You think we need a lynch an anti lynching Emmett Till Bill in 2022 as we're facing what some people fear might be World War three? We're facing gas 6, $7 a gallon? People whose backs are being broken by the disaster of a Biden administration? And we have got to pass an anti lynching law in 2022 now, of course, to the left, of course you do because you've got to reinforce the belief that this is a disgusting filthy evil racist nation. And if we got an anti lynching bill that we can debate and we can put on the news, it almost infers that black people still need to fear being lynched.

Emmett Till Bill Capitol Hill Biden Administration
John Perkins Describes His Journey to Jesus During the Civil Rights Era

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:09 min | 11 months ago

John Perkins Describes His Journey to Jesus During the Civil Rights Era

"I'm talking to John M Perkins who at this point is one of the last witnesses of the civil rights era and he writes about it in his book Canada, joy. The subtitle is the ridiculous paradox of suffering. I want to get to that. But John, you were talking about your brother was killed by a cop. This is one of these classic situations that you hear about a nightmare. That there was so much violence that you left the area. And then in the 1950s, Emmett Till is murdered, all kinds of things are going on, but it was during that period that you came to faith in Jesus and it changed everything for you, at least that's what it sounds like. It did. It changed everything. And he was at a good news club in Southern California that was held in our home and in the community. And in a neighborhood. He first went to the club and went to Kurt and he came to teach them battle class. And then when I heard that God loved all the children of the world, reading yellow, black and white, it was all over. I saw a whole new reality in the milk of religion and religion had accommodated all of that that was going on. And black was not able to separate, but Inca, that's a triple. You can't get there from here. You can't get that from here. It's too expensive. And you call it colts society and make quite that for the world, and now we are mad with the minorities. Well, it was Bernard is going to be able to spend it.

John M Perkins Emmett Till Canada John Southern California Kurt Colts Bernard
Julie Kelly: ACLU, Government Doesn't Care About Awful Treatment of January 6th Detainees

The Dan Bongino Show

01:21 min | 11 months ago

Julie Kelly: ACLU, Government Doesn't Care About Awful Treatment of January 6th Detainees

"What Julie's doing and asking questions is doing the nation to service that the media used to do Julie but they don't seem to care And even worse they don't seem to care about the treatment of the January 6th prisoners either all these prison reform advocates are prison reform We've got too many people in jail We get when you talk about January 6th They're like throw them in the cell feed them dead rodents I mean what a bunch of frauds And let's keep in mind the people who are detained right now as I explained in my book in this D.C. gulag which has been opened just for January 6th defendants and they have not been convicted of any crime They are there denied bail at the request of Joe Biden's Justice Department With the consent of D.C. district court judges and we're talking everyone some wake and appointees Obama all the way to Trump appointees Signing off on pre trial detention orders to keep these men behind bars their trials keep getting moved I just listened to a trial this week a man who is turned himself in over a year ago his trial was supposed to start February 24th It now has been moved to April 20th Judge Emmett Sullivan yes that judge didn't even consider flatly rejected the idea of allowing him out of prison Awaiting a trial did he just moved back another two months

Julie D.C. District Court Joe Biden D.C. Justice Department Donald Trump Emmett Sullivan Barack Obama
Emmett Till investigation closed by Justice Department

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Emmett Till investigation closed by Justice Department

"Hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi a a reporting reporting a a justice justice department department investigation investigation into into the the lynching lynching of of Emmett Emmett till till is is being being closed closed the the US US justice justice department department has has told told relatives relatives of of Emmett Emmett till till it it is is ending ending its its latest latest investigation investigation into into the the nineteen nineteen fifty fifty five five lynching lynching of of till till in in Mississippi Mississippi a a person person familiar familiar with with the the matter matter who who spoke spoke on on condition condition of of anonymity anonymity told told the the Associated Associated Press Press about about the the closure closure of of the the investigation investigation the the fourteen fourteen year year old old hill hill who who was was from from Chicago Chicago was was abducted abducted tortured tortured and and killed killed after after witnesses witnesses said said he he whistled whistled at at a a white white woman woman the the justice justice department department reopened reopened that that investigation investigation after after twenty twenty seventeen seventeen book book quarter quarter the the key key figure figure Carolyn Carolyn Bryant Bryant don don as as saying saying she she lied lied when when she she claimed claimed till till grabbed grabbed her her whistled whistled and and made made sexual sexual advances advances relatives relatives of of Donna Donna who's who's in in her her eighties eighties have have denied denied she she recanted recanted her her allegations allegations two two white white men men Roy Roy Bryant Bryant and and his his half half brother brother JW JW Milam Milam were were tried tried on on murder murder charges charges that that the the quoted quoted by by an an all all white white jury jury months months later later they they confessed confessed in in a a paid paid interview interview with with look look magazine magazine hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi

Emmett Emmett Justice Justice Department Dep Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Us Justice Justice Department Associated Associated Press Pr Hill Hill Mississippi Carolyn Carolyn Bryant Bryant Chicago Donna Donna Don Don Roy Roy Bryant Bryant United States Milam Milam
"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Thank you. Thank you thank you. Thank you so much. That was fantastic. Hey on the back of your t-shirt shirt. Great dizzy canadian beer. Now it's Di dino dino records dyna loans like alexis on fire and all yoga is dallas is on anyway so it's it's actually it's something that dead die alone without copeland those are starting to make it big down in the us. Like but i think. I also think there's i think there's also the nineties right when likes sloan was getting signed by geffen. And it's like always like. Oh this canadian sounds like we're going to get hot. Yes yeah yeah no. I mean we had the two bags was you know rush and obviously broken down a lot of boundaries for us but you know we never thought about this -essarily trying to be canadian. We just wanted to be a touring band in the united states. You know with a with a us record deal because if you wanted to be big in the world that the united states was like an eighty seven percent of the world market kind of you know. Canada was like three percent of the Everybody treated candidate like a branch plant. Beca- yeah i hear you. I hear you rick. Do you have a poem. you'd like to to return. I have selected one. Yes which one is it. There's a series of a four poems in the middle of the book. It's not the heart of the book there. There's two poems about my growing russell who passed away to me. That's the heart of the book on. But i would never attempt to read those publicly. I would end up crying but there. There's a series where it starts with one called self invention which is the first phone and then there's reinvention to reinvention tree and the finalists. I'm gonna read the reinvention story because it's the one that's more about you know that rockstar baggage part of my life. Okay awesome so looking reinvention. Three of my own free will. I invented the man shop. A rocket incur tune christians. And so what. If i did dan 'cause they did damned. If i didn't assist in the production of the funhouse of smoke and mirrors inside the gran houses of cards that got built up all around. Meanwhile i proudly scrawled on the dotted line. My name my likeness. My ass signed corporate sealed and delivered property belonging to multipurpose vertically horizontally integrated business enterprise. Anything i might do or fixed in any four was the potential asset of the brands and logos and the divisional management soothes in those surrounding office. Buildings of cards of my own free will was owned and i've had to own their so the front house. I was barking seal an organ. Grinder's monkey a clawless clueless toothless tiger leaping around on platforms at the crack of a whip. Poke of share inside the house backstage. I was the junior partner who got outvoted on things that really mattered and got managed in the nippy lated into which the rest. Why did i let it happen. What went to motivation. Your honor the higher purpose was to build a marriage family. A real life with the woman. I love. I wanted to manufacture the wind. The multiplying provision of distinct church st alas eventually they're muslim destiny. No fade that. I felt i could call my own artists. That had become was not something that the human being inside me could live louis. The machine had lost. Whatever naive ghost of a soul it might have had for me. Funhouse was empty. It did not take much courage to walk away as it had been causing me humanity sanity to stay q. Reinvention park for the nastiest. that's awesome. that's another reinvention. Isn't it exactly it. Definitely it definitely is rick. This has been such a pleasure to have you on on our show. Thank you so much for joining us. We've only literally touched like this. So much of of what. Greg i wanted to talk to you about so you don't have to but i'm hoping that once we can go back into studio that you'll agree to come in and we can. We can continue this conversation. I'd be happy to do it yet. Sure it was fun. And i'd love to do it anytime we normally record of the radical road which is on queen street at jones. So let's get back in in the club or in the bar and Sit down and have a chat face to face. And i look forward to pay before we let you go. Where can people go to to get your book work. People go to to find out more about what you're up to these days. Okay well easy. W is easy. W press is a small canadian press and so they try to do is convince people who go to your local bookstores and you know by a hard copy from a local bookseller so the bookstores don't disappear and that's a really important thing but you know you can't fight city hall and you can get it on amazon and get it delivered to your door. You know So you can find it on amazon And you know like they they have the medium to go and and large chains and stuff too but And of course there's an audiobook which is a whole different experience. Then just as you've heard me read they're like i. I spent a couple of days in the studio. I had no idea how hard it was like to listen to your own. Takes back and go of at socks. That's terrible gotta redo that it was. It was a lot of work but but I like to recommend folks do both like get the book but also experienced the audible because Anyone folks are out now because it cooled with their ear buds interlocking and and audible to become something as standard as anything else but nothing replaces having that thing in your hand and being able to have it on a shelf and then three months from now you can revisit it. You know a year from now you can go back and have another. Look because poems have that they're like an onion right. Up the layers and then all of a sudden you. Where did the onion girl. There's nothing onion skin around is so Poems have that ability to shape shift to morph Anyways thank you thanks. Janice thank you appreciate your time. Thank you rick and joy have a great evening. Thank you so much each seventeen dress..

Di dino dino us geffen copeland rick sloan alexis Reinvention park dallas russell W press Canada dan louis amazon Greg jones city hall
"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"You imagine what that building smelled like laugh and the vomited the urine. And the you know just crazy but Yeah so none of those places exist anymore. But they're still. I have fun feelings. You know within my slow. Tell so absolutely. That is awesome. That was really really fun. Thank you so much for sharing that Rick we're we're we're closing in on dinnertime. Be everyone wants to get back in and finish off some some dead turkey. You've been kind enough to offer a asong your form you. We're gonna we're gonna end with the poem as well. Oh okay all right so let me out yeah now. Let me get my guitar here. The only thing. I gotta have these. Earphones used to do these without earphones. Air buds then appoint. Somebody said to me. Rick inlet The audio is a lot better. And i went really bad. Start using these things for office. greg is. Is there anything that we need to know about the music other. Good guitar all right. Do you want intro. The song yeah This is like in the Poetry book there were some things that were not poems. They were clearly as they were developing. Gorgeous the lyric might as well finish it as a lyric. and then i'll write some music. And then when i do the audio book for for this i'll i'll record a couple of tunes and then in fact i put some little jazz guitar things as segues from section to section two. Because you know. I mean playing guitar making music. It's it's in my blood so you know it's not a huge stretch.

Rick inlet Rick greg
"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"What. What was the biggest change in terms of what you had to teach. Your students are at least what you had to make them. aware of. y- will. I mean as i said earlier like i started out teaching music business but i. That's not how i ended up. I talked music business course for a boat. I don't know thirteen fourteen years individually. I went to the people there. I said i'm not qualified to teach this anywhere. The music business that. I knew that you know that i that i know it. No longer exists like record companies. That an and radio making determinations as to you know what the thumbs popular and successful you know. I mean even. Mtv had come and gone. You know what i mean the way. It was not really what it was innocent. Said you need to find younger guys that that have started their own indie labels and done their own thing at people that understand about getting licensing into dawson's creek you know blah blah blah. These kinds of things like i. It's not what i did. I am aware of it. But i can't teach it because i don't really i don't really know it. You know in in in any case. I had morphed the course that i taught to become something that was more about entrepreneurial. Spirit of learning the ins and outs of just standard business. What what does a financial statement look like you know. What does the balance sheet look like profit and loss. These kinds of you know which of course from a nuts and bolts thing. It's important but in of course people who are you kidding me. This is horrible. You know there are certain fundamental things. You can teach like i. There's one as you guys have heard of a true band called like they were originally called ginger ale of the milano wells. I think just called the manoel's on okay. So the person is. Sally sally shar and she was in my business clients and the the the music director had warned me. He said we don't know what to do with this girl. Like you know she's a she's not she something and a half so but We're gonna give it to you. And because she formed out the first semester of this thing and so she was mcclatchy asked good questions when she was paying attention but there were moments where it was like. Yeah clearly she's going on a tangent. So i said to her. I want you to go. See the david bowie exhibit that sit there down jail and i want you to really absorb that and then what you're going to this government website. I want you to talk about how you do a marketing plan. And i want you to do a marketing plan for your band. Based on what you learned from david boy applying it to yourself and then you know from this marketing business marketplace. And so i said don't come to class. I don't care you don't have to do any assignments in the durham. I don't care just final assignment. Give me a marketing plan for your old. When she gave it to me. I went through this worth over ninety lake. I gave her ninety two three years of because it was it was because it was about her. She could really thinker teeth into that. You know and it was. It was a really great piece of work. And the thing is i didn't need to know about music is to be able to see teach fat and make that happen but it's not in every case so that was why people back doubts. Let me teach. Songwriting songwriting is something he line. I know about that. Yeah that's not a change. That's great speaking of tangents. I have a tangent. I have to ask you. How how. how do you get involved in a project that includes meatloaf. Brian may tangerine dream. Okay well triumph. It's dreams locus was was metalworks. And so you have recording things becoming a going in a different artists musicians and so projects would pop from time to time and that was a special olympics thing and there were some areas that were co writers. They were in there and they were doing something and it was like a wreck. We don't want to help us. Go write this thing from the special olympics right. And so that's they suck me in to that. And i mean i never met. Brian may or meatloaf or any of those people that they were that was. This was the beginnings of a world where studios were starting pro tools and that sort of thing started to happen yet but there was now this thing where you somebody working in the studio and somebody and tapes what fly around and then there would be collaborations that would occur so but that was special olympics. It was a fantastic. Yeah no i. Just i i. I saw that on doing some research digging back away. that's a really interesting Even tangerine dream. And i was like what well you know. That would be one of those things where somebody's writing a theme song. It's to be. This is the some but somebody's also writing music. It's going to be for the opening ceremonies. All somebody's writing music is gonna be Tangerine dream was probably. They're doing some sort of weird sounds people to be dancing. Rick we have a segment called lost venues where we ask our guest share that share stories or or a nice story about venue they played in that is lost does not exist anymore. So we're wondering if you have a story by the lost venue that is near and dear to your heart does. Because i'm an old fart. Select for a long. The first one that pops to mind but i'm gonna extrapolate out of this but I every year. I would go back to philadelphia and play. This club called the tin angel and it was In a bar district of old philly. And i loved it. It was like you know the way. Toronto had the combo or or or or hugh's room like just a room that had been around forever and that had been around really forever. The guy that old it a book that had been part of the whole folk scene when it was like pete seger pollen mary and that kind of thing and the they'd done very little to renovate the place Over the course. But i played their twelve years running back there every waiter and played and it closed and they moved it and then cova kane and and you know so i think there may be is still a ten angel. But it's not the one that that i used to go and play which was a it was like it was a restaurant on the main floor and then there was this long narrow rue the stage was only about ten by eight in no a and it was mostly for folks but they would put little indie bands on their tune. Stuff put so. I love that place in. It's gone and that's her. Bracelet hurt But i can no extrapolate this up note. Triumph flavor maple leaf gardens. And it's no longer a concert band. I play joe louis arena. Detroit in that building got knocked down you know. Triumph played the nassau coliseum on long island the night after the new york. Islanders won the stanley cup. And why were people fans of the islanders that had stayed in the parking lot drinking. Come to try like two nights in a row at the nasa. Were.

milano wells manoel Sally sally shar ninety lake olympics dawson mcclatchy Mtv david bowie Brian durham david pete seger cova kane Rick hugh philadelphia Toronto maple leaf gardens joe louis arena
"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"When When my kids were being born. I was starting to feel like. I don't think i can be in this rock band anymore triumph because it just eats up to way too many big chunks of my life and i need to be a father a husband to from family. This is much more important to me. You know so but you know. My kids are all in their thirties. Now and i'm a grandfather. And now i look at these grandkids. I go so this is how this works. Like this is kind of life ends up. Your horizon is in those kids now you know and and and my own kids. i'm going. Yeah yeah i mean i love. I love them but Fan for themselves. now take care of themselves so degree. that's with this. So maybe that shows you what my priorities are inserted. How yeah. What will you do sort of. Give give a hint in the gender strangers foreigners and lovers yet year end off that with i have never so complete as when i am fully engaged surrendered willingly committed in the service of others. But it had you know but yes Circling for family. That's true but also you know. I was always completely happy to volunteer to be on a curriculum committee at the college. I said there's some people wouldn't be caught dead and they would say well. You can bill for your time. And beverly like this is great. This is like the the the judge gave me this court appointed community service a community service that i love to do. I like i like it. I used to love the moment at the end of the night. Finish the show you know. Stand up everybody's applauding into the encore kissed the mecca my guitar and you know bow and think i've just been in service to these people. It's nice that i'm getting a paycheck. I love that. I'm going to say no to the money Black i also just love the fact that i was able to do this thing creatively that was so fulfilling for these folks and that was to be their service in their at rick. When you when you got into teaching what did you start. You said you started off. Teaching the business of music What did you want your students to know. I'm guessing there was stuff you said. Oh i can't wait to tell about all of these things you know. It's not just fun playing and guitar banging on the drums. They need to have something up here. So i'm curious. What was it about. What did you want to teach them. You first started. Well i wanted to understand the practical realities a career was going to be like and i mean the first day i would write on the board Ah van morrison quote you know. Music is spiritual the music businesses. Not and there was another one that i like to well. There was one where all never been. Remember it now but it was like who was the guy that wrote for rolling stone and he had the cigarette in the cigarette older and Any road fear and loathing in las vegas. Oh yeah the the movie then. Right train remembers name now. Alias talk eight. There was a cooler it was. It was something along the lines of the music. Business is a long plastic hallway full of thieves camps. And you know blah blah blah pay was. There's also a bad side. I would redacted them. I would say like the music. Business is a business of mutual exploitation. And you have to understand that there's gonna be guys that are businessmen and you are just a widget to them. You're just you know you're just meet and that's how that's gonna work and you have to know that that's the way that works and accept that you have to be perfectly willing to go. No no actually. It's it's about money you know and and and and that would be the first less the the second thing i would say. Is you know in those. When i started music business. Which just an option that they could take in their third year. So i'd have maybe thirty five four a people in the room right eventually. The whole school had to take it so now i have two classes and they would like one hundred twenty in each class. A visually are sharing the workload was submitted. Because that's a hell of a lot of marking graded jubal link anyway so So i would say to them. You know Here we are in this classroom. There's food and i hate to tell you but statistics canada. We'll tell you there's only gonna be one and a half of you that are going to end up having a job and music business that's the statis- and said you're here at humber college. Which is you know It's not even like mcgill or of t. programs where they're training classical musicians to be in in that you know part of the business and that's where a lot of the statistics are coming from. You guys your odds are even worse. I hate to tell you and the the one of you that might end up having a job. you're probably going to be working for music publisher or you're gonna be working as manager of a line of mcquaid store you. It's not going to be the music business career you think you're going to have black. There will be one of you every three classes. That is going to have a music business career like you. You're gonna be in the music business as a musician now. I know what everyone was thinking. I'm going to be that good while the ambition is i of course the reality the the practical reality of it is the your your actual chops as business person as entrepreneurship are not gonna match your decision. You're dreaming pipedream. you know. And they sadly realize it over the next four or five years of their lives. They get to the point where they don't not not for me. I guess i'm going to take a job bookkeeper with my uncle. Louie wow you taught for a while you you left in twenty nine thousand nine right ally actually left the teaching the year before that i knew my crutch and then i played out that foale of gigs and played a huge room in toronto in january and it was the last gig that i played live aware. Both the gagan played my own repertoire. That's your thing. I i'll i'll still go and sit in from time to time do things. I never going to book my own shows. Input is hugh's room still up and running. You guys are gonna get you a question lit later on where you're going to work but we're going to get what i wanted to get. Rick was the stuff that you started teaching and then when you stop teaching a few years ago like so much changed in the music industry so much changed about how you make money in the music industry especially with the advent of streaming i mean just a huge disruptor or a huge opportunity depending upon you to look at things.

van morrison beverly rick mcquaid store Alias jubal humber college las vegas mcgill foale canada gagan Louie toronto hugh Rick
"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Larry gallon two. You know who knows what to be giving their memories of it was like so i wrote this prose piece for him and gave it to him for his book and then when i was putting the poetry book together i thought you know that that pros is. It's close to being poetic. Just because of what it's about at so if i modify if you just a tiny bit I think i can turn it into a kind of of opponent. So goalies goal is about this little boy very canadian story. You know Playing ball hockey on the street. When i was a kid and we would do foster you. And and his son bills play-by-play you no longer passing the ball around making johnny bauer splits to make saves a lot of stuff and my grandfather had made pretty good money in the trucking business in toronto and so he gets done so he bought seasons tickets in the north end of the blues immediately gardens and he died early Had a heart attack in my grandmother had inherited these seats cheated and go all the time. So my dad would get. We had two brothers. Soledad's get three cents tickets and take the kids like it. All gives chance to go now. When i was a kid like the games ought be on saturday nights in the only came on after the juliet. Show like the didn't even start to like nine o'clock had missed the whole period. Probably a little junk of the second and it was in black and white. There was no color. Tv yet. When i was a kid and oh man this is probably making me seem so going like who is dynasty out so we go there and like. It's it's brilliant color alike. It's this unbelievably amazing magic place. Maple leaf gardens. The you know the Current smyth bill and the poem makes the loop from the the little kid going there and being part of that thing to triumph in. It's a cockiness getting the playmate leaf gardens. Concert will for the first time in nineteen seventy eight and i'm walking out on a stage in this building and in. Oh my god you know. Are we going to be able to sell them of seeds. And we're going to be able to carry this and michael was the guy from. Cpi at the time. Yup and he thought we were way too cocky like this is going to be a disaster but we sold out and michael bodice all leafs jersey. So he came back to the dressing room. And there were leaf's jerseys hanging. I picked the one that was Joining one 'cause he was like one of my favorite leads at the time so anyways that's that's that's that calms them awesome. Nice you start off. Rick in the book. Obviously there's the the preface. Which is i guess. The the reason or came about two to writing the book but the first poem is this. The search is sacred. Is there a reason that you picked this to be the opening poem. I think the like. I had some beta readers to help me out. Organize my thinking. And and what it was that i was doing early on one was my cousin on the west coast. Nancy would end up a novelist who lives in bristol. England right now at family. Frank jane christmas and so these ladies read my stuff and sometimes they would like yang. I'm not sure what you're reminding here. You know i would. Okay so what i did. Was i organized the stuff. Not into chapters but it dissections. Yeah and so. The first section of the book was sort of the stuff that was like the humanities. It was kind of like things that were about religion and and and sort of the way that i viewed the humanity psychology sociology. You know that kind of stuff. So searches sacred is really again. This is autobiographical stuff me. There's not a lot that hold sacred there. There's not like some folks might say you know you know you can't sorry you can't slaughter that cow that's not what we do know or i'm sorry you can't fishing on friday like you want to be sacred. We have these rules. Go will go you to a lot of your sacred rules. Just don't you know. And i think they give a lot of problems to humanity in the end they become things that divides instead of bring us together. So what does brings together. And i think it's the search for something sacred in that which is to say writing of making music Trying to be creative. Like i think a a rocket scientist in his lab is searching for something. And that's a sacred task. What he's doing really matters. You know But you know whether or not you know. Go off on a tangent here. I will read the book folks to much. Let me if maybe we continue with this question. Because what the heck let me ask you this. What are you like. What do you consider yourself searching for. What are you searching for yourself right. Yeah well maybe currently Still searching and i haven't found what i'm looking for. I i will always I used to tell my students at the call. taught at homer for over two decades and an atop music business in taught songwriting to say if you're born with artists spirit. You're really always worried about the horizon. You're looking there and you're going. Ooh i wonder wonder what's coming. I wonder what's just moving beyond their and even if you have tremendous success in you have gold records in and you're done great and it's still killing going. Yeah yeah okay. so what. what's what's that. What's next and. I really think that that sort of who i am that. I'm always never going to be truly satisfied. And all this in real simple plain turns you know when.

Larry gallon johnny bauer michael bodice Maple leaf gardens Soledad Frank jane heart attack hockey toronto leafs Rick west coast yang michael bristol Nancy England
"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"emmett" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Greg told me this guy was a poet welfare. Thank you can be more than one in canada. I was just telling greg before you came on. I said as i was sitting down it was either saturday or sunday. Just prepping and i told him it was like back to my q. Seven days just listening to classic rock. It's a disguise coming out of. We're talking to him. So i'm i'm very excited. Thank you so much for giving us giving us your time. You're welcome gentlemen. I'm happy to be here. I was that your background. Or is that like a battle. This my to mega-terror show like she's awesome so start starts there and goes all the way around there and then there's also underneath them consumer access so like and some of the myrtle link over here you can see. That's the tallies in the les pauls for rock and there's a double neck there and then a couple of bases and then but i had an endorsement deal with the off for years. And so that's what some of these really nice art tops are. And now i have i. I work with the goal. Dan people have a. There's a canadian company. Now that makes qatar is as good as anybody at you may be better and so so i have a relationship with him now but some i found along obviously fairly from full kind of a life as a musician before he became a poet. Very nice. very nice. That's that's a lot of guitars. But then i remember listening to randy bachman. He's like he's got hundreds if not thousands. I think he actually pays like one of the guys. That baby road manages or a rhody forms of but also like he's kind of a curator for his collection. I all i did a gig. That was like one of those cruise ship. Things randy was on it and we were sitting in the at the airport together with his guys and there was this one guy and he was talking to ours his school. While you know i curate. Randy's a a curator was. Yeah like somebody's gotta handle this because the guitars is constantly coming and going and there was recently the story in the paper about. Randy's you know sixty sixty one. Twenty grach that he'd had in nineteen fifty seven or whatever and the Track down and he got it back so long lost. But you know like ready is a Wrote a story about him that he had like the world's greatest collection of gresh guitars and he'd also bought john entwistle's collection which was considered to be one of the greatest collections of grudge guitars. And that has certain point. Randy sold it back to the grinch company. They were going to do their own museum in nashville or some place in and they'd make any minute deal and that's that strikes me that would be. Yeah that's randy hilarious felon back. Their own guitars do you. Do you have a story like that. Rick of guitar. That meant so much to you. That either went missing or it got wrecked or anything like that. I you know what this is like kiss of death. But i you know i have never had. I've never had a guitar stolen in my own life. I've had a couple of iraq you know fell off stages a gear fall on them or whatever but never had any never lost one headwinds stolen and all the years on airplanes stuff. I mean i was. I was playing some stuff with a outfit called jeans. Classic subtle Material and they do orchestra shows and the one guitar players in that thing had lost two guitars months. One went onto an airplane in the never came back in another one where they could see it on. The you know the luggage Drumming across garmak sobbing guitar off in a truck drunk owed for fifty years known. So do you were you fly. I know you probably haven't flown much in the past two years back in all i i retired january. Twenty nineteen and climbing game did you. Were you checking your guitar or would you carry with you on the plane. Little both like sometimes you know. Sometimes there's airlines like air. Canada will let you carry a guitar on unless you know it's like it got nobody on the flight current thing which i loved to fly porter down into like places like chicago in boston and to take a new york because they would let you carry a guitar on so i could pack a softer Gig bag Thing and carry with me. But most times i had a flight case in. Have to check your cheers. You know you're taking your chances high. The following podcast is brought to you by radical road brewery. The best craft beer in the heart of leslie will find him at eleven. Seventy seven queen street east. That's radical road brewery. I ladies and gentlemen right names rik emmett. I was in a rock band called triumph for time. And i'm now a poet. I'm here to talk with cream and greg They have this show which is called. Welcome to the music. And so you're welcome to my music anytime and a but i'd like to focus on my poetry for this episode. So you're welcome to my poetry so there.

Randy grach randy bachman randy greg Greg qatar john entwistle canada Dan nashville Rick iraq porter rik emmett Canada boston chicago new york leslie
Lala Kent Gains Strength Leaving Randall Emmett

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Lala Kent Gains Strength Leaving Randall Emmett

"Another bullshit story taking shape. Days after breaking up with her fiance, Randall Emmett, Lala Kent, the great Lala Kent, the thespian lilac kid. She appeared more confident recently. She was signing copies of her memoir, give them Lala for a bunch of fans at a Barnes and nobles in LA the other night. And people there said that one fan expressed concern for her. If you don't know her, she's on Vanderpump rules. And she asked how you holding up because she split from random limit. They've got a 7 month baby and she's split and la la replied like any big strong woman would. I'm doing what I can. I'm doing what I can. I got my daughter ocean with me. And I'm doing what I can. And when the fan told Lala that whatever decision she makes about a future with Randy Amit would be the right one, she responded with the way she always talks. I'm a smart bitch, she said. And that should let any man know, you don't want to marry this girl. You don't want to impregnate this girl. You don't want to be anywhere near girls who talk this way. Guys, I don't care how hot they look on Instagram or a hot the television cameras make them look all the perfect editing they employ. You don't want to be with women who say, I'm a smart bitch. That's dangerous. Get out because you're going to lose all your money and half your

Lala Kent Randall Emmett Lala Vanderpump Randy Amit Barnes La La LA Instagram
US Military Equipment Left Behind in Afghanistan

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:20 min | 1 year ago

US Military Equipment Left Behind in Afghanistan

"Over eighty billion dollars worth of helicopters guns trucks. We got us supplied. M twenty four sniper rifles emmett assault weapons other small arms but christopher has a good plan for all of the military weaponry that we stupidly left behind for the terrorists to use a presumably against the west and against us. Hey christopher welcome how are you. I'm great so you know Some report several hundred thousand. Us rifles left behind. And we have. I think we've finally found a gun. Buyback program that the american American people On on our side of the fence get behind how 'bout we Each law abiding citizens who wants one could pony up a couple of hundred dollars for one of those rifles and we can just start you. Get back and put him in the us is. I've never met a democrat. Who didn't love a good buyback program. I mean i think i like this. I like your thinking we can find some common ground here. Finally absolutely we can meet in the middle christopher. If you don't laugh you cry. So thank you for a little levity in a moment of national turmoil and anguish and shame and humiliation

Christopher United States Middle Christopher
Author Jonathan Eig Discusses His New Book 'Ali: A Life'

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Author Jonathan Eig Discusses His New Book 'Ali: A Life'

"Book is ali a life biography. And it's incredible and the author of jonathan joins us on the podcast. We're going to kind of do an ollie specific pot here so let's start at the beginning just like the book does his family's two generations removed slavery. We know there are some history that none of us really knew about. Even he didn't know about about his own grandparents. He has a father whose abusive but talented. They weren't a destitute family by any means In their neighborhood louisville it was. It was a family that was probably doing better than some others. But i think the the foundation of who ali became as a person. How did he develop this kind of unpolished. Personality is non compromising personality at such a young age. That's really one of the central questions to understanding. Ali and i think it goes to understanding american history. You know when. I interviewed dick gregory for this book. He said to me e books not going to be worth a damn. If you can't explain. What made a kid from the jim crow south same age as emmett till think that he could talk back to white people and get away with it that he can call himself the greatest when everybody around him was telling him he was a second class citizen. You got to be able to understand what made ali capable of that. And it's a really difficult question. I mean it's really complicated. Part of it is that he grows up in. Not the deep south louisville thinks of itself as more progressive. There are some opportunities That wouldn't be available to him anywhere else For example to to walk into a boxing gym at age twelve and have a white cop offer to help him and to be to get in the ring and mix it up with white kids. That didn't happen in alabama or mississippi. But it did happen in louisville and so all of these things And the fact that his father was really a you know a fighter Not in the boxing sense. Which is somebody who didn't think that we should have to take the the conditions that we were born into because of this racist country that that That we live in.

Jonathan Joins ALI Louisville Ollie Dick Gregory Jim Crow Emmett Boxing Alabama Mississippi
Amazon union organizers deflated as vote tilts against them

Up First

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Amazon union organizers deflated as vote tilts against them

"Workers at a warehouse in bessemer alabama voted against unionizing defeating. The hopes of labor organizers that this would be amazon's first unionized workplace in the united states would have been a rare victory and they traditionally add a union south but workers voted overwhelmingly against unionization by a margin of more than two to one here to talk to us about that. Is stephen basan. He is with our member station w. b. m. in birmingham. Hello good morning. Was this outcome. Surprise won't for a lot of people here yes. There was a lot of excitement. A real sense union had a chance now where this house is located about. Twenty minutes outside of birmingham surrounded by trees. Really not much else in on that. Drive there from birmingham. You see lots of pro union signs. There've been lots of rallies here with big headline names like actor danny glover bernie sanders coming through a congressional delegation but add the six thousand workers that actually work at this warehouse. Very few were showing up at these rallies. Mostly it's been crowds with out of state organizers for the unions or locals in alabama democrats shirts and not many people actually working for amazon so really we didn't know what most workers were thinking until the actual vote count this week where they delivered a definitive. No i mean so much. Attention has been sort of lavished on this vote. How is the mood. Change to after it was pretty crushing. Defeat more than two to one against the union and union. Try to keep up a brave face during a zoom press conference on friday. After the results organizers in the couple of workers spoke including emmett ashford who works at the amazon warehouse there. He sent a message to workers telling them to not get discouraged. The floodgates opened. We can't stop it. So i hope everybody has to get day this news as not discouraged as and we are holding our head high marching or and we will get what we deserve.

Birmingham Stephen Basan Bessemer Alabama Amazon Danny Glover Bernie Sanders United States Union And Union Emmett Ashford Amazon Warehouse