18 Burst results for "Emma Green"

"emma green" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

02:22 min | 8 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Experiment

"This story was reported by Emma green in collaboration with this American life. And also appears in this American life's December 10th, 2021 episode, but I did everything right. From the this American life team, this episode was produced by Mickey meek and Diane Wu. Editing by Laura starchy with fact checking by Jessica soriano. Special thanks to Emily Patel and Amy Barron. From WNYC studios, thank you to Joe lord for our engineering and sound design. Production by Julia Longoria and me, Peter breslin, with help from Alina Coleman. Music by tasty morsels and Joe poured. Our team also includes Natalia Ramirez, Kelly prime, Gabriel berberi, Emily Bo team, Tracy hunt, Jenny Lawton, and David Hermann. If you enjoyed today's episode, please take the time to rate and review us on Apple podcasts, or wherever you listened. And just so you know, the experiment will be taking a break for the holidays. Returning with new episodes starting January 13th. The experiment is.

Emma green Mickey meek Diane Wu Laura starchy Jessica soriano Emily Patel Amy Barron WNYC studios Joe lord Julia Longoria Peter breslin Alina Coleman Natalia Ramirez Kelly prime Gabriel berberi Emily Bo Tracy hunt Jenny Lawton David Hermann Joe
"emma green" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

02:42 min | 8 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Experiment

"I'm Julia Longoria. This is the experiment, and we're back with the story of sonographer Rebecca Schrader. Here's Emma green. In 2017, Rebecca found out she was pregnant a third time. And 7 weeks in, scanning herself, she noticed something was wrong with the baby's head. Against all odds, the worst thing was happening. Again, another pregnancy with a fatal diagnosis. This time, anencephaly, an extremely rare disorder where parts of the brain and skull are missing or develop abnormally. Babies with this diagnosis are usually still born or die within a couple of hours or days. There's no chance of survival. How did it feel to have another challenging diagnosis? Did you feel like God was playing a joke on you? Did you feel like you were just profoundly unlucky? Like, what was that like to be there again? I was like, maybe God put me in this situation again to I don't know, test me, or show himself again, but why do you have to do it this way? I was mad that we were doing this again. I was mad that I was going to. I was almost meant that I was going to have to choose life, like I wanted to, but I was also mad at the decision that I was having to make. It felt like because this was different than core. I didn't have any hope. There wasn't any hope. Doctors later told Rebecca, there wasn't any genetic or medical explanation for why she and Josh had two pregnancies that went so wrong. I just got very, very unlucky. They had to sit down again with a doctor to talk about what to do. It ended up being the same Doctor Who had talked them through their decision with Korra. She said the same thing again, she was like, I know that you carried to term before. I don't want to assume because I remember this. She said, I don't want to assume that you're going to carry a term again. She was like, so I just want to put termination on the on the table. She was like, and if you need to talk about it, I can be here to talk about it. If you want to talk about it, just your husband alone, you can do that. And I remember looking over at my husband, like me saying, yes, we're going to carry a term and him saying at the same time, I don't know. We both said it at the same time. The doctor noticed that we both said different things stepped out. And we had a conversation right then and there about it. And I guess I felt like I couldn't live with myself.

Julia Longoria Rebecca Schrader Emma green Rebecca Korra Josh
"emma green" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

04:11 min | 10 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Experiment

"Jesus Christ. Okay, why don't we start with you just telling me the joke? I guess I can pull it up to see what year it's from. I recently asked Atlantic staff writer Emma green to pull up a joke that she told me from a Christian satire website called the Babylon bee. So here we go. Okay, so this is from their early days from 2016. And the headline is, Holy Spirit, unable to move through a congregation as fog machine breaks. Which is really funny because, you know, I guess now I'm explaining the joke, which is a little lame. This is poking fun at the fact that there's a certain kind of megachurch where the environment is very much like a rock concert. It's like fog machines and skinny jeans and neon lights, so it's just a funny joke to be like, we're here to be reached by the Holy Spirit. But the fog machine kept us from doing that because we got distracted thinking that the fog machine was the point. Emma, of course, covers religion for the Atlantic. And she first came across the Babylon B as this sort of evangelical answer to the onion. I remember thinking, oh, this is something different. This is like insiders who totally get what evangelicalism is. And love it and consider themselves part of it and also just hold a really hilarious joke about smoke machines and a megachurch. But if you've followed the Babylon bee over the last few years, you know it doesn't just poke fun at megachurches. The Babylon B has always had a political streak to it. And you can say a political mean streak. Like the headline Trump announces illegal immigrant gladiator games, or another one. Hillary turns to husband for advice on attracting young impressionable female voters. So as these political posts have started to go viral, they have gotten a lot of criticism for pushing satire past the line of making jokes and into misinformation. Liberal media wouldn't know a joke of a punched him in the tic tac sack, especially jokes from a popular satire website. The Babylon bee. New York Times recently denounced the Babylon B is, quote, a far right misinformation site that quote sometimes traffics in misinformation under the guise of satire. No humor allowed. So. With my reporting, I spend a lot of time. In the evangelical world that the Babylon bee inhabits. And I wanted to know directly from them what do they think they're doing when they're telling these jokes? So I called the editor in chief of the Babylon B, Kyle Mann. Well, I'm not going to explain the joke to you. Do you want me to explain the joke dude? Yes. The joke is that humor is this weird thing where either you think it's funny or you don't, either you see it as a joke or you don't. And I think understanding the why behind that can also help us understand something bigger about politics about this divided political world that we're living in. And I really think it's important to understand the people who think that the Babylon bees jokes are funny. This week, Atlantic writer Emma green sits down with Kyle man. The editor in chief of the Babylon bee. To talk about Christianity and comedy. There's this idea that conservative comedy can just say something and everybody will laugh because they agree with it. It just comes off as angry. It's not gonna hit that mark. Like it has to be clever. The balance of comedy is trying to find that line. Where is the line between making a joke and doing harm?.

Emma green The Babylon bee Atlantic Emma Kyle Mann Trump Hillary New York Times Babylon bee Kyle
"emma green" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Command your space, Gary. Huh? You're worth it. Let me tell you right now. You are worth it way air going to give you the top spot in the CIA. I'm calling them right now and It's not about checking boxes, Gary, but you just check them all my friend were going to get your real good spot that you've really call Gary. I'm trying to think of what my list would be Irish Catholic, um, common sense and on that book, Smart. Um, the sensitive skin. Allergic to strawberry shampoo and a little bit nervous around certain dogs. Do you think I get into the CIA? You're worth it. I am worth it. Here. I want you to come with your checks for the other side. You've got it on a full check list. Tim. Go ahead. You're next with Grace and Grace curly show. Came paste. Um, actually, how you doing? Great. Oh, good. How? How's it going, Jim? Sorry about that. Good. Hey, um so I'm wondering about what he what positions. Are we looking forward to it? The CIA anyways, um, foreign election rigging. Well, yeah, that was brought up in Tucker's monologue to like all the mistakes and all of the off the you know, problems at the CIA and how, but this is what they're focused on, Jim. You know you don't have to worry about any of that, because you have a CIS gender mother who can change a diaper with one hand and carry a baby in the other, So you don't have to worry about anything anymore. It's all gonna be okay. What about John Sullivan being in the capital? I mean, antifa, um, instinct that break on January six. I hope people understand that John Sullivan was the he said he was like he was making a documentary or he was just getting footage of the capital. But then S o. He was on CNN. He was on all these shows talking about it. And then when the footage actually got back to, I think the cops or whoever you could hear him in the background, instigating all of the riots and then I think at some point, he said, we did it or somebody said we did it. Um, yes. Oh, thank you, Jim. Good point. Good point. And that's that's what really irks me is like the CIA. The FBI, the D O. J. They always seem to have their priorities so mixed up. It's a Oh, there'll be. There'll be a mass shooting, and we'll hear. Oh, yeah, they got they had a couple warnings about him. You know, they go. He was on their radar for a long time. And then all I keep seeing is like pictures of These old grandma's walking into the capital on January six, and they're like we need help. I get to find this woman. Her name is Mabel. She's from Las Vegas, and she walked into the capital through the ropes. We need to know who she is right now. Way got reports about the supermarket shooter? Sure, but we didn't have any sex gender. Lotina's in the office that day, Our hands were tied. Exactly. They just You can't handle the truth. That's another lesson that I think everybody needs one number one in Grace Curly's book of lessons, Okay, Jared? Mind your business that's always number one. Mind your damn business number two priorities. You gotta have priorities. I don't really care if you can change a diaper. If you're signing up to be on the CIA, maybe I'm old school. Maybe I'm old fashioned. I don't know. Seems like you have bigger things to worry about. That's going to scare those insurrectionists in Colombia. Exactly guys. We'll be back on the other side, Jarod. I don't keep saying that. Jared Jared pointed that out. There's a guy in hate mail who hates when I say we'll be back on the other side. And so because of that, I have started saying it more and more. You know, it's like the Donald Trump effect. You tell me not to do it. I'm going to do it every time when we get back after the break. Jared is going to give us his list of why he should be in the CIA, and I'm looking forward to this. We also have a great great piece. I can't believe I'm about to say this, but it's a phenomenal piece out of the Atlantic. And I don't know if this woman Emma Green if she's from New England, But she went around New England specifically Somerville and she started looking into These liberals who are obsessed with the pandemic and all of its, you know, the masking and everything else, and it's great. It's a great piece of writing. I'm gonna read that you guys will be back. Don't go anywhere. It's the Grace Curly show. She's never held office, but she paid the whiskey priests monthly rent once she's grace, curly. All moms love turtles, especially when they're Phillips Chocolate turtles made with rich, smooth caramel hand roasted pecans, cashews or almonds, then talked with a generous dollop of mouth watering milk or dark chocolate, A tried.

Gary Las Vegas New England Jim Donald Trump Colombia John Sullivan Jarod Grace Curly FBI Emma Green Jared Lotina CIA Tim January six Mabel S o. CNN Tucker
Persecution Complex

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Persecution Complex

"Hi everybody. Hi guys well from somewhere in Oregon and Salt Lake City Utah. It's thank God I'm atheist the podcast I'm mark and I'm Dan and. Mark Hello pay there now. You're not frank, I'm I'm not anymore. I have emerged like a butterfly from Christmas. From the Frank Shelf Christmas and the Frank. No thanks. That's right Thank you so much for coming on and and help out you you who have helped out here before but are also my co host over on the how do heretic. As much as well as other things I, guess you sure you've in the in the world not that I pay any attention. To the most important stuff Yeah. Unfortunately, I was going out of town and frank was going to have to find a replacement for me. And then, and then frank came down with some horrible apparently non-co vid disease. And and I had to fill in last as far as we know, frank does not have the Rona. Dead. Yeah it seems. It seems as though he is negative though false negatives have occurred in the world. So but anyways, prayers in that seed money coming in. Yes exactly basically, the only way to save him is to is to send us a all of your money. On the television screen, we'll tell you how to do that a later in the program also later in the show you and I are going to have a discussion about persecution privilege. And There's a difference between those two things and points and purpose purpose qwerty. So the four pence perspicacity yeah, which is also Yeah. I anyway, we'll get to all of that later on but in but first, why don't you tell me one of your stories I understand that you've come prepared with with stories to tell the kids you know me I'm already I've got a pocketful of magic for everybody so. This, this will probably relate a little bit to our discussion later in the show. Daniel Okay and this is an older article, but it's been making the rounds again because of reasons. Okay. Yeah. It's an article in the Atlantic by Emma Green and it's about. You know the most most persecuted people in America and those would be. Christians. Of course, they will let me. Let me read a couple of excerpts from the article here in. Many. Many Christians. Believe they are subject to religious discrimination in the United States new report from the Public Religion Research Institute and Brookings. Offers evidence. Almost half of Americans say discrimination against Christians is as big of a problem as discrimination against. Including blacks and minorities. Three quarters of Republicans and trump supporters said this. This article is like a year and a half old. So imagine it's much higher now. And so did nearly eight out of ten White Evangelical Protestants of the latter group six and ten believed that although America wants was a Christian nation, it is no longer a huge jump from twenty twelve. Forty, six percent of those surveyed said immigration from Mexico and Central America has been too high in recent years. Yeah. When asked the same question about immigrants from predominantly Christian countries though only ten percent of people said immigration has been too high. The irony in this is essentially the same question phrase student as Latin American countries are overwhelmingly Christian. Right. All those all those non-catholic Mexicans that are coming over our border. Yeah exactly. Well, who didn't Alex Jones we talk about Alex Jones saying that Mexico was run by a bunch of white shoes at one point but. You know. So Then to kind of conclude. While the US, is still a nation of faith with roughly seventy one percent of adults identifying some kind of Christian. Religious organizations of all kinds are struggling with lower levels of attendance declining participation in ritual practices. More and more people say they're not part of any religion and this is especially true of young people in their twenties and early thirties with you. Guys if religious believable believe their institutions are declining, which demographically speaking they are they may feel more threatened by what they perceive as the growing numbers of people in the country who have a different kind of faith. There's evidence of this in the strongest style. Many people seem to feel for the past and allusive time when Americans felt more of a consensus about their values and beliefs strong majorities. Evangelical Protestants in White Catholics believe America has changed for the worse since the nineteen. Fifties. So off the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty s Jim crow women knowing their place raging cold war nuclear arms race the good old days as Back Yeah back when we could win when everybody's lives were so much better. So this is a lie that just will not die. Like this Christian persecution complex Oh. My God it is amazing and we're GONNA get to more of it. We're going to expound on later in the show like you alluded to but my God it is. It's astounding at what's really funny is. The Christians believe that it is a due to outside influence that everything's getting so bad. Not at not at all acknowledging that, no dude, the calls coming from inside. Right. He's leaving. You are doing this. Yeah. First of all. It's not true that you're being persecuted but part about right believing. You're doing that. Yeah exactly because you're persecuting. They're not leaving because the world outside of Christianity looks. So enticing your leaving because the world inside of Christianity is a an abusive health gape. Maybe work on that you

Frank Mark Hello Daniel Okay Emma Green Public Religion Research Insti United States Salt Lake City Alex Jones Utah Oregon DAN Brookings Mexico Central America Evangelical Protestants
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Reason be proud. Any Cockney Barrett and the trail she's blazed leading her to this moment. I'm struck by the irony of how demeaning to women. Their accusations really are. That you a working mother of seven with a strong record, a professional, an academic accomplishment couldn't possibly respect the goals and desires. Of today's women. I'm joined now by Robin given the Washington Post senior critic at large, and Emma Green, a staff writer at the Atlantic covering religion, culture and politics. Robin and Emma. So great to have you with me. Thanks so much for having me on Robin. Let's start with you. Both of you, in fact, have written in very fascinating pieces about Judge Barrett's confirmation hearing. Robin. Why are we talking so much about Judge barrettes motherhood during the confirmation hearing so far? Well, I think it's because I know the Republicans have really put it out there one of the things that I was particularly struck by Wass and the day of opening statements. It was the rare Republican who could get through their 10 Minutes statement without bringing up the fact that she has seven Children on going even further to say that Not only does she have seven Children, two of those Children were adopted and really underscoring the connection between The size of her family on DH, her qualifications for the Supreme Court and also her essential identity. So you know, it's understandable that she is proud of her family and certainly reference them and introduce them, But it was striking to me that it was such a talking point among the Republicans. In fact, Robin to that point about mentioning her adopted Children, she also they also highlighted the fact that they were Children who were adopted from Haiti. What's the intention and bringing that up? For me. What I found. Particularly striking was, it seemed to be a way of quietly underscoring a sense that Amy Cockney Barrett is a open armed Charitable person that she is a person who's celebrates and embraces diversity because those Children are from Haiti on that she is also someone who kind of stands as an example or as evidence for those who want to make the point. I got there is always a welcoming home for Children on DH. Therefore, there is no need to ever consider abortion. Emma, When you look at these confirmation hearings, particularly as Robin noted the first day of the hearings. Why do you think Judge barrettes motherhood role has become such a key part of the conversation. We've heard over and over again from Republican senators, including at adopt the top of today's hearings that their day of hearings that Republicans see her as a new kind of icon, a role model for conservative women. You don't necessarily have a lot of figures in politics of popular culture took up to look up to Lindsey Graham, the senator from South Carolina today was commenting on the fact that he thinks that Amy Cockney Barrett is going to be someone that AA lot of young conservative women around the country who are ambitious, who wanna have careers but who also want to have families. And who also potentially have pro life views. They're going to look at her and see someone that they can grow up to be, and I think Republicans see Ah lot of advantage of this culturally, and they also see advantage for this politically at a time when they're desperate for women voters to feel like they have a home in the Republican Party. And as we noted, I'm at the very top. However, fatherhood doesn't seem to be discussed very often. I'm thinking, most recently with Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings. Is there a double standard here? You know, I was thinking of Brett Kavanaugh to because he is clearly very proud of being a father. His daughter's had a visible role at his hearings as well. But there was never a question like the one that Senator John Cornyn posed to Amy Carney Barrett during her hearing's How do you do it? How do you possibly manage to balance your career and your large family? And I think the answer here is that the same kinds of sexist assumptions about what women are capable of doing and the sacrifices that they should be making. Those apply equally to liberal women and conservative women. So I do think that there is a double standard here of examining the way that any Cockney Barrett balances her family life with her professional life in a way that her male colleagues before the Supreme Court has not. Robin. What are your thoughts on that? We've got about a minute left in this in this part of the conversation. Do you think there's a double standard there? For sure. I mean, I think one of the surprising things for some people is the fact that Justice Scalia who Ah Ah, Judge Barrett. You know, was mentored by had nine Children, and that was not something that was raised as evidence of his extraordinary ability to balance work and life. S o the way that it's being used as a sort of defining feature of of Judge Barrett suggests that you know, the role of motherhood is somehow on typical Teo and technical to the responsibilities of A judge to the responsibilities of a professional and that she has somehow miraculously.

Amy Cockney Barrett Robin Cockney Barrett Emma Green Haiti Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court Republican Party Senator John Cornyn Justice Scalia Washington Post Wass Lindsey Graham South Carolina Teo staff writer senator
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:00 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is showing up in any Tony Barrett hearing. I was struck by the kind of credulous questioning from Republican senators who were men such as John Cornyn from Texas. Who said, How do you do it? How do you and your husband managed to full time professional careers and the same time? Take care of your large family? And what's so notable about this, of course, is that nobody was questioning Antonin Scalia about his many, many Children when he was out poor Supreme Court nomination decades ago at this certainly wasn't a question that was brought to Judge Cavanaugh when he was potentially going to be a Supreme Court justice at just two years ago. So we really do see the same double standards applied Tio her even though this time it's the Republicans who are sort of lifting her up as a potential feminist icon. At the same time, I did find it very moving, and I thought it was kind of long and coming in the course of the hearings when Dick Durbin did ask her about our what many people want to call racial reckoning and specifically About this. Take a listen. Have you seen the charge? Floyd Video. I have What impact did it have on you? Senator, as you might imagine, given that I have two black Children that was very, very personal for my family. Jesse was with the boys on a camping trip out in South Dakota. So I was there and my 17 year old daughter, Vivian, was adopted from Haiti. All of this was erupting. It was very difficult for her. We wept together in my room. And then it was also difficult for my daughter, Juliet, whose 10 I had to try to explain some of this. To them. I mean, my Children to this point in their lives had had the benefit of growing up in a cocoon where they have not yet experienced. Hatred or violence on DH for Vivian. You know, toe understand that there would be a risk to her brother or the son she might have one day. Of that kind of brutality. Has been an ongoing conversation. It's a difficult one for us like it is for Americans all over the country. So Emma Green. I Ah, imagine that while we agree you and I, that sexism and viewing women through a different lens is not right. Whatever the political persuasion This was a very moving exchange. And I thought this though I don't think a male candidate would have received this question. This I thought was quite revelatory about her family life about her rather American family, her her rather unique place in our sort of arc of the moral universe transition in American life, and I guess I have to say I didn't mind it. What was your response to this exchange? You know, I think you're right. I think her family story is so clearly a central part of who she is, she said in her opening statement on Monday to the Senate Judiciary Committee that you let the law consume her toe. Let her life just be about her career. Would be a shallow and unfulfilling life and that she is really self consciously tried Tio lean into her family life to cultivate community to protect her marriage. And I think this was a really powerful way of illustrating that that she along with being very accomplished in her scholarship, and at Notre Dame. Is someone who's really dedicated to her Children, and not only that she has a family of many, many different perspective. She has a child with down syndrome. She has two Children who she adapted who's as she testified here? She's trying to navigate questions of race in America, just like other Americans. So it was one of those moments that I think really humanized her and also made it hard to caricature her as being One kind of ideologue or another is just about her as a person with her family. And Emma on the abortion question and your other article on the Atlantic. Today is the abortion question comes for Amy Cockney Barrett. Let me play a little bit of an exchange between Judge Barrett and Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal. He's pressing her here on things she has said or written or signed in the past. That make her opposition to legal abortion explicit and why that shouldn't be a clear signal for the public why she was nominated and how she would roll. I think we might be talking past each other. Because the statements that I signed for statements of my personal beliefs and not not your personal belief, your honor your legal position. Be willing to say that role was correctly decided, because that's really the essence of the question here. Well, Senator, as I said, you know, to others of your colleagues in response to questioning that it's inconsistent with the duties of a sitting judge there, her husband, the practice of every nominee that sat in the seat before made to take positions. On cases that the court has decided in the past. Emma, your thoughts on that exchange. This is the line that Judge Barrett took throughout the hearing. She got this question over and over again at the top of the day, Senator Dianne Feinstein from California. Basically opened her questioning by saying, Do you agree that row was wrongly decided, and judge bear really determinedly would not answer this question and the way that she justified that was to say. That not only would it be unethical for her as a potential Supreme Court justice to get a preview of the way that she might decide a case because that would suggest bias, But she's also a sitting judge on a circuit Court of appeals, and it's actually against their code of ethics to Advertise their personal views and suggest the way that they might decide a case one way or another, And this has been the hallmark of judicial confirmation hearings for many years, judges and potential Supreme Court nominees who go up for the Senate Really try hard not to be pinned down on specific issues, and that is on ly more urgent when it comes to something as controversial is abortion. And how does this plan To the larger question, which Democrats? I think we're studiously avoiding today of her membership in this particular Christian sect. Which some people see as very fringy, and that she even once according to what I read, had the title of handmade in Indicating belief in male supremacy that the male dominates the house and women should obey the male thinks like that. Um And I guess she can believe that if she wants, But if It is something that then Comes up in a gender rights case, and she imposes her religious view. This is why we have an establishment clause right? One reason so that People don't try to establish their religion as public law and the Democrats didn't want to get caught calling out her religion so they don't get called bigots. But then there's some colonel of legitimate question in there about whether she would try to establish a religion that's considered Frenchy. So I think the biggest question of the day which crossed tons of topics, even though her religious faith did not explicitly come up on the Democratic side is weather Judge Barrett is capable of setting aside her personal views. From issues that would be affected by her faith to personal view she might have on abortion or LGBT rights. Whether she could set those aside and follow the law, where it leads her to interpret the law as it should apply in each individual case, And this is a huge worry, obviously among Democrats because Hey, look at her life. They look at her writings. They look at her background in the conservative legal movement, And they believe that she may decide against some of these fundamental rights that are especially how dear among progressives. And Judge Barrett has really taken pains to argue that she understands that the oath of office for Supreme Court justice is to set aside their personal views and to take the law seriously to not have sort of personal preference or favor. Obviously, Supreme Court justices, like any judge are influenced by where they come from, from the background from their ideology. But it's really, really clear that she understands that that's what's at stake here. So she's made that argument over and over again that no matter what her personal views, maybe she is going to follow the law where it leads. Now, Emma. Many people think that Sandra Day O'Connor was a Catholic, but she wasn't people hear the name O'Connor and they make assumptions. We have our biases, right? But she was baptized member of the Episcopal Church. But now as I'm sure, you know the church has a Catholic. Well, maybe we call it an imbalance because the church has the court. I'm sorry..

Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett Emma Green Tio Senator Tony Barrett Judge Cavanaugh Vivian Dick Durbin John Cornyn Antonin Scalia Sandra Day O'Connor Senator Dianne Feinstein Texas Court of appeals Democrats Haiti Senate Judiciary Committee Episcopal Church South Dakota
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Talking about the Amy Cockney. Better confirmation hearings on W N Y C. They have adjourned for the day. Just a little while ago. Long day Theywill do day to tomorrow, and I should mention that we will be back Jamie Floyd and I in the same eight o'clock Allah and do this again tomorrow night. Also when the hearings resume in the morning, we'll be streaming them live WN my si dot org's so you can watch or listen. They're also joining us now is Emma Green or covers politics, policy and religion for the Atlantic. Already churned out two articles about this hearing on the Atlantic website one called the Abortion Question comes for Amy Cockney Barrett and the other one. The irony at the heart of the Amy Cockney Barrett fight. Hi, Emma. Thanks for joining us tonight. Thanks so much for having me now. I pulled the Joni Uts clip that you wrote about in your article. The irony at the heart of the Amy County Bad fight. You want to set this up for us? What's that irony? So throughout the hearings, both at the opening statements that we heard yesterday and the question that we heard today again and again, Republican senators have drawn attention, Tio any cockney barrettes family to her faith and to her ability to balance her career and her commitment to her community and to being a good wife. And a good mother and we heard that in particular coming from the female Republican senators, including Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa. I'm struck by the irony of how demeaning to women their accusations. Really? Are that you a working mother of seven. With a strong record of professional. An academic accomplishment couldn't possibly respect the goals and desires of today's women. And leading into that, senator Ernst Republican from Iowa, had said, instead of entering into this nomination process with an open mind and a desire to understand this woman They've used the Siri's of tactics to undermine, coerce or confused. The American people and women all over the world are painfully painfully familiar with the strategy as she accused the Democrats off. So you want to elaborate on that? Why is that your central irony? Emma Green from the Atlantic. Well, it's kind of ironic because the Republicans are effectively accusing their Democratic colleagues of sexism, the seat of Ruth Gator. But Bater Ginsberg has long been iconic because she was such a Trailblazer for women's rights and central to her work was her work to expand abortion access. Now Republicans have offered up any Cockney Barrett as a kind of conservative counterweight to fill that seat and to fill that role, but from a very different perspective. Which many women on the left see as a threat to some of their most of central rights. So Republican senators air trying to kind of have it both ways where they really want to lift up Amy Kuney Barrett as this feminist icon who can represent a new brand of conservative feminism. While kind of underplaying or suggesting that Democrats concerns are illegitimate. I said at the top of the program that this reminded me, Emma Ah, bit of the Sarah Palin selection, not, of course, comparing the two women at all in terms of intellectual capacity. But in terms of the ways in which conservatives reach to these women as feminist icons Ah, do you think that's a fair assessment? Obviously, a lot of time has passed. But maybe not that much time has passed. What do you think about that analogy? Well, I think the strongest similarity between Sarah Palin getting named Teo, the 2008 McKeen presidential ticket, and Amy Kuney Barrett is that they are both coming from a party. You're representing an ideological wing in United States politics where women do not have very many leadership roles. It's notable that Amy Kuney Barrett is the fifth woman Tio potentially sit on the Supreme Court or would be if she's confirmed. She is the second woman who would be nominated by a Republican president. But in terms of other leadership within the Republican Party, there really aren't that many women to speak up. Which is why I think her model is so interesting that Republicans are really eager to say Not only do we see in her the potential for great justice. What we see in her potential women voters. We see conservatives across America potentially looking up to her and saying, Wow, I see myself in any Cockney Barrett and I see myself in the Republican Party. Isn't this something that women across the aisle share in common? However, this very difficulty Ah, and I see it with Camilla Harris. I saw it. Certainly with Hillary Clinton any time A woman is in high profile public life. There's a certain scrutiny that women suffer and have to navigate that our male counterparts simply do not. I noticed and barely noticed because I was too busy listening to the hearings, but some conversation about the dress she chose to wear yesterday, which I have to say. Rather infuriated me. It goes right back to that nonsense about the suit Hillary chose to wear when she accepted the nomination. It shouldn't be a conversation about what a woman chooses to wear on an important day like this. No one's talking about. Dick Durbin's or Lindsey Graham's a Thai choice. So that seems to be something we women share in common. No, I certainly think that sexism is of no party orc leak and that The kinds of standards that we saw applied Tio Hillary Clinton when she was a candidate for president that we've seen to a certain extent in this race with Kamala Harris is a vice presidential candidate..

Amy Cockney Barrett Tio Hillary Clinton Amy Cockney Republican Party Emma Green Atlantic senator Ernst Republican Sarah Palin Senator Joni Ernst Iowa president Emma Ah Emma Jamie Floyd Kamala Harris Dick Durbin United States Bater Ginsberg Ruth Gator Camilla Harris
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pence didn't quite answer the question. The moderator Susan Page, put to him, which is What he would want his state of Indiana to do if Rose, overturned and abortion rights become an issue for each of the 50 states. Would he impose a blanket ban on all abortions if he could get the Legislature or referendum to pass it? So do we have to look at Pence's record? On Religious liberty verses. Equal treatment under the law as governor of Indiana in order to find the answer to that, or does he just come out and say If I was governor of Indiana again, and I could get the Legislature to do it, I would ban 100% of abortions. So I think it's pretty clear that Mike Pence is the big Pearl, a champion at the Trump administration. He tends to be the ambassador to pro life organizations. He always makes an appearance at the march for life, and this is an issue that he is really vocal and direct time and we do have some evidence from Indiana. His home state. There were a couple of lives that were passed a few years ago that actually attempted to restrict abortion through the language of human rights and civil rates, saying that it would be illegal for women to discriminate against unborn Children on the basis of race nationality. Uh, ethnicity, etcetera. Etcetera s o. We can already see that Indiana is one of these red states where state legislators have had these pushes to restrict abortion. And I think Mike Pence is very, very secure and comfortable being put and fit within that part of the movement within that pro life movement. Velma in the Bronx. You're on WNBC drama. Hey, could your guest speaks to the fact that at this debate, Pence said that the president and himself would not ever dare to tell anybody what health choices to make regarding Corona virus. And Judge Barrett at this party in the White House. Inside, she's been diagnosed with Corona virus, and so is her husband. And I guess they're well now and that's all well and good, but As a judge. How could she then turn around and say, I'm not going to tell anybody to do anything with their health regarding a Corona virus? That's their decision, but then turn around and say, But we will go and tell somebody what to do with their body regarding abortion. Yeah, and another contradiction There that I've heard people bring up is if she considers herself pro life. Why did she allow herself to be introduced at an event that didn't protect life by not having social distancing? Your mask wearing Ah, but Emma to the caller's question. So you think there are a lot of tensions here between the right wing anti masking attitudes or this idea that individual liberty should determine whether or not you wear masks and for what it's worth? I think there is disagreement among people who describe themselves this pro life. About how to think about the masts and social distancing whether it really is the responsibility of people who consider themselves to be pro life to take that extra step and do what they can to protect other people. But as we've seen, they're a lot of people in the Republican Party and the conservative movement who don't agree with that and who aren't taking those steps, so there is a tension there. And I also think that the language is a big problem here. Someone like any Cockney Barrett. Presumably, he's certainly someone like President make Punch wouldn't see the issue abortion as a matter of health care, or as a matter of medical decision, they see it as the matter of ending a life, So they put it into a separate moral category from how they would think about Corona virus. Let's take another call Camille and Roslyn. You're on WN my sea with Emma Green from the Atlantic. Hi, Camille. Hi, two points unless I missed it. I did not hear your gas mention that in people of praise that they used the term handmaiden. They have since gone away from that, But the husband seems to be still the head spiritually head of the household, and another thing is that Amy Cockney, Barrett wrote. Her first law review article Catholic judges in capital cases with one of her professors from Notre Dame. This goes back to 1998, I guess. And Ah William Brennan was asked about potential conflict between his Catholic faith and his duties as a judge, and of course, he said, His primary duty was to uphold the Constitution and the law. Amy Cockney, Barrett said, and her professor that they did not defend the position as the proper response for a Catholic judge to take with respect. To abortion and the death penalty. I don't know how someone like this can be impartial as a Supreme Court judge, and my other third point in last point is that She's only been a judge. For what? Three years to me. She has no business being anywhere near the stream court. Thank you. Thank you. We're going to leave unless you want to say something about those comments will leave them as comments and go on to another caller. Sure. Asher in Croton on Hudson. In New York. What were else You're on. W m I C All right. Well, I think, but one of the goals of the hearings would be to expose. How How the Xtreme Justice Bharat Bharat positions are so they might explore.

Mike Pence Indiana Judge Barrett Legislature Corona Amy Cockney Emma Green Camille president Susan Page Bharat Bharat professor Republican Party Asher Supreme Court Rose Velma Croton Trump administration
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W N Y C Good morning again, everyone Now we continue with our election. Siri's 30 issues in 30 Days since last week, we've been focusing on issues other than the corona virus or racial justice. Tomorrow we will begin eight in a row on racial justice, followed by eight in a row on the Corona virus. Today we're up to issue 14 religious liberty versus civil rights, both constitutionally protected Each a part of the other and very real ways but often in conflict, who has the higher right between a baker, whose religion considers gay marriage is sin and the couple who have a constitutional right to equal treatment under the law in a store. Should anyone's religious views on abortion rights dictate access for other people? Land is asking Amy Cockney Barrett about her relationship with the fringe Catholic group religious bigotry. And when is a common sense to see if she has a kind of zealotry that believes in imposing her religious beliefs as public policy with me for this is Emma Green, who covers politics, policy and religion for the Atlantic. And, uh, thanks for coming on. Welcome back to WN. My C Thanks so much for having me. And here's a clip of vice president. Pence from the debate last night defending the nomination of Amy Cockney bet so close to the election. And we particularly hope that we don't see the kind of attacks on her. Christian faith that we saw before. The Democrat chairman of the Judiciary Committee before When Judge Verret was being confirmed for the court of Appeals. Expressed concern that the dogma of her faith lived loudly in her. Dick Durbin of Illinois said that it was a concern, Senator. I know one of our judicial nominees you actually attacked because they will remember the Catholic Knights of Columbus. Just because the Knights of Columbus holds pro life views. So, Emma, can you start there and fact check those charges. What was he referring to? Regarding what He described his past attacks on Barrett's Christian faith, or about Harris and someone from the Catholic Knights of Columbus? What was really there and what was not. So to understand this, we have to go back three years to 2017 when any Cockney Barrett was being considered for a position on the U. S circuit Courts of appeal. There was a hearing held in the Senate Judiciary Committee, where Senator Dianne Feinstein confronted any Cockney. Barrett was then a professor at Notre Dame. About her views on abortion, and whether or not her fate would prevent her from being a fair dressed and following precedent, and that's where that famous quote that Bass president Pence came into being that Senator, Feinstein said. The dogma lives loudly within you, and it's a concern and instantly. This was portrayed on the right as evidence of Senator Feinstein's religious bigotry. Never mind the Catholic affiliations of many Democrats. They said that this basically indicated that she was trying to impose a religious test. I'm Barrett to see whether she was fit for office, which is against the Constitution. And now this has been turned into one of the rights major rallying cries in advance of the Supreme Court confirmation hearings, trying to portray Democrats already before the hearings even start As being religious bigots and trying to disqualify this line of questioning from entering into the hearings. What can you tell us about the group that Amy Connie Barrett is in it and why it draws special scrutiny. So this is a group called people of praise that is center in South Bend, Indiana, where any Tony Barrett has been a professor at Notre Dame for many years, they are part of what's called the charismatic movement. It's an ecumenical group of people from all sorts of Christian nominations, Catholic and otherwise, who in the 19 seventies. Began gathering as a sort of thick community of people who agreed Tio Covenant of the way that they were going to behave and worship agreed to certain types of communal life, giving away money volunteering for the poor and also embracing sorts of practices that are common and other charismatic communities so this can include speaking in tongues. Believing that there are certain messages or modern day prophecies. This's a charismatic expression of Catholic faith, which is not necessarily typical for most Catholics in the US but is also not unheard of, and it's something that a number of Catholic groups across the country embrace. Is that group or does she is an individual have a history of trying to impose their private religious views on public policy? That's the central question, right? Great, So we know that when she was a professor at Notre Dame Judge Barrett signed on to an editorial in the local paper about the right to life and the evils of abortion. We also know that the views of the group that she's involved in people have praised tend to be very conservative on abortion tend to hold a pro life you that opposes abortion rights. And we also know that Judge Barrett has said in public appearances, speeches in her comments before the Senate Judiciary Committee that she believes that the job of a justice is Tio uphold president and to follow the holdings of the court. So we're in a little bit of a bind here because on the one hand we have strong indications that her personal views are almost certainly pro life that she is a critic of Roe versus Wade. But on the other hand, she has maintained that the job of a judge is Tio put aside their own personal views and follow the law wherever it takes them. Here's another clip from the debate, and this will be the longest clip that we used today. This is this is almost two minutes, and I think it's on a question that Really hasn't been discussed that much in the media around this campaign, and maybe because it's such a perennial issue, and everybody already knows where there's They stand on it. Maybe, but it's abortion rights. And here's Pence explicitly on the issue of abortion rights, and then we'll hear Senator House's response and this also gets into Court packing and the Amy Cockney Barrett nomination. So the starts with Mike Pence. I couldn't be more proud to service vice president to president who stands without apology for the sanctity of human life. I'm for life. I don't apologize for it. And this is another one of those cases where the such a dramatic contrast Joe Biden and Kamala Harris support taxpayer funding of abortion all the way up to the moment of birth, late term abortion. They want to increase funding to Planned Parenthood of America. For our part. I would never presume how judge any Cockney Barrett would rule on the Supreme Court. Of the United States, but Will continue to stand strong for the right to life. First of all, Joe Biden and I are both people of faith. And it's insulting to suggest That we would knock anyone for their faith..

Amy Cockney Barrett Cockney Barrett Senator Dianne Feinstein president Amy Cockney Supreme Court professor Senate Judiciary Committee vice president Senator Emma Green Catholic Knights of Columbus United States Kamala Harris Joe Biden Mike Pence court of Appeals Siri Columbus
"emma green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:15 min | 2 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We begin today with airlines, their CEOs and union leaders are begging Congress for an extension to the $25 billion industry bailout. That was part of the cares. Act. Travel demand isn't returning fast enough. And now the industry is warning of a massive wave of layoffs if lawmakers don't extend funding before October, 1st But Congress is fighting and preoccupied. So where does that leave the airlines and their employees, marketplaces and Euler reports, according to the trade group Airlines for America, Passenger Volume is off about 65% from a year ago and airlines air collectively burning through $5 billion each month. CEO Nick Calio says airlines are asking for six more months of federal help because hopefully by then we will be over the hump. And we will start to have a pickup and travel by next spring the conditions of the previous bailout protected workers until October. 1st Kallio warns that up to 100,000 airline employees could soon join the ranks of the unemployed. And Robert W. Man, former airline executive and industry consultant, says a second bailout would help the U. S economy recover faster when the pandemic wanes. If the industry were to fall into disrepair if it were Tio fall into destructive Restructuring during the pandemic. The question would be what would you have around Tio help you around on the other side, when exactly we get to the other side of the pandemic That's still murky. And Veronique Rouge at George Mason University, says another $25 billion is not going to solve the problem. This is just postponing the inevitable as long as that demand is in the back up. This is just basically a bandaid patch. She says bankruptcy would be the best option. Airlines have shown that they can emerge from restructuring healthier and she says that means troubled airlines don't pose a major risk to the economy at large. I made you ler for marketplace on Wall Street today. Once again. Federal Reserve officials said that without more fiscal relief from Congress, the economy will continue to decline. Once again, Investors got briefly Concerned We'll have the details when we do the numbers as families endure the new school year remotely or in person. Lots of parents are questioning whether the traditional school system is safe for their kids during the pandemic. And whether it's actually working for their kids in the long run. Emma Green is a staff writer for the Atlantic who recently wrote about parents who are pivoting to home schooling. Welcome, Emma. Thanks so much for having me on so before the pandemic, let's get a little level set. How many students were home schooled officially in the United States. So we're looking at roughly 3% of the American population. And often the scholars who look at the home school world divided up into these two camps of people who are religious, Christian, mostly, and people who are kind of hippies. But as we've seen with the pandemic that is expanding rapidly, and do we have any indication? Are there any numbers about how many parents are either considering or shifting to home schooling now? You know, we don't have that data yet. And I think the reason is that we are still very much in the thick of it with trying Teo get a handle on what's happening educationally around the country. But I can tell you anecdotally from having made a bunch of calls to parents who are trying it and also to home schoolers who have been getting enquiries. There's just a flood of interest from parents of all kinds, saying I don't think this is the way for us. I don't think I can stand wth Ian certainty of not knowing whether my kid is going to be home with us after going to in person school if there's an outbreak, So we see from some of these anecdotal pieces of evidence that there are a lot of families who otherwise would never have considered home schooling who are now trying it. There's been a lot of conversation about the infrastructure that is necessary to pull this off like a lot of students just don't have Internet access at home. And so we should clarify that this is Not an option for every student, and I wonder what other infrastructure Exists. What do you need if you suddenly want to start homeschooling? So one thing I heard a lot from the home school families that I talked to who had been homeschooling prior to cover 19 was a kind of resistance to the narrative that home schooling requires a lot of money or a lot of resource is many of them. Talked about your public library card being your ultimate ticket to home schooling. But I think you're absolutely right to point out that there are built in inequities here for kids whose parents worked full time where who are sort of balancing work out of the house during the covert pandemic? It's just impossible to expect those parents to simultaneously homeschool their kids. It's also impossible to expect those parents to watch over their kid's shoulders as they do zum school and distant school for traditional Cooling system. So I think the takeaway here is that in equities are affecting kids on both sides of the tech er, those who are exiting the traditional schooling system and those who are staying in As a deer reporting. How much do you think we're going to continue to see, though the landscape of schooling overall change? Oh, I think that this is just an extraordinary moment. And I think that because there's no and in safer the pandemic, it's really not clear that any point during the 2020 2021 school year There's going to be a reprieve are returned to normal. And what I'm interested in as a reporter is seeing over the course of this year into the next year and the year after that, whether the pandemic represents an inflection point for Ah Hole, a tech in a new suite of parents and families, her home schooling who probably would not have if they never had experienced the.

Congress Emma Green CEO Nick Calio Federal Reserve United States Veronique Rouge George Mason University America Ah Hole Teo Robert W. Man reporter U. S Ian staff writer executive consultant
"emma green" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

11:31 min | 2 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Has absolutely not worked for swinging some segment of the Jewish population and to support his administration. In fact I would say the opposite I have seen activism from Jews not just really progressive Jews but really all all across the spectrum of people who feel compelled to go out to protest to write open letters to their newspapers to say trump's rhetoric on on emigrants and on the stranger on the other really. Don't sit well with us. They alienate Jews in a fundamental way. And I think when it comes down to Jewish Jewish voters and potentially to other minority religious groups in America. The question is less about how many people is the current administration. Ain't GONNA swing to their column. It's what kinds of donors are they able to court. What kinds of influence are they able to capture in terms of the people writing op eds and support and also who are the other people who are watching what they're saying so for example on trump's Israel policy? I would argue that. He is making as much of a pitch to Evangelical Christians as he is to American Jews. Democrats support for other religious groups specifically support for Muslims. Do you I think that also has an impact or there's a worry that that some Democrats have that that has an impact on the way White Christians view the Democratic Party. He you know. I can't recall single conversation I've had with a democratic politician or operative or strategist or commentator. Who has considered taking a softer approach to support for the American Muslim community at a fear that they'll alienate white Christian voters are Republican voters. Because I do think that the Democrats see that as a kind of baseline issue that trump's policies ellis. He's on people coming from majority. Muslim countries was out of bounds that his rhetoric on Muslims and Islam hating US hating America has has been out of bounds and. I don't think that they see that as negotiable. I do wonder what kind of priority those issues we'll take especially as we move into this general cycle. How much of that rhetoric you'll see centered in what the Democrats say about who they are and what the country should be you know in a funny way from the beginning of the trump administration when an Islamaphobia and all of these policies having to do with Muslims were so so much a center of the conversation and such a part of the fear that Muslims and others had about what trump would bring? That's actually kind of decelerated a-rated in the past two and a half years and as we've been watching these early primary debates I haven't heard a whole lot of messaging that specifically designed designed to say. Hey American Muslims. We're with you and other Democrats who also want to support you. You should know that we're the party. That's going to stand up for those religious minorities. I'm agreeing thank you so much for coming and talking with me about this. I really appreciate you having me on. Emma Green is a staff writer at the Atlantic magazine covering politics policy and religion when it comes to the battle for the Democratic nomination. Iowa is getting the lion's unsure of media attention which makes sense since it kicks off primary season voting on February third but Iowa and New Hampshire which votes a week later. A racial leap monolithic about ninety percent of the electorate is white. It's not until February twenty-second when Nevada holds its caucus and then February twenty ninth. When South Carolina holds its primary that the electric gets more diverse in two thousand sixteen? Black voters made up more than sixty percent of the democratic electorate in South Carolina and reaching black voters in that state often means visiting black churches and doing outreach. To their congregations I sat down with Joe Darby. The senior pastor of Nichols Chapel Ame church in Charleston Charleston to discuss the role that religion plays in the Democratic primary in his State. African American voters of faith tend to be conservative on some things. Bud Eh progressive on earth is that goes back to the civil rights movement. I think I think that contrast with fact that the Republican Party has done zero to attract African American voters except for some shameless pandering by handful of folk who consider themselves to be the Christian right but who are neither Christian right for most black voters voters faith those will. There is really no choice between the parties. Do you feel as if Democrats have taken that vote for granted in the past and if so do you feel as they are doing so again. This year they've done in the past there have been flashes of light During the Obama Obama campaign camping's they worked there. African American community wonderfully They were in tune they were visible. They made the appeal Democratic Party sometimes gets that wrong and as seeing that happened in South Carolina. Where you don't see anybody you don't hear from anybody? They don't do the boots on the ground things and then two weeks before the election. They'll do Poli and then start making Friday call saying help us get the people out and I would hope they don't do that the stat. I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about your faith and how that guides you as you think about politics well well. I'm born and bred. In the African Methodist Episcopal Church our Church has a legacy of social advocacy is probably one of the few denominations that came into being not because of the theological doctrinal difference but as a protest against racism. In seventeen eighty seven win black worshippers will cool from these. At Saint George's Methodist Methodist Church in Philadelphia and walked out and established mother Bethel Ame Church. So that's the part of what shapes me Very much a product of the eighty s theological legal and Jim Cologne and some contemporary theologians were shaping Liberation Theology so I very much believe that God most really identifies with his present with the oppressed and that we ought to be opera notice insistence keepers that we ought to fight for freedom justice as the product of an African. The American church is starkly African American Church That's the part of the DNA of the church Doing the sixties that was a clergyman movement at the Fug good reason not only divine intervention but because clergy were paid by black folk and so they weren't fighting for standing up for What was right so all of that is a piece of me? I'm fourth generation. How often does the issue of politics come up with your congregants? Says he said you've you've got folks now running for president coming into the church. So how do you balance those two things. Well politics at Elise especially in the age of trump. So I avoid so. That discussion comes up if candidates do come to visit. I've got a pretty standard rule. You don't do a drive by. You'd have to come in time for worship you stay through the worship service when we acknowledge other visitors. We will acknowledge you give you about five minutes to say you're a space say you'll get and and you can hang around and greet people have to. Churches will. So what do you see going on in South Carolina right now in terms terms of how these candidates are. I don't know how they're shaping up holding his own quite nicely. I'm still a lion share. The African American vote I think that's owing not only to the fact that he was vice president to President Obama but I think it's because he has as long deep ties in South Carolina. He's a known quantity and he seen as by Lada folk as the best chance to to defeat Donald Trump and that surprises the a lot of people do care about the policies and things that are being put forth by the candidates you gotta fill billion formed electorate but the main thing that people talk about is we got to get donald trump out of the White House and so it's almost as if the the houses on fire at nationally and be nice to talk about decorating the house. And you'RE GONNA put into the House but I you got put out the fire. And a lot of folksy Jill Joe Biden as a person to put out the fire but he has some solid support. I think Kamala Harris has some solid support even though it is nice showing in the polls but she's very well-thought of that year as well. There's another candidate who gets a lot of at least national media attention that's people to judge and the big question mark over him right now is whether or not he will be able to expand support within the African American community right now. He doesn't have much if any support report. How do you see him playing in South Carolina and with your with you with your congregation? I think is going to be the interesting to see how he does in South Carolina On the one hand he has a compelling message and he probably does a better job of framing his faith faith than any other candidate actually that comes against the backdrop of the fact that he's a mayor of a small town that a lot of focus leery of that That he's got a spotty record the small town when it comes to being assertive in progressive on issues of race. Even those Marshall Plan looks good and the gorilla in the room quite frankly is you know the LGBT issue a lot of black voters still a conservative about that. Some of them will not articulate but they'll articulated at the polls. Yeah so that. That's still when we talk about Buddha judge in his challenges being gay is you think one one of the bigger hurdles for him is a bigger hurdle but it it would be a hurdle for some folks you know. It's sad to say but but that's a reality. I've seen it after efforts with some of my colleagues said we still have a ways to go in making progress. How important do you think it is for for Democrats to be able to have a message about their faith or about religion as a way to hugh connect with other voters? Who are voters of faith? I think is critically important and I think the Democratic Party needs to do a little bit better job travel that the party is big but faith is a piece of that tent. And if you don't reach out to those voters if you don't identify if I were those voters in sometimes it's hard to energize those voters. So you know. I think the president needs to do that The Republican Party. I don't know what they're doing do it now. Because what they're practicing isn't exactly faith but they mobilize quite evangelical and I think democratic probably should be just as aggressive progressive in mobilizing people of faith and not downplay that Reverend Darby. I really appreciate you taking the time and talking with me Glit-.

"emma green" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

09:52 min | 2 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It's politics with Amy Walter from takeaway. The saying goes. It's not polite to talk about politics or religion so for the rest of the episode. You're going to hear about both while we have a clear division in this country between Church and state the way we vote is very much linked to our religious identity. Recent study from Pew Research found that whites who identify as Christians represent about two-thirds of all Republicans meanwhile Americans unaffiliated with any religion and racial minorities who identify as Christians. Now each make up a bigger share of the Democratic Coalition. But to me it feels like the conversation surrounding religious voters namely Christians has felt one dimensional evangelical will support trump. No matter what or Black Christian voters will turn out for for Democrats and high numbers no matter what now well there's some truth to those generalizations. It's important to understand that religious. Voters are not a monolith. I wanted understand Dan though how we got to this point and how people of faith are balancing their religious beliefs with the messy realities of politics there are thousands of religions and fitting them. All into one episode is an impossible task. So for this episode. We're going to focus on some aspects of Christianity. A number of the two thousand twenty Democratic candidates are using MM faith as a way to contrast themselves with the policies of the trump administration and for a party that associates itself with Christianity. To say that it is okay to suggest ask God would smile on the division of families at the hands of federal agents that God would condone putting children in cages has lost all claim to ever ever use religious language. My Mom taught Sunday school and she taught me she taught me love your neighbor. No exception and never let someone pull you so low that you hate them. So I'm not GonNa let Donald Trump comport my soul. What is for me is the importance of the lessons? We learned and when we remember our values when we remember our faith still we know the president trump has a deep well of support among White Evangelical voters so those unrelenting assault against of faith take care of the People God put into your life have a a great life and love your country and love you God in America. We don't worship government we worship God God this even though. He's demonstrated a lack of familiarity with the Bible. Two Corinthians right two corinthians three seventeen gene. That's the whole ballgame and many evangelicals Chafe at his coarse language especially his taking the Lord's name in vain but should we assume evangelical stick with trump and two thousand twenty and if Democrats have a chance to win over Christian or White Evangelical Christian voters. Do they need to look at what they got wrong. In two thousand sixteen helping us dig into all of this. Is Emma Green Staff writer at the Atlantic magazine covering politics policy and religion. I started by asking Emma about how we got to this point where whites who identify as Christian represent two thirds of all Republicans but just a quarter of Democrats. It's perhaps the sharpest example of this sorting that we've been seeing across political partisan lines for years where essentially the two parties no longer just have policy differences differences on taxes or the size of government. They essentially represent two different world views. And they they have self consciously played into messages around those worldviews playing up moral issues cultural issues issues that have typically been in that religious fear and so what we've seen is the self sorting where people who identify as Christians particularly from conservative theological background find themselves identifying in this deep visceral identity way with Republican Party and on the Democratic side. Did you know. Obviously there's a long history of Christianity and Christian voters and religious voters. Being a big part of the Democratic Base Black Christians for example people are a huge component of the democratic base. But you also have a large portion of the growing segment of Americans Akins who are not religious not religiously affiliated saying. I can't be in that Republican Party. I guess I'm a Democrat. The things that they're saying about separation Asian of church and state about abortion about gay rights. Those resonate with me intuitively again on that level of deep identity. Well that's what I really want to get to. Who is that question of the difference between identity and faith you know? I think it depends on the kind of voter. You're talking about so in my reporting I encountered a lot of people who say that. For example abortion is their single issue they are very strong pro-life odors for example hampel and for them. Everything else has to take a backseat to what they see. As the biggest political crisis of our time they're going to vote based on promises around judges promises around the way that federal and state legislation will be handled. So for those voters. You could say as Catholics. I even Jellicoe. Whoever they may be that set of teachings that set of beliefs really dictates how they're acting politically but I think for a large segment of Americans these other ambient signals about what it means to be Republican and what it means to be a Democrat and how that fits with how they imagine themselves as a person of faith are really really powerful signaling devices and I think we've gotten to a place where the Democrats the Republicans more or less have to face off over these who Gulf worldviews? There's a huge gulf between them. Where are people who are faith Kinda see themselves fitting in with generally the suite of Republican views and others who may be having more progressive faith or or no faith at all see themselves more cleanly aligning with a democratic worldview? Can you help us understand the ways in which Democrats Democrats are trying to bridge. This religion gap e-e-e-e-no people in my world who think a lot about the role of religion and politics. They look at this moment from the two thousand sixteen election and many of the decisions that the Clinton campaign made around religious voters and they see that as the fatal decision end of her campaign. She's a person who comes from a pretty deep end. Apparently quite sincere religious background as a methodist. She is to keep a Bible on her kitchen table during the impeachment years of her husband's administration and yet she totally played down this aspect of herself and did not build up. The infrastructure needed to reach voters on these kinds of religious lines. And I do think that at least some of the primary contenders now in the Democratic primary have taken a lesson from Hillary Clinton's mistakes and we see this in a couple of different ways the most powerful is in rhetoric. You have candidates from Cory Booker to Elizabeth Warren to Buddha judge. Quoting from the Bible and talking about their favorite passages and how they see these messages aligning with their view of how politics should work and we also see it on an infrastructure level. All you more seriously trained to engage with religious voters who are going to be important in those early primary states Iowa New Hampshire especially South Carolina Mina but also keeping an eye towards that general election knowing that when we get out of this bloody war over the Democratic nominee. In who it's going to be there there is going to be a really big task at hand for the Democratic nominee which is trying to reach those voters in the states that flipped and went to trump in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton thought she had in the bag would do Democrats really much good to try to reach out to voters who seemed to have absolutely no interest in in leaving the party or leaving trump people who are all in for trump in his base super-conservative white evangelicals are not going to be smart targets for the Democrats Kratz in two thousand twenty. But that leaves a whole lot of other religious people in the United States for them to go after you have white mainline Protestants who dominate the religious cultures of states. Like Michigan and Ohio and Wisconsin and these states that also not coincidentally and up on our list of potential attentional swings. That could be really really important for that general election. You have Catholics. Not Just White Catholics about Latino Catholics and the question is will these voters who have often been split across. The party's be inspired and mobilized to try to join along with that Democratic candidates seeing somebody who they can resonate eight with even though for example. Black Christians vote for Democrats in the high percentage ninety percent. Something like that. It's really important to have those voters feel like they wanna go to the poll on election day that they don't continue to be cynical and feel that they've been left behind by the Democratic Party Party so the president has reaffirmed support for Israel since before he was elected he's moved the US embassy. He's supportive. Netanyahu has that helped him with Jewish voters in terms of raw vote. Percentages trump's rhetoric.

"emma green" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

26:29 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"I think it's hard to find any paying for yeah but you have to do a lot of free things to be all done that and you know you have to volunteer department mean it's a lot of people that are more interested in the gear than they are with the craft realize it to who we know realized that by spending all this time trying to get a camera when they could indeed be focusing on something right a little bit more pertinent right let's normal right because guys like things and Gizmos and gadgets and then so of course most of us respond that way yeah and it's Okay I love gadgets but toys sometimes me up to the toys go fast the toy yeah well so what I want to ask today is after you've read a script cinematographer how do you craft or how do you go about crafting kind of the visual identity of a movie and what I WanNa do I wanna take three movies that you've shot today okay talk about them in four things for categories that we've come up with so the movies that I want to talk about today are three hundred super eight and then Batman versus superman three kind of drastically different movies and I think you more than really a lot of people that I know of shot wide range of big Hollywood blockbusters and in those movies too I wanna talk about how from the script you approach the camera lenses filtration I leading inspirations or how you decided you were going to let this movie coloring of course a huge aspect of the film and then if there's any fong secret sauce it's drizly up anything maybe we aren't mentioning here that was special that you approach do with where you went about that I'll try so when you read a script first of all kind of more broadly how do you approach kind of deciding hey I'm gonNA craft style out of this it's going to start to look like this is their says that you go through there used to be because I think when I read a script of course you're reading it and you're dreaming you know you're stopping every couple of sentences and then can I see the scene what look like right now did it for a long time but but recently actually have done the opposite I've just tried to get through upped weeks the script because he would read and try to yeah junior senior managing but now this is no secret and people do this but just it all the way through try not to see it actually just get the story because everything comes from that like let's say I have I saw photo when I was inspired today Azeem something and then I read script and trying to fit that picture in my head forcing that into the script that's completely wrong right because the story should should inspire what it looks like and also don't forget the director it's really his baby more than yours so I try not to let's say how his ideas and I believe the opposite then what so gotta kill your babies yeah and like look appeal look books I'm really jealous because people a lot of time into those but I've really a blank slate which is really hard disciplined by the way go through the script and just try to be a robot and just read it for what it is theorized upbeats are in the process that before like yeah no soul contradictory right because sold off the sole information right because now is just a blueprint with the screenwriter is trying to say because that's Never GonNa Change right you can change the feel of it but like you know whatever the story is a guy does this he has this job he does this this thing happens should just get that in your heart so and also because I really wanted to hear more and more I want to hear the directors take on obviously yeah so now that's what I do and I it's weird because when I have all subsequent meetings with the director I want to hear what the victor has to say so almost two fault where I'm asking all these questions and he's like yeah this is your job look for what do you think I hold back because I'll just keep talking and seemed like I have no idea is right but I really want his get it out first because it's his thing so that's what I've been doing more so lately but after I get an idea after days hours even get into his head then I start to draw into like all the things that have hidden away that I like can I work you know the thing they saw cooler maybe there's a way to work this in it make sense and I and by the way I'm always you know touching base with him about these ideas I would never I don't think anyone would try something that he has no idea where let's say was shopping the set and he comes in the crazy nutty going raise exactly yeah never knew value this right so you really have to go through his overall far-reaching us then I also go to the scenes and say have talked what are the Moods Change Eli and even you know I had a recent project where is it how stylists what this and I know your style and I feel like I need to hold back going to crazy my right on this Berkeley yeah kind of films thanks yeah I don't really like Oh you hired me a little something the DP two I was just a vessel executing what they wanted yeah that's fine amy put up a movie that I did he goes this is all cool then this part all this I don't like this I don't mind at all okay and I know that you have to go get what he's saying like that's too self-conscious that's not his style right and then is very very productive and informative because I go I was right neither bag don't go nuts on it it's more about the writing on the acting more than the crazy camerawork but within that you doing camera work and you do it embel- little emphasizing his stuff but he might not notice because like I said he's working with the actors so I mean I see it's more Moody's I'm making the lighting slightly more moody but he would never see that he's too busy yeah but when he sees on the waters film allowed civilian working I'll have to describe it or smutny thing because you're on the same page with Yapping order know what he's Kinda yeah for yeah but that's also feeling on the set I don't need to have lighting setup or equipment special things ordered you to make that kind of adjustment set right just settling there's no special lighter piece of equipment that does that that's just aesthetically you know I call accounting seasoning when you cook the broad strokes of the protein sauce or whatever but but when you're spices in your soul and your pets right at the end that you're not sure gunky now this is good how spicy Omega yes that's that's at the APP and those to me are light little angel height of the Lens or how much fill direction of the phillies Richard Keelan things that's why the African would like this whole giant stadium it's obvious lights come to the windows Blah Blah Blah but I don't worry about that too too much when close up that's where you know talk I appreciate you calling the stadium Mrs we record this in the back room of the aperture office it's basically a utility closet here but I appreciate you calling it a stadium for it does get account these lights are GonNa come into play on your later questions hold onto that thought okay so so you re script try not to impose your vision in too much right really listen to kind of beats the story here the actual reputation of the director and then thank you for the actual interpretation for director this is when you're starting to try to build or trying to execute via the APP right nausea because not just my things but also don't forget the product designers success on this right yeah he's there he's there way before the DP ever is he's designing satin concept drawings so he doesn't set in windows of the uh-huh you see the light pounding through the air you've got to execute that yeah by the way is on my idea you know Alec welts people productions are enough credit because without him nothing in front of the Lens right yeah so often the color Palette too so I don't think DVD's Wrexham's honours enough credit costumes which again are huge aesthetic in the colors and makeup and hair all that is super important yeah so let's take it kind of movie movies starting off with three hundred what is the inspiration that you got told or what is the or you can tell me to this is the movie that you went in your really like I've got this picture of inspired the museum well that did have that test film right so they're kind of gave the vibe for camera motion whatnot in the Palate let's talk about the what's the best film he did he I don't pay for it but he did a one minute seen some guy being attacked by persons and slaughtering people and all with that the speed ramping everything is blended animated background CG background and he had done I need no he'd done it he tacked on some other projects crew and the money I guess and so that was the beginning of the set at least for the motion you know again until you the whole violence that was something we developed together but the the main thing is the source material which was the graphic novel like I said is all watercolors and no not at all you can't do that we did our job but if you look at that was not like the third movie coverage is really boring right it's always once shape you know they're all kind of crazy shapes they deal with time and space referencing cool Tutti things but so you had the in a reference material and you also had the test Oh yes you did you have a color Palette to work with their concept paintings that were done by the art department and I think the goal is just to make everything look surreal and and painter Louis so we had to do a lot of tests so we would do tests film them and I was trying to think what's the best way to light it so that when it's affected later that'll still cool there's a lot of testing so turn out what ended up being the best was this kind of soft overall top line almost everything yeah so so so all the stages I just had the build a soft overhead lighting on all of them so that was the basic lighting and where did the idea come from for that you just just that soft overhead lighting looks it's kind of intense and dramatic yeah even if you put a lot of Greens reminded of always love top light on the first person I mean even just that let's say uh-huh he's in his office right it's done right so cool but I also realize that with all these three sixties Zach likes to do and everything you know it's up out of the way right first of all that an excessively no yes no lights on Emma's green screens usually when three sides uh-huh for depending on what we're doing and the central raise like I think four or five feet too so the green screen yo disappears behind the set is not like the corner Yes yes not a corner of a green screen right so you have to deal with that but the we detest and every scenario to make sure his top saw kind of work as as the base kind of thing not all the senior predominantly there but it was always there but made sense right because in.

one minute five feet
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Steve Inskeep. About one in five Americans has little or no contact with people of a different religion about one in five Americans. Also reports scant contact with people of a different race and large minorities rarely encounter someone with different political beliefs. That's according to a new study by the public religion research institute, and the Atlantic magazine Atlantic writer emigrant talked with Rachel Martin about Americans who live in a bubble. Can you tell us? Why why did you do this poll? I mean, what was the going in theory or question your tiny answer? One of the big questions that has really been at the four of American politics, particularly in the last couple of years is whether Americans actually think diversity is good. Whether they want to live in a pluralistic democracy where people can be themselves, but they can also live side by side with neighbors who aren't the same as them. This was a huge. Team in the twenty sixteen election, and it's just gotten more and more forefront and politics since then so we wanted to actually understand people's lives. What is it like for them to encounter people have difference? Do they like it? Do they hate it? Do they feel comfortable with their children marrying into families that are very different than their own? So let's talk about the difference between living side-by-side like running into someone at a convenience store at the dry cleaners and really incorporating people who are different than you into your actual lives because those those are different experiences. Right. They are and we know from social science that the depth of relationships with people of difference really really matters in how that influences your view of politics or maybe your openness to thinking differently about the world this survey, it didn't measure exactly the depth of relationships we use the word encounter. So that could be anything from that chance encounter. I'm public transportation to the grocery. Star. But we did have a few measures that suggest a deep ambivalence across a lot of different categories that people have with incorporating people have difference into their lives the stat that stuck out to me. Most was that forty five percent of Democrats said they would be unhappy with their child marrying someone from a different political party. And thirty five percent of Republicans said the same thing, this is a huge portion of people who really feel strongly that their kids shouldn't marry someone with a different political ideology. So what's behind that? Because you could make the argument that your political identity is an extension of of how you see the world, right? And I suppose if a parent is of one political stripe and their child goes a different direction or marry someone of a different political identity that that would be some kind of repudiation of their view on the world. That's exactly right. And to make sense of these findings. I called up a scholar who I really admire Liliana Mason. Who's at the university of Maryland. She said if you think that were interesting to me, the first is that it's not just people's beliefs that are being grouped around their partisan affiliation. It's also dare taste in television shows and cars and what they buy. So in other words, partisan identity has become more than just about politics. It's about culturally density in a sense of who you are. And the more that that all gets wrapped together the harder. It is to see someone else who comes from another perspective or party, very clearly, and the other thing that she brought up is to point out that it's hard to be in community with people who are different than you. There's something to be said for just avoiding being in those situations of conflict, it might not be good for our democracy in the long run, but it isn't understandable motivation. So when does it cross the line, I mean when does wanting sameness or homogeneity in your immediate community start to run at odds with what America was founded on as this pluralistic, multicultural society. It seems clear that some forms of segregation are just ugly, just plain ugly. And that of course is most obvious when it comes to racial segregation. We know not just that the long history of America has created explicit forms of segregation. But also that people make choices all the time about where they're going to live wanting a certain type of lot in the suburbs on a certain type of good school all of these decisions can add up to defacto racial segregation. And the other thing I would say is that we're in this time when there's a really big question around partisan, Maxine as well as we were talking about before these cultural identities that have come to be attached to democrat versus Republican have made it ever more difficult for people of different. Ideologies to sit down have a conversation and understand where another person is coming from Emma, green writes for the Atlantic. Her most recent piece is titled these are the Americans who live in bubbles, Emma. Thanks so much for.

Emma Steve Inskeep America NPR David green Atlantic magazine Rachel Martin university of Maryland Liliana Mason Maxine writer thirty five percent forty five percent
"emma green" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

09:44 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Back to the daily dive weekend edition. Let's get back into our conversation with emigre LS from wired about the blind YouTube community. Youtube has expanded its accessibility for obviously for creators. But also for consumers as well. So blind users could are able to access a little bit better. So they do different things like screen readers and other things that are available to them. So they can be on the platform a little more naturally as far as I know decent. Totally blind youtuber was a from the Edison does film review. And he said that when he first got on the platform that he couldn't get it even a little bit. And since then they've added keyboard shortcuts and screen readers, but screen readers are like a separate software. But with the web developers have to do is fill in the field. So something is being right allowed were the screen mouse over that area. And so they've really improved people's ability to use the park for which if you come at it from a perspective that isn't necessarily cited is much audio as it is visual one of my favorite ones. The blind. Film critic talking about how you know, he's listening to movies experiencing the movies. I just didn't connect with it. Because I'm lost in the shuffle of all this nonsense audio and how is this sticks in my head was watching something about a blind lady talking about her favorite show. And it was everybody loves Raymond, and they asked well, how can you enjoy it? You can't see it. You know, she saw few seasons before she went blind. So she remembers what the characters look like. So just hearing them and how they yell and laugh and all that stuff and operate. She can remember it. So it's almost as if she is watching it. It's the same thing for I would assume for the blind. Film critic, you know, watching these movies. He's just going to tell you my experience, and how well I can follow the story with sound one of the features that some of these creators are advocating, but you've added or at least make a little bit easier to do is something called audio description, and they already have this for a number of movies and other platforms is when you have a voice actor supply additional narration for people who aren't cited. And so if you had a team that was the camera panning over. A mountain, right. There'd be someone in this audio description telling people what those mountains, look like things like that are really really helpful in detour already having a pretty full experience with audio and it's possible to make it better for them, and on YouTube, all that would really take is adding the ability to upload and additional audio track that you can toggle on and off in the same way that you toggle captions on off. Is a big advocate for that has spoken to YouTube developers about it. Emma, green Ellis writer at wired. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. Was supposed to help these love stories about flying and being up in the air. It's such a crazy time to be in an airplane packed in with tons of people. You never know what's going to happen. It's always unexpected. The thing right now is it flight attendants now have to start hustling for tips. There's a new policy at frontier airlines that lets passengers tip the flight attendants whenever they use their cars to pay for drinks or snacks. And a lot of cases. They also they're also selling credit card. Subscriptions right there on the plane something to get some air miles for yourself reaction is mixed with a lot of people welcoming the extra income in. These tips other flight attendants are saying that this new sales job bogs them down. When passenger safety is really the main concern. My producer maranda joins me to break. This whole thing down. We started off by talking about this new policy at frontier. Airlines starting January first frontier airlines began allowing like you said individual flight attendants to collect tips from passengers and. It's just like when you go to Starbucks or you take a ride in the taxi the buttons pop up with the options, you know, ten percent. Fifteen percent twenty percent or no tip at all. American. United delta spirit frontier and others have flight attendants making in-cabin pitches for the credit cards like you said, and that's tied to their frequent flyer. Programmes the commission rates are different for everyone. But typically it's about fifty dollars per approved application American says that while it's voluntary to make the sales pitch in flight. Most of them do want to participate because those commissions add up, honestly, these credit card deals might be really good, especially if you do tend to fly a lot you do wanna save those miles those things are beneficial. So they're kind of worthwhile pitches or the passenger and for the flight attendant who could be making some of these bonuses. But with regards to the tipping front frontier is one of these ultra low cost airlines where you basically need to pay for everything they charge for sodas and snacks you need to pay for. Baggage fees overhead compartments, I think I read that you have to pay the tickets are cheaper. But they charge you for everything else that way, they start this thing. Whereas you said you buy a soda you buy a drink. It's going to say have the bring up that tip line and ten fifteen and twenty percent increments. And it reminds me of the story that we did on the podcast here about tipping etiquette with all these ipad tipping systems. Now, you have almost tip right in front of the barista or the store clerk, right? They're kind of creates an embarrassing thing. Like, maybe I don't want to tip you. So no tiff with regards to the flight attendants say that it's kind of half-and-half some of them like it because they get a little extra money. Other people say devalue their work there, primarily there for safety and the snacks and giving you all your drinks and everything is a secondary part of the job. But that's the thing that we see mostly as passengers that's the visible part of the job is we don't see them when they're attending to a life threatening emergency. Maybe in the back of the plane that we're not supposed to know. About the we see them as sort of like servers up in the air waiters and says, that's what I see one flight attendant in particular. Her name is Jennifer Saleh says that half of the workforce likes the tip because they rely on that extra income and the other half is offended. They're humiliated by because they weren't trained to sell drinks. And a lot of these airlines are now even incentivizing them by making them have quotas to sell more alcoholic drinks, or what have you during the flight to up those increases? I mean as a flight attend you're going to have to start identifying the passengers like, okay, they're here to party. Yeah. Let me go try to sell them another because they save, you know, flights that are to Las Vegas, those people tend to tip better than overnight passengers who wanna sleep on their Red Eye Red Eye flight, you just want to close your eyes and not be bothered, basically. So where does the opportunity come to sell some of this stuff? One of the things that I did not know and Miranda you and I were talking to this before we started was how they get paid flight attendants their clock doesn't start until those cabin. Doors shut that's so weird. And that's why they say that it's frontier and made some of these other airlines are starting this tipping stuff because as a way to supplement that they work a lotta off clock hours. And this might be a way to help other people have said that this started three years ago, the general tipping thing when they were going through some nasty negotiations about pay increases for the flight attendants. And this was just a way to quiet them down. Maybe offer them a little more money without really giving into the negotiations. One thing to note is that this tipping program. Oscar has resulted in millions of dollars in tips since the inception three years ago. A lot of the major airlines have caught onto this. They still don't accept any tips. Some airlines say maybe accept tips if the customer is really insistent, but generally they have rules against tipping. But these literally fare cost ones frontier starting at maybe spirit, airlines and other ones might take notice and say it's working over there could work over here as well. Right. It's funny in all of this. You know, you have to start identifying what really would constitute A a. tip. Hey, are you helping me a lot more than some of these other passengers if I ring my bell, you know, how fast you get here. All that. There was a story recently. It was just so disgusting. But this lady of all people deserves a tip. It included an overweight passenger who was on an LA to Taipei flight. That's a long flight. She had to go and clean him after he went to the restroom. Make me tell this story now. Flight attendant for I'm going to call it. Eva EVA Air, and they are one of those airlines. They only employ e female cabin crews and this poor woman. She had a passenger who was confined to a wheelchair. And he told the flight attendants, he needed assistance to use the restroom. This was about two hours the flight one poor woman got tasked with helping this man use the bathroom, and so she had to remove his underwear which she felt was beyond the scope of her responsibilities. I would agree. Right. And so when she told him that she couldn't help him do this. He started screaming and threatened to just relieve himself on the floor. And then once his junk was exposed another colleague came in and brought up a blanket to kinda give him some privacy cover up, and he got angry slap the hand away. And said he didn't want is junk covered. He just wanted her to remove his underwear. So he could use the toilet. And as she was wearing three gloves to wipe his bottom. She says he was moaning and groaning. As if he was pleased by this. This is just horrible story. And it's indicative of some of the crap that flight attendants have to go through literally she didn't wanna do it, obviously. But the only reason why they gave in was we also can't have him staying in the bathroom for the remainder of the flight. Who knows what would happen to him in there? It's not safe. If something happens that's two hours into a really long flight. So I mean, you have to kind of do that thankfully, the union. The flight union is standing behind her. Yeah. I don't know if they're gonna sue the passenger. Thank you for any length. Oscar. Don't forget.

Youtube Oscar Starbucks Raymond United delta Eva EVA Air Jennifer Saleh producer Las Vegas Miranda LA wired Emma writer Taipei green Ellis twenty percent three years
"emma green" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

09:41 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Back to the daily dive weekend. Editions? Let's get back into our conversation with emigre Ellis from wired about the blind YouTube community. Youtube has expanded its accessibility for obviously for creators. But also for consumers as well. So blind users could are able to access a little bit better. So they do different things like screen readers and other things that are available to them. So they can be on the platform a little more naturally as far as I know decent told me blind youtuber was a guiding Tommy Edison film review, and he said that when he first got on the platform that he couldn't navigate it even a little bit. And since then they've added keyboard shortcuts and screen readers screen readers are like a separate software. But with the web developers have to do is still in field. So something is being right allowed for the screen mouse over that area. And so they've really improved people's ability to use the platform, which if you come at it from a perspective that isn't necessarily cited is much audio as it is visual. One of my favorite ones is the blind. Film critic talking about how you know. He's listening to movies experiencing the movies. And it's like, you know, I just didn't connect with it. Because I'm lost in the shuffle of all this nonsense audio and how is the this sticks in my head was watching something about a blind lady talking about her favorite show. And it was everybody loves Raymond. And they asked the question. Well, how can you enjoy it? You can't see it. You know, she saw few seasons before she went blind. So she remembers what the characters look like. So just hearing them and how they yell and laugh and all that stuff and operate. She can remember it. So it's almost as if she is watching it. And it's the same thing for I would assume for the blind. Film critic, you know, watching these movies. He's just going to tell you my experience, and how well I can follow the story with sound one of the features that some of these creators are advocating, but YouTube ad or at least makes a little bit easier to do is something called audio description, and very have this for a number of movies and other platforms is when you have a voice actor supply. Additional narration. For people who aren't cited. And so he had a team that was the camera panning over a mountain range, then there'd be someone in this audio description telling people what those mountains, look like things like that are really really helpful in were already having a pretty full experience with audio and it's possible to make it better for them, and on YouTube, all that would really take is adding the ability to upload and additional audio track that you can toggle on and off in the same way that you title captions on and off to the big advocate for that has spoken to YouTube developers about it Emma green Ellis writer at wired. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. It was always love stories about flying and being up in the air. It's such a crazy time to be in an airplane packed in with tons of people. You never know what's going to happen. It's always unexpected. The new thing right now. Is it flight attendants now have to start hustling for tips? There's a new policy at frontier airlines that lets passengers tip the flight attendants whenever they use their cars to pay for drinks or snacks. And a lot of cases. They also they're also selling credit card. Subscriptions right there on the plane something to get some air miles for yourself reaction is mixed with a lot of people welcoming the extra income in these tips. Other fight attendants are saying that this new sales job bogs them down. When passenger safety is really the main concern, my producer Miranda joins me to break. This whole thing down. We start off by talking about this new policy at frontier. Airlines starting January first frontier airlines began allowing like you said individual flight attendants to collect tips from passengers. It's just like when you go to Starbucks or you take a ride in the taxi the buttons pop up with the options, you know, ten percent. Fifteen percent twenty percent or no tip at all. American. United delta spirit frontier and others have flight attendants making in-cabin it just for the credit cards like you said in that's tied to their frequent flyer. Programmes the commission rates are different for everyone. But typically it's about fifty dollars per approved application American says that while it's voluntary to make the sales pitch in flight. Most of them do want to participate because those commissions add up, honestly, these credit card deals might be really good, especially if you do tend to fly a lot you do wanna save those miles those things are beneficial. So they're kind of worthwhile pitches for the passenger. And for the flight attendant who could be making some of these bonuses. But with regards to the tipping front frontier is one of these ultra low cost airlines where you basically need to pay for everything they charge for sodas and snacks you need to pay for. Your baggage fees overhead compartments, I think I read that you have to pay our the tickets are cheaper. But they charge you for everything else that way, they start this thing. Whereas you said you buy a soda you buy a drink. It's going to say have the bring up that tip line in ten fifteen twenty percent increments. And it reminds me of the story that we did on the podcast earlier about tipping etiquette with all these ipad tipping systems. Now, you have to almost tip right in front of the barista or the store clerk right there. And kinda creates an embarrassing thing. Like, maybe I don't want to tip you that much. So no tiff with regards to the flight attendants. They say that it's kinda half-and-half some of them like it because they get a little extra money. Other people say devalue their work there, primarily there for safety and the snacks and giving you all your drinks and everything is a secondary part of the job. But that's the thing that we see mostly as passengers that's the visible part of the job is we don't see them when they're attending to a life threatening emergency may be in the back of the plane that we're not supposed to know. No about so we see them as sort of like servers up in the air waiters. That's what I see one flight attendant in particular. Her name is Jennifer Saleh that half of the workforce likes the tip because they rely on that extra income and the other half is offended. They're humiliated by because they weren't trained to sell drinks. And a lot of these airlines are now even incentivizing them by making them have quotas to sell more alcoholic drinks or what have you during the flight up? Those increases as a flight attend. You're going to have to start identifying the passengers like, okay, they're here to party. Yeah. Let me go trying to sell them another because they save, you know, flights that are to Las Vegas those people tend to tip better than overnight passengers who wanna sleep on their you're on Red Eye flight. Flight you just want to close your eyes and not be bothered, basically. So where does the opportunity come to sell some of this stuff? One of the things that I did not know and Miranda you and I were talking to this before we started was how they get paid flight attendants their clock doesn't start until those cabin doors. Shut. That's so weird. And that's why they say that it's frontier and made some of these other airlines are starting this tipping stuff because as a way to supplement that they work a lot of off clock hours. And this might be a way to help other people have said that this started three years ago, the general tipping thing when they were going through some nasty negotiations about pay increases for the flight attendants. And this was just a way to white them down. Maybe offer them a little more money without really giving into the negotiations. One thing to note is that this tipping program. Oscar has resulted in millions of dollars in tips since the inception three years ago. A lot of the major airlines have caught onto this. They still don't accept any tips. Some airlines say maybe accept tips of the customers, really insist. But generally they have rules against tipping. But these ultra low fare cost ones frontier starting at maybe spirit airlines, and another one's might take notice and say if it's working over there could work over here as well. Right. It's funny in all of this of you know, you have to start identifying what really would constitute a tip. Hey, are you helping me a lot more than some of these other passengers if I ring my bell how fast you get here? There was a story recently. It was just so disgusting. But this lady of all people deserves a tip. It included an overweight passenger who was on an LA to Taipei flight. That's a long flight. She had to go and clean him after he went to the restroom to make me tell the story now. A flight attendant for I'm going to call it. Eva EVA Air, and they are one of those airlines, they only employ female cabin crews and this poor woman. She had a passenger who was confined to a wheelchair. And he told the flight attendants, he needed assistance to use the restroom. This was about two hours in the flight, one poor woman got tasked with helping this man use the bathroom, and so she had to remove his underwear which she felt was beyond the scope of her responsibilities. I would agree. Right. And so when she told him that she couldn't help him do this. He started screaming and threatened to relieve himself on the floor. And then once his junk was exposed another colleague came in and brought up a blanket to kinda give him some privacy cover up, and he got angry slap the hand away and said he didn't want his junk covered. He just wanted her to remove his underway. So he could use the toilet. And as she was wearing three gloves to wipe his bottom. She says he was moaning and groaning. As if he was pleased by this. This is just a horrible story. And it's indicative of some of the crap that flight attendants have to go through literally she didn't wanna do it, obviously. But the only reason why they gave in was we also can't have him staying in the bathroom for the remainder of the flight. Who knows what would happen to him in there? It's not safe. If something happens, it's two hours into a really long flight. So I mean, you have to kind of do that thankfully, the union. The flight union is standing behind her and. Yeah. I don't know if they're gonna sue the passenger. Thank you. Thanks.

Youtube Emma green Ellis Miranda Tommy Edison Starbucks Raymond United delta Eva EVA Air Jennifer Saleh producer LA Las Vegas Oscar Red Eye wired writer Taipei three years
"emma green" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

09:40 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on KTOK

"Back to the daily dive weekend edition. Let's get back into our conversation with emigre LS from wired about the blind YouTube community. Youtube has expanded its accessibility for obviously for creators. But also for consumers as well. So blind users could are able to access a little bit better. So they do different things like screen readers and other things that are available to them. So they can be on the platform a little more naturally as far as I know decent told me blind youtuber was a guiding Thomas Edison who does film review, and he said that when he first got on the platform that he couldn't navigate it even a little bit. And since then they've added keyboard shortcuts and screen readers screen readers are like a separate software, but with the weapons elders have to do is fill in field. So something is being right allowed were the screen mouse over that area. And so they've really improved people's ability to use the platform, which if you come at it from a perspective that isn't necessarily cited is much audio as it is one of my favorite ones is the blind. Phil. Critic hawking how you know. He's listening to movies experiencing the movies, and I just didn't connect with it. Because I'm lost in the shuffle of all this nonsense audio and how is the sticks in my head as watching something about a blind lady talking about her favorite show. And it was everybody loves Raymond. And they asked the question. Well, how can you enjoy it? You can't see it. You know, she saw few seasons before she went blind. So she remembers what the characters look like. So just hearing them and how they yell and laugh and stuff and operate. She can remember it. So it's almost as if she is watching it. It's the same thing for I would assume for the blind. Film critic, you know, watching these movies. He's just going to tell you my experience, and how well I can follow the story with sound one of the features that some of these creators are advocating, but YouTube ad or at least makes a little bit easier to do is something called audio description, and they already have this for a number of movies and other platforms is when you have a voice actor supply. Additional narration. For people who aren't cited. And so he had a team that was the camera panning over a mountain range, then there'd be someone in this audio description telling people what those mountains, look like things like that are really really helpful in already having a pretty full experience with audio and it's possible to make it better for them, and on YouTube, all that would really take is adding the ability to upload an additional audio track that you can toggle on and off in the same way that you'd huddle captions on James rats is a big advocate for that. And has spoken to you about it. Emma, green Ellis writer at wired. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. I always love stories about flying and being up in the air. It's such a crazy time to be in an airplane packed in with tons of people. You never know what's going to happen. It's always unexpected. The new thing right now is that flight attendants now have to start hustling for tips. There's a new policy at frontier airlines that lets passengers tip the flight attendants whenever they use their cars to pay for drinks or snacks. And a lot of cases. They also they're also selling credit card. Subscriptions right there on the plane something to get some air miles for yourself reaction is mixed with a lot of people welcoming the extra income in these tips. Other fight attendants are saying that this new sales job bogs them down. When passenger safety is really the main concern, my producer Miranda joins me to break. This whole thing down. We started off by talking about this new policy at frontier. Airlines starting January first frontier airlines began allowing like you said individual flight attendants to collect tips from passengers and it's. Just like when you go to Starbucks or you take a ride in the taxi the buttons pop up with the options, you know, ten percent. Fifteen percent twenty percent or no tip at all. American. United delta spirit frontier and others have flight attendants making in-cabin pitches for the credit cards like you said, and that's tied to their frequent flyer. Programmes the commission rates are different for everyone. But typically it's about fifty dollars per approved application American says that while it's voluntary to make the sales pitch in flight. Most of them do want to participate because those commissions add up, honestly, these credit card deals might be really good, especially if you do tend to fly a lot you do wanna save those miles those things are beneficial. So they're kind of worthwhile pitches for the passenger. And for the flight attendant who could be making some of these bonuses. But with regards to the tipping front frontier is one of these ultra low cost airlines where you basically need to pay for everything they charge for sodas and snacks you need to pay for. Baggage fees overhead compartments, I think I read that you have to the tickets are cheaper. But they charge you for everything else that way, they start this thing. Whereas you said you buy a soda you buy a drink. It's going to say have the bring up that tip line in ten fifteen and twenty percent increments. And it reminds me of the story that we did on the podcast really about tipping etiquette with all these ipad tipping systems. Now, you have to almost tip right in front of the barista or the store clerk right there. And it's kind of creates an embarrassing thing. Like, maybe I don't wanna tip, you know, tiff with regards to the flight attendants they say that it's kind of half and some of them like it because they get a little extra money. Other people say devalue their work there, primarily there for safety and the snacks and giving you all your drinks and everything is a secondary part of the job. But that's the thing that we see mostly as passengers that's the visible part of the job is we don't see them when they're attending a life threatening emergency. Maybe in the back of the plane that we're not supposed to know about. So we see them as sort of like servers up in the air. Waiters says that's what I see one flight attendant in particular. Her name is Jennifer Saleh says that half of the workforce likes the tip because they rely on that extra income and the other half is offended. They're humiliated by because they weren't trained to sell drinks. And a lot of these airlines are now even incentivizing them by making them have quotas to sell more alcoholic drinks, or what have you during the flight to up those increases? I mean as a flight attendant going to have to start identifying the passengers like, okay, they're here to party. Let me go try to sell them another because they save, you know, flights that are to Las Vegas those people tend to tip better than overnight passengers who wanna sleep on there. Right. You're on Red Eye flight, you just want to close your eyes and not be bothered, basically. So where does the opportunity come to sell some of this stuff? One of the things that I did not know and Miranda you and I were talking before we started was how they get paid flight attendants their clock doesn't start until those cabin doors. Shut. That's so weird. And that's why they say that it's frontier and made some of these other airlines are starting this tipping stuff because as a way to supplement that they work a lot of off clock hours. And this might be a way to help other people have said that this started three years ago, the general tipping thing when they were going through some nasty negotiations about pay increases for the flight attendants. And this was just a way to quiet them down. Maybe offer them a little more money without really giving into the negotiations. One thing to note is that this tipping program. Oscar has resulted in millions of dollars in tips since the inception three years ago. A lot of the major airlines have in con- onto this. They still don't accept any tips. Some airlines they may be accepted if the customer is. Really insistent. But generally they have rules against tipping. But these ultra low fare costs ones frontier starting at maybe spirit, airlines and other ones might take notice and say if it's working over there could work over here as well. Right. It's funny in all of this. You know, you have to start identifying what really would constitute a tip. Hey, are you helping me a lot more than some of these other passengers if I ring my bell how fast you get here? All that. There was a story recently. It was just so disgusting. But this lady of all people deserves a tip. It included an overweight passenger who was on an LA to Taipei flight. That's a long flight. She had to go and clean him after he went to the restroom to make me tell the story now. Flight attendant for I'm gonna call it. Eva EV a air, and they are one of those airlines, they only employ a female cabin crews and this poor woman. She had a passenger who was confined to a wheelchair. And he told the flight attendants, he needed assistance to use the restroom. This was about two hours in the flight, one poor woman got tasked with helping this man use the bathroom, and so she had to remove his underwear which she felt was beyond the scope of her responsibilities. Right. And so when she told him that she couldn't help him do this. He started screaming and threatened to just relieve himself on the floor. And then once his junk was exposed another colleague came in and brought up a blanket to kinda give him some privacy cover up, and he got angry slap the hand away and said he didn't want his junk covered. He just wanted her to remove his underwear. So he could use the toilet. And as she was wearing three gloves to wipe his bottom. She says he was moaning and groaning. As if he was pleased by this. This is just a horrible story. And it's indicative of some of the crap that flight attendants have to go through literally she didn't wanna do it, obviously. But the only reason why they gave in was we also can't have him staying in the bathroom for the remainder of the flight. Who knows what would happen to him in there? It's not safe. If something happens that's two hours into a really long flight. So I mean, you have to kind of do that thankfully, the union. The flight union is standing behind her. Yeah. I don't know if they're gonna sue the passenger. Thank you. Thanks.

Youtube Miranda Thomas Edison Phil Starbucks Raymond United delta Red Eye Jennifer Saleh producer Las Vegas James Eva EV wired LA Oscar Emma writer Taipei