18 Burst results for "Emma Green"

"emma green" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

05:01 min | 2 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"You know there's a google doc. The mom who came was trying to fix dinner go home and get me some dinner and bring me back dinner right like it's these normal people who are just doing very normal thing but it was profound in that it showed a deep amount of for the people who were shot and killed and also this dedication to making sure that even in the most horrible circumstances that the highest religious dignity and honour would be afforded and that the entire community would come forward to make sure that that happened so that was. It was an honor to be able to be present for that last story. Here's the headline trump season opening with voters on term abortion. And then the part of the story ram the the president lamented bills. That would allow a baby to be ripped from the mother's womb from birth unquote. This is in in the state of the union address. Now kind of world we've been. We've been very critical of president. Trump's character over the years on this is quite possible it is just politics and just a way to sort of cement. His base on the other hand. I've i've seen numerous times. Where tuesday expression depend drops when you own abortion that somebody what it seem like an abstract or theoretical principle in some ways somebody someone comes to grips with the reality of unborn children and that may have happened with with donald trump. Certainly he was not. This was not is understanding years ago but anything of saying one of my favorite weird movies field of dreams. Nowhere where there are these players out there. Who some concede some can't see and then there's one guy and suddenly he was blind and now we can see and he sees there there and obscene things like that happened concerning abortion and so this whole story thank assumed i mean from the headline again. I don't know if i was yours but all the story. This was just politics and that may be true but it may not be and strange for me to say we may be doing. Don't trump a disservice in some way. But maybe we maybe maybe that was the case that he's really just come to grips with us. Been moved by. that's such an imprint. Intellectual question about the approach to journalism. Framing because i will never have personal access to donald trump's heart. I may dream of dreams. Get into the oval office. And if i do i promise i will quiz them on this issue and try to get to the bottom of this but until that happens i. We only have circumstantial evidence for sincerity of his belief. But not just any politician. And i think it's a certain part of the performance of politics the nature of politics that we can never really know what a politician believes in his heart of hearts her heart of hearts and what we have to go by is what they say and what they do and within that context. I think it's always important to leave. Open the possibility of earnestness charity. Personal background. motivating someone's political agenda that deeply-held commitment to ideology is motivating and agenda. And also that at the same time you have to holding your head. The fact that politics is a game of strategy and tactics and those things. Don't cross each other out and they don't make one or the other less true or more true they just all exist at the same time so sometimes i think it's our job is reporters to be putting on the hat of strategy and tactics and say what's the political calculus here and i think in that in that article. That's what i was doing. But i take your point really seriously. Which is. there's no reason why there should also be an acknowledgement. At the same time that there could be a deep ideological for personal belief that motivates this gravitation towards this topic and on the other side Which one's particular. But i wouldn't be surprised if there are some republican politicians who talk pro-life they've weaponized abortion for political purposes. But they don't really care mean in new knows that we see in fringe cases that there have been republican politicians who have been caught up in scandal because they had a mistress and as'monstrous to get an abortion or whatnot. And i think all of that just goes to show that we as consumers of the political drama that's unfolded before us only limited information about the sincerity and what we have to go on our facts and actions and talk and policy and we have to sort of make the best use of that that we can and so we should be skeptical but any words.

donald trump Trump one guy google doc. tuesday one of favorite trump years ago one republican
"emma green" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

06:10 min | 2 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"The pro-life movement has stood by john voters and faithful to the promises that he made some believing that his personal conduct reflects very badly in terms of his ability to be leader Who are maybe skeptical of the alignment. Between evangelical and trump. when trump's personal life is seemingly not consonant with some of the values or behaviors. That even joe close holds dear or evangelical sold dear. So i think that's sort of one very brief and not comprehensive list of the ways. In welsh differences have arisen but ultimately i think for reporters at the time of importance and opportunity to be getting inside of these different kinds of communities where there are different perspectives on president trump ben our moment in politics and to be bringing that back to readers and to say here is a good faith interaction with what that belief is in this particular neighborhood. And here's the larger context of the world in which that neighborhood sets and how there's no uniformity under that broad catchall that we say as even close them how would you rate me on that pretty good in fact and let me just say this this next article of yours i think is definitely worth and a good yeah The this is from last october Politics as the new religion for progressive democrats. That was really interesting and useful to notice and people have you you. You quoted a political scientists saying this online world of political entity is basically acting as a replacement for people who maybe a generation or two before would identify catholic overs. jewish or irish or talian. So this is this. I thought was perceptive article. I have no criticism whatsoever recognizes. What bob dylan. I think put it. You know you're going to believe something. Everyone believes something. Everyone is a believer of some sort. And this is what's going on over here so yeah could could stop but The senator shooting in pittsburgh you you had five articles on that and i could see there. That are really got to you. I mean you were there in person as opposed to sort of having to sometimes stories. Just do it by phone. And i think rightfully you're emotionally engaged in that story and it and it showed. Is that something you want to do. More of not not cover more synagogue shootings but is that something that you want to view want to be more personally emotionally invest in stores or do you like to sort of look at it from afar and not being waived. That's hard question. It's hard in part. Because i feel strongly not in that. This is the right position but just that it's my position that writing is more interesting when it's not about the writer and there some types of personal memoir and some types of first person writing that i love and that is right for those writers. So that's why i gave that framing. It's not the right position as just my position. I don't think i'm the most interesting part any story really. And i'm always wary about putting myself in the story so in that sense. My emotions are not the center of the story. How i'm feeling is not the most important what's most important is to capture. How the people. I'm talking to are feeling to give people who are not a sense of what it's like to be there but i would say the hard part of the question is that emotion makes is better. I think it would be worse for me as a writer and probably suspect for me as a person if i was able to attend the funeral of the two mentally handicapped adult members of that synagogue who were known as the leaders of the community who always showed up and stood at the door and handed people books and said hello. I went to their which was packed at the thousand. People are more who had come from pittsburgh but also from out of town. I sat next to a man who had driven with a busload of people from washington. Dc in order to be there. I think it would. It would be worse if i if i didn't feel that in my gut because it's horrible and i don't know if i'm able to do my job as a reporter fully if i have iced myself off from that and cut off my ability to feel at a moment like that. And you know the figure the customer judaism of not leaving the dead body by itself so called from that. There were people who are coming in an hour after hour after hour. Someone would always sitting by by the corpse and that was moving. Also the way you just reported that and i would describe that as one of the most moving moments that i've experienced person and certainly in my career There this jewish customers. You alluded to of staying with the body and normally at that means that people will go to the funeral home and they'll set in the watch until the burial happens. Burials happen very quickly According to jewish custom but because this was a crime scene and the fbi is investigating and needed to look at the bodies at there was a delay in the release of the bodies from the site. And so the solution that the community came up with was to recruit a set of volunteers. They had a google doc that they circulated around And people signed up for shifts. There were roughly an hour each and when the bodies were still in the synagogue on saturday and then starting on sunday night and into sunday evening when they were in the pittsburgh morgue There were people who would show up at the right spot and set and they said psalms so they would hand off from person to person where the last person had left off in the psalms to make sure that they went straight through. I thought that was just in some ways. A small act in that there is this very mundane..

washington saturday trump last october bob dylan pittsburgh five articles sunday night sunday evening google doc jewish two two mentally handicapped adult thousand irish one an hour each a generation john first person
"emma green" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

07:22 min | 2 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"That's a big problem that needs to be rectified. The other is also immersing. An intellectual world's following people on social media having conversations with people visiting places reading publications that are outside of this consensus worldview and to a certain extent. I think that's the bigger patch for for that kind of mistake. Which is a segue to to third store this. From two thousand seventeen and article did about decentralisation federalism and so forth and i think he noted in the article that that whoever is out of power at the federal level structure talking in that way. And you know in texas where i lived there. Were there were people in texas saying during the obama administration you know maybe we should leave the country or something like that and of course right after the election was people in california. Who were saying things like that. But i'm just wondering about when you look at Basically national newspapers at this point like the new york times or the washington post or national magazine like the atlantic. Wouldn't there be a natural tendency in the part of the journalists there to favor nationalizing because it makes their publications more important as opposed to the local stuff and decentralized which would not be so so. Is there an ingrown sense of this grown push towards nationalizing things just in terms of the way media work so i would describe it more as a cyclical effect and you could say it's cyclical death spiral Towards this terrible bottom. That were all occupying together. I do think that news and specifically cable television help to push a certain type of national narrative to take over the conversation about politics and the united states and i think similarly catering to that and also based on certain ideological presuppositions. Both political parties have concentrated their focus and energy on that national narrative those national characters players. So there's a certain amount of effect where the stage is created by the cameras but the people on the stage need the cameras in order to stand on the stage and both need each other and feed off of each other In that sort of nationalization narrative. But what i will say. Is that the big crisis in media beyond all of the other ones that i've already alluded to is the demise of local and regional news. And we see this in the shuttering of local newspapers. We see this in the uniformity of especially television news and local media markets one company owning all of those local media markets and having more generalized news rather than local takes. This is really bad for everybody in part because it prevents local communities from being empowered with knowledge about what's going on in their local government and their local communities but also because the national news needs the local news in order to know what to report about. It's just a fact of reality that i cannot be everywhere at once. Seeing everything and some of the ways. That i find stories that i might want to pursue a c- a little write up somewhere in a local newspaper three hundred words or something and i think oh. I want to know more about that. I need to find out more about that. We all need each other in this media ecosystem and so. I think it's really important for the national news to be humble about what it's able to do in the absence of that local ecosystem here store number four. This is from January twenty eighteen. Here's the headline interesting in the atlantic science giving the pro-life movement a boost which is pretty unambiguous headline pack. You'd even consider it to be. I looked and say wow. This is this is basically. I mean it is. It is factually accurate. But also a pro pro-life line that way and so far as we esteem science so who wrote the headline on the article. I think was my editor. We went back and forth on a number of them. But i also talking about this earlier. I don't get final word on the headline an pretty sure. That was my editor. Who wrote that okay. Well that's interesting. You're probably familiar with not enough or at least he was one of the founders of the village voice in new york and i once profiled him back in the nineteen ninety s and that was the one person in the village voice who was pro life. Everyone else is very much in the the abortion camp and even though heads off was legendary writer jazz critic founder of the publication when he walked through the office and there were a bunch of younger writers around it was almost like the parting of the red sea. At that point. I mean no one. No one wanted to talk with him. He had become a persona non grata in his own publication. Just by being pro-life so i'm just curious. The environment in the atlantic would have pro-life reporter be well recognized there. Would he be allowed a little more latitude and writing. Perhaps because this is something we always ask about is there. Here's their room in a secular liberal publication for someone with a different world view so the atlantic prides itself Sometimes in acts as well and being of no party or click. And i think that even though like us all we fall short sometimes in in reality that aspiration is really important and i think that reaches across a lot of different issue areas. There are probably certain ideological hard lines. That i don't want to freelance out because i am not the editor in chief of the atlantic. But you know. I don't think that of no party or click slogan leads to relativism. Meaning that any idea belongs in the pages of the atlantic and any idea would get away but that being said. I do think that there is a hunger for people who are good faith interlocutors with big important ideas in american life and on the topic of abortion there is a large large segment of american population. That finds us not only to be a moral belief. There's but one of the central moral beliefs that they cherish that shapes our politics that flows from their religious faith and informs their religious faith. And so i think there is certainly an openness to having people be good faith in our interlocutors that movement in part because if no one is able to do that work of trying to understand the pro-life movement understand pro-life people fat is a huge blind spot in our ability to understand america and the atlantic was founded as a magazine. The american idea. I think it would be foolhardy for that to be shut off. As one of the avenues that reporters are not able to explore. Just one question but the article. Here's where you wrote. This represents the shift in america's abortion debate the role of science now in the pro-life movement an issue that has long been argued in normative claims about the nature of human life and women's autonomy has shifted toward a wobbly empirical date. Why is not wobbly. So i think. In general there is equality about our political debates. Which is what. I can call in. Sort of lefty academic terms scientism but maybe more plain language is this attraction towards the language of science as the only legitimate language for making an argument..

california texas January twenty eighteen one nineteen ninety s both three hundred words one question one person third store new york Both political parties american one company post two thousand seventeen america obama administration avenues founders
"emma green" Discussed on The Patriot 1280 AM

The Patriot 1280 AM

02:55 min | 5 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on The Patriot 1280 AM

"I was just laughing, laughing, making America great again. But it was obviously so dark that I didn't dare to retweet it because, you know, people accuse me of fomenting murder. Fomenting, ladies and gentlemen, foo M e N t i n g murder. I think you know, I just feel that But anyway, my clindell has been attacked so much he has put in his own. Money and time and energy into producing absolute proof. Which is this documentary, and I do think it's worth watching its online absolute proof. It's worth checking out to see what you think. I mean, I I'm just I'm obviously fascinated by this subject. Yeah, yeah, I think between that and the time magazine piece saying Yeah, we did in Yea yea yea and they said they saved democracy or something. Bye bye. Canceling people's This story is not over there so many unanswered questions. I have to tell you the capital riot. Whatever Whatever happened there in the Atlantic article? I said, I'm not even clear on what happened. Everybody's saying, What do you mean? We don't know what happened. A trump supporter, you know, murdered a cop with a fire extinguisher beat him with a five. They kept saying this over and over and over. And I said, Well, who's the name of the murderer? Are they arrested? How do you know it it and nobody has any answers. Well, there now they retract limestone. CNN retracted. They were attracted this information now that it's out there, everybody knows that happened even though it didn't happen. And so even in the article, um, Emma Green is asking me this. And by the time the article came out the retraction had already been printed. It did not happen as they've been saying They think he was He was killed. They don't know how he was killed. They actually don't even know And I'm just fascinated that this has been used. You know to be. Oh, uh, to silence people when it wasn't even true. And this is the kind of thing I just want to say. Just so people understand where I'm coming from. You have to agree with me. But when I see that kind of behavior where people are taking things that we don't even know what happened, But they're already using it as a bludgeon to say we're going to force you to be quiet because you know there's murder and and then you realize The only woman killed. What was it was a trump supporter, right? She was an unarmed Trump supporter who is obviously over excited and she was shot at point blank range. It Z. Unbelievable, and nobody's really talking about this. Anyway. I just It's It's confusing Boy, We need to have grace for each other. This is tough when we come back. We're talking to Kevin McGary. Every black life matters in our two black robe regiment Don't go away. Make like Mr.

Kevin McGary Emma Green CNN Trump trump five two black robe regiment America Atlantic
"emma green" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

03:33 min | 8 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on People of the Pod

"We don't have to sit across the table. In fact we shouldn't for health reasons but we should give thanks for the precious moments we have with our families even if we're looking at them through the miracle of technology if nothing else. The pandemic has given us that perspective. And that's what we'll be talking about at chabad table steffi. What's on your mind and will link to that. Thanksgiving hugged is you. Put it america's table in our show notes. If people want to check that out we'll talking about truth in lies and monica's talking about life and death and family and i'm talking about the similarly weighty topic of hoops. I've never been much of an nba person college basketball for sure. Big tarheels fan over here but when it came to the nba. The nets were good and local. When i was a kid. The knicks had one good season. But i was spoiled by being a yankees fan so anything less than a championship. Every year felt like a failure. There are some nba happenings. That have grabbed my attention over the years for sure lots of things to do with lebron james the superfund toronto raptors run a few years back and of course the career of kospi two thousand and nine became the first israeli ever to play in an nba game. Here just as an aside. That i believe that the first israeli to ever play in a w nba game is actually one of the greatest wnba players of all time. Sue bird who holds israeli citizenship through her father and who has lived and played in israel. But let's set bird and kospi aside for the moment because there was huge news for israel out of last night's nba draft with the ninth. Pick of the draft. The washington wizards selected denny of dea and with the forty seventh pick. The boston celtics selected yom maddow. These two israeli nineteen year olds became the prides of the jewish state overnight. All due respect to yom but i want to say a bit more about denny who became the first israeli player ever taken in the top ten of the nba draft denny was born and raised in israel to a muslim serbian father and a jewish. Either it was a bit hard to tell but last night i think i saw him wearing a pin with both the israeli and serbian flags on them for sure. The israeli flag was one of the two. Hebrew is his first language he said last night on. Espn that he was excited to represent israel in the nba. He received an athletic exemption from military service. But when the coronavirus pandemic turned the world upside down this year he was briefly drafted into the he spent about two weeks in basic training. And says that even that was a good maturing experience for him speaking of maturity so many newly minted professional athletes coming out of college where they were the big man on campus often far from their parents get into trouble when they finally get a big league paycheck still far from home and go a little wild not denny. His parents will apparently be moving to washington with him which is just the most adorable thing ever and also the most israeli. This is a huge win for the big suburbs of dc bethesda. Silver spring up in baltimore where i expect. There will be spiking interest in the wizards. And i'm sure. I'm not the only american jew who hasn't thought much about the wizards in the past but will now perk up at the mention of the team on sportscenter each night hoping for a glimpse of one of my favorite new players. The pride of israel. Danny of dea chabala shalom sure.

nba israel denny washington wizards lebron james yom maddow knicks yankees boston celtics wnba basketball america Espn monica nets washington Danny Sue bethesda
"emma green" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on People of the Pod

"These are people who are not inclined to blow up precedents and to go along with radical agendas including things that are pretty unpopular of adding more justices to the supreme court. So i think what we're gonna get in the next two years at least until we come to the twenty. Twenty two midterms. Oh my gosh. i can't even believe that. I said that. I think what. We're going to see a lot of haggling across the aisle. A lot of partisan gridlock as they say. And maybe maybe a lot of compromise. We'll see michel. Say okay so. I want to turn to your most recent story. Which was about andy. Stanley and evangelical mega church pastor in georgia who ran foul caused a stir with some of his members by cancelling and person worship and by doing so. They said buying into a particular political agenda. Your story goes much more in depth than that but it did. Prompt may wonder if you've encountered that same dynamic in any orthodox jewish communities where leaders have canceled worship cancelled prayer and members have thought. Wait a second. have you encountered that. So i think this is really challenging. Because there's been a range of reactions in the orthodox world which is large and diverse range of reactions. You know it will be really intuitive to this audience but one big divide that we see in the jewish world. Bradley and how clergy are handling. This is the divide between congregations that use electronic on Bats and that are able to zoom services and that kind of offering any time during the week and communities that don't use those electric chabad rely much more on in-person worship perhaps have that weekly service as more of a pin of their community of what brings the lifeblood to their community. And so i do think that a lot of orthodox communities that don't use electronic have been unwilling to do zoom kabulov chabad after sundown or on saturday morning. They have felt much more pressure to start. Meaning in person Pressure from their membership but also pressure from a religious point of view. I think there's been a pretty wide range in how rabbis from different parts of the orthodox world of handled this. So on the one hand you see modern orthodox congregations especially back. In april some of the modern orthodox sort of councils or of rabbis in new jersey and new york where some of the first to say. It's really important that you take health seriously. It's really important that we don't gather in person important not to have passover sater's and really taking those precautions to try to restructure their services so that their limited sometimes outdoors or sometimes limited number indoors but there are also parts of brooklyn where there are more haredi communities that have not really adapted their services as much at all so i think we see a real range and honestly one of the things. That's fascinated me about this. Time is the amount of anger that a see from people who are parts of those worlds or run on edge of those worlds particularly in brooklyn. Who see what's happening in some of this communities and really feel that it's irresponsible not just from a public health perspective but from a religious perspective one of the most stunning examples that i've seen a community kind of turning on itself. As the jewish insider reporter jacob corn blue who went to report on some of the protests that were happening that were kind of pro-trump and pro opening protests from some haredi jews in brooklyn and they literally chased him to his door and tried to break into his apartment which is terrifying. He's a terrific reporter and just a total professional. He's also a part of that community. So i think we're seeing in the orthodox world as many play of how charged this is and how divided the orthodox world can be. It's not just one sort of uniform reaction. There really is a lot of division. You know..

reporter brooklyn supreme court michel andy Stanley Bradley georgia new york jacob corn
"emma green" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:51 min | 8 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on People of the Pod

"I'm not sure that people necessarily know that those are anti semitic dog whistles. That what she's doing there is trying to spin a narrative that eludes to a sort of dark and shadowy force. Which is the ju. I'm not sure that people think of it that way and so. I think it's really complicated when you try to unpack. What is in somebody's heart. Who's in north georgia. You know. I think a lot of it is very much atmospheric and she is really masterful tapping into that kind of conspiracy thinking that alludes to that dark looming. Ju i appreciate that thoughtful. Answer i think that it is very complicated. I'm curious where else you found. Surprising outcomes or dynamics play out in this election not just georgia but but where else. Well i think one of the big headlines from this election is that we are still very much a divided country. It's looking like seventy million votes. For president trump and seventy four million votes for president elect joe biden. Those totals might change a little bit but ultimately on the one hand is a very big popular vote lead for joe biden also suggests that president trump is really popular and a lot of places in the country. There are a lot of people who turned out very very high turnout on both sides of the ticket and more broadly we saw that there was a lot of ticket splitting that in down ballot races. There were people who didn't vote for trump at the top. Maybe they went for joe biden or a third party but then they voted for republicans in swing congressional districts. We saw democrats all over the country who had flipped seats in two thousand eighteen. Lose their seats to republican competitors in senate races that democrats have been really really hopeful that they were going to pick up such as main with susan collins. There's a ton of money poured into that state to try to flip that seat and ultimately she had a comfortable win. So i think what this suggests is that unlike some of the predictions that there was going to be a really big blue wave down the ticket on the back of president trump's on popularity in fact what we saw was a very engaged electorate from both parties and a lot a division over where the leadership of the should go. And we're going to see that play out. As president-elect biden takes the helm in a very divided washington. Can you talk a little bit about how your reporting has changed during the pandemic..

joe biden trump president Ju susan collins north georgia senate president-elect georgia washington
Persecution Complex

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:02 min | 10 months ago

Persecution Complex

"Hi everybody. Hi guys well from somewhere in Oregon and Salt Lake City Utah. It's thank God I'm atheist the podcast I'm mark and I'm Dan and. Mark Hello pay there now. You're not frank, I'm I'm not anymore. I have emerged like a butterfly from Christmas. From the Frank Shelf Christmas and the Frank. No thanks. That's right Thank you so much for coming on and and help out you you who have helped out here before but are also my co host over on the how do heretic. As much as well as other things I, guess you sure you've in the in the world not that I pay any attention. To the most important stuff Yeah. Unfortunately, I was going out of town and frank was going to have to find a replacement for me. And then, and then frank came down with some horrible apparently non-co vid disease. And and I had to fill in last as far as we know, frank does not have the Rona. Dead. Yeah it seems. It seems as though he is negative though false negatives have occurred in the world. So but anyways, prayers in that seed money coming in. Yes exactly basically, the only way to save him is to is to send us a all of your money. On the television screen, we'll tell you how to do that a later in the program also later in the show you and I are going to have a discussion about persecution privilege. And There's a difference between those two things and points and purpose purpose qwerty. So the four pence perspicacity yeah, which is also Yeah. I anyway, we'll get to all of that later on but in but first, why don't you tell me one of your stories I understand that you've come prepared with with stories to tell the kids you know me I'm already I've got a pocketful of magic for everybody so. This, this will probably relate a little bit to our discussion later in the show. Daniel Okay and this is an older article, but it's been making the rounds again because of reasons. Okay. Yeah. It's an article in the Atlantic by Emma Green and it's about. You know the most most persecuted people in America and those would be. Christians. Of course, they will let me. Let me read a couple of excerpts from the article here in. Many. Many Christians. Believe they are subject to religious discrimination in the United States new report from the Public Religion Research Institute and Brookings. Offers evidence. Almost half of Americans say discrimination against Christians is as big of a problem as discrimination against. Including blacks and minorities. Three quarters of Republicans and trump supporters said this. This article is like a year and a half old. So imagine it's much higher now. And so did nearly eight out of ten White Evangelical Protestants of the latter group six and ten believed that although America wants was a Christian nation, it is no longer a huge jump from twenty twelve. Forty, six percent of those surveyed said immigration from Mexico and Central America has been too high in recent years. Yeah. When asked the same question about immigrants from predominantly Christian countries though only ten percent of people said immigration has been too high. The irony in this is essentially the same question phrase student as Latin American countries are overwhelmingly Christian. Right. All those all those non-catholic Mexicans that are coming over our border. Yeah exactly. Well, who didn't Alex Jones we talk about Alex Jones saying that Mexico was run by a bunch of white shoes at one point but. You know. So Then to kind of conclude. While the US, is still a nation of faith with roughly seventy one percent of adults identifying some kind of Christian. Religious organizations of all kinds are struggling with lower levels of attendance declining participation in ritual practices. More and more people say they're not part of any religion and this is especially true of young people in their twenties and early thirties with you. Guys if religious believable believe their institutions are declining, which demographically speaking they are they may feel more threatened by what they perceive as the growing numbers of people in the country who have a different kind of faith. There's evidence of this in the strongest style. Many people seem to feel for the past and allusive time when Americans felt more of a consensus about their values and beliefs strong majorities. Evangelical Protestants in White Catholics believe America has changed for the worse since the nineteen. Fifties. So off the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty s Jim crow women knowing their place raging cold war nuclear arms race the good old days as Back Yeah back when we could win when everybody's lives were so much better. So this is a lie that just will not die. Like this Christian persecution complex Oh. My God it is amazing and we're GONNA get to more of it. We're going to expound on later in the show like you alluded to but my God it is. It's astounding at what's really funny is. The Christians believe that it is a due to outside influence that everything's getting so bad. Not at not at all acknowledging that, no dude, the calls coming from inside. Right. He's leaving. You are doing this. Yeah. First of all. It's not true that you're being persecuted but part about right believing. You're doing that. Yeah exactly because you're persecuting. They're not leaving because the world outside of Christianity looks. So enticing your leaving because the world inside of Christianity is a an abusive health gape. Maybe work on that you

Frank Mark Hello Daniel Okay Emma Green Public Religion Research Insti United States Salt Lake City Alex Jones Utah Oregon DAN Brookings Mexico Central America Evangelical Protestants
"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:02 min | 10 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Reason be proud. Any Cockney Barrett and the trail she's blazed leading her to this moment. I'm struck by the irony of how demeaning to women. Their accusations really are. That you a working mother of seven with a strong record, a professional, an academic accomplishment couldn't possibly respect the goals and desires. Of today's women. I'm joined now by Robin given the Washington Post senior critic at large, and Emma Green, a staff writer at the Atlantic covering religion, culture and politics. Robin and Emma. So great to have you with me. Thanks so much for having me on Robin. Let's start with you. Both of you, in fact, have written in very fascinating pieces about Judge Barrett's confirmation hearing. Robin. Why are we talking so much about Judge barrettes motherhood during the confirmation hearing so far? Well, I think it's because I know the Republicans have really put it out there one of the things that I was particularly struck by Wass and the day of opening statements. It was the rare Republican who could get through their 10 Minutes statement without bringing up the fact that she has seven Children on going even further to say that Not only does she have seven Children, two of those Children were adopted and really underscoring the connection between The size of her family on DH, her qualifications for the Supreme Court and also her essential identity. So you know, it's understandable that she is proud of her family and certainly reference them and introduce them, But it was striking to me that it was such a talking point among the Republicans. In fact, Robin to that point about mentioning her adopted Children, she also they also highlighted the fact that they were Children who were adopted from Haiti. What's the intention and bringing that up? For me. What I found. Particularly striking was, it seemed to be a way of quietly underscoring a sense that Amy Cockney Barrett is a open armed Charitable person that she is a person who's celebrates and embraces diversity because those Children are from Haiti on that she is also someone who kind of stands as an example or as evidence for those who want to make the point. I got there is always a welcoming home for Children on DH. Therefore, there is no need to ever consider abortion. Emma, When you look at these confirmation hearings, particularly as Robin noted the first day of the hearings. Why do you think Judge barrettes motherhood role has become such a key part of the conversation. We've heard over and over again from Republican senators, including at adopt the top of today's hearings that their day of hearings that Republicans see her as a new kind of icon, a role model for conservative women. You don't necessarily have a lot of figures in politics of popular culture took up to look up to Lindsey Graham, the senator from South Carolina today was commenting on the fact that he thinks that Amy Cockney Barrett is going to be someone that AA lot of young conservative women around the country who are ambitious, who wanna have careers but who also want to have families. And who also potentially have pro life views. They're going to look at her and see someone that they can grow up to be, and I think Republicans see Ah lot of advantage of this culturally, and they also see advantage for this politically at a time when they're desperate for women voters to feel like they have a home in the Republican Party. And as we noted, I'm at the very top. However, fatherhood doesn't seem to be discussed very often. I'm thinking, most recently with Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings. Is there a double standard here? You know, I was thinking of Brett Kavanaugh to because he is clearly very proud of being a father. His daughter's had a visible role at his hearings as well. But there was never a question like the one that Senator John Cornyn posed to Amy Carney Barrett during her hearing's How do you do it? How do you possibly manage to balance your career and your large family? And I think the answer here is that the same kinds of sexist assumptions about what women are capable of doing and the sacrifices that they should be making. Those apply equally to liberal women and conservative women. So I do think that there is a double standard here of examining the way that any Cockney Barrett balances her family life with her professional life in a way that her male colleagues before the Supreme Court has not. Robin. What are your thoughts on that? We've got about a minute left in this in this part of the conversation. Do you think there's a double standard there? For sure. I mean, I think one of the surprising things for some people is the fact that Justice Scalia who Ah Ah, Judge Barrett. You know, was mentored by had nine Children, and that was not something that was raised as evidence of his extraordinary ability to balance work and life. S o the way that it's being used as a sort of defining feature of of Judge Barrett suggests that you know, the role of motherhood is somehow on typical Teo and technical to the responsibilities of A judge to the responsibilities of a professional and that she has somehow miraculously.

Amy Cockney Barrett Robin Cockney Barrett Emma Green Haiti Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court Republican Party Senator John Cornyn Justice Scalia Washington Post Wass Lindsey Graham South Carolina Teo staff writer senator
"emma green" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:17 min | 10 months ago

"emma green" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's good to have you with us. We begin today with airlines, their CEOs and union leaders are begging Congress for an extension to the $25 billion industry bailout that was part of the cares act. Travel demand isn't returning fast enough. And now the industry is warning of a massive wave of layoffs if lawmakers don't extend funding before October 1st, but Congress is fighting and preoccupied. So where does that leave the airlines and their employees, marketplaces and Mueller reports, according to the trade group Airlines for America, Passenger Volume is off about 65% from a year ago and airlines air collectively burning through $5 billion each month. CEO Nick Calio says airlines are asking for six more months of federal help because hopefully by then we will be over the hump and we will start to have a pickup and travel by next spring. The conditions of the previous bailout protected workers until October. 1st Kallio warns that up to 100,000 airline employees could soon join the ranks of the unemployed. And Robert W. Man, a former airline executive and industry consultant, says a second bailout would help the U. S economy recover faster when the pandemic wanes. If the industry were to fall into disrepair if it were Tio fall into destructive Restructuring during the pandemic. The question would be what would you have around Tio help you around on the other side, when exactly? We get to the other side of the pandemic that still murky and Veronique Rouge at George Mason University, says another $25 billion is not going to solve the problem. This is justice. Boning the inevitable as long as the demand is, um, go back up on. This is Just basically a bandaid patch. She says bankruptcy would be the best option. Airlines have shown that they can emerge from restructuring healthier and she says that means troubled airlines don't pose a major risk to the economy at large. I made you ler for marketplace on Wall Street today. Once again. Federal Reserve officials said that without more fiscal relief from Congress, the economy will continue to decline. Once again, Investors got briefly Concerned we'll have the details when we do the numbers. As families endure the new school year remotely or in person. Lots of parents are questioning whether the traditional school system is safe for their kids during the pandemic, and whether it's actually working for their kids in the long run. Emma Green is a staff writer for the Atlantic who recently wrote about parents who are pivoting to home schooling. Welcome, Emma. Thanks so much for having me on so before the pandemic, let's get a little level set. How many students were home schooled officially in the United States. So we're looking at roughly 3% of the American population. And often the scholars who look at the home school world divided up into these two camps of people who are religious, Christian, mostly, and people who are kind of hippies. But as we've seen with the pandemic that is expanding rapidly, and do we have any indication? Are there any numbers about how many parents are either considering or shifting to home schooling now? You know, we don't have that data yet. And I think the reason is that we are still very much in the thick of it with trying Teo get a handle on what's happening educationally around the country. But I can tell you anecdotally from having made a bunch of calls to parents who are trying it and also to home schoolers who have been getting enquiries. There's just a flood of interest from parents of all kinds, saying I don't think this is the way for us. I don't think I can stand wth Ian certainty of not knowing whether my kid is going to be home with us after going to in person school if there's an outbreak, So we see from some of these anecdotal pieces of evidence that there are a lot of families who otherwise would never have considered home schooling who are now trying it. There's been a lot of conversation about the infrastructure that is necessary to pull this off like a lot of students just don't have Internet access at home. And so we should clarify that this is Not an option for every student, and I wonder what other infrastructure Exists. What do you need? If you suddenly want to start homeschooling? So one thing I heard a lot from the home school families that I attacked two who had been homeschooling prior to Cove in 19. Was a kind of resistance to the narrative that home schooling requires a lot of money or a lot of resource is many of them attacked about your public library card being your ultimate ticket to home schooling. But I think you're absolutely right to point out that there are built in inequities here for kids whose parents worked full time or who Are sort of balancing work out of the house during the covert pandemic. It's just impossible to expect those parents to simultaneously homeschool their kids. It's also impossible to expect those parents to watch over their kid's shoulders as they do zum school and distant school for traditional schooling system. So I think the takeaway here is that in equities are affecting kids. On both sides of the tech er, those who are exiting the traditional schooling system and those who are staying in as a deer reporting. How much do you think we're going to continue to see, though the landscape of schooling overall change? Oh, I think that this is just an extraordinary moment. And I think that because there's no end in sight for the pandemic, it's really not clear that any point during the 2020 2021 school year there's going to be a reprieve are returned to normal. And what I'm interested in as a reporter is seeing over the course of this year into the next year, and the year after that. Whether the pandemic represents an inflection point for Ah, Hole up Tech in a new suite of parents and families for home schooling, who probably would not have if they never had experienced the panda, Max..

Congress Emma Green CEO Nick Calio Federal Reserve Mueller United States Veronique Rouge America George Mason University Teo Robert W. Man reporter U. S Ian Cove staff writer executive consultant
"emma green" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"And of course, the child they once divulged as their favorite Glenn. camp. That's the end of my obituary. Wow. That's so sad I don't know are we using? Red Carpet reporting I think we still will have some of that probably. I probably because it was always under the moniker of news but I'm sorta like, are they going to have to bring in like freelancers? Be I. Think e will still news presents. Yeah. They'll still do something but we're losing what we're losing as the daily show the daily news show any sort of your daily Juliana retainer. She already left. She left came back and left again she's got a show up if they need her look if you need Juliana. Understands it is sad because he news did die in like not knowing gave a shit. You know because the show has already been like splintered off into like papa the morning and like daily pop and all these other like semi Jason but new generation versions of E. News because you're right it's still technically a website their so technically publishing celebrity news and who knows how the like us that you know. If they're twitter ever stops at their twitter. We're stopping. The podcast is over we're done. They'll be so sad. So Sad. So Lindsey, I know where we just really quickly this is not on the dock because this just happened but. I, know we're talking about death. So I wanted to mention something like new life. Did you know that there's a new Netflix series starring Hilary Swank and Weekly Favorite Josh Charles doing what is it about? No, I didn't know that. Well, it's called away and if if there were a show, I did not know about this until maybe thirty seconds ago if there were a show seraing hilary swank and who weekly favorite Josh. Charles Josh Charles Them. Who In my opinion? Josh? My opinion well, I forget what original opinions were actually. opposite. opposite. If there were a hilary swank and Josh, Charles Them. Joshua's who show. Called away and the tagline were home can never leave you. What would you guess it was about? Hilary Swank is woman in the window she's stuck in the home. She's not stuck in the home. She's actually what's the opposite of being stuck in get in her house it's locked and she can't she doesn't have the key. I think like Think Grander Than her, how does the opposite of being up in your house her house? If you. Own a house and she's trying to buy a house. It's very difficult because it's expensive. If you weren't agoraphobia. What is it career? You could just never imagined the most expansive career real estate aged. Astronaut, she's asked. She's Y is the only thing I've ever known for sure in my life is that I wanted to be on the first mission to Mars. What are you saying home and I'm like, what are you talking about like an American Renat Emma Green Swank prepares to lead an international crew on the first mission to Mars she must reconcile her decision to leave behind her husband and teenage daughter when they need her the most. So I guess it's like they both look really sat and there's like a rocket ship behind her and it's like I. Guess they're going through it and she's like, I'm sorry I have to leave because I have to go to Mars. What if what if your mother abandoned your family because she had to go to Mars? That's what this show is. She has to go to Mars for the Greater Good Win Amar's okay okay. That's the funniest premise I've ever heard. That's ridiculous. MOMS should be able to go to Mars to belong in. Mars like him go to Mars moms can go to Mars. There's a Disney movie about it. Yeah. Ours needs mom I'm just saying why can't moms go to Mars just seems unfair to Hillary swank she can't go to Mars because she's a mom okay fine. The only thing I've ever known for sure in my life is that I wanted to be on the first mission to Mars. Only three years. Trigger Saul Michigan. Be Right. Mars needs MOMS January, Jones, who right or is Jane John's them. January Jones. So, January Jones posted these photos of her watching a basketball game, a mavericks game at Clippers Mavericks Game. So she posted these photos of La, clippers basketball player named coalisland heard, but didn't name him. She was like at La Clippers future boyfriend. And then the next photo. She put his name and said call me I like. The telephone thing which is very January. Jones behavior she likes expressing her thirst for other people other celebrities on instagram hoping something's going to come of it. Maybe not hoping something's GonNa come of it. Just being fun charity like that's the problem with like this type of shit where it's like, of course, January Jones like says anything or anyone says anything it's like they're gonNA ask him about it and he's like don't even know who that is or like I didn't see that like, why would I see you know? So he allegedly after I looked into apparently not allegedly apparently is like extremely well known for being very quiet and very offline. Like, his whole thing is he doesn't do social media. He doesn't do interviews. He barely speaks so much show Linzie that like he went viral, there's a memo of him like two years ago simply because people don't really know much about his whole like vibe personally and so whenever he does sort of express himself like in an emotional way, people are shocked. So he was being interviewed at some point after a game once and someone reporter said something that made him laugh and his laugh went viral because no one had ever heard it before and they were like this is what he sounds like. What would you like people to know about you? I'm a fun guy. You obviously I love the game of basketball. I. Mean they're just more question you have to ask me in order for me to tell you about myself. I just can't give you a whole spiel. I don't even know where you sit natalie..

Hilary Swank January Jones Josh Charles Clippers basketball Charles Josh Charles Them Emma Green Swank Juliana twitter Glenn. Joshua Netflix La Lindsey reporter papa natalie Charles Them
"emma green" Discussed on 1A

1A

07:35 min | 1 year ago

"emma green" Discussed on 1A

"This is one A.. I'm todd's Willik in Washington the historic impeachment trial president trump began with the swearing in of senators six Democratic presidential candidates debate in Iowa. Virginia tips the scales els in favor of the equal rights amendment. But will it wind up in the Constitution and Major League baseball hands out punishment after the Houston Astros cheated during the two thousand seventeen season and playoffs. It's the domestic our news. Roundup joining me in studio to talk about the week's top headlines carol-lee she's correspondent with NBC. The News Carol. Great to see you. Jonathan Tamari is national political reporter with the Philadelphia Inquirer. PHILLY's Fan. Thanks maybe he is. Maybe he isn't and neutral professionally neutral from Billy Emma Green from NPR NEW YORK. She's a staff writer with the Atlantic. She covers politics and policy and religion. Emma Emma great great to have you things for having me well as I said folks. The impeachment trial in the Senate has officially begun the charges against the president of the United United States abuse of power obstruction of Congress. Chief Justice John Roberts was sworn in on Thursday to preside over that trial. The house impeachment managers enters walked the articles of impeachment across the Capitol to the Senate in a rare ritual. This week the Washington Post called it. The world's slowest missile heading toward the Senate floor the speaking of those impeachment Managers House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi name them to do the job of prosecuting. This case in the Senate Carol who who are these managers are there any surprises there. There were There seven house managers A couple of them were expected. Obviously Adam Schiff. WHO's chairman of the Intelligence Committee? jerrold Nadler Chairman of Judiciary Committee Hakeem Jeffries who's the leader of Democratic Caucus and then there were some who were couple of freshmen Ashman Sylvia Garcia. She's on the Judiciary Committee. But she kind of came out of nowhere surprise she's and the other freshmen is Jason Crowe who's one one of the quote Unquote National Security Freshmen. That were elected In the last congressional elections and and then you have a couple folks who stood out during being the questioning of the during the house Hearings and the VAL demings Is One of them from Florida And then another person who another congresswoman who worked on Who Actually has a lot of knowledge about impeachment who worked Nixon And that impeachment was involved in the Bill Clinton's impeachment and and so you have kind of this this mix and you can see what the speaker was aiming at which is some season folks As well as some of the younger folks to try to give a good representation Asian of her caucus. Emma does this team. That Pelosi has chosen. Tell us anything about how the trial might go. Well when Pelosi announced her choices for the impeachment managers she really emphasized that she selected people who had courtroom and litigation experience. Who would be comfortable in that? Let's setting because the people she selected the burden of this entire process is on their shoulders. They really are the seven people who are are responsible for making the case before the Senate the other thing that she really seemed to emphasize but didn't make this quite as explicit as that. These are Democrats who represent the future of the party. The represent the makeup of the party they come from all over the country from Texas and Colorado California New York doc and they also represent different ethnic backgrounds different points of view from within the Democratic Caucus so with those two pieces the courtroom experience the answer and this diversity. I think Nancy Pelosi was both trying to make sure these were people who can bring a strategic in for the Democratic Party but also symbolically considered represent who the Democrats are now. We also learned earlier today. HOW PRESIDENT TRUMP IS GONNA stack his legal team? We have pat simple on the White House. Counsel Jay Secolo uh-huh trump's personal lawyer wanted his personal lawyers a Ken Starr famous for Bill. Clinton's impeachment Robert Raya former independent counsel and Jonathan Tamari. A lawyer named Alan Dershowitz. Yeah we've heard of him. I mean he's obviously been a hugely prominent attorney for a very long time. Now up to the durst GONNA do for for the president on the Senate floor. Well I mean. He's been one of his most outspoken defenders for a long time. Now and he's a guy who is we know the president likes people can go on TV and make the case in a compelling way in that medium and he's someone who's been doing that for a very long time and He's a combative. Well known. litigator gator and and look the President Lakes again people can go on TV and he likes famous names and Dershowitz checks a lot of those boxes. Carol the question of whether there will be witnesses in this trial on the Senate floor there are forty seven Democrats in the Senate you need fifty one to do anything and that means for Republicans could would compel the Senate to call witnesses Mitch. McConnell has said he's not interested in many Republicans and we'll talk about more of them have said they're not interested what Republicans are now l. saying something different about whether they would want additional witnesses or additional evidence well it seems that the Republicans at least have a are unify a a unified front on witnesses in the sense that they're not going to support witnesses. Vote on witnesses. In the first phase of the trial island they would kick it to after opening arguments which begin on Tuesday and where it goes from there remains to be seen Susan Collins put out a statement statement there are some Republicans who have said that they are interested in hearing from witnesses particularly John Bolton former national security adviser and perhaps now at least on the democratic side. love Parnasse. The associate of Rudy Giuliani Susan. Collins has said she is interested in hearing during witnesses a sheet checking the polls back home. What she's doing that's making her break with the rest of Republicans? Well she has a history of this also I mean. She supported witnesses in the Clinton trial. Roland then voted To vote voted to it. And and so she. She's that there's that piece of it and then there's also She is looking at her election. And she's not the only one I mean. Mitch McConnell this is all a political calculation by the majority leader on you know trying to balance his caucus. Doc is in the sense that there are some who really want witnesses. There are others who it's just not gonNA be politically beneficial for them to take these sorts of votes and then there's the White House and they've been all over the map on this. The president has said he wants a trial he wanted to show and now he's saying he doesn't want that And so I think Susan Susan Collins is looking back home as are several other Republican senators. Now when we talk about witnesses in new evidence this trial is about to get started as new evidence is as emerging and it did this week. Democrats released text messages. voicemails photos shared between left Parnassus and indicted Soviet born businessman and Rudy Giuliani. Trump's personal lawyer others were in those exchanges to Parnassus was working hand-in-hand with Giuliani to pressure Ukraine into investigating Joe Biden and this week left went on. MSNBC talked to racial motto and told her exactly what he was up to. What do you think is the main inaccuracy or the main lie? That's being told that you feel like.

Senate president Susan Susan Collins Nancy Pelosi Bill Clinton Democratic Caucus Emma Emma White House Mitch McConnell Jonathan Tamari Alan Dershowitz Billy Emma Green NBC NEW YORK Virginia Houston Astros Major League Rudy Giuliani Susan Rudy Giuliani Chief Justice John Roberts
"emma green" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The progressive democrat Senator from California captured the sediment when she questioned for during the hearing, I believe you, and I believe many Americans across the country believe you. But the writer of this story whose name is Emma green. Said the women I interviewed, however, resented the notion that people's accusations should be believed on the basis of their identity alone. This makes me furious. Because I think that's taking advantage for the worst purposes of something that's real in our culture. A woman said women are not a monolithic bloc. Most of us are not going to take to the streets with pitchforks. And torches. That said there's a large large percentage of us who feel very very strongly about the way this process has played out conservative women are angry about cavenaugh. They think other voters are too. Due conservative women, live in suburbs. The reason I ask that is because the Democrats claim to have a hold on. College educated suburban women. Well, they may be losing that whole to if some of this polling data is correct. Let me just say this. If everything were just, and it isn't. And I know it. But if everything were saying, the Democrats would be destroying themselves right now as they did back in two thousand two when they did the Wellstone memorial the democrat party. Is in a sane world. The democrat party is engaging in self immolation right now. With the treatment of Kavanagh the backing of a woman who's got no evidence hasn't had corroborated and thanks to Donald Trump. Now more Americans than ever know the truth of her story. And the truth of her story is that it's from holds if Trump hadn't went on his rant gone on his rant on Monday night. The drive-bys would have never reported that because they had not reported it. The Democrats are not the majority. They did not win the Senate. They win the house the advise and consent role. Does not give them the right to determine who goes on the court, and who doesn't that's for the winners. But the the behavior of the Democrats have engaged in here. The public political murder. Of a highly achieved brilliant guy who never did anything to anybody anywhere near the way. He's being described. People bringing forth, the allegations like this would be s lies no evidence to back it up in a sane world would be paying a price. So so high they wouldn't even engage in this kind of behavior. But the Democrats think they speak for a majority of Americans because they have the media on their side. And they think. That they have succeeded in making the majority of Americans hate rate cavenaugh and hate conservatives and Republicans as as well. Well, we don't live in a world. We don't live in a sane country right now. But. It's still possible for the Democrats to pay a huge huge price for this given the standard time-tested American moral code, and our sense and set of values the Democrats. Should be halfway finished with their self destruction in the middle of this. I'd take a break. We'll be back in a minute. Don't go anywhere. Rush limbaugh. Simply brilliant on the..

democrat party Donald Trump Emma green Rush limbaugh Senator Wellstone memorial writer California Senate Kavanagh murder
"emma green" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"However, exploitative and awful they are. It takes a great deal of courage as the late Alex is on had to be able to document what happened and also talk about the bought that he followed. To come to that conclusion on his own kind from a culture myself where you know things like domestic servitude Feddie coming, but it's it's, it's it's common enough for people to know what exists without really calling it that it really made a huge impact on me. And I suspect that as we move forward, you know, exploitation is something that is tan amidst and it's important. Remember how easy it is to normalize. It. Another deep one from the Atlantic it is, and it's a story that I would hope to revisit as the years pass. The third type of keeper after the media recommendations, the books, the movies, Netflix specials, Atlantic stories. The third type of keeper that people tended to mention was the observation on human society. And so let's start with this one from Emma green at spent most of the last year in Israel and watching America from afar and also watching how Americans interacting Israel has really been a study and fracture. One of the most historic moments I got to see while I was in Jerusalem was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem, which is something that American presidents have been promising to do for literally decades and it finally happened. So I was up in the rafters when the ceremony happened. I got. See all the bigwigs of the Republican party. It was like shooting fish in a barrel might beat so many famous pastors and people who I, I write about all the time just right there. And at the same time, as we were watching this triumphalist ceremony that was happening in Jerusalem that brought so much happiness to so many communities Jewish Christian lake. There was this violence that was happening also in Israel the same time in Gaza, the comparison between those is a little bit fraught because they weren't necessarily directly causally related, and it was also set up in order to grab the attention of the American press. The protests were set up to grab the press attention while the embassy opening was happening. So in that way, it's hard to acquaint the two of them, but it certainly was a moment of recognizing that America has a big footprint in Israel and abroad in general, and that the way that footprint is expressed caters to. Certain groups interests more than others, and it can sometimes have a against less ameliorating effect in one area and a much more positive effect in another. So that message of fracture is what I'm taking away and just trying to be sensitive to the stories that are coming out of twenty eight teen and how radically differently experiences have have resonated for different groups and being an Israel as probably the best arena for understanding that as any. Dick, we did remind me of a great story that's been circulating by Atlanta contributor, Amanda Ripley. All of the story was published in medium called complicating the narratives. She asks the question would have journalists covered controversial issues differently, recommend that to our crowd Amandas very smart. A lot next will hear from our staff writer out in one of our California bureaus, Alexis Madrigal in twenty eight, I think have the most significant conceptual thing that I learned with that in the late nineteen sixties. You know, a time of similar political Tavel, you know, craziness there with these three things that happened that actually completely transformed the global economy that basically no one was talking about in national media. One with containers, ation jets covered a lot shipping and the way that it transformed global trade one was a development of the MasterCard. These payment networks that allow you. To drop money from your Bank or your credit account. You know, in Kuala Lumpur and the third is internet protocol. You know, the way that we ended up like shipping around network traffic bits and created this kind of world that we know and those three things come together..

Israel Jerusalem Alex America Netflix Amanda Ripley Republican party Emma green Kuala Lumpur Gaza American press Jewish Christian lake Dick Alexis Madrigal staff writer California Atlanta
"emma green" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Ecksteen hours a day in the trash how much of the work you do on a production happens before the production how much during and how much after shh no bogilov our work as far as myself earth angel's the consulting happen in preproduction sh that's when all the decisions are made and that when it's really really vile can be able to influence specifically the buying power of the shows out once that is constructed there's obviously very little that can be done influ is what materials they'll pass that let's say um and so we focus a lot on the pre production making sure that were set up to do all this carbon calculations sustainability metrics uh data collection that work is really pivotal uh once production takes place we really pass the torch to the eko crew and it's really about daytoday implementation and being available to the shooting crew an off production grew in whatever way there uh whatever needs they might have as far as capable resources and then as far as close production goes that's really when we do all we now with this all the tallying and see where they came in not essentially now you guys have logic you guys have won the environmental media association awards haven't you we did well our productions did rather right um we were awarded uh and emma green feel four seasons you madam secretary's pieces 1 billion he's in one of vinyl uh as well as a the disney feature film queen of caught by a really i loved queen of cocked way knock we just got way it was an amazing experience that was one of those unique times where the producer was the freezer who had worked with us before and even though it shot internationally it shot in uganda in south africa sh she was able to bring us on and it was really remarkable it was our first international production and it was really amazing to be able to apply our message in a completely different compton and and uh there's a lot of uh learning experiences that came out of that but yes we're we're really really proud of the work we did with clear of kabwe oh cool so you actually went with them to uganda i would.

emma green secretary producer uganda compton eko disney africa
"emma green" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Prayer it seems is no longer a politically acceptable response to tragedy instead were being told to put our trust in something else please stay tuned to break one from the colson center for christian worldview here's john stonestreet with breakpoint as a record this just days after the horrific massacre at first baptist church in southern springs texas a massacre that claimed twenty six lives and wounded twenty others authorities continued to piece together the motives of the young male who perpetrated this act of terror apparently it was a revenge shooting at the his motherinlaw attended though she was not there on that sunday morning the victims ranged in age from a baby in you'd road to seventy one and included more than one family that laws multiple members and the pastor's 14yearold daughter most of the victims were according to reports children as happens at every mass shooting there are those committed to superimposing their own narratives on the tragic events in fact some as happens at every match shooting have found a way to even implicate christians this time that way is what emma green of the atlantic monthly dubbed after the san bernardino shooting prayer shaming this refers to comments and both social and commercial media that criticize those who say that there are thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families the epitome of prayer shaming was a frontpage story in the new york daily news after the san bernardino shooting which read god isn't fixing this and called talk of prayer quote meaningless platitudes.

colson center john stonestreet emma green new york daily news san bernardino
"emma green" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Your healthy radio addiction starts now hello laura ingram show nothing like a gospel choir to get your gone now raymond royal sitting in for the great laura ingram whose away on a sign it but you know i was reading this piece in the atlantic and it drew my i actually it filled my soul when i read this piece by emma green i think it will touch you will too hillary clinton wants to preach is the title of the peace that's what she told bill should lady deal xility her longtime pastor pastors should lady they were at a recent photo shoot for a new book on daily devotion see center during the 2016 campaign and scattered bits of reporting suggests that ministry ministry ladies and gentleman have always been a secret dream of the twotime presidential candidate now i thought to myself that wait a minute before you start laughing hillary is committed methodist and she has long spoken about her fate perhaps not demonstrably but she has spoken about it like many of you i 5 strength and purpose in the values i learned from my family and my faith they gave me simple words the led by an old method as saying do all the good you can for all the people you can't for as long as you can.

raymond royal laura ingram emma green bill hillary clinton
"emma green" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"emma green" Discussed on KOIL

"Nothing like a gospel choir to get your gone now raymond royal sitting in for the great laura ingram whose away on assignment but you know what i was reading this piece in the atlantic and it drew my i actually it heat filled my soul whenever it this piece by emma green i think it will touch you all to hillary clinton won to preach he's the title of the peace that's what she told bill should lady deal chalet to her longtime pastor pastors should lady they were to recent photo shoot for a new book on daily devotion see center during the 2016 campaign and scattered bits of reporting suggests that ministry ministry ladies and gentleman have always been a secret dream of the twotime presidential candidate now i thought to myself now wait a medical four you sir laughing hillary is a committed methodist and she has long spoken about her fate perhaps not demonstrative but she has spoken about it like many of you i fight straits and purpose in the values i learned from my family and my faith they gave me simple words to led by at old methodist say do all the good you can for all the people you can't for as long as you can better if resist the forces trying to drive us apart friday we can come together to make this country war for everyone one now that's a good lesson for us to reveal that's important for us to remember this morning if we risk zeus those who were attempting to drive us apart and we're going to talk about some davis said things happening in the country mitch mcconnell apparently add it with with donald trump it i want before i leave this topic i want you for a moment to visualize because the atlantic piece goes on and it says clinton is working to rehabilitate or public image and her figure and figure out the next steps after her brutal november loss she's lifting up an intimate closely guarded part of herself and it is her faith sharing her faith now imagine ladies and gentlemen it's a sunday morning the birds chirping the traffic is light you make your way down to the methodist church on the corner and you find your way into the crowded pews you're just on the end near the wall you can't quite see to the to the rostrum there where the preachers about to stand the.

raymond royal laura ingram emma green bill old methodist davis mitch mcconnell donald trump hillary clinton