35 Burst results for "Emma"

Bruce Willis, diagnosed with aphasia, steps away from acting

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Bruce Willis, diagnosed with aphasia, steps away from acting

"Actor actor Bruce Bruce Willis Willis is is stepping stepping away away from from his his career career after after he he was was diagnosed diagnosed with with aphasia aphasia I I marches marches are are a a letter letter with with the the latest latest Bruce Bruce Willis's Willis's wife wife Emma Emma his his ex ex wife wife actor actor demi demi Moore Moore and and his his five five children children right right on on Instagram Instagram that that Willis Willis is is diagnosis diagnosis of of aphasia aphasia is is impacting impacting his his cognitive cognitive abilities abilities aphasia aphasia is is a a condition condition that that causes causes the the inability inability to to understand understand or or express express speech speech it it typically typically occurs occurs after after a a stroke stroke or or a a head head injury injury but but it it can can also also develop develop gradually gradually from from a a tumor tumor or or disease disease Willis Willis was was sixty sixty seven seven has has been been working working Studley Studley he's he's got got three three movies movies due due to to come come out out this this year year

Aphasia Aphasia Bruce Bruce Willis Willis Willis Willis Bruce Bruce Willis Emma Emma Demi Demi Moore Moore Willis Stroke Stroke Tumor Tumor Studley Studley
Hunter Biden's 'Laptop From Hell' With Miranda Devine

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:42 min | 2 months ago

Hunter Biden's 'Laptop From Hell' With Miranda Devine

"With us right now is a phenomenal patriot, she's super smart and is shaking the matrix. There's a lot happening. I think it's because of her reporting and because of her book that we're starting to see some rumblings from our federal law enforcement agencies. In the direction of Hunter Biden with us is Miranda divine author of the plainly titled but accurately titled book the laptop from hell, Miranda, welcome back to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks so much. Charlie, great to be with you. So tell us the book is out I've heard some amazing things about it and so tell us what the reaction has been. Well, look, it's been a bestseller, sold a lot of copies to people on our side of the fence, but really there was this wall between conservatives and people who are, you know, perhaps Trump voters who didn't vote for Joe Biden. And the people who read The New York Times and watched CNN and MSNBC and just were kept in the dark by their favored organs before the election. And until 17 months later, last week, The New York Times broke that wall, just a little, just a little chink by admitting that yes, the laptop from hell, Hunter Biden's abandoned laptop is real and they had authenticated emails on it. I mean, we did that 17 months ago, you know, basically the New York Post that was your previous guest, Emma Joe Morris, my friend, my colleague, she did a brilliant job of doing the due diligence that was necessary. And we also had Charlie Bobbie linsky, who you didn't need the laptop. You could just talk to Tony bubble linsky who was a very is a very credible businessman who got caught up in the Hunter Biden mess and a patriot, a naval veteran. He offered himself to the media and gave a press conference before the election after the New York Post story first came out. And no one was interested. They just dismissed him. They ignored him. We didn't. We published the material that he gave us, which was, you know, it corroborated what was on the laptop and it augmented it. And then there was the chuck grassley and Ron Johnson inquiry, which already about a month before we published that stories had already started laying down the paper trail, the documents that showed all this millions of dollars ended up being tens of millions of dollars coming out of Chinese and Russian and Ukrainian shady coffers into the bank accounts in America of Joe Biden's family members and their business

Hunter Biden Charlie Kirk Miranda The New York Times Emma Joe Morris Charlie Bobbie Linsky New York Post Tony Bubble Linsky Joe Biden Charlie Donald Trump Msnbc CNN Chuck Grassley Ron Johnson America
Emma-Jo Morris: School Choice Will Not Address the 'Woke Problem'

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:06 min | 2 months ago

Emma-Jo Morris: School Choice Will Not Address the 'Woke Problem'

"Dot com. She has a phenomenal news story out. This is school choice alone will not address the woke problem in the United States. Here's the plan to fix it and also she has a story that says exclusive undercover mothers, moms form covert network to expose indoctrination programs, plaguing private schools across the country, Emma joins us right now. I'm a joke joins us right now. Welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you, Charlie. Thanks for having me. And you can call me Emma. All right, you got it. So Emma, tell us about the story. Yeah, so I got into contact, I'll just tell you briefly the background. I got into contact with a group of mothers who could not be named and had to be kept anonymous because they're mothers of children in private schools. And AIS accredited private schools. And they are having a huge problem because their children are being indoctrinated with leftism of the worst kind. I'm talking about race essentialism, critical theory with gender where 5 year olds are being told to observe and affirm their gender and it may not be coordinated with their sex. You know, all the stuff that you're seeing in public schools, but really another level. And they have no mechanism to push back on that. Because they are bound by contracts that are really unconscionable contracts, which means one side concedes everything and the other side holds all the leverage. So that's the position they've been put in, so they came to me anonymously. Obviously, I know their identity, but I'm not able to disclose it because their kids could be expelled for this. But they have revealed some of the most shocking jarring disgusting material that is that made me uncomfortable and I'm 30 years old. Let alone, if I was 5, 6, 7, 8 of the stuff that their children are being taught. And so I got interested in this story and we did a series together I've done now I think four stories with these mothers. And it got me to think a lot about what our politicians are talking about in terms of education policy. And I realized that, you know, Republicans have entered the spotlight as education advocates in the face of all the CRT and the critical pedagogy that's being taught in schools and helps set parents are and they've responded to that. But there is something missing in the way that Republicans have been talking about this issue that I felt I had revealed in my reporting. So I wrote this column that's up on Breitbart News today. That basically says, you know, talking about school choice, which is the central pillar of Republican education policy is not enough. It's not enough. And if anything, if left alone just as is, it may empower the woke institutions that are really undermining the lessons and the spirit of America, the spirit of meritocracy, for example, which is one of our highest held values. So I suggest that in order to lead on this issue, Republicans really need to actually broaden and increase the sophistication of the way that they talk about education. And I brought up three pillars

Emma Joins Charlie Kirk Emma Charlie United States Breitbart News America
Michigan State snaps slump with 68-65 win over No. 4 Purdue

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Michigan State snaps slump with 68-65 win over No. 4 Purdue

"After losing five of their last six Michigan state comes out with a gutsy effort to knock off number four produce sixty eight sixty five and she was up by eleven with just over ten to go Boilermakers tied up at sixty five but it was Emma Shugart Tyson Walker's three point shot with one point four seconds left to give MSU the win this was about an issue limiting their turnovers to ten while forcing producing the seventeen and the Spartans with nineteen fast break points coach Tom Izzo knew how important this game was we needed to win a game the way we won the game had our moments of up and down a little bit header moments we could've crashed like you know we have been a couple games Zach idiot led all scorers with a career high twenty five Martie Martin east Lansing Michigan

Emma Shugart Tyson Walker Boilermakers Michigan MSU Tom Izzo Spartans Zach Martie Martin Lansing
Who Is Attorney Robert Barnes?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:07 min | 3 months ago

Who Is Attorney Robert Barnes?

"Today, we are delighted to have with us Robert Barnes trial lawyer just kind of data based individual bit of a troublemaker and that's what we like. Robert Barnes, welcome to America first one on one. Happy to be here. Robert, let's start for those who are not familiar with your work, your background, what you do on your out there in the media every single day. Talk to us about your background, your training and what is the focus of your work today. Sure, Emma constitutional lawyer do civil criminal cases do tax cases do cases around the country and across the globe, clients are across the board politically. So it represented everybody from the Green Party and the peace and freedom party to the Libertarian Party and the taxpayers party and the Conservative Party. Everybody from Wesley Snipes and Julie Stein and a range of others to president Trump and a range of people, the Covington kids, you name it. So the only thing that's in common is that most of my clients are underdog clients and their cases and causes concern matters of constitutional

Robert Barnes Taxpayers Party Robert Peace And Freedom Party Julie Stein Emma America President Trump Green Party Libertarian Party Wesley Snipes Conservative Party
Breitbart Editor Emma-Jo Morris Describes Hunter Biden's Proposed Office Mates

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:20 min | 4 months ago

Breitbart Editor Emma-Jo Morris Describes Hunter Biden's Proposed Office Mates

Nancy Pelosi to Run for 18th Full House Term

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:59 min | 4 months ago

Nancy Pelosi to Run for 18th Full House Term

"Well, remember Nancy bought that house in Florida and I thought there's no way she's running again. She's gonna live in a free state. Did you hear? She's rerunning. Yeah, but she might be still living in Florida. That's true. That's true. Let's pay the cut for our guests. It is so creepy. Eric said it is like something it is like big brother or big sister from a dystopian movie. Of course she's not in California. She's not there. These screenshot behind her is the green screen. It's so creepy. Play the cop. Our democracy is at risk because of the salts on the truth. The assault on the U.S. capitol. And the state by state assault on voting rights. This election is crucial. Nothing less is at stake than our democracy. But as we say, we don't agonize, we organize. And that is why I am running for reelection to Congress and respectfully seek your support. I would be greatly honored by it and grateful for it. Thank you so much. Getting the shivers, I need a bucket to vomit

Florida Nancy Eric California U.S. Congress
Police Officers Are Being Targeted Every Single Day

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Police Officers Are Being Targeted Every Single Day

"Police officers are being targeted. Every single day. Today, saw something in New York, the likes of which I don't think we've seen in decades. I've posted the images online. You need to see them. Of the funeral. Of a slain officer. Gunned down in his prime. And his widow in the cathedral with literally thousands of members of the NYPD raid outside. I mean, it looked like a C of law enforcement. Shoulder to shoulder. Paying their respects to comrade who shouldn't be dead.

New York Nypd
What MSNBC Says About the Future of Joy Reid's Show

The Larry Elder Show

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

What MSNBC Says About the Future of Joy Reid's Show

"Now I want to also correct something we said last week and last week I said that joy Reid, who show on Emerson behe, I watched that you don't have to her show is not going to be renewed by MSNBC hall. Well, Emma's in Bihar put out a statement and said the reports that say she no longer is going to be having a show. Or wrong. One of those reports was in red state. In my opinion, normally is a reliable source conservative source, but still reliable. They published a story claiming that MSNBC hall was not going to renew joy, Reed's show. Now says, in fact, they are, so I don't know whether they initially said no, they weren't going to renew it. And then the fit hit the Shan, her fans, contacted them and they changed their mind, or whether or not the story was wrong in the first place. I don't know. All I know is that, according to MSNBC, she does, in fact, still have a show. Triple

Msnbc Hall Joy Reid Emerson Behe Bihar Emma Reed Msnbc
Daily Mail: Daunte Wright Victims Tell of His Violent Past

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Daily Mail: Daunte Wright Victims Tell of His Violent Past

"Well what about Dante Wright Who is he Our friends at post millennial took a deep look but actually the daily mail did and they pointed it out Here is each of rights victims in their stories about how Dante derailed each of them Jennifer Lemay May 1420 19 Not much is said about the initial incident that Jennifer's son Caleb suffered Caleb and Dante were purportedly friends until that day at the gas station where Dante Wright discharged a firearm toward Caleb striking him with a single shot bullet in the head Causing serious disability impairment Enders injuries Caleb Livingston was left crippled and wheelchair bound over the incident He can't even talk in his limited limb movement Dante Wright shot him in the hit CV December 2019 an anonymous woman who calls herself CV as it stands for crime victim Her story is the aggravated robbery charge that Dante Wright was scheduled to face trial for before his death CV and her roommate invited someone named Emma J driver over on the night of November 30 2019 Driver brought along Dante Wright the pair were friends The four of them hung out all night but eventually driver and Reich caught win that CV was due to pay her rent So the two men hung out until the next morning when they could rob CV over $800 in rent money Dante Wright held CV at gunpoint He said the following to see the I know you have the money give me the effing money We know you have the money That is what we are here for unquote And after that right choked her and both he and driver fled after trying to rob

Dante Wright Caleb Jennifer Lemay Dante Caleb Livingston Enders Emma J Jennifer Rob Cv Reich
This Is the Warning Shot! With Emma Jo Morris

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:22 min | 5 months ago

This Is the Warning Shot! With Emma Jo Morris

"Welcome back to Emma Joe Morris one on one with me. Sebastian gorka. I need to ask you so many things we have to get you back. So many things I want to ask you, but first things first, given everything that you've uncovered, the thing that blows my mind apart from the corruption, the ambassador, the constant lying from all of the bidens. None of these people are top draw. None of them are smart. None of them are sharp. None of them are street smart. They're crazy crackheads like hunter, who takes films of himself with whores and crack and gets caught, crashing a rental car with his dead brother's attorney general badge in it and his crank pipeline. I mean, stuff you wouldn't believe in a novel. How do these people get away with it? Why does it take until you the poston and Rudy? Because there should have been detritus of corruption for decades. Yeah, I mean, I call them over educated fools. Good. 'cause I think that that's what kind of educated and dumb. Yeah, they go to Harvard. They go to Yale, whatever. And they're not exactly what you said. They're not street smart, but they can't. It's a miracle that they tie their shoes in the morning. Some of these guys, it looks like that. And I think how do they get away with it? I think it's saying that Trump made clear through his entire time in the white as if there's anything that there was to learn about Trump's time in The White House is that there's a club. Yeah. And if you're not in that club, you can't play with them. But if you're in the club. You can do no wrong. And there's no repercussion for anything. I mean, we exposed work that was being done while Joe Biden was vice president. And there's testimony in public from people who were involved in these deals. 20 public ski and Miranda writes about this and he said it in public, he said to them, why are you doing this? How are you doing this? This is like there's something really wrong about this. He was basically brought in to kind of button up their deals because they had no experience in any of this. So Tony was brought in with experience right up their contracts. Veterans. And he comes in and he realizes what's going on, and he says to Jim Biden, how why would you do this? How are you doing this? And his brother. Yes. And Joe's brother says to Tony, plausible deniability.

Emma Joe Morris Sebastian Gorka Poston Donald Trump Rudy Hunter Harvard White House Joe Biden Miranda Jim Biden Tony JOE
Emma Jo Morris Describes the Legal Due Diligence Required Around Hunter Biden's Laptop

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:34 min | 5 months ago

Emma Jo Morris Describes the Legal Due Diligence Required Around Hunter Biden's Laptop

"This is America first one on one, we continue our discussion with Emma Joe Morris. So you start checking out we're talking to the you have a chapter in the laptop from health. In Miranda divine's book, you broke the story of the laptop from hell Hunter Biden's laptops. And you can be followed now at Emma Joe NYC on Twitter. Emma, so you get these additional documents from Bannon's team from Rudy's lawyer. Then what happens? Are you by yourself? Does the New York Post give you a team? Talk about it. No, so no, yes, I was by myself. I began first by well, first I gave copies to the New York Post, obviously, first and they had to take them into legal because this is obviously a legal landmine. There's so much personal information on this. Well, I'm criminal activity. Yes, exactly. And I mean, valid is the waiver that hunter signed to the computer repair guide to surrender his laptop. So this is crucially important after what a 60 or 90 day interaction. If you don't pick up the hardware you left there to be fixed, it becomes the property of the shop owner, which is a pretty standard arrangement. So you have to verify that. Yeah, exactly. Everywhere. So we had that copy of that contract. So hunter brings it in. This is any computer repair shop standard, if you don't pick it up in 90 days after I call you, it's mine. He also didn't pay for the service. And he just left his stuff there. He cracked heads too. Right, apparently. They fall off the face of the earth, which actually does track. So anyway, that's so we had that document that he had signed. We had to match the signature somehow. We had to take that to legal, is this contract applied to us? Are we allowed to report it publicly? How much are we allowed to report publicly? What is it could be that he gives over his computer doesn't give over the contents? There's all kinds of legal questions about this when you're handling somebody's personal stuff and personal information that you have to deal with. So I start trying to check Secret Service records with some of the stuff that I had because there are dates and locations. Exactly. Right. Exactly and trying to understand, is there stuff that shows them here at some time? You're trying to just basically see if there's any other source of information that you can cross reference. So to make sure that this is January and not what more than 50 quote unquote intelligence analysts said that this is a Russian information operation.

Emma Joe Morris Hunter Biden Emma Joe New York Post Bannon Hunter Miranda Rudy Emma America Twitter Secret Service
How Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris Came to Know Hunter Biden's 'Laptop From Hell'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:50 min | 5 months ago

How Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris Came to Know Hunter Biden's 'Laptop From Hell'

"Welcome back to one on one with me Sebastian gorka and breitbart's Emma Joe Morris. Emma, I'm curious, I'm not a journalist, if anybody calls me that, I correct them very, very rapidly. But I'm very curious that I want to want you to walk us through the inside story, give us a little bit of inside baseball because I love the New York Post. It is, I believe the oldest extant newspaper we still have founded by Alexander Hamilton. So as you're breaking this story of the laptop from hell, what is it like at the post? What is your management think about the impact your coverage is going to have and then walk us through is just before the election, Jack Dorsey, Twitter and Facebook just memory hole this orwellian New York Post story just has to disappear. Yeah, I mean, so we became aware of this laptop in September of 2020. So just before the election, about two months before the election. Was it through Rudy or Bernie or yeah? So I can tell you that. So Steve Bannon has a producer named vish who I knew from New York. He's from New York. He was not previously in politics. This was his first job with somebody political. And I knew him from my days back in Hannah. I used to hang out with him a little bit. He was friends with some mutual friends, and we had kept in touch, and I went to the New York Post in any way. They obtained the laptop or Rudy does actually. And then Bannon becomes aware of it. And these are copies, right? So the story. Certain people to download the hard drive. Exactly. Exactly. He gave, well, he gave Rudy's lawyer the first coffee that was out and they were looking at it. Oh, multiple laptops. One. A one, because they were two in the stool, weren't there? No, well, I think there's 300 laptops in circulation. Wow. The post had one. Okay. And that was the one that went through Rudy. And Rudy called Bannon because there was so much China on there and Rudy knew that Bannon was the guy for that. And decide, they need to get this out into the press. So Bannon's producer, I knew from years ago, and he was telling Dan and I know somebody an editor at the post, you got to get in touch with. And she is going to know what she's looking at and you better call her. So I got a call from Steve Bannon who was actually on Yankee poor. I'm Jewish. So I remember that way. Very intense holiday, actually. And he calls me and he says, I have to Steve actually called you. Yes. Okay. Bitch texted me and said Steve Bannon. It's a big deal. When Steve Bannon doesn't get somebody else to call you, that's a big deal. Leave a story. Oh, you don't miss it. Of course. And sex is a big deal from Steve. Trust me. Especially at 3 a.m., which is when he used to text. He carry on. So this randomized text me seems about to call you, don't miss it. I get the bone. He says, I have a story that's about to change your

Rudy Steve Bannon New York Post Sebastian Gorka Emma Joe Morris Bannon Vish Breitbart Jack Dorsey Alexander Hamilton Emma New York Bernie Baseball Hannah Twitter Facebook The Post China DAN
Breitbart's Political Editor Emma Jo Morris on Joe Biden's Knowledge of Hunter's Business Dealings

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:03 min | 5 months ago

Breitbart's Political Editor Emma Jo Morris on Joe Biden's Knowledge of Hunter's Business Dealings

"I don't know what he was doing. I know he was on the board. I found out he was on the board after he was on the board. And that was it. And there's a lot of time. Isn't this something you want to get to the bottom of? No, because I trust my son. But that doesn't pass the smell test. It's like, when you're a vice president, isn't there a higher standard? Don't you need to know what's happening with your family. Don't need to put down some guardrails. Unless there was something that was there was something on his face that was wrong. There's nothing else face that was wrong. So look, if you want to talk about problems, let's talk about Trump's family. I mean, come on. This is amazing. Nothing on its face was wrong. Let's not talk about me. Let's talk about the Trump family because yeah, reasons. That is the sad pathetic old man who bear Bailey bears the title president of the United States, talking about whether he knew anything about his son's business relations. No, I didn't. But just stop asking me questions. Let's get to the truth about the actual knowledge that he had of Hunter Biden's corruption in so many different ways. With somebody who, well, broke the laptop from hell story. We are delighted to have her in studio. She is an awful terrible. Maybe because she spent far too much time in Canada. She's Emma Joe Morris. She is the political editor for one of the most powerful organizations in the world that's on the right side. It's called breitbart dot com and she is in studio welcome Emma. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. So first things first, I'm going to ask you about your background. How you get to bright about where you were before that. But just to reaction to that random act of journalism from axios where we're here to see how old guy get a little bit touchy at the end, but first say, no, nothing to see here. Yeah, I mean, it's pretty unbelievable, especially after all of the reporting from the New York Post. I mean, the first story, the first story was addressing that claim, specifically, which was that he didn't know. So he was kind of skirting by saying my son does what my son does and I don't have anything to do with it and nobody had anything to say actually you do until the post reporting, which was the first story. Vladimir from burisma says, thank you for the opportunity to meet your father. And that was an email that we have the actual words of the originator who it's going to thanking Hunter Biden for having me meet what your daddy. Yeah. And then obviously, you know, a couple with that story of the same day. We had the story of The White House leaking conference calls to charisma. So obviously he was aware, obviously, they were helping each other. And the way that they were kind of making this whole thing look okay if you don't have the emails in public view was they weren't being paid while Joe Biden was in office. So that was kind of the plausible deniability way that they

Hunter Biden Emma Joe Morris Donald Trump Bailey Breitbart Burisma Emma United States New York Post Canada Vladimir White House Joe Biden
UPenn Transgender Swimmer Sparks Outrage by Shattering Women's Records

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:46 min | 6 months ago

UPenn Transgender Swimmer Sparks Outrage by Shattering Women's Records

"A former coach swim coach apparently. Coated and daily mail, whereas the Emma former swim coach Emma McGee voiced her support for Leah. The name of the biological man who just switched over to female and one the competition for the University of Pennsylvania, I expect nothing from the University of Pennsylvania. I made a mistake in saying that Columbia is competing with Yale. The competing with the University of Pennsylvania, but everything in Philadelphia has been destroyed by the left, including the city generally. So it's not surprising that this happened that UPenn and nobody and nobody says, you know, we really cheated winning this competition. We cheated. It's called cheating, my Friends. A 5 year old would understand it's cheating. Nobody gives a damn if you want to change your sex. That's your business. It's my business if you cheat. It's not my business if you change sex. I wish you a good life. A decent human being would not use this in order to cheat and win record record speeds in swimming. A father of two girls who were swimmers spoke of his anger. We have a great video at prager U by a high school girl. To have the guts to speak out against this. No one spoke out against it. Now one swimmer. Not even the swimmers who lost.

University Of Pennsylvania Emma Mcgee Leah Yale Columbia Philadelphia Swimming
 Police say Liverpool attacker bought bomb parts for 6 months

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

Police say Liverpool attacker bought bomb parts for 6 months

"British police say the suspect who was killed in a Liverpool taxi explosion spent at least six months buying components for a bomb and appears to have acted alone bust Jackson the head of counter terrorism policing north west England says Emma also will mean had rented a property in the city in April could have been making relevant purchases for device at least since then Jackson adds investigators so far have not found any of the people of concern detectives are also piecing together details of the dead man's life and

British Police Liverpool Jackson North West Emma England
The Life of Anna Leonowens

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:31 min | 9 months ago

The Life of Anna Leonowens

"Anna leeann. Owens was born and harriet. Emma edwards in india in november of eighteen. Thirty one anna came from a mixed race family. Her father sergeant. Thomas edwards was english. Her mother mary. Ann glass scott was the daughter of an anglo indian. Marriage on anna was just three months old. Her father died and her mother remarried an irish catholic corporal named patrick donahue as a result of patrick's unit assignments. The family moved frequently but eventually settled on a city on the western coast of india in eighteen. Forty one some of anna's childhood remains murky anna and her older sister elisa attended the bombay education society's girls school which was known for admitting mixed race daughters of deceased or absent military fathers but in her memoirs and i wrote that after her father died and she and allies were sent to boarding school in england and returned to india as teenagers. Whichever's true it's clear that animator purposeful effort to hide her ethnic background and lower social class on christmas day of eighteen. Forty nine anna married private. Thomas leinen owens who was an army paymasters clerk from ireland. On the marriage license thomas combined his middle and last names making them the liens after her marriage anna cut off all ties to her family. In india in december of eighteen fifty anna gave birth to a daughter selena but the baby only survived for seventeen months in eighteen fifty. Two and thomas emigrated to australia while on the boat. Their son thomas was born tragedy struck again and baby. Thomas died at the age of thirteen months during their four years in australia. Anna and thomas had two more children. A daughter named avis in eighteen. Fifty four and a son named luis eighteen fifty six the following year in april of eighteen. Fifty seven the family moved to malaysia. Where thomas found work as a hotel keeper. He died suddenly two years later. Anna was left alone with very little money and two small

Anna Anna Leeann Emma Edwards Thomas Edwards Ann Glass Scott Patrick Donahue India Bombay Education Society's Gir Harriet Owens Thomas Leinen Owens Thomas Elisa Patrick Mary England Selena Ireland Army Australia
US Open Day 8: Djokovic vs. Brooksby

The Tennis Podcast

00:46 sec | 9 months ago

US Open Day 8: Djokovic vs. Brooksby

"Eight of the. us open. Anna's we come to you. We are watching novak djokovic. Sit in a meditative state at the chair. Midway through his fourth-round match against twenty year. Old american jensen brooks be. He lost the first set. It has been an epic second-set with still in it. Jovic leads five games to brooks spear serving. Two five to stay in the set to five does not tell the story of this set of tennis. There was a twenty minute game in the middle of it in which books be broke eventually the joke of which served to to get things back on track but rich being the guy that he is immediately sees the

Jensen Brooks Jovic Novak Djokovic Brooks Spear Anna United States Tennis
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"We still we definitely got to have that ashes episode next year. Yeah. So we had him twice differently dot care if we liked him so much we got him back straightway. Yeah. Plenty to chew on that and I, think obviously even unintentional I think we've our eye on this twenty twenty, two deadline haven't way. Of the rollout of this new curriculum, the curriculum form. So I think everything doing is kind of got that flavor as that thought that Lens I think that third theme that emerged about research informed practice kind of connected to that wasn't it because we're all kind of very excitedly consuming everything we possibly can, and in some cases creating as we try to get to grips with curriculum reform. and. Then bring it right back to. What I perceived to be and who I perceived to be the most important people kind of in this whole education game, which is the teacher in the room and. A brilliant episode an interview with Dr Judith, Nin Book ended the this season about teacher agency fiber and she did the on very short notice with some big technical issues in the background and she was just brilliant. Wasn't she she was brilliant the legend. And of. Corona virus happened. it it. It didn't stop us and I've got to say for those listeners I haven't gathered this already tom is an absolute technical wizard as well as being you know fantastic in enduring and making sure that this podcast indoors in fact I've gotTa tell you as I was walking out the door little. Did we know that you know it would be another five months before? So each other again, he thrusts just a few things into my hands won't being you know a headset microphone. subtly. I'm just GONNA give you. A little did I know it was all of his master plan to make sure that the past? Meeting in the office where I was frantically stuffing is into a bag of. About four days before the booted off campus. Excited that. I mean if a massive thank you and well done to Tom Breeze for helping to keep this podcast going because Yeah we're part of it. We did say this is this is dropping dropping you in a little bit last year say which our favorite episode of the year at being or favorite moment I'm just trying to think what might have been I must admit I. Do have a soft spot for first both massively getting the giggles in the episode. Oh, the cake fighting. With that was an excellent episode. Yeah I really enjoyed that. Wasn't there I'm just I'm just scrolling through our list of episodes which you do because your phone has died I'm just thinking now I was a big fan and slightly in awe of perfasive James Yes actually right that was great was named Best David James Another one, I'm I'm really proud of Actually A. Tow Gina Saunders I really enjoyed the episode and. Yeah, it was. It was lovely to be in school recording a couple of times but it was. Definitely do so any teachers out there who would happily host does obviously Kobe Safin. What are you telling? What was your favorite?.

Dr Judith Tom Breeze Kobe Safin A. Tow Gina Saunders David James
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

11:11 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"With diagnosed working memory limitations. There are really quite well understood things that you probably ought to date to maximize his successor. Children in those situations on one of my contention one of the things I say is what works. Best for children with special needs works best for all children regardless of they need. No one is disadvantaged by best practice and say if you're if you're diagnosed with dyslexia then it's even more important that you get high quality systematic synthetic phonics carefully sequenced on well if your autistic spectrum. It's even more important that you have good behavior routines around you so that you can. You can predict what's going to happen when you walk into a classroom. If you've got working memory deficits is even more important that you have instruction chunks in Sioux bite-size sequences before you move on but everyone has working memory problems. Everyone suffice. We you know from distraction chaos. Everyone would get the advance you know be be more likely to learn to read with good. Phonics instruction say those are just free examples? So that broadly speaking this or the bigger argument that I'd make is as as as experts. Each's it's very difficult for us to see what led to our expertise as people successful products of the education system. You Insulin says why are you so good at mass y you say good in English why he say could a French science or when it's difficult to know is difficult to be able so what we do. Is We post talk rationalize and come up with just so stories about where our ability came from? But when we're when we're honest about this when we analyze where skill come from it comes from individual components the factual knowledge aggregated together free practice. Which over time become skill in one of the one of the processes that seems to happen. Is that with that? Is that the more you practice the less mindfully. You are of what you're practicing the more automatic it becomes the less you recognize that you're that you're in possession of knowledge which led to scale the more you think you think of yourself as just skilled and then when we kind of go into schools and say right. This is the scale. I'm going to teach you the components of knowledge which built that scale. We end up almost pulling up the step ladder that we've used to climb up to where we are and say to children. Can you get up with answer? And of course. The most disadvantaged children probably con maybe the most advantage can find ways to get there which you might have done yourself. Does that make sense? It does to really quick fire questions. I'm trying to ask everybody. Student teachers have to research. They have no choices. Par The course if you could give them a juicy topic what would it be Well it depends on their on their sort of area of interest so one of the things. They're I research question which were IRA research your which I. I'm not that I think would be fascinating for to find the answer to is. There's good reason to think that listening to a text being read aloud and trying to read it. Independently and silently at the same time is counterproductive because your own internal reading speed is unlikely to be exactly the same speed as Raider and so your more likely to miss things. If you're a good independent radio light to block out what you're listening to. If you're poor independent radio lightly to put the extend just listen but this is a practice. That happens a lot in school so I think it'd be really interesting to sort of evaluate the extent to which if comprehension is the aim of reading particular texts what the effects are trying to follow along as a reader reads are because as I say. There's good reason to think it's negative but I think I think it was done was actually done that. Study Okay and finally. You are a teacher once in a classroom. You've moved on and you must see loads of teachers loads of practice. You experiences much wider. What one thing do you wish you knew? Then I guess that's a big question. I think that if I had to reduce that down to one thing it's not so automatically assume that the people who were in authority at the schools that I worked knew what they were doing Because I I did. I saw if they told me to do something I'd think well they must know must be good reason for this and so I kind of dampened my critical Faculties d'Ivoire I was told and then struggle and then internalize the failure. Geigy must be may are. I filed. Not The advice of given poor so I think my best advice for any teacher is to be professionally. Skeptical and professionally skeptical. Because you can't just poo poo everything but it's critically evaluate new ideas you know to be open to the fact that you're wrong and there are new ideas out there but not take any on faith if there was any golden thread. I think that came out today and it just struck me there in listening to. Daito again was how we work with and how. We put things in place for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. That was really kind of recurring theme. That came up through the day. J- you think. Yeah it is making me. Think about a thing that came out from the Education Endowment Foundation the other day another one of our favorite sources of things about her guidance on how to spend a pupil premium which is the money that schools gap four sort of additional money according to the number of people who are disadvantaged and the ethnic the point that you shouldn't do so special gimmicky things with that money that actually good stuff is good for everybody not yet. There isn't such a special good stuff. That's that's good for disadvantaged peoples in the same way that David Di di they're saying there's not special good stuff that's good for people with special educational needs it. Good teaching is good teaching. And I think that's a really nice kind of thing to chew over as a teacher. You just made a great point there at the about people premium and and how it spent achy that kind of links to what Gareth. Rain said the start about what he's managed to achieve. He talked about resources time as a resource. And how he's Kinda got curriculum team together. Maybe that's the way to do it. Maybe is buying every member of staff in school. You know buying the ticket to research. I'd come Ray may be. It's how you allow the time and space for teachers to focus on pedagogy to focus on that the classroom practice. Which is the frontline stuff the non gimmicky stuff? That's in the realm of that control that you know that it's possible to help all teachers. Whatever stays in Korea get better at new hope? That's what they want to get better at first and foremost definitely and I think the other thread that ran through going all the way. Back to Dillon Williams point and also point that was made in some the main talks which we don't have the Audio. Is this really important? Thing to bear my particularly. If you're new you're going out trying to make everything as good as it can possibly be. Which is that. You're not GonNa find the magic bullet. Necessarily nothing works everywhere you know. Nothing's going to be the kind of answer. Everything keeps moving on so it's a process of constantly kind of checking and reflecting and keeping up to date with things and bringing new things. It's not the source of all or nothing black and white. Oa found it a bit. Like we're Kevin Smith Dr Kevin the other day saying you know what if a pupil justice the hand up and says miss? I think I've reached my potential. You know I'll say I think I've got this teaching now retire. It's not going to happen and I guess that constant cycle of inquiry a that was a theme From John Tom sets work. That we're GONNA talk about a bit more in a moment. Headteacher at Huntington School in York. He has all of his teachers. Everybody who he employees is contractually bound almost to engage in regular inquiry. So you know that there is. There is a very clear wave in education. Now which is I. Think helping to re professionalize teachers and to invigorate teachers and it says you know you can try to gather your own evidence. Yes we might not be evidence based so there is a bit of a of contention for us to chew over there in a later episode. But you've got the power to to try something I to ask a really clear question about your practice to gather some data to do some deep reading. Maybe some of the sources that you've heard today and to be empowered on your own with the help of this if if you've got that support in school to make changes that are rooted in what works. Yeah definitely and hard. It may sometimes feel to have to do some of this stuff to be perfectly honest you know. I qualified as a teacher in a culture. Tony what was it? Twenty years ago I guess or fifteen years ago Just fifteen years ago in which absolutely wasn't a culture to do that stuff and after five or six years in all honesty. I was really bored. I'm sure somebody would say to me. Well why didn't you go and become a head of department? Why didn't you become a? Why didn't you go to senior management because it didn't want to just wanted to be a really good teacher? Yeah Yeah and APPS and so they sent a clear message here Achy. That is enough that is okay and can be satisfying and can be fulfilling and is probably. I would talk with the most important jobs in the school. Yeah definitely and I'd have to say I'm liking this podcast format because we barely done any work. Forty five minutes into this episode. So thank you to all of the people who's audio. We have padded this episode out with so far I mean they were absolutely fantastic and really generous and very very kind they were but I guess we did our bit in the day we had the graveyard shift But I am going to give. It will shoutout to all the expressive arts teachers out there. Sometimes at these big conferences. I mean it is a big conference. Now we talked about this being Ordering talked about this being grassroots. Start BUT ACTUALLY. It's gains momentum. Now I sometimes feel is drama practitioner occasionally when I go to conferences and sometimes when I read more generic books about pedagogy that drama very seldom gets mentioned in La the examples about how to apply some kind of of these evidence based pedagogy so I felt that we had GT. I was really really pleased that they accepted our our paper proposal. Because even though we had quite a small relatively small amount of people attending our presentation I would say somewhere in the region maybe twenty. I hope that for them..

La Huntington School IRA Education Endowment Foundation David Di Geigy Daito Korea Gareth Dillon Williams Rain Ray York John Tom Tony Kevin Smith Dr Kevin
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

10:45 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Hello and welcome to another episode of the PODCAST. And it's just you may but we've got some Some virtual guests and some adventures to tell you what. What's Yes we've been out on the road again. We attended a conference Very recently at Cardiff High School in South Wales for the first ever research Ed Comrie Conference. Yeah conference with the difference. Because we've been to one or two conferences ourselves but always tended to just be aimed education. Academics has never been a teacher in sight but for the first time we went to that. Raby Sta Conference. That is entirely created with teachers in mind. Yeah it was excellent. It was a real buzz about the place. They were all some students on our current program who present Some teach students shout out to them. So the really nice mix of practitioners from all across different aspects of the of the profession. And we were all there together to listen to some keynote speakers. There was some parallel papers. There was a lot to choose from wasn't a year there. Were absolutely lo two sessions and some of them with some very big names people who've written books that we've read so even reviewed on the podcast. It was a a difficult decision. I wasn't working out what to go to but it was. It was certainly exciting. Room is absolutely full of teachers. Who are giving it their Saturday to be there. So we've got a clip for you just to kick this off to give you a little bit more of an insight into the work of Research Ed and to give you an insight into why this research had come reinvent was so special and important. Yeah we've got Gareth rain. Who is one of the organizers? He's a friend of the PODCAST. You may have heard him on the curriculum design panel mega episode a few weeks ago so we interviewed him down the line from his school in. Paneth and asked him what it was. All about. So Gareth you're a big mover and Shaker in the wilder research ed so I guess you'll probably the person to ask what is it. How did IT COME TO BE? What's research had four? I'm amid tall. I'm nobody in the ruler so research adds started about seven years. Go relea- where told Bennett no-doubt in conversation with lots of people had this idea of getting teaches together on a Saturday so that they could talk about the idea of how research could be used in their costumes and so he got together with Helene? O'shea I hope I'm pronouncing her name correctly under put a tweet out and said if we were to run such an event may be for about ten pounds I think. Do you think that people would turn up and within an hour? I think they had enough people that responded to say yes. I definitely would come on Night the the field of dreams Kevin Costner. Few bill did they will come. That's exactly what's happened you know. The rest is history so they've had now events in countries in every continent apart from Antarctica. They all always vary widely attended at a nate. Have the national conference in London. Each which is always a huge event now in in the calendar. Fantastic I mean. Is this something for student. Teaches and keep tease early career teachers as well as more experienced members of the profession. And you often hear from them. You know I'm just worrying about the nuts and bolts. I just want to keep them quiet and sitting down but actually is this something in it for people who are new to the profession. Everybody so Student teachers even people who had just considering going into teaching I would say could attendant should defend research events. They are despite sometimes the apparent dichotomy between different ideas. On twitter they saw open to everybody so heterogeneous emit makeup in terms of the speakers. A A a very welcoming events on it's great to see the different age ranges. Probably I would say it would be more so under certified's when you're actually up the events but there's people always through retired teachers both speaking and being part of the days and I think that's absolutely fantastic. And we hear a lot of our perceived gap between the world of education and the world of people working away in the classroom. I'm trying to close that. Gap is explicitly. Part of what we're doing over here in Wales now you know. It's written into the design of our teacher. Education programs is something we really need to begin on within doing. So what do you think the challenges are in trying to achieve that and I guess apart from Research Ed's Where do you see? The solutions might lie. So one of the major challenges is is time Another interesting aspect of a research Unwind being successful in how it's been successful is the fact that people are willing to give up a Saturday so to have people at all stages of their career who want to pay their own money to turn a bonus out today to listen to great speakers. I think is incredible. If you divorce me ten years ago this would do business success. I probably wouldn't have faith that Tom had said Noxon. Today's precious weekends pressures for family. Tell him for catching up on all the things that teaches fight so difficult to do during the week yet. This grassroots way of working seems to be flourishing so Natural Guide in Erie Wales. But it's great to see so I think. What are the challenges? Despite the fact that they've been successful successful is time. It's really hard for teachers to release people from the classroom. Of course. There's always accustomed with that. I think if we can maybe strike a balance between how. We're able to do that so I'm teaching of Saint Joseph's school here Tickets from the school so teaches didn't pay. I'm we allowed. Our teachers will attend the event on now. Would've Irene set days in the year will be given over to that so that Saturday working will be given back to them where we don't have to have in school so I think schools can be creative in terms of how they do these things so that would be one way of tried to deal with the challenge. I think that something else that we didn't jokes to school has really worked for us on that was to set the curriculum development team. So if I go right back to to suit off to the publication of successful futures we decided in suggests that we wanted to look at what we do in the school to review everything on to think about what we should change in how we could change it and so we established a curriculum development team of five people within the school so from relatively creatures right through to his head and between us we read lots of lots of books journals a blogs. Listen to podcasts. I Nev- we fed back to each other unbanned. Those fights them went out to the teachers across the school. Undone chatted about ideas on we even provided digests of stuff. So we said you might not have the time Toledo love daisy student. Seven minutes about education but here all the things that we think you should know from the book and then hopefully you would then use that to go to read the book. But if you haven't got these are the things that we think could help you and impact upon you in the classroom practices school. So those kind of digests At which we had down pressure looting sessions will really help. I think Ta stop so I think the schools could be running such a days or after school sessions. Leads time clubs. I know all these sorts of things are going right now. I think it's a real gold at age of the use of research in schools under the ideas of teachers doing it for themselves and a really nice message there but this isn't just something for senior management for the top brass in a school. You're making it clear that brand new members of the profession of something they can bring to an established school environment. Yeah absolutely under something. That hopefully is happening in universities now and other and I do see it happening through the students. The we've had just here in St Joseph's school is that they're being given these messages right from the stuff to decorate. So they're being told that you should be research informed and that you should not only try and access the the kind of books and journals Electrodes are recommending but also to go wide then to try and even develop the ability to undertake enquiries and so those people will be able to go into schools already working in that way and then helped me be called. Who Only told Nikolaus? You have done that in a long time. We have never done that kind of thing so they will become valuable within schools because they will have the skills to help by this and it looked like it was a really successful event. Research had come reap the first research at Camry. Does that mean this going to be another one? We hope so obsolete. We're we're in discussion with Heading no we've at kind of the provisional date for next year so we just have to try and make sure that we're able to cross the t's and dot the i's Aman if we can we'd probably be left until announced that tate sometime suits hopefully still within this month of much. We'll keep an eye out gareth. Ray Thank you so they have it. Gareth rain if you build it. They will come in and they indeed did come. It was really full hall and we started off. Didn't we with Not The man himself in the flesh but a video message from a giant of education search. Yes Mary My. It caused him. Saint Dylan does because he's going to listen. That's okay. We're not breaking the whole room. Mary Sorry Dylan see if we still employed yes you had a video message from Tila willing. Because he was on a plane when research at but he is. He's very committed to the research at movement isn't he is and he gave us some really great food for thought at the start of the day that actually because we were presenting. We'll talk about this a bit later on we presenting at the end of the day and I was a bit nervous at that to begin with because I thought Oh gosh. I'm going to be waiting the whole day. Not going to be able to really get into the other speakers because I'm GonNa be worrying about mine but actually I found it really helpful because everything every new presentation kind of gave me a new spin or or shed light in a different way on what we were going to do in the afternoon so I actually found it really helpful starting wave Saint Dylan Speight Mama for the English because Dylan William here. When I was first teaching back in the nineteen seventies. I think my attitude towards research in education will is exemplified by the story of a man who's walking his dog in a field and a hot air balloon comes into view above his head and the man of the basket leans over says. Where am I on? The ground says bloom thirty feet above my head.

Gareth Cardiff High School Raby Sta Conference Saint Dylan Ed Comrie development team South Wales twitter Kevin Costner Saint Dylan Speight Mama Mary My Saint Joseph Paneth O'shea bill Antarctica Erie Wales Wales Bennett Dylan William
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

16:40 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"I'm kind of ashamed to say that you know I have ordered some books and I am awaiting anonymous in delivery right now. Oh yes I still go weak. Yes yes happy. They were still going up so dirty now knows not intended to make you feel at anyway due to you but it is interesting isn't it. There is a very scary out there about the data that they've got about all kinds of ways go tate and not just an accident also things as well and you do wonder what they could do that if they really wanted to yes. Let's just ponder over that we'll see a lot of time to think about it. Think about it too hard. Okay so if I give you my tweets because you yes. You've you've tweeted on blog. So I I should blog tweets as well and this one is very short to the point. It's topical Blinken you may set so this is all of us who are now adjusting to a new life off working at home and meetings online conference calls and all that kind of thing. It's from Donny. Berger who is from Bloomberg TV and it simply says this not meeting your mic. Is THE KNEE REPLY. All loving so much. Because I've been so which on ninety seven meetings over the last two weeks just bang on the money was we're saying people as a celebrity eighty called at Burger Danny got yes backs Yes she's say right and not meeting might and misusing the dreaded reply all and does seem to be the preserve of the same. People doesn't it. I can say this in safety campus. It's fine you gotta social distancing and `isolation and restrictive measures go on for so long enough after this episode. Is Ed suspect? It'll go onto the longer after it's gone on forever renounce now I mean if there any silver linings these circumstances and I absolutely would not want to make light of a very very dire situation moment. But there's going to be so much comedy. Gold that has been captured on the recording functions. On the likes of Zoo and teams. I mean it's probably already starting to come out already but crikey some of the things you hear when people don't meet them. I not meeting like it's the knee reply. All of that person might get up to all of my laughter. This these five minutes of laughter. Okay right now. It's able to me now. Yes Yup Yup. Okay so I before we went into town I actually. I actually had a life and was able to go outside and And do some cultural things as I like to do. Given our tip to it before we actually even read you the article. I was walking to work. Gosh back actually. Working in our office I was walking to work and I was actually listening to Women's hour and on this particular episode there was an interview with a choreographer named Cathy Marston. Who was talking about peace. She had choreographed for Believe it was the royal ballet cold the cellist. I got very excited about this. Because there were a lot of cross curricular links going on in this interview. I'm not going to give spoilers by until I read the review of this piece but I actually run. I run you. Tom Did not listen to this as I was walking along and I was excited about it. And so I-. Judy went to see a a live stream. Screening all the cellist. Choreographed Cathy Marston. Just before everything went into lockdown and I just thought I would read you a very lovely review of it because the review itself is really nicely written touched upon some of the interesting things. This is a a a review by will gone Pertz who arts editor at the BBC. He is at will go puts BBC IF YOU WANNA follow him on twitter and this article is entitled The cellist. Wilga comforts reviews. The Royal Ballet Work inspired by Jacqueline. Behn to pre. It might sound a bit rich coming from someone not noted for as good looks but beauty isn't getting the respect it deserves not so long ago it was all the rage and lighten -ment philosopher Immanuel. Kant was pro beauty. He considered it a form of morality Einstein said enticed the inner child activists and Wise Old Confucius believed everything has beauty but not everyone sees it bringing it into plain sight used to be the job of artists. Authors and composers wearing billowing white shirts and splendid Frou frou collars last seen on Gironde Duran in one thousand nine hundred ninety s but pops new romantics were no match for the relentless march of modernism with its frigid. Less is more dogma and strict. No frills dress code. I blame Marcel. Duchamp. He was the hottest proposed. A urinal is a work of art back in one thousand nine hundred seventeen. He chose it precisely because it was as he said. Anti retinal an unattractive site it was intended as an act of destruction. An Animal Exocet missile aimed at the heart of bourgeois art establishment aligned to a political class responsible for horrific bloody war. It was no time for beauty. Duchamp argued if art meant anything at all. It should speak the truth about what was happening. Which was ugly and base. His toilet scored a direct hit. Romanticism was dead. Henceforth beauty was enough and frivolous cynicism with the new religion for secular age. Music became dissonant literature. Became Fragmented Theater became absurd. An art turned ugly. Caught up among the collateral damage was classical narrative ballet the most romantic of Art Forms. Tutus and fairies had no place in the new order ballet was dispatched to the art doghouse to be consumed by the people of Tunbridge wells or somewhere equally is on cool where locals dress in Brown tweed and mustard corduroy and consider country life magazine not brand of butter and that is where Bali remains with some of the most beautiful choreography in music ever created written office elitist and irrelevant. It's a shame to see exceptionally talented dancers. Express emotions in story through graceful movement accompanied by full. Orchestra is a sensuous experience. Like no other. It isn't Porsche or difficult or any more expensive than going to a GIG or a Premier League football match. It isn't stuck in the Pasta. Cellist has just opened at the Royal Opera House in London. It is a new ballet by Cathy. Marston telling the true story of Jacqueline debris the prodigiously gifted postwar cellist whose career and life recruiting cut short by Multiple Sclerosis the tragic remanded tale of love and loss centered around a young woman in classic class in classic classical ballet. The difference here though is the subject of our heroine's affections isn't a lover and and husband the pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim but an instrument the eponymous cello. Barenboim gets to play the Goose Bay as he watches his wife enthusiastically. Plonker instrument brought brought vividly to life by the Royal Ballet's newly promoted principal dancer. Marcelino Somebody Lauren. Cuthbertson takes the role of Jacqueline depre-. And as you would expect from one of the finest dance. Sivy generation gives a wonderfully nuanced intelligent performance. The show begins with me. Very Young. Jacqueline played by student at White Lodge Ballet School at home with her parents where she's having a fist encounter with instrument that would make current international superstar by the mid sixties and to Cuthbertson who stands behind. Some Bay had shallow in minds playing playing him to the sound of L. Goes Cello Concerto. It is beautiful. He then left turn Peres says. She maintained a seated playing position which I must admit is less beautiful and took my mind backed duchamp and lavatories no matter it is one of very few awkward moments in peace full of newly found positions which races through. Dupree's life in sixty minutes. Barenboim enters the fray leading to a memorable party TWAT before dredd loons in the form of inexplicable shake in the cellists. Right leg the transformation from women at the top of their game to one confronting. An unknown terrorist is undertaken with enormous skill and sensitivity by Cuthbertson who's onstage chemistry with some. They transmit seller for him her cello with an intensity that makes the hopelessness of the situation. Profoundly moving to have a Taylor and such as hers is a blessing to have it snatched away so soon by a silent. Malevolent kallit condition seems so cruel to her and us. It is the tragedy of something truly marvellous being destroyed. That is not a romantic condition. It a fact of life. Jacqueline debris a reminder that beauty should be cherished not banished it is not an cool or nuff is an idea worth believing in striving for and appreciating that is the message of the cellist delivered with plum by the dances and Orchestra. You company them with a score referencing pieces by Elgar Beethoven Mendelssohn Rachmaninoff and Schubert Beautiful. An asset. Cry Rita get I just I is most is a beautiful beautiful pace and it and it taught me so many things I didn't know anything about Jacqueline debris I hadn't heard Alga And it just led to so many new things for me to find to buy into learned And Yeah it's and it was. It was accessible via streaming. So anyone could access it so again. You know making a making a way to point that you know this is for everyone should be and should our our children be able to access this. I think yes. They should an interestingly. Kathy Masters Mom has asked as well as it's only layers of complexity to work this piece and all that kind of contextual stuff at the start that review about the kind of You know the destruction of the orthodoxies of all the different arts around the first half of the twentieth kind of with our with our work hats on gas appoint Towards how we can perhaps make those powerful connections across subjects. That are new curriculum. Wales is calling for how it can be made to work. Yeah absolutely and again. That's something Another point that Mary might makes in Herbert She's a very short chapter in the book. About Cross curricular planning in the curriculum and she talks about starting with the wider context. And what was going on during the renaissance period. Let's say or post war as You know post I will wars as As will jump it talks about in his article if we start with that then. Maybe we won't end up with tenuous links between subjects. The had works held up as kind of these great works removed from that context. And just sort of help us this. This is a great piece of music. This is a great play or whatever you know so much easier to understand. What's going on when you know what's going on elsewhere in the world I suppose elsewhere in the arts. Yeah totally totally. So if you if you haven't heard of Jacqueline debris read about if you haven't heard Al Gore listened to it and if you managed to get a chance to see the checklist You won't be disappointed. Wonderful wonderful and I am going to bring this whole thing crashing back down to Earth now with mine. This is my role. Is You know you are? This is why we friends your perpetually the the high minded bringer of wonderful things just shed Ross from left field that just ruins the whole thing. I have a feeling this is gonna be quickey unsuitably brains. I do try. Do try to sit on this. Why actually this is A. This is a story from the Times newspaper on New Year's Eve. Twenty nine thousand nine so a little while ago..

Jacqueline depre Cathy Marston Daniel Barenboim Duchamp Cuthbertson BBC tate Blinken Donny Berger Royal Ballet Bloomberg TV Royal Opera House Burger Danny twitter Gironde Duran Al Gore country life magazine Wilga Judy
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

15:28 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"And hello welcome back to the PODCAST. Podcast that is still locked. Down and pair of podcasters. You still haven't seen each other now for several weeks several weeks. It does feel like that as well as time. Strange right now they face it Nehal. Yeah we've not been having our campuses being close to a snow for water week. I think There was two. I've I'm losing track me. Two at time has become strange. Tying feel suspended I feel suspended in time. We probably describe our circumstance. Right now sat in a car. This podcast down the line Because obviously we ought to be in the same place we are. We are social distancing from one another. So yes I in the car outside my dogs because everybody is sleep. It's quite late night. I don't have the luxury of any kind of guarantee or anything cars. A very good record in because they're very very dead inside their designed to kind of debt and old road noise and the engine noise. They're great space to record and But I am literally parked on the side of the road outside my house. I can pick up my Wifi from outside the House and Yeah it's Dark. It's cold and some people just won't pass but addicting. They sold me the link. We go to bring you this podcast. I feel I feel with surpassing ourselves. I think this is good. Yeah it's I I imagine you're probably you're comfortable high so you. My surroundings are nowhere near as as Quirky as yours right. Now I'm in the The tranquility of my study and Yeah I have no cocker Spaniel. You'll be pleased to hear a wandering around me. 'cause he's tie-dyed to walks. Because these self-isolating times we take the dog different shifts so got levingston walked to within an inch of his life or I'm just wondering if all the coding skin to be interrupted by the police coming past asked me whether my journey from my front door to my car was essential or not. The answer is yes it is. We hope that it might feel like proper journalists than some police manno tapping on your window. You Talk I live so we are going to bring you our traditional holiday light edition of Blogs tweets and stories from the news that we've gathered together Mine certainly are not particularly education related as usual. We haven't told each other what we've got an advanced but I can tell you that minor pretty far removed from the world of education deliberately so well one of mine is education related Quite short but the other one is definitely not related. Although I'm sure I'll I'll make some tenuous links But yeah hopefully you will find them of interest and if not you can always switch off. Please don't just stay with us if you can't stay with it. Just it can be freezing in the dark car recorded this. That's worthwhile yeah. Stick it out. Go the long distance for Tom. I'm going I'm going to start this off. You're going to start off with something. Work related this tweet. That came out on a very ominous day. Actually on the sixteenth of March twenty twenty which. I'm pretty sure was the day. That are poor Stevens. We're told that they could no longer be Going into school on their place but anyway this is not related to that. This comes from an a twitter handle at our S and school network. Which is an abbreviation of Research Schools Network? Which is an England based organization? I think have lots of connections with other organizations that we talked about on this podcast such as the Education Endowment Foundation. They have tweeted a quote from a guest blog on the education. Endowment Foundation's website And Quote at reeds treating implementation as a process not an event and seeking to answer the question. Does it work? Hia is how we believe. Our school can best improve. Student outcomes. it sounds quite dry. Leon are light episode but so I just thought I'd I'd mentioned white grabbed me and Tom and I have been an all of our co workers. Colleagues academic had been reading Mary. Miot book of late and She talks a lot about do wing more with less spending more time going deeper allowing teachers more time to think deeply. We've talked about this law in relation to quicken foils just rut really liked this this idea it. The the blog is speaking to senior leaders school leaders mainly but it just makes a refreshing point in the context of evidence informed practice in schools. Who Evidence informed. I dislike this idea that you know implementation is a slow burn Uninvolved a lot of collaboration discussion. Tiny get people on board and also that that really good question that's quoted in that tweet which is does it work here Because there are a lot of fire side than there are a lot of you know really important evidence strategies areas of focus that regain a lot of Menton in education. But I just struck me with this tweet that amidst so of some slightly more vitriolic tweets out there by you know retrieval practice cognitive science which is absolutely Acknowledged to be very very important in the world of education but I dislike the idea that you know with everything we should be asking. Does this work here. And how can we best? You know integrate this in a way. That's going to be right for us and Fowler kids. This is the theme. That would come up all the ones has next. We've talked about this move towards evidence. Informed research informed practice in schools and general. I think a lot of US welcome. I think it's a a real shot in the arm for the profession. But we've we've said more than once said with our friends from impact Wales. We'll said With Professor David James. It's so tempting for that to become the next management stick for beating people with all the next kind of quick fix or or you know sort of thing that the new broom imposes on everybody when they get appointed to a school. And you're and you're absolutely right. There are no shortcuts with this stuff and there are no black and white cut and dried ounces as much as some people might want them to be. Yeah absolutely and when I when I then sort of drill down into the block itself which is quite sure read actually. There was some nice reflect refreshing messages to to school leaders In how they how they grow leadership capacity and how they lead on on change implementation and you know change culture change mindsets and one of the big things that they talk about In this blog with this person talks in this blog by should name him. His name's Roger Higgins Director of Norwich Research School part of the education endowment foundations for search schools network and he talks about the platform for Good School. Implementation is to create the right lead ship environment and carefully plan for implementation as a process not event and he talks about the importance of Senior leadership teams teams working as teams Rather than You know as individuals sort of going around policing everything is. It was just refreshing and for any student teachers out there who have got aspirations for senior leadership roles on the nine. I think is a lot to be found by looking into sort of school culture and implementation of of research informed practice house interesting. I think are sort of mentality building up a little. A little kind of metaphorical drawer marked really controversial. Podcast episodes we should do. I know we said to be recorded. Christmas. Didn't we gonNA really let ripon creativity at some point after Kepler stiff drinks. I think I'm going to add to that. Draw school leadership culture Yeah yeah he said. He says that he says the changes. We're making twenty. Chip habits aren't easy so it's just nice. It's nice to hear that and I hope that it may be nice for any senior leader listeners out there to to hear that two and two You know to to know that we don't see the enemy we see is very very important. Leaders of change in definitely make the occasional Kind of spiky comments about senior leaders sometimes better you know I. I always was aware even even when I was perhaps as a as a teacher. The chalk face kind of cursing the latest Thing to hit my email inbox that they were only being hammered by somebody above them in the same way. Anna wonder whether perhaps it might be worth just putting out their open invitation for any senior leader. Who would like to maybe come on and discuss The complexities and the sort of the pros and cons of different ways of being a senior leader with us. Because I think that could be a really interesting episode. I agree and there's an offer if after I heard done Tom. Okay Kamata senior leaders really WANNA speak to you now. You're up you're okay. So I know we always say blogs and I think I've done this before ended up with a sort of online newspaper column instead but it it's it's effectively a bit like a blog. I suppose I'm cheating slightly This column in. The Guardian called the network which deals with technology and. This is an article that came out. It's written by John Naughton then. It came out on Saturday the twenty eighth of March so just a couple of short days ago. And I'll spare you the sort of fooling the to cope with the bit. That really grabbed me. was a comment that they're making about Amazon. The enormous online giant company Amazon and the role they played in this corona virus pandemic. That's hit us all And just to kind of quickly give you the the punchline of the article the last couple of paragraphs it says that this whole kind of situation with the corona virus pandemic reveals an important truth back to our economies namely the extent to which Amazon has become so central and so powerful he named checks and other journalists at this point. Julia Carrie Wong and says that she's pointed out the Amazon in the US is beginning to behave more. Like a government than the trump administration itself. the author likens the hiring by Amazon of hundred thousand staff and their two dollar an hour. Pay Rice that they've given their staff to twenty-first-century version of F Diaz famous works Progress Administration In in the Great Depression the company sudden support for small businesses around Seattle headquarters so that they might live to serve Amazon. Another Day is. She says akin to a government stimulus package on its decision to stop accepting non essential products from third party. Saleh's who uses warehouses essentially Mites to government style market regulation so the pandemic will radically transform. The Industrial and commercial landscaper Western societies loss of companies. Large and small will go to the wall. No matter how fervent government promises of support our but when the smoke clears in some kind of normality returns a small number of corporations ones that have played a central role in keeping things going will emerge strengthened and more dominant and chief among them will be Amazon. What will then have to come to terms with is. The Amazon is becoming part of the critical infrastructure of Western states. So to perhaps a Google and Microsoft apple is more like a luxury good nice but not essential and the only reason for keeping facebook is what's up in which case one of the big questions to be answered a society's rebuild once the virus is finally being tamed will be. Really difficult one. How should Amazon be regulated? I just found that really interesting because it is absolutely true to to see that Amazon is now becoming so big. It is almost like a kind of like a small country or a government or something in itself and those points about some of the things that he's doing over in America. It's almost kind of taking the reins of of certain things that are traditionally the role of governments And it's just kind of really interesting to think whether this is one of the things that that will come out of this situation a kind of realization that some of these companies are now. I mean you. You just couldn't imagine being without the they have an enormous enormous amount of power and there was. There's been some really scary articles by Amazon. Those are a really terrifying one about Alexa. Outsourced data didn't send you because I know you've got one in your swell just about to say before we started this podcast. I asked Alexa to switch on my steady lights. I'm going to say it's you know she'll switch off okay and funnily enough it some. You know it's something that my half and I've been mindful of since we've been working at home out today because you can you can mute Alexa Stop Her from listening because she does should took speaking speaking about like she actually exist. It does records you. Obviously you can you can. You can look at all your review it you can. You can delete all but does transcribe everything that you've said. Kind of create. It creates micro con recordings of things that it thinks. You're saying to her. It's bizarre so yes an aunt..

Amazon Tom US Education Endowment Foundation Alexa Nehal Menton Endowment Foundation Research Schools Network John Naughton Saleh Stevens Miot Mary Fowler Professor David James Wales
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

14:24 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Notion actually that something happens inside of us when we've produce something absolutely fantastic and how we feel about ourselves and our capabilities. There's a theme running through a lot of what she says isn't that we should maybe consider doing less but spending a lot more time over it and doing it better. I really quite like that idea that we we jettison some of the kind of dead were doubt of our schemes of work in order that we cannot. She spent some time to produce something. That is really genuinely impressive. Yeah it's it. I mean if we're sticking with the food analogy it's moving away from fast. Food Curriculums talks about banquet a bit later on in this chapter in how we we lay out a banquet in front of Luna's of of lots of different things and they have a little nibble each but they don't really get to kind of indulge in each fantastic new complex course. So Tom's right. It's about kind of doing more with less. But the less make sure that they're really really quality stimulus materials curricular materials so she makes strong case for good quality resources in our. She gives nice example each expire school. Who gives professional pastoral? Ooh What are they passed? Passed two peoples. She went to primary school and they've got these really beautiful artist pastels that they're using and she asks the teachers why and they say well when we tell the children that these what real artists us they respect those things more as well and I. It has an impact on on. They work in this. Got Me thinking about exercise books and it may seem to some teachers. It's a little bit onerous to be insisting that people's take pride and take time to make their books that good but actually that can have a real knock on effect how a people feel about themselves and their work definitely. There's ruth. Right article called kicking the Habit Office. Which is two thousand and eight or two thousand nine? Remember the top of my head. Which but she speaks to pupils about whether they see what they do in music lessons as being real music and she finds a strong correlation in there that basically. They don't see as real music. If they're forced to play on plastic recorders and chewed percussion and Edo Dodgy old hand. Percussion for box and all that kind of thing. They see it as real music if they get to play on the instruments that the bands that they listen to on their phones play with. So you know real guitars and drum kits and things like that so I think there probably is an analogy in all subjects there that if we give the kids the real authentic there. It is the word again tools for the job. They feel that what they're doing is real. Yeah I totally agree and and for drama perspective. You know that's you know seemingly innocuous things like when we choose to introduce them to the props cupboard if they've just got carte blanche access to it they're not necessarily going to be making really precise choices about what products they use. How they use them when they use them and the kind of respect they should have for the props that you've curated carefully as a drama teacher in your department so really important and she. She makes a nice point at the end of it. She says raising the significance of quality work raises the game overall. She says it's a question worth asking. What two actually look like when met with integrity depth an imagination so when you planning whatever resource it is. You're planning for for this project you know ask yourself. What does a really high standards piece of work in relation to this resource? Look like and how is the resource helping them to to achieve that sense of depth integrity and imagination? I suppose the next section kind of we know what's coming next don't we there's a there's a section of the chapter the basically says if we're going to do all of those things we're gonNA have to slow things down yes curriculum pace sto. She says in a fast pace curriculum coverage task completion is privileged and held in higher esteem than deep understanding. Those are my kind of summary Summary. Words of what Mary might is saying. So and I'm the security of contents if we're working fast we actually don't know how secure Li they've they've got the content down we don't know how deep their understanding as and actually what we we focus on is have the completed. The work have the competes. The work not necessarily to. What extent have they completed the work? She says that like some things in life and obviously in education take and deserves more time so the example I came up with Madama. Perspective here was analyzing playtex. This is a really delicate and complex interplay of content style and form so actually we ought to slow down How we work with people's playtex how we unlock and build up layers of knowledge understanding of what playwright is doing in the text and how that translates into practical embodiment annotation of. What's going on in text? Fats takes more time to serve more time. And this is one little thing about. Isn't it because as she makes the point on? Page forty eight. We spend all our time saying pace pace pace. Don't let the paste drop. Don't let things get kind of boring. But there's a difference isn't there between those sort of moments where everything sags in the kind of a single lesson context and the idea that we are. GonNa just stick on topic or stick with with a piece of work and really look at it from all angles. There's a to pace different. Sort of levels the micro level and the macro level is important not to confuse those two things. Yes yes at the micro level. I like the way she kind of talks about taking the time in a lesson to talk about unfamiliar words contextual details for et CETERA. You know I'm I'm thinking maybe from music perspective you know how much time is spent kind of building up the context around a composition. Is that important? And what new respect understanding will will earn a get an again. I can I can. I can think back to two drama as well. You know how much more will they respect? Shakespeare's work if they understood the context that he was working in when he was writing at the time. And how how? Much more informed with their decisions be when they then try to interpret it For modern science per se. There's definitely loads interesting. Said at the moment about this idea of the Canon isn't that these great works that we are encouraged to look out with the pupils. And of course we've sort of strip them of all of that context drag them out of their historical place in sort of stuck them on a pedestal kind of entirely sort of disinfected of all their connections and all that kind of interesting baggage. And maybe that is partly the reason. Why sometimes these great works in whatever subject we're talking about? They don't tend to grab the pupils. Because we've done that kind of bizarre. An artificial thing with them absolutely so as she says everything we do should be getting to the heart of the matter so you know in relation to what Tom just said. It's about really going deep trying not to decontextualize because you know nothing is created in a vacuum particularly in art so understanding how artis responding to that moment in time is is a really important thing to reveal FROLUNDA's she talks again about fewer resources but in greater depth so I'm thinking about stimulus material in drama. Here you know. How much time do we take? How can kids to understand? Get to the heart. The stimulus material that will be the springboard for their ideas for creating their own device. Works and finally. She talks about the final piece of the puzzle. I suppose if we're GonNa talk about going deeply into things and producing beautiful outcomes from the pupils and that is the fact that it's GonNa be hard. Yes absolutely so. She this lovely quote from Daniel. I WANNA say Carmen. At the at the start of this section which says true intuitive expertise is learned from prolonged experience with good feedback on mistakes. So again we've got that kind of I think. For both sides of the subject calling him music and drama process practice going through the rehearsal processes is such an important part of the success of our curriculum products. So actually the effort in time that we take during the important part of the learning processes shouldn't be skipped out and actually needs to be explicitly taught to our learners might might bear is Mike John. Lott will know is the devising process in where children are left to their own devices and expected to just be able to create a play from scratch without that process being very very carefully scaffold. It with lots of feed-back and lots of architect opportunity to show work in progress. Yes she makes a really nice point about the fact. You do. Need the scaffolding there. Because you're GONNA waste loads of time and produce loads of absolute rubbish. I guess if you don't have there but and then you need to be really careful about how you remove it so that it's not still there at the end and people are not producing very very similar things. I think we've probably got an advantage in music and drama that we've we always know from day one that we're going to have to create an atmosphere classrooms where it's okay to get stuff wrong because you know in all subjects. People fail very publicly in front of their mates. And so we're kind of very good at that but something where we always need to be a little bit. Careful I think is is this balance between allowing creative freedom but keeping it in in such a way. It's not just a total free for all because both ends of the kind of continuum that both extreme ends are going to produce really low quality outcomes. Yeah yea absolutely an and she and she comes back to time again. Didn't see an space at the end of this chapter and cheat. She talks about you know when something is something complicated is expected to be covered in one or two lessons is very unlikely that expertise can be developed. It makes a bit of a profound case. I think for the frequency of of our lessons. We are expecting a lot of our learners in drama and music to be able to to really kinda deeply immersed themselves in a in a process to produce a really great product when sometimes they're only with us once every fortnight so I get on my pedestal era and whether you feel the same it's definitely difficult is definitely logistical process. Involved in making sure that you forget stuff between lessons. Yeah but she makes some really nice closing points in the chapter cheap out the way that this will then allow the pupils to deal with new. And I'm familiar situations and make new connections and I think that's where we see that she's actually got a lot to say to those of us who are wrestling with ideas around the new curriculum for Wales. Just looking at that side of things from it as well as helping us get our heads around how to effectively teach out really high level stuff at key stage four and key stage five. Yeah absolutely love lovely quote here without the deep work so you know really going deep and allowing time to think deeply about the kind of foundational stuff in in our subjects. The new knowledge floats around without any organizing structure to it. So what might seem time can see me at. The start is actually an investment in time so that when more detail and knowledge is added it links to existing earlier knowledge which held together in the deep structure. I we talk about the elements of music and the elements of drama. You know having a deepen standing about where they come from and why they matter I think he's absolutely fundamental to them being able to use them an an stand how other artists of use them down the line so those were some of our thoughts our words of wisdom our reflections on the fantastic work of Mary Miot. He's given us lots to chew over his hopefully given you quite a bit to over two and for those of you who are in the latter stages of a teacher training program it might be a useful resolves few to start thinking about moving from a really kind of lesson by lesson. Focus on planning towards some of those big juicy questions when you've got a little bit more autonomy and sway over the curriculum decisions that you make for you your learners and maybe your department to so I suppose we could say we're we're just living through an enormous something to try slot from podcast imposed upon us with accident warning whatsoever. Yeah I guess we have so I suppose we talk about wellbeing we've talked. We've got enormous something to try. And I guess the The what we've been reading is Tom. Sherrington Daphne have a look at that. Blog entries called setting work for a long haul shutdown..

Tom Mary Miot Luna Madama Habit Office Wales Mike John Canon Li Sherrington Daphne Shakespeare FROLUNDA Lott Daniel
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

13:01 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Thank you sunny. So we've five really interesting challenging. Thought provoking presentations there. I think one of the themes that run through all five of them is the fact that you the audience student teachers are at the forefront of all this change in a way and the schools are going to be looking at unit very different way to how they might have looked at new entrance to the Profession. Impasse years which is kind of scary. I suppose so as a public service to you. We have got representatives from the government from consortia school senior leadership and academia. Who are now it for you to be thought provoking right back out boom with some questions. Now Emma's got one to kick us off to give you a little bit thinking time because it's always good to give people thinking. Time are Glamorous Assistant Lisa Fan. Who's got a microphone on the longest wire? I could find my office so anybody. Even the people in the naughty corner at the back potentially can ask a question As long as you wait for the wonderful to kind of get to you with the microphone but while we're while we're waiting for your brains to Kinda turnover. Emma has a question for the panel to kick us off. Thank you Tom. So I'm going to start by coming up this from a subject perspective. I am primarily a teacher but I'm I'm a drama teacher dramas specialist and actually historically. We've never had national curriculum so we have faced the big question of curriculum design day today and we have benefited from not having prescription but also we have climbed as a result of not having prescription. I'm just you touched on this sunny. In the end of your speech in relation to equity. I'm just wondering for our student teachers who are about to go into different settings and Nikki. You mentioned asking why I just wonder how we What advice we give them to give them the confidence to go into settings where perhaps there might be differences approached. There might be differences in terms of how quickly have slowly. They're responding to the curriculum reforms? It seems to me that there is a big weight on the shoulders of our of our avenue to qualified teachers in our OP. Starting teachers in the profession. So what advice would you give them to give them the confidence to go in and and tackle these these challenging circumstances? That isn't to anyone in particular I mean I would. I would say to be aware of the very range of situations in the schools that you'll be going into. There are some pioneer schools who've been curriculum pioneers and who've been heavily engaged in in one part of the curriculum design process may have experts in that particular area. There are other schools who've been professional learning pioneers. Who would have worked in that area? There are other schools who've not been pioneer schools but who've made a start on developing their vision for the curriculum there were other schools who are at this stage. Not so I would say my advice to you. I will be two to get really understanding of the school that you're going into and really get a feel for where they're at what stage on their journey there because every school is at a different stage of their journey so really understand the school that you're going into and working with build up relationships with the teachers says that you're in a position to be able to be a part of the team that is on that journey in that school And you're going in as a as a as a member and a valued member of the team in the departments and the groups that you're working in and you're with them as they're on the journey moving forward you might the only did I two. That is the when you go into your your jobs in in September. Don't be just kind of consumers. Don't just go into a school and think that the professional learning will be done to you and and that everything will just fall into place it. Won't YOU HAVE TO BE PROACTIVE. When you go into schools as I said it might it might talk professional learning inquiry. That can be a little niche. That can be where you are the experts on that senior leaders and teachers in school. We'll look to you for your expertise so I think that in the first instance might be an area where You know primary or secondary you really have an important role to play so I would. I am. Don't be shy. Don't go into schools and tell them where they're going wrong but don't be shy all so don't don't be afraid to to put forward your ideas. Don't be afraid to do a great job in your costumes and I make people want to come and see you. So Saint Joseph's is a relatively small school just a one form entry but some of the best practice I've seen has been from teachers in the first couple of years of their career and I'll happily send in more experienced teachers to go and see what's going on so the something that hasn't been mentioned at all so far this morning teacher agency A big part of this curriculum is is around each agency in around. You doing what you think is right for your students in your classes. You just keep doing that. Some people want to come and see what you're doing and hopefully will in from you too I think When I the very first thing and very I I showed up at the first school. I Todd in Cincinnati Ohio I was talking to a teacher and and I was being rather idealistic because I my purpose might motivation and teaching was was embedded within some pretty lofty ideals. like the for purposes are and the person turned to me. And said you think you're GONNA change these kids lives and I say I hope so. And he goes there just hillbillies with Afros and I stopped for a moment and my illusions of what I thought school and my colleagues and everything was shattered and changed because I went up against someone whom was like diametrically opposed to everything I was hoping to achieve as a teacher and school. So luckily though I had the luxury of being able to read Lots of books about the philosophies of education lots about the purpose and values and education. I had been able to set what I what my course was. My trajectory wasn't what I hope to achieve so I was firm my understanding of what I felt. My purpose was but also flexible so that I wasn't being rigid in my thinking but I could fall back on what I had read before and what I believed and I found allies and colleagues and comrades throughout the school. Who helped because survived those rougher spots and to kind of see kind of a more comprehensive approach that we as as a school are trying to achieve so I recommend That not only. Do you know your purpose but that you understand it and that you study and that you create your thesis about your teaching that you can defend that you can allow to be complemented by others. Thoughts added to but also that you can respond appropriately to things that you find challenging or that may be damaging in the school and to your pupils. It's time for someone to break out in the room. I I like to address the whole Pollen Column Williams Saqlain English Teacher Due to the uncertainty of qualifications moving forward On the Welsh I'm Jesse's let's say when compared to Scottish Irish or English qualifications will they be perhaps an initial disadvantage of value when applying to top universities like Oxford Cambridge? Nicholas Maw pittance you because I live within the gwent area on. I'm speaking specifically about pupils from trajano. Planet went as a whole all. They more advanced disadvantaged when applying to Oxford and Cambridge compared to more affluent areas. I know the process of universal application depends on levels. But she says he's taken to account as well Yeah so I I would. I would say firstly that we have got an independent regulator of qualifications in Wales Qualifications Wales. It is their job to leave the consultations on what the future of qualifications will look like The first one of those is out now. The next one is going to be out. I believe in the in the autumn which will be more of the specifics about the types of subjects and a number of options etc that that the qualifications will have That they are committed to ensuring that our qualifications are accepted and aren't treated equally. That is one of their fundamental principles. And that really is their their role as the regulator to ensure that the world whatever qualifications are adopted. Here are meet. The needs of learners are also universally recognised. I would say there are ready when you when you look at University applications. You look at admissions office universities except qualifications from all around the world they accept Scottish hires they accept the international back there except French. German Hong Kong diplomas they accept qualifications at the moment. From all around the world So it universities are not a not just accepting of a-levels so I would say. They used to a wide range of qualifications. What means for Wales though at the moment we don't know we don't you know until the court consultations happened until qualifications wells make the decisions about what qualifications are going to look like here. We don't know whether they're going to be very similar to to as they are now whether they're going to be different in any way that moments not being decided but it is fundamentally qualifications Wales purpose to ensure that they are Equally recognized and they have been working with US quite extensively in the development and designing the curriculum while through each of the rallies on as early the principles are not this what we are very very clever. Whatever qualification would look like? It'll be transferred about internationally and nationally recognized as it is even though we all keep juicy brand but archie says. He's art different from England for example numbered as graded so there is a divergence happening there but it comes back to the question about the Welsh. Gcc's in general they will be. There will be two nationally recognized and that is paramount. Importance of qualification wells when they offer the sweeter calls for any of the regulatory bodies then awarding bodies to work there after. But it's a good question. I know the daily Rag mentioned about the Consultation Document and so on so whilst maybe the consortium government might play things with a straight bat in an give an answer that might be a little bit generic. I'll just tell you straight from my point of view I think is quite straightforward really. I think all. Gcc's should be branded in the same way. I'm what I mean by. That is at the moment employers. Maybe then hired colleges and universities you can have from Wales. Let's say a plethora of different qualifications. Hey Jan dis what I did this. You could list them all. I think it might be wise that at a level or qualifications are given the GNC brand. So what I mean by. That is kids go to colleges They have a haven booty. Jesus they have a car mechanics so that when they come out of school at the age of sixteen and they say I've got ten. Gps's that's exactly what they have. They haven't got four. Gps's I'm one something else in two of something else at a higher level or lower level which can be quite confusing for some colleges for some employers of course that needs to be robust that needs to obviously ensure that across the board GCC's challenging and we're not dumbing down any of the qualifications. But I think in terms of any confusion in the system particularly later on them when you go to apply to universities and so on. It's absolutely clear that children in Wales. They have that set the qualifications. And there's no ambiguity. Right where are you going to send Lisa next I'm Scott Tireless. Pg SEE secondary drama. Student I kind of double question is so the first one is when going into school. A lot of approaches school will take is a carousel program to all different subjects. So what are your opinions on using Carcelle within your own schools within your own academic studies on? Then the second question would be when we look towards the new pedagogical style of inventively as we look towards the full call. Pepsi's as the car set itself actually crippling this approach because if we think about how we tried to teach about a topic and we gotta get into a set goal of they must learn this indepth knowledge of say drama where we look. Braxton of ASCII every kind of practitioner. How do we ensure the full corpses Gov our own subject Knowledge Kinda coexisting and Scott? Sorry to interrupt but speaking in practice we talking about a very limited amount of hours in..

Wales Emma Lisa Fan Gcc Nicholas Maw Scott Tireless Saint Joseph Cincinnati Nikki Tom Afros Pepsi Braxton trajano Cambridge Ohio US Jesse German Hong Kong
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

12:59 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"The case of semantic gravity if we put something in a specific context is easier to understand something that's easy so strong semantic gravity. It's easy easy and if it has week semantic gravity it means we understand it D- contextualized which is harder so strong is easy. The week is hard in semantic gravity so the example. I think one of the examples that we use drum you talk about. This was the idea of knowing about the battle of Hastings. For example the history teacher or you know something to do the Second World War II by a very specific contextual thing or to go right down the other end of the scale war thing. I mean that's a that's a massive thing. It's it's quite deacon text utilized. It's hard to understand understand and I suppose if you know the more you know about war so the weaker the semantic gravity so therefore the harder as the more you know about war the I suppose the deeper you go when it has a stronger semantic property fifty so you can look at the battle of hastings in a whole new way. Yeah and the more you can transfer things. I guess to new and unfamiliar things so as a teacher. We're not going to start by saying hey kids. We're going to learn about war today because that's really hard we're gonNA start with specific content student. Examples semantic density works a slightly different way round semantic density is in how many ways thing is understood in different connections so the example. We we use these ample gold. Didn't we have the things that we were looking at. In the context of science we look at in the context of science initially. And we said Okay you you could understand gold in just one way which is a shiny metal or if you're doing science you could understand too in terms of where it sits on the periodic table or you know what kind of and and structure it has a molecular structure or you could understand it in terms of its melting point or you know it's reactivity or something like that you start understanding gold Connecting it in a lot of different ways says semantically dance yet you become more semantically dense and that gets harder so it's going the other way round the more dense you get. The harder is because you understand the thing in more different ways and we actually took gold. Then didn't we took out science and we said the gold while actually if you're in if you're in sports if you win gold means you came. I if you talk about gold you know it's got got connections with being rich ch- it's kind of got connections. Maybe being slightly tastelessly rich go looking chain. Yeah exactly You know gold suddenly has an awful lot more understandings. Understand it in an awful lot of different ways and as a teacher. You've you've probably got to isolate it initially thought to give it You know far fewer connections. So you're GONNA you're going to remove all of its connections and give them much week.. Semantic density and only issue pupils get older more experienced in the world and understanding of the kind of metaphorical associations with things and you know more complicated implicated scientific associations with gold will start to make sense in a whole lot of different ways and connect to load rather different things and it semantic density will become stronger longer. So what is the point of this. I hear you ask well what this article goes on to do as he goes on to visualize the process by which teachers take hake these complicated things and make them accessible to pupils so it talks about the way that we will take a thing and initially we will present it to pupils who's with strong semantic gravity and week semantic density so we will put it in context and we will forget about those other meanings. We're just give it a meaning so that people can get it but we will then start to so we'll take the thing and we will make it simple and it's got loads of diagrams. It calls them escalators. You know you start off with it super complicated and decontextualize as teachers we kind of move down the escalator of difficulty. Not doing exactly that but then it makes the point that if we just do that with a Lotta things. We're not doing the pupils any favors because they then just understand a load things in separate context next unconnected transfer exactly and so this author Maton goes out into a series of lessons and watches as teachers. Take these things make them easy easy and then crucially repack them re kind of connect them to the rest of the world start kind of weakening the need for context so the people can start making things transferable and start making connections and of course in Donaldson World we talk about powerful connections so this is really the important and so so the wave this sort of diagram. Instead of just coming all the way downwards it comes downwards and then Carter changes direction starts going up puts again. So it's just a really nice way of visualizing a thing that we all do by instinct and giving it names and explaining why we do it and explaining that maybe we we do in different ways and in different directions in different shapes in different subjects on the rain is pouring down so yeah uh-huh not a festive side of snow falling rain outside Directly Bavaro desk here which has to leak so. I hope it doesn't so I'm just recommending recommending that as a nice example of an article that puts into words something that we'll do every day without thinking about it so that we can maybe think about artistic or explicitly. I think it's really great win. And it really kind of opens your eyes when we know this new got this kind of conceptual frame. I'm for it the theory behind it. You see it more more visibly everywhere. I I was on a school at Training Day on our school on our Of course the other day and student teacher was talking about a lesson that they had observed of their peers in different subject discipline and they describe is this lesson. Particular lesson was a geography lesson that was about aging populations and what the teacher done is as the starter. They looked at the case of an old person. and Lt Person It was like a case. Study Dawson pupils. You know how difficult their life be when they're when they're at this age h what might they need to support them. Before the teacher went onto zoom out and look at aging populations as a thing you know look impact look hurt consequences et cetera. And so you know hearing that tail just made me think there it is there. It is right there. Good to make it explicit because maybe we are sometimes guilty of just leaving them at the bottom of the escalator not repacking because repack difficult is good to it just sort of know that so that we can watch ourselves and check ourselves and make sure we do that all important thing lovely. Well done thank you. You're T- The two boys that based off of you okay. Oh you're not gonNA believe this random. It's you again on. It's something interesting. Dang that's okay because I've just taken a big swig of coffee. Not Why any no no. No it's coffee is coffee vice chancellor on his schedule it is are transparent. Mark those who could be in there all right so this is something interesting to me again. Is there Okay and I. I'm getting a bit SCIENC- here I think because I'm going I want to talk about something that happened thirty years ago this February. Oh yeah which is. That's the one of the voyager spacecraft at turned camera back at the earth as it left the solar system and took a picture of the earth and this has become an extremely famous picture and it is a picture I was aware of found it. It's starting to a little bit more. As as we approach the thirtieth anniversary taking of this picture I was aware of the picture but I wasn't aware of a lovely quote that came with it. That just Kinda makes us think a little bit so if you are sitting with your your tyrannical device in front of you listeners. You may be fire at Mr Google at this point and safe you can find the Pale blue dot photo. It's simply known as the Pale. Blue Dot photo and to save Emma the trouble. I'm going to show her picture of the Pope in you can see the earth. Wow on it's it's less than one pixel on this picture because for each was you know billions of miles over three billion miles away from us by the point that it took took this picture and you you can see it. It's just sort of caught in a in a bit of class from the sun and it's this tiny tiny Pale blue dot which which I knew out Out But I didn't know that that there was a quote. The went with it from a talk that was given by again. I'm not entirely sure how to pronounce the Call Sagan or saga and I'm sure but he gave a talk about this picture and I just thought that at this moment of pause in the year we could just have a little think about this and he says look again at that adult. That's here that's home. That's us on it. Everyone you love everyone you know everyone you ever heard of. Every human being who ever was lift out that lives every teacher of morals every corrupt politician every superstar every supreme leader every saint and sinner in the history of our species. He's lived there on a motive dust suspended in a sunbeam. Wow think if the rivers of blood spilled by those generals and emperors so that in Glorious Oreo triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of adult are imagined. self-importance the delusion that we have some privileged position position in the universe challenged by this point of Pale life to me. It underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish arish the Pale blue dot the only home we've ever known top and maybe you know quite apart from all the all the climate change stuff that's going on at the moment in the news actually just from a really kind of individual personal point of view. It's a great reminder when we believe that it's you know today's crisis is all encompassing and you know or maybe that what we do is is super important that maybe it's not really. ooh That's great when it just made me think about anyone planning assemblies. Oh if you cheat agree might need some really nice discussion. Yeah it might so you could use it for that and you could just use it to guess that's a perspective yeah we were talking about semantic gravity you. You seem to the entire. Yeah exactly but she doesn't do us good sometimes because I think we do bound up in in these crises of our lives and our work sometimes so just remember everything that's ever been even life on a dot. It tastes a fraction of a pixel SCIENC- feel ozzy's fields this too leslie thank you for that. Okay right it's me break just fish McAfee. It's me and it's something to try okay. Okay and this. Something try was inspired by a thread. That was kicked off on twitter by Tom. Bennett and for those as I. Don't follow Tom Bennett. He is founder of Research Ed He's behavioral advisor to the government in England and and many other things and first and foremost to teach He is many other and he he sent out quite an interesting Question into the twitter sphere and I shall read to you now on some of the things that came out of said question so hive mind colon. What is the best literacy intervention? A teacher slash school can make for year eleven set in January for the improvement of a wide range of subjects..

Hastings Tom Bennett twitter McAfee Maton England ozzy Carter Dawson chancellor Mr Google Mark Emma Sagan founder advisor
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

11:44 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Hello and welcome back to Amarin. Tom's PG podcast. We are very nearly at Christmas. We are and we are very pleased as to welcome a very new guest to olive leaf. PODCAST studio Bethune Rowlands. Welcome thank you very much. Would you like to just tell our listeners. Business a little bit about who you are. You are colleague got caught a little bit about what you do before we talk about your research case. So I'm a lecture here Cardiff Matt's I teach on the be a primary education with cute. Es Course I do it through the Welsh medium and with English medium. I also like to he he with. PG Primary Amputee Secondary. I used to be a teacher teacher for twenty years. And then I worked in University of South Wales before coming here to Cardiff and would it be fair to say that you are an early career researcher. I'm very early. Career researcher researched in my twenty s of being a primary teacher. I hadn't hadn't really in that role. I don't start to do research once I started in the university so I've been in the last two years active researcher. John Thank you very much and I think is important to say that we have an award winner in our midst. We're borrowing down to you wit. It is just such an accolade given what you've said about how how new to the world of research you are. So I'm I'm really excited to interview along with my lovely talk today about your research because you one and I'm GonNa get this route you with a joint winner of the British Educational Research. Associations Post boost appraised one thousand nine hundred and nine on your work entitled raising awareness of Dyscalculia. Did I say that rats correct within the educational setting tag so Beira. Yeah you a question straight off. The Bat are moving to you. Well I was just thinking because we are I guess gas quite early career researchers as well and we've been to the bees conference British Educational Studies Association and they are lovely. We Love Bees. Incredibly Nice US barrer though they are the kind of you know. They're the big league in our kind of will the British Education Research Association. They write the ethical guidelines that we all follow when we're doing doing educational research. The words on the grapevine is the it can be quite intimidating going to bear and presenting so just in case we fancy taken GonNa step up the ladder. How did you find presented at the mighty beer field? I conference this is my first ever conference so that You know it was. I hadn't I didn't know what to expect so sometimes listen carefully ignorant about it so when I competed I was assed part of my work for the postgraduate certificate in higher education I researched into dyscalculia and finish this work and it came at the time when you're to submit admits abstract to to be so I decided I will have give it a go and many of my colleagues at university South Wales at the time decided to do the same. I'm I'm was obviously delighted to find. Abstract was successful so I went out to create the poster and a little bit may be naive. Wasn't sure but I've never been translated this before to know what to expect and we went and we had absolutely fantastic time. They were very welcoming when we arrived. We were given stick with quite large stickers. We knew ten people. Also welcome you to to be I'd like to have Bacon Rolls No is very good so we saw with my presentation. I have to be they for two hour hour slots for people to become talk me about my project. Everybody was so welcoming. They really interested in the subject. They wanted to know more about it. on it was fantastic. There was nobody wanted to catch you out or be nasty and I was very fortunate. Many of my colleagues also were presenting at bureau so I went to their presentations nations as well and everybody was listening. You know some some vagrant questions but there was nobody there was very intimidating or nothing so they were fabulous fair-play they play sometimes. Naive not is just a good thing I think I think that's what I hopped on when I said to. Emma shall we make it podcast. I remember that you have no idea. No the idea. Now that's really reassuring to hear really reassuring and I guess before you tell us about your award-winning research. The first thing that we and I'm sure our listeners. I would really like to know is what as Dyscalculia. Hey So dyscalculia summarized is dyslexia Assia in maths. And it's not very well recognized or understood may be in the profession as maybe dyslexia is so research has proven proven that. There's so many children we understand what dyslexia is. But they just don't know the signs of a of identifying children with dyscalculia. Okay unlovely Segue to my next question how would we. And I'm going to say adults as well as as teaches working with with people's how would would we recognize identify this lifelong condition in ourselves in our people's so the key things you would be looking at really as the the the the as dyscalculia is a calculating so the inability under the quite being able to calculate and children children can't count very well the continually. It's ghetto point. Where they they? They'll get to ten eleven twelve. Stop up they won't show what's coming next then need support all the time they get directional confusion. So what you'll find is that children and I'm looking at a clock quarter past and quarter to the whole thing. They cannot identify the differences between the two. So it started. I I identified it from my daughter was very poor maths and I couldn't understand why she she. She wasn't really progressing as she. You should be doing and I was a teacher time and I must been teaching for about fourteen years and I remember one of my friends came to me and she said to me I you know. Maybe she's got dyscalculia. Oh cool and I remember. At that time. I was being in the freshman fourteen years and I didn't know what it was and from that point I knew I needed to research and help my own daughter so through that I really wanted to find out how I can help her because she she has difficulties with time turn the time them with money and place value is terrible and oversee the key things you want to teach. Your children is many to tell the time and times table table. She just could not recall. The memory retention is terrible. Can't recall timetable. And it is like the best I can describe it. Is Somebody somebody taking the hard drive out of computer and just taking place. You've taught something you've learned that you've given them strategies you've helped them. They've got it that day he go back the next day and it's like the heart driver's gone and and they've got to start again so it's changing the strategies of how we teach somebody to be able to get them to understand. You know the how to do master you break it down tables. For example with two times six is twelve and then just look patterns for example maybe four times six two and then look at the doubling of it and just those those key facts before going into anything else maybe relating thing it things but So that's how I started really the GENU- research in Dyscalculia and you mentioned in your research that very few teachers a train to work in this field and a real discrepancy between our our understanding recognition of Dyslexia In comparison with this Cockatiel. Why did you suspect this is? This is like a training lack awareness. I think at the moment in the lack of funding and in research at the moment in this area many researchers say say themselves you know That is time that Julia caught up with dyslexia. In you know that we do need to raise awareness. I think anybody. DT notice lex serious. I think the majority of would acknowledge that but when it comes to discuss cooler I don't think we do. And there's a lack of research untimeliness. It's at the moment and so really. I wanted to raise awareness from a personal perspective of my daughter who who really finds it difficult in maths and would benefit from the strategies and supporting children in multi. Sensory approach is really teach in the mud sense approaches. And the you know the same way as we would we dissect children's with wanted to raise awareness for my research work and guess end to your research so before we talk about the findings from your day and I really like to ask a bit more as well about multi sensory teaching purchase but will come to that in a moment. Tell us about your study. who was involved? What was your methodology? So how did you go about gathering data. I just kind of the nuts and bolts of that no problem well and they started the poster presentation what I did. I did this with students. I was working with. I wanted to keep it. My my main aim was to raise awareness with with the students within the university without Taito and so when they went out the two cases that they actually became more aware of what is this calculation identified children and how to support them and these were sorry gypsy these were primary shootouts. That's correct yeah. So they'll be primaries that these with Cutie as they were in level five's the second year and so I went about first of all I did a whole cohort lecture and I started the lecture really and I put a questionnaire out and I just popped it out tonight said Gino. You know I discussed earlier is have been identified in a one year out on placement did any children with children diagnosed and it came came back. There's quite shocking. Hotly any of the students at ever heard of the word they didn't know what it was so it was saying we went about then giving giving the lecture materials giving them ideas given approaches to help them to support their children when they go out to schools and then at the end then I would I asked them. You know from from the Tito's tight introduced to them what they use it in the classroom. And they were all under center them said they would put quite compelling starts he said a staggering fifty one percent scored zero zero be no knowledge of Dyscalculia and the remaining forty nine percents going between one and five so very brief understand very brief. She's quite shocking. As I you know everything that you in your hunch. That's right right and then I asked the students as well is when they were out on their placements. How many of the children were actually diagnosed with? Lee's discount Julia. I think one child was identified at the time of being identified with Dyscalculia. Yeah so the triangulating those stocks stocks. And you just go. Wow this is this is significant. I studied food then for my air may and found we went to a specialist dyslexia centre thirty of the children. All have specific needs in dyslexia quite severe to.

Dyscalculia British Educational Research PG Primary Amputee Secondary researcher British Education Research Ass Bethune Rowlands Amarin Julia US Tom Matt British Educational Studies As Cardiff University of South Wales Bat John Tito Emma
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

13:32 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Okay just before the music rolls on this one we're going to have a bit of a podcast I and put an and overcome clear stand emon Tom's PG podcast and I'm hoping we're hoping that you feel very And our tradition now is to do something a little bit lighter for the holidays which gave lots of food for thought and you would just as excited as we were in that coffee shop bit over-excited also a coffee was what I'd have sugar and Caffeine Standard Diet is an and so the teachers out there back relaxed session a little bit shorter the normal and we're going to bring you ends at at them what part so Tommy you're going to kick us off I am so yes we're just Easter time we did a blogger tweets an story spurs this counts as a blog it's a regular column he's standing in for our normal wellbeing slot yeah so something Russian okay on the subheading is the effects of this technique are extraordinary so dates to in one thousand nine hundred seventy four but judging from the media and many people I know it's the official paralysis leaving her unable to complete basic chores so this idea that stare in our to do list in a panic and I think we can all kind what to do and you really want to be productive in that PPA time but you kind of see any other and better suited to this era era of exhaustion and overwhelm Ban yes Japan we salute you Japan we do we're GonNa go to an international conference era think an excuse to go over then you add no further tasks to your plate until you finished at least one arranged in columns each task moves from the To-do call him to doing has the effects are extraordinary by limiting work in progress. You feel your finite capacity what's new job is one of your task it'll jammed things up for months wow yes USC before embarking on the next commitment become addictive a pattern and eventually a habit and I can relate to that they're all they're all edge I'm not even GONNA look at my to do list and tell two hundred that's an impossible request your only options are to choose consciously which operating lead down to Earth engagement with how things really are and the truth is be doing three but he's right if you don't consciously pick the three you're going to be working on then limited amount of things that you physically can do so you might feel like you need to do them all but anyway that might be one to think about decide three things you're going to do park everything else and don't program here at Cardiff met the other week it was the strategy four the spectrum of the half and lo and behold in the world of engineering once again this is a space for Kanban board we do then fantastic okay well my contribution this talked in the past about homework and homework that are useful eight which comes from Miss K. p. ten at Miss Look Worm and crafty type and I think she's she's based in the West Midlands in England that's a conversation for another day okay so what she posted Oh lovely happy weekend all and then she's put Hashtag aim for excellence it all the hashtags now let me describe what's in the picture these are Charles the first I should be including divine right of kings the great chain of being oh well was your child able to explain what they've been learning about and did you learn I was a child was able to tell me about the great chain of being the IT started to describe it and he took over and gave me a detailed oh practice homework a really helpful learners they didn't take too much time yes to find out something they have to respond it it's just I just thought it was a really nice exceptions in areas to return back to with help the parents I love that one of the things you know the parents say Oh what did you do in school today earn much and actually the parents really want to know what's going just found the binding them into the whole process made the whole thing feel a lot better than they used to child who's in the home and you can potentially be someone to help with homework a sub teacher saying how good it was to to write letters home when pupils have been good I me that letter home I said Yeah Nice let me see yeah my parents saw letter with the school standpoint really what's know when they've been good as well as what they've been bad there we go something to try show is the Washington Post it was definitely an American news paper websites take this is going to really annoy you but it it's a bit like my you know the pitfalls of the classroom it's GonNa.

"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

12:08 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"In the classroom so you know it's born out in this study. What what you've said there sean and I think it's really good advice that we do witness S. and get to know our peoples in different contexts absolutely and you know we'll have students children in our classes who exhibit low level behave via or I think it's important to remember that nothing is personal and a child is misbehaving in class. It's not personally that they're reacting because of of experiences that we might not be aware of. We all we might know about We shouldn't take it personally. Low level behavior behavior is one thing when we start getting children with more extreme behaviors as I discussed earlier that's when we need to sort of investigate a little further some children for example if they've had an adverse childhood experience so a stressful or traumatic experience which might include abuse neglect blacked household dysfunction such as growing up with substance abuse or mental illness than those behaviors might be more extreme. We need need need to be taken into account. There's also a theory about attachment. John Boehner B.'s theory of attachment and suggests that children come into the world old pre-programmed to make attachments in order to survive and that you know they need one primary care giver and that person is critical colts that child's personal development their emotional and social developments so for those children who do not receive that attention that Levin cat early early on and have close bond well that could lead to behavioral issues in the classroom they could exhibit poor behavior behavior but also they could be withdrawn. They could be clingy as well as maybe aggressive but it's it's understanding knowing what the backgrounds backgrounds are and that can help us as teachers then to know it's not personal. I am to us and that we can try and find the best ways through multi-agency working in those situations to support the children. There's a great point in the report. Actually isn't there says no the limits of your influence and I know a lot of our student didn't teachers they go in. They want to change the world. Won't they want to make every pupil's life absolutely perfect. They want their behavior to be great. It's really important in that huge kind kind of web of things. We've just talked talked about to know that some stuff we can change really easily as teachers and other stuff sits a little bit outside of our grasp when we can try to influence it. We can try to kind of make things happen sometimes through multi-agency work but we're not going to go swinging into our classroom and change all of these people's lives life's overnight. I really great pointon and actually it is even more rationale for collaborating with colleagues. You know if you if you're having an issue with a particular people who you know has a very good relationship with another member of staff or if you're inheriting a class that a a different teacher had the year before he can give you some really useful insight into the themes. Sham was talking about there. I think it's really important that we network a and with with other practitioners in order to upscale ourselves increase our knowledge and ultimately create better provision for our learn as much wants to pick up on something that Sean mentioned there you may not have heard before and I would advocate going in and having look more deeply into it was acis adverse childhood experiences. This is research coming out of America. I believe an on page thirteen of the report. There's a basic overview of that research rich but it's something that is sitting gathering momentum in Wales in his Sydney starting to influence our practice on a classroom level so I would urge. You have a look at that thinking as well just to finish off this section on knowing our learners. I think it's also important to know the kind of changes the physiological changes they going through as they age and progress through through school life. The report makes the point about teenage years and during the teenagers peer influence is more important than any other stage the social pressure whether it's real or imagined contributes to increased risk taking behavior this age and can also elite risk aversion such sudden reluctance to answer questions in class and its comments be acutely self-conscious particularly in early adolescence eleven to fourteen so you know this is struck me there. There's an opportunity and we know this information about what's going on kind of physiologically with with our pupils does an habits affecting them hormonally and how that's affecting the behaviors a one to how this could also affect our classroom practice so for example could this knowledge effect act. You're questioning technique with eleven to fourteen year olds if they are very risk averse and therefore are unlikely to want to raise their hand and an answer so question take risks when actually you know they just don't want to stick their head above the parapet because of what's going on with their bodies and of course this happening earlier and earlier now there's an Schanzer the teenage years are extending down into primary now for a lot of pupils absolutely challenges a never ending and if we're looking for things that we can effect fact we can't affect the fact that these pupils may have had adverse childhood experiences all back home life is is not maybe what we would like it to be. Our classroom is the place where we really. We can't change things great point okay so getting to know our people's getting to know what influences their behaviors is right up front and center so for those of you who wrote on teaching practice now observe ask questions get to know okay so the second one is teach learning behaviors alongside managing misbehavior teach learning behaviors. This really resonated with me. I didn't what my lovely colleagues think. I wonder how much a my early career as a teacher I thought when I was planning my lessons how is that not going to look what sort of behaviors expecting my peoples to demonstrate when they're engaging in that activity when I'm doing some direct teaching when I'm coordinating in eighteen group work whatever whatever whatever the pedagogy what behaviors and am I explicitly teaching them and should I be. We concentrate so much on the product don't we when we ask student teachers to think of their success criteria so they want to get something done in the lesson. What should it look like if the pupils are successful it's really easy to concentrate entree on the final product and not think so much about the process and we can also get bombed out with the kind of subject discipline nuts and bolts and we'll we would happily we spend ages teaching them knowledge about the subject but we somehow seem to expect them to come preprogrammed with the ability to work. Well in groups ought to behave in the right way or to persevere and be resilient and all of those things and yeah the more and more. I think about it the more and more I think that that needs to be thought about just as much as the kind of subject knowledge stuff that we're putting into the lesson. There's a really nice quote here. From the reports about what we mean by a learning behavior has a learning behavior can be thought of as a behavior via that is necessary in order for person to learn effectively in the group setting of the classroom and think about everything that Sean just mentioned in relation to kind of the child's background their upbringing in what kind of environment they are inhabiting home. It becomes even more important that in in school we model the learning behaviors that people are going to need later on in their working lives and not kind of professional sphere what you think think about that. John yes I think that as teachers there are certain things we can consider as part of our lessons as part of of our delivery however starting with ourselves. I think we need to model and enthusiasm for learning that we are lifelong learners Anez ourselves that we don't know everything and that we do have to sometimes go away and read or look things look things up to know that we have took model being risk-takers that valuing mistakes and mistakes are fine and that's the own you know that's what needs to happen to be able to learn so it's about creating an environment where children can feel safe to learn and I think modeling as teachers starting point is important. I really like the the notion as well as of being able to teach those behaviors and passed them on because there are a lot of terms that get bandied about in relation to learning learning behaviors things like being more resilient being resilient learners having a growth mindset and I think the danger is without clear and explicit approaches strategies tools that we can teach learn is they could be seen to be a bit of a weapon so you're not you're not being resilient enough and you know it could be. What was the word that you use. Tom Perceived as kind of synonym compliant so resilient meeting. Do as you're told Yeah you not being resilient enough because doing what I wanted us to do. And similarly with the growth mindset thing isn't it. It's it's all great right if you if you have come across growth mindset if you haven't you can easily find it by looking at this idea that we believe we can learn. We believe our knowledge isn't fixed. You can just ended up saying well. You've got a fixed mindset you know as if it's just the equivalent of con- of sorted out police off together and get on with it without giving people some kind of assistant so instructions on how to make that happen absolutely it they report talks about Carol. D- Waxwork who is the researcher of and the I guess coined the term growth mindset mindset isn't in fact check out there. Come come you want but what does highlight. Is that even to herself. Alf has warned that mindset approach is difficult to implement. She says it's really hard to pass a growth mindset onto others and create a growth mindset culture. Uh It's not about educators giving mindset lecture or putting up a poster. It's about embodying it in all their practices and the report says encouraging encouraging a growth mindset rather than fix mindset involves as a teacher having a growth mindset yourself sue truly believe that all your students will achieve and improve improve on a guest that speaks to you know if you've got that class was talking about all year nine if you if you got fixed mindset about whether they they can improve their behaviors or not whether you can kind of get them on board and get them learning then potentially you're perpetuating those negative babe and you're part of the problem problem is as praising your students effort rather than the person the end piece of work or results you so for example. You've worked so hard on this. He's your persevering brilliant eighth through tough. New concepts doesn't feel right in my mouth but yeah ultimately kind of empowering them to be able to adopt that growth mindset without you going forward and avoiding fixed mindset labeling that praises intelligence or talent. You're so clever you're so talented paid and actually the personal levels teacher one of the questions. I often ask people who are into being for the course so we're top for anyone listening. WHO's trying to come on the programs they they all come in and they say oh. I want to be teacher because I love my subject. I love music in my case. I want to pass it on to other people and one of the questions I ask is. What are you GonNa do if they come right back at you and don't love music you know. Sean says it's not personal but when it's something you love it can feel very personal. I think it's quite easy as a teacher..

Sean John Boehner B. Levin America Sham Wales Sydney Tom Perceived Alf Carol Waxwork researcher fourteen year
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"The best and the much more meaningful planning and thought that goes into making sure that both disciplines gaffer crack of the whip and when people don't quite get the difference between those two things. I think that's a great way to kind of show the difference absolutely assuming onto our final category catch grateful common concept which actually we were talking about. We had a bit of a taxonomy that emerged later. We've also talked about a spectrum. We would probably per category foreign three on even grinding in terms of how meaningful the connections they can. They can facilitate we put the peripheral rule one that the arts being used right at the bottom we put the hit and hope in the middle and these last two we couldn't really choose between them in terms of their meaningfulness so we put. I'm sorry by side at the top we did so common concept is people's learning about a concept which is shared between more than one discipline so I suppose there already you've got to engage with the subject teacher within the opposite discipline opposite disciplines in order to seek out what that common concept might be they overcome difficulties bay the pupils overcome difficulties misconceptions regarding the concept in one discipline by using their understanding at the concept in another this works equally well in either direction is really useful. If we give you a concrete example of this the involves English this comes directly from one of the papers that we read and this is where pupils were investigating the concept so the common concept of composition by using a double page spread in notebooks they look at composition in writing and composition in drawing people's make progress in composition in one medium in order to improve their understanding of the skills and competition in the other and the impact was that progress was made in both disciplines because pupils could use the individual individual strengths to improve the weakened and it was quite independent their decision about when to go to the opposite page so they might might be having trouble with the writing choose to work a little bit more on a on the drawing and that might unlock something that might then intern have an impact impact on their on their writing composition on the article used a really nice metaphor didn't in the metaphor translation seeing it as a process of translation backwards and forwards which was a nice one to think about it was actually because it talks about translation when we're trying to translate from one language to another sometimes there is no word it. Oh there is so you have to come up with something new. There's something unknown unknowns innovation kind of comes in when and you find that there isn't a word in this language that translates directly to this word in his language is I mean not that example is really powerful ofo with me because I've never thought of doing that as an English teacher looking at composition from an artist's point of view but I do practice myself and so seeing there's sort of all light bulbs going off in my head right now bowed how that helps both disciplines and and I think going back to kind of authenticity also going back to the the the real will that were setting our peoples that for I was actually listen into radio for woman's hour this morning on my way into work and they were interviewing famous out. You've got to help me with this. BRAS play. She's ninety-one. She Scottish sh we'll find out for you but she was. She was on the radio. She was talking about how she likes to go to art gallery. He's she's really interested in the work of Turner and his artwork has really influenced her composition. She gave some really good concrete examples. WHO's of this you know so even in in the in the field in the profession artists out there are looking to other arts disciplines to help them identify common concepts and to help them unlock aspects of their creativity and innovation in what they working and making money from it yeah so those are findings and I suppose we were quite heartened by this not only because we've now got some concrete examples to give our students rather other than sort of slightly vague instructions which is what we had up to this point but also this whole idea of combining subject disciplines. I mean Judith hinted at this in the last episode is particularly scary to secondary teachers partly because of the subject identity and partly because of the sense that kind of almost the whole school needs knocking down and rebuilding from scratch you know in the timetable needs thrown in the Bin and all that kind of thing and what are the things we discovered was the most meaningful ways of combining the subject disciplines ah don't actually destroy the kind of really important sacred things of the individual subjects in fact as we found in the difference between indisciplined re proximate and the one above it was called cooperative development between the last meaningful in the morning mean for was actually the presence of the subject discipline things in there and also that you don't need a ton of resources a ton of expense and to throw the whole kind of thing out and start again so that was kind of strangely heartening really yeah. I think it really was an and one of the Writers Wiggins thousand one also mentions that you you know we don't need chuck whole bunch of money at this in order to make meaningful connections it could start with a cup of tea with you sitting down with somebody within your AOL in my case it was music and just looking at your your respective curriculum documents or looking at the what matters statements looking at you know the the more subject iterations of of those documents and then looking for commonalities minorities common ground how powerful to be able to then simply just as a step in the right direction say to one of the will. You'll doing seem work on X. I'm doing Kazimi. We're we normally do complete different times in the year. Let's just place them side by side in the end and see how we can draw attention to one another's common common concept so discipline skills or whatever I think savage has it right Disney when he he tells us in his book on Cross curricular teaching and learning that really all you need is to go to those other subjects with an appreciation and a sensitivity towards what makes makes those subjects special to those people who love them and teach them and specialize in them and that if you go in with that sort of mindset I mean really I suppose we're just modeling and approach to things to pupils that people should be doing more widely in the world really you're not GonNa go far wrong and you're gonNA find plenty of interesting things that could well refresh rush the way that you go about your job so there we go. That's how deep discussion into cross curricular teaching and learning inexpressive is it's time to have another go short slots and as promised. Emma has an interesting quote from Einstein I do I mentioned novel the I've been reading last time I won't go into to the absolute details of it but I will just remind you that it comes from Deborah Harkness from her all souls trilogy a discovery of witches and and as I was reading I came across an interesting quote that was by Albert Einstein and comes from a much longer essay entitled the World Old as I see it by Albert Einstein and it's a really interesting reads so have a little look for if you'd like to read it in its entirety but what I thought was that that this particular extract peaked my curiosity because I thought it might have a wider message for teacher trainees or indeed teaches at any stage career because it kind of China with me of you know the reason why we do what we do but also kind of gave us permission inadvertently from Albert Einstein into not always know the answers so he says the most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious it is the fundamental emotion which stands is it the cradle of true art and true science whoever does not know it and can no longer wonder no longer marvel is as good as dead and his is our dimmed. It was the experience of mystery even mixed with fear that engendered religion a knowledge of the existence of something we cannot Donald Penetrate our perceptions of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty which only in their primitive forms are accessible to our minds it this this knowledge and this emotion that constitute true religiosity in this sense and in this alone. I am a deeply religious. Man Man. Now quite wordy is quite long. I think what what I got from this is that you're not always going to have have concrete answers the quest for knowledge in the quest for mystery and and the feeling that sometimes art and science always give you the answer is but actually that stats maybe reason to thrive into live is that quest for a mystery in your life into to be asking why and in how when what next really spoke to me and I guess you as teach trainees at the start of your journey to Murray that you don't know all the answers we're still trying to crack this. this teaching lock but but but enjoy each new scheme of work that you teach when you come in fresh because it'll be a mystery not you as to how you're how you're people's will receive it and they will always throw up something new and exciting in in response to to this lovely the job that we have in in giving the gift of knowledge skills and and a lot more to Orlenas yeah I think probably this episodes coming out towards the the end of September so maybe those new academic year resolutions are starting to hit the reality a little bit so it's nice to just remember what we're supposed to be doing. As teachers is an the kind of set up in our classrooms for pupils. Okay so wellbeing for me yeah and I have a quote note. I have a quote from the world of music to kick this off and this is from a book by a famous accompanist called Gerald more so an accompanist is that person who sits at the piano behind the soloist generally getting totally ignored in performance and I trained as an accompanist so I used to sit behind a range of divas us on stage before I got into this teaching large and so his book is one. That's very precious to me and there's too little bits that I just want to share first of all he says at the risk of shattering the readers illusions I must terrified the veil of mystery which shrouds the God like figures of musicians and state when they walk onto the platform phone. They're often so petrified with nerves that they would give half their fee or nearly off to be elsewhere and he also it goes on to say that the audience applauds a dexterity of a juggler is not aware that he's perspiring profusely and his immaculate top hat that he's cursing copiously sleep under his breath or that he's practice in particular trick for months before venturing to perform in public it all looks so easy and certainly certainly as musicians and I guess as actors as well. Everybody is trained not to give the audience an uncomfortable experience by making it clear what an absolute suit nightmare were often have it on the stage and I think we do as teachers as well. I think in the school environment where almost conditioned and to try to always look like we're on top of things to pupils to our colleagues maybe to those senior managers. He might be centene blood in the water. We always try to present this facade. The everything's great we're totally on top of things. I'm going to invite you. You listeners to just consider the possibility that actually maybe we're not on on top of that to suggest that perhaps if we're so busy giving the impression that we're absolutely on top of things. Maybe we're convincing somebody near us in the workplace who is looking at you and thinking. Oh Gosh they're on top of everything I'm not on top of everything therefore I must be a complete disaster area and and I know that we have both been guilty of doing this to have it we sometimes they presenting the facade evidence great and actually we're not and I oh you sometimes make a point now of just letting you know complete shambles. I make just because I don't want you to think doc that about me and often you know. I think that's a really useful opportunity for that the other person to say yet no I'm..

Albert Einstein intern Turner Judith Deborah Harkness chuck AOL Donald Murray Gerald savage Emma China Disney
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

13:17 min | 2 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Cross curricular pedagogy in this resonates sweetie nicely with the research that Judith presented in our previous episode about different types of integrated curriculum design but this went went to it's slightly more granular and more focused degree where they were classifying how that looks and how that feels the outcomes aw ah within expressive arts lessons and it was quite a nice bit of luck for us really because we thought we were going to have to do a kind of double process of coding this sort of really broad brush rush coating was just supposed to be the first stage and then we were going to look for some more individual themes within that but actually just doing that to category coding theory and practice turned indepth these classifications of cross curricular approaches in the expressive ways that you can join more than one subject together in the classroom and it was so potentially useful that we actually stopped. We do it in decided that was going to be focus. Yes and I think the reason why we stopped and got so excited was that we had a bit bit of high politics. We had a bit of a hunt when we were just feeling our way. In previous versions of our cross curricular practical expirations with students are university St Sessions. We had a hunch that there might be a bit of a a spectrum of meaningful connections and hopping back to to Donaldson Donaldson and also to your research judith so this spectrum I guess you could loosely classified as being on one end of the scale. You've got arts. Disciplines being used as a container or am research save referred to them as being a handmaiden for other subject disciplines wins all the way up to much more what we would call meaningful connections where perhaps arts disciplines are being enhanced in both camps use by being combined in an integrated or multi disciplinary going back to your your episode you death in that way so having having looked at five sources that came up with these categories we then decided to come up with our own kind of classification system. Didn't we tom we you did yeah and this links with something. You said Judith in the last episode didn't you in terms of the challenges primary that the subject disciplines need to be taught. You said they're being used I yes I think there is also a danger that speaking to primary colleagues that things aren't always appearing appearing within the curriculum and then when they are appearing within the curriculum they're not always the skills and the knowledge are not as being being explicitly taught and a lot of our sources that classified had some version of that we highlighted and we found the names they all had different names and we highlighted did them all the same color but what they were basically saying was the arts were being used as a way to make something else more interesting or more fun and we decided edged to call this. We'll call it category one peripheral yes so the arts is on the outside banging on the door trying to get in sitting around the outside and I think it's really important to say there's not there's nothing wrong with that approach. There's nothing wrong with using songs to make drilling more interesting or you know even as some of my primary student said they just is play music to get the kids to tidy up faster and things like that. It's absolutely fine a perfectly good strategies a teacher as long as you understand that you're not necessarily teaching teaching them that discipline skills of music or whatever it is that you're using Philip purpose lovely quote that sums that up here and this is by wiggins two thousand as an one one of the sources that we came across in view he says if it is limited to this as in a peripheral or handmaiden sort of approach we cannot falter our colleagues for relating us the arts to a subservient position as mere entertainers and not times with everything that Judith mentioned about how the the arts historically have been marginalized and may be seen as as perhaps the icing on the cake but but not you know frightened Santo or not a firm fixture on any curriculum not worthy of exploration and investigation themselves and and development but it also you going through this now remind me of or it makes me think about English as a subject because that's my own area area of actually we wouldn't think of just having English been taught through the other subjects. Obviously it is taught through the subjects but it has its own credibility another subject area as well. We don't just use writing or reading to service the other subjects that's par. Tulsa Eh but it has its own special place within the curriculum which is which is what should happen with the arts as well so that was I mean we sort of think think of that as being the lowest on our scale simply because we just feel that the the arts discipline itself is so low on the priorities in that learning experience and the next one that we I came up with. I think it's fair to say was the one that we tend to see most often. When a student teachers thrown into our cross curricular project we're trying for the very first first time to try and combine drama music in a learning experience which is we didn't call it this but the sort of hate and hope method the put them together in a room and hope that some sort of meaningful connections will be made just combine them and what did we call it disciplinary proximity yeah together news? Sir Yes so this is where we're aspect of two or more discipline chat time space topic under stimulus and I think this is similar to your well and I was the multidisciplinary where they might be combined by topic. It's probably yes multidisciplinary as combined by topic But yes the disciplines are still exist in very much side-by-side yes yeah the hope is that one day are filing enriching and mention enough yet but enrich another and the thing with this which we found with our students is it just doesn't always work. It's it's it's too easy to just just hope that that's going to be the case and if you don't have some sort of quality control in place in terms of the way that you plan either one discipline gets massively short changed changed at the expense of the other or actually sometimes. I think we've observed this. They both Kinda get dragged down to a sort of lowest common denominator situation so thinking from my music music point of view we would see learning experiences plan by students where the music was really just relegated to sound effects. Yes I'm not really kind of musical content and similar. I think your Your Bay was freeze. Frames wasn't Emma yeah absolutely so just diluting everything dimed to the sort of the most foundational form which is fine but it's as you said Judith is not that kind of deep dive Def- India subject it also in danger of becoming a tick box thing of yeah. We can say that we've done drama because we've Don a freeze frame. We can say that we've included music because we've put some music in the background and the right point yeah great point so yes and this is something again that came through in the literature obviously which was where all of this derives from but we've got quotes here that sums this up this is nine hundred seventy six says as the quality of the art experience needs to be constantly improved so that children perceive the equal value of the subject being related and gain more knowledge of the arts as well as knowledge of the subject areas as kind of just a compounding quotation there so. I think what we concluded. was that sometimes teams they can work if you just put the two disciplines in room and hope for the best but in our articles that we read in knock classifications that we found it quickly became clear to us it was possible to get beyond just hoping and plan in such a way that both disciplines were far more likely to be equally served. Yes yes so then we started to get to approach is where the magic was beginning to happen. Third category is called Cooperative Development as as we've coined it and this is where people's use their skills and or knowledge in one discipline to help them understand concepts or overcome become obstacles in another and vice versa so development in one discipline helps prompt development in the other in an iterative process. Yes yes so I tend to think of this building walls. You've got your one discipline wall in your other discipline wall and you don't necessarily want one to become massively higher than the other but they're never going to be quite the same height and I think in some of the best things are student. Teachers have done for us when we've been working with them in this. It's when they give the pupils does the time and space to choose which way they go round so if they get stuck in the music they've got the kind of freedom to stop and park it and go and go. It's something to do with drama which will allow them to kind of get more understanding or go round the obstacle and not have it managed out so I know we've had we've seen things where the kind of classroom management has taken over and the opportunities to do that have been kind of taken away from the pupils because people's will be stronger in different disciplines at different times and I guess this really does rest and live and die on some of the additional kind of resourcing implications that you talked about Judith. Did you know if they are going to be able to sort of pendulum between the two disciplines at the same time then that's what we got scheduling issues to navigating advocating also resource issues to navigate but I guess you mentioned about you know at a at a minimum. It's teaches talking to to one another by the opposite discipline and looking for those opportunities for building the two walls and wealthy in regard to our own subjects. The elements of music in the elements of drama have common ground yeah and it's very much a sense of discovery from the teachers as well on development all AWW undestanding not only their own area but having a broader understand enough of what's going on so so you know when interviewing the teachers involved in the project that we were doing it was it was very much. They were boosted. They were encouraged by content with the by their connections with the other subjects. Yeah we can say this. Doesn is a lovely quote. Sewer Jim Strike. Yeah Yeah that coffees kicking in sticking in yet so we're gins from two thousand and one says the actually is not just the pupils the benefit from this if you do it properly properly because it gives the opportunity for teachers to enrich their own understanding of things by going and talking to their colleagues and discovering the exciting thinks about the other subjects and how interface with their own subject specialisms absolutely so yes that was category number three and that's where we I would suggest and I think you probably back me on this time. If not I withdraw your coffee. Time is a more meaningful full connection between the subject definitely and we saw this with our students. Didn't we have a nice example of that with our students where they taught some skills was in African drumming which was a music scale and they taught some skills in movement. Something called him hands which I haven't come darling darling. My life is enriched by it enormously as I didn't get involved and then crucially they were able to experiment and discover how how altering the way that the music was performed so just simple things have fast. It was performed. How loudly it was performed made them perform? The physical theatre theater in a different way so they were able to see how the elements have one influenced the elements of another and the crucial thing was that they learned some solid discipline supplant skills in the two subjects I and without having done that they couldn't have moved onto the stage of investigating how connected yes. I'm unjust to to add to that that concrete example what was also a really key feature. The successive of this workshop was that they chose into narrow quite oy precisely down to the the elements. They wanted to their peoples to explore. It's about depth not breath. If you want your pupils pulls to to read kind of gain those that knowledge and skills in a meaningful way you need to be quite restricted in what you ask them to focus on yeah and that's a really great example of the difference between the disciplinary proximity shove them in a room and hope for.

Judith Donaldson Donaldson Tulsa Philip Cooperative Development Don Emma Santo Jim Strike one day
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

14:11 min | 3 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Hello hello and welcome to a special summit bonus very short edition of the podcast with me and emma. Hello hello how are you. I'm alright and this is coming <music> out in the middle of the summer when hopefully nobody's thinking about teaching or any of that kind of thing that's all so we are not going to do anything heavy in this episode. I've got a lovely. I dare era people sat on a beach with us in their headphones. Having a little listen drifting away on the going on those they do but we were just a little bit worried is such a long time between the end of season one and the beginning of season two and there is going to be a season two that we just wanted to pop into your podcast fee just to reassure you that we haven't gone anywhere and how it will reflect on what we did in season one and a little look forward to what we're going to bring to you next year so starting off with our reflections a lot of good stuff apart from sweating and not which is definitely definitely a good thing but sweating stressing over our our lovely podcast baby that we're pretty proud of but yeah yes a good staff came out of it is not without its blood sweat and tears but it's definitely been worth and it's just been really strange actually hasn't when when when a student or a member of staff has come up and said oh i really enjoyed that whatever on your podcast and you realize it is actually out there in the public yeah so i guess top of the list is his engagement engagement from anybody and everybody who has lessened but i guess i personally students who've engaged with their and who perhaps have followed followed up on some of the reading or follow up on some of the strategies that we jess date or indeed of improved their well being as a result you know just stephen engagement h. meant and it making a difference there experience. A gas was the impetus for this podcast worlds because we don't actually spend an enormous number of hours with our students. It's not like <hes> undergrad degree where they're all the time. They're only in for a day a week and it was just nice to be able to bring them some things that we didn't have the time for. We couldn't physically the government to the building and it's actually worked really well. As the way of reaching some of our candidates who have applied to the program so that they can get a sense of <music> who we are and what we're all about before they join us in september so in that sense it's been a good marketing tool but also a good way to get into their subconscious as early yeah. It's it's good and it's always nice that they won't have any nasty surprises. I suppose if they come on the program because they know what we're about and what we do and it just means. They're gonna maybe hit the ground running a little bit more when they join us in september so hello to all those candidates who email back and forth and told me what they've enjoyed over the course of this year well done for listening listening and we will see you in person valley shortly. Yes we will and i guess connection is is a key theme to some of the things that we've been really proud of this year. We've connected with some really interesting people guests. We've had on the podcast people who we've given shy tights too so hopefully our our reaches has been wide in terms connection and engaging with all of those people and what they're interested in yeah. There's been some lovely people who've gotten touches. It's always been like a form of publishing has supposed to publish here in university and instead of writing everything some of it. We've just put out as a podcast and it's always nice. When you meet a new person. Absolutely we've engaged with <hes> some international listeners we haven't we haven't managed to <hes> to track dime getting on the podcast yet but we are aware of their existence and hopefully that will continue continue. Yes one of the beauties of the podcast softer as it can sort of tell me roughly where everybody is and it's interesting to see how many people there are in different parts of the world and do say hello to us. You're very quiet quiet llanview out there on twitter so i if you like what you hear or if you don't like what you hear or you have suggests i know you like to come on get in touch because we'd love to hear from you and that brings us to the all important social media platforms that we we inhabit namely namely twitter writers probably our main our main social media output but yes. We don't have one for the podcast but we have one each for ourselves. I'm thomas brees all one word and what am i. You are ethiopia underscore c._m._u. Wow that's yes as hubs of even tyrone home known your phone numbers and it just didn't retain that information to work on my retention retrieval practice yes so tell us tell us what you think yeah or if you have a suggestion for topic because we have got to find twenty one more episodes if we come back next year yeah when we come back next yes when we come back next i say we need twenty or more episodes to philly i always with so we have always suggestions but before we do that we'd like to just take a little bit of time to reminisce about some of our favorite episodes food and our favorite wellbeing tips from our inaugural year of the podcast. What about east home. What was your what was your favorite episode. Well l. strangely enough. I think although we had highlights like getting the minister in for example in interviewing her and all that kind of thing strangely. I think my favorite it's episode was probably the easter special one. I also enjoyed the christmas special one. I particularly liked that one that we did those two lighter episodes without kind of pulling the occurred him back too much it. It's quite hard work making some of these episodes. We put a fabric work into them and try and make them tight as we possibly can and it was just kind of refreshing rushing to chill out a little bit in easter episode. I particularly liked the fact that we spontaneously decided not to give each other material in advance. That's a formula <hes> that will repeat next year isn't it i think we will and it was it was just nice to have a laugh and i know that towards the end of last year i got a little bit mischievous in my approach to certain discussions quite nice to drop. If you crazy ones in there into the episode it was just. I think that one was is probably the closest to what it's like. When we just sit down with a cup or somewhere i agree with that and i really enjoy being able to share the marietta marietta outputs or even just a fraction of of the outputs are constantly coming through my twitter feed constantly coming through blogs that i've subscribed to so so you know there's a big conversation there by education and and it's really great to be able to present some of those voices on our podcast yeah i think so so we're hoping to do a few more of those next exchange because they were they were an experiment. I think they were a successful and so yeah. That was my favorite episode. I enjoy listening to that and mine. I well. I'm going to be a little bit sort of sitting on the fence. I'm a libra so do try to maintain balance which you could assume he's also indecision paralysis by analysis. I i actually loved all of the episodes we had guests. I love interviewing. I i am developing ping a real passion for interviewing and asking really great interview questions which i will continue to work on this year but i i really love hearing the variety steve perspectives on education and on hearing about people's passion projects to <hes> to quote khakassia he wasn't a gaspar is somebody who we've got earmarked and who anyways who is already been contacted about coming on on the show next year. We should definitely thank those guests because they usually absolutely terrified kevin here. Aren't they yeah yeah. We try to calm them down. She says she brings her hands. In fear of getting back on the horse i mean i think thank even we as we tested these microphones after a long break. We're not entirely sure what was going to happen when the red light went south sudanese. It's pretty scary. Doing this and our guests are very lovely to us to come in. They normally really looked pretty frightened and we we ply them with coffee and cupcakes and things like that. We definitely want to recognize it takes a certain amount of bravery to get up in front of the microphones even when you're talking about your special subject so thank you guests anna gassar an extension of that is if you if you would like to be guest you know not not not they don't listen to tom. He's not meet again just received more free and lose so no if you if you would love to join us at eta on our humble podcast then do get in touch with us paps via twitter and we'd love to range getting you in you can get you in. We can get you down the line. We'll have you a chef away. You'll come on the podcast. Yes guests are always good. Okay so <hes> to calm nerves. Let's let's just cast our minds back to to our favorite wellbeing tips that came across the airwaves the air that was an important part of the podcast wasn't it. We were feeling the need some wellbeing when we set it up so we decreed it will be a regular part of the podcast and it seems to work quite well yeah so what was what was your favorite tip. Tom well think my favorite one was. My mind. Most left field when i brought to the john hattie episode which was episode six and some people still kind of go on at me about this one. I know that <hes> <hes> our friend julia jenkins from teach fists mentioned this one and that was the survival the idea that i remember that so the outdoor instructor taught the people that the most important survival thing they needed was the ability to make a cup of tea and the reason was that they would go and do something familiar get hot and consign them and not rush into doing something stupid. I like that. It's passed into our language. Hasn't we do actually in conversation say sometimes this has happened. Oh no of had this email. I'm going to have a survival cupo before. I reply apply to it. Yeah absolutely lexicon there have been several they see a permanent survival captured stalled in front of us. I think i think so my favorite wellbeing tipped bat. She comes from episode five <hes> which cross curricular episode and it was the mood elevator i mean has a bit of a special place in my heart because it did come to my attention via my other half who inhabits the world all engineering and it was just really great to to be able to learn something from completely different sphere that i thought had a a really good application <hes> within education and i'm beyond really just being able to name the emotions that feeding and to know that you i you you might not be doing your best thinking in that moment because your emotions onto at the right floor on the elevator. I think it's a sign of a good wellbeing tip when it's passed into our shared language because it's it's not unknown when we're props on the phone off talking to say oh. I don't think i can do this today. I'm really low on the mood elevator. Yeah absolutely says another another common phrase that you'll hear around these parts <laughter> podcast is changed our whole way of speaking to another clue what we're talking about most the time no instead if you haven't listened to episode then you go back and listen so you know what the hell away so..

twitter tom emma ethiopia tyrone thomas brees john hattie marietta marietta libra l. kevin steve julia jenkins gaspar instructor
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

09:47 min | 3 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Email. He was incredibly excited excited about what he'd heard he was infused and he just wanted to share that with me and I thought well you know what you can share that with the rest of the world so we're GONNA get an mirror brandon. Joe and Tom and I want to give a shoutout to them and say a big. Thank you to them the coming on because they've got some really inspiring things to tell you all yeah I would agree with that and say that we have actually recorded their episode already. Four them are absolute podcasting legends so I would shooting for the episode defy and buy some amazing chance. I've also got you doing something to try so yeah okay so I was having a little nosy roamed on twitter as I sometimes do of weekend with a cup of tea on my Sofa and I noticed an article that was written by Mark Essner for the times educational supplement and it was about preparing G._C._C. level people's for exams and it was about how to prep prep them and give them some really good examples of revision techniques and something that caught my eye was technique that you use in class that effectively turns your people's classwork into a usable revision aide down the line. He recommended an approach that comes from across the Atlantic in the U._S.. Called Cornell notes. What they say is a note taking system that was actually devised in the forties by somebody? Nobody called Walter pork an education professor at Cornell University and he advocated its use in his best selling book how to study in college what it is. It's it kind of gives a nod to all those end to graduate students students out there who can remember sitting in a lecture theatre the first time being given this really inspiring lecture and writing every single thing down for fear that they might miss something and not necessarily really knowing what they should write right down and what they shouldn't or indeed undergraduate students sat in elector who was owning in and zoning I have said undergraduates like new Jenny Rather Dayton title and nothing else and it struck me that actually early. Nobody ever really taught me how to write lecture notes very good point. No nobody taught me how to write lecture notes hence I wrote almost none so I guess we'll to poke notice this discrepancy and therefore devised eastern designed and imparted a note taking system for undergraduates unwell anybody ready. I'm what Marcus nurse saying is that people's in classrooms could use it what it involves is essentially taking your your piece of note paper and dividing it into thirds the first third being the kind of main area that you would normally write your notes. If you've got a normal piece of note paper the margin and maybe a little bit of extra space would be enough fl your left hand portion of the page the right hand side of the page where you normally write your notes can be just a little bit smaller than usual so you've got kind of a smaller left hand column and a slightly larger right tank column and then underneath your final third can and be sort of with a third of the page from the bottom up. I'm not very good at describing not a region page into three thirds and in those three thirds you do different things. Okay a case step one in your right hand. It's kind of way you would normally traditionally write your notes. This is the record phase so during the lecture you use the note taking column on the right to record the lecture using saying what he calls telegraphic sentences and I watch e telegraphic sentences comes from telegrams and what that means is short concise sentences so nothing to would e so these these notes are good to be really kind of. Punchy and an unuseful when you're trying to revise them later on down the line so in that right column you've got key notes on things like dates details definitions formulas concrete examples pictures pictures so nothing too far from probably what you already right in your notes but then this is where the magic happens in the column on your left or two left this is kind of step two and this is the recall column. I'm what it's the advice is. Is there in that column during the lecture also you're writing key words you distilling the main oats on the right hand side into keywords but also writing key questions so that you can test yourself on the material afterwards you might also note on the left hand side cut the big ideas of the lecture so what you're doing there is you distilling your distilling the lecture to its essence and you're writing in question so you could test yourself on those notes after the lecture what that does is it promotes more active engagement in the lecture so rather than kind of sitting passively as someone receiving information you actually happen to use that information and device questions for at the same time now also again magic can happen after the lecture in the final thirds that bottom third of the page and not step is the summarize is step so what is suggested is that you use that space after the lecture to summarize your notes by way of testing yourself on how much you know now what you could do who is you could eat the right hand column and simply test yourself using the questions that you wrote on the Left and see how much you can remember or indeed you could try and summarize you could add some additional information that you found out since the Latte Joseph taking those notes a little bit deeper there are multiple ways of doing it but essentially if you use this in a secondary context or maybe in a very very basically you could use an appropriate context. You're turning exercise books in the content from the lesson into a revision aid so they've got on the right hand side the May notes from some direct teaching you've been doing on the left hand side some key questions to test themselves and then a space for them to for their homework down the line practice weekdays retrieving information that they've learned and I must say I tried this when you showed me this what I used it in a slightly different way. I <hes> like we all do received a large and indigestible document in my email was supposed to read our name. The the document in case the person responsible for is listening and I created a Cornell page layout by dragon my left margin across and making it really big and dragging my bottom margin up and making it really big printing the document which is where we slightly he kills trees and doing that but with the text in the main block and I found it really useful way to kind of digest the important themes and put myself little comments and things like that. I found it really helpful so thank you so this is actually rooted in some. I'm in some useful research. That's going on in the realm of Cognitive Science Weinstein Simmer rockies book understanding how we learn a visual guide from one thousand nine hundred eighteen and they talk at the back and gives some really great guidance actually to people's ripples about revision and they say that research from the field of applied behavior analysis recommends the use of guided notes they actually hold up guided notes as a really really good example of practice that helps people's undestand and remember and be able to kind of convert the short term into long term memory but whatever it is you're trying to teach they say some more effective to note taking approach it has been proven to improve note taking on learning from lectures ages and they say that teachers lecturers can also provide guided note resources containing cues and blank spaces that pupils are students have prompted to take notes about specific concepts covered in lessons so even if you don't do it Cornell notes style if you've got a section of the lesson where you're doing some direct teaching the important thing is to have really thought about what you want your peoples to capture and to think about and to actively engage with during that direct teaching and then providing a resource that guides them and guides their notes they know what it is that you want them to look for Cornell notes. Get out there and start using them. I have to say this episode has been an absolute treasure trove of things to do particularly the older pupils. Isn't it your kind of high level learners which is quite timely at sea when we as we as we approach exam period yeah so there we go loads of things for you to use thanks it must be nice doing a podcast just to get nice news timing not much better so much perkier. Thank you thank you for keeping the faith okay. We will be back next time with the aforementioned for students I really do we recommend getting yourself ready to listen to not because they were absolutely brilliant absolutely and they're going to give you some really important key ministers about trained to be a teacher as certainly are so until then we'll say bye bye that was Tom's page you see podcasts presented by me and on Thom breeze this episode was brought to you by flipped learning Cornell notes and all the people better than us. If you like the podcast please rate and review us..

Cornell Cornell University Tom Atlantic Mark Essner Joe Marcus Jenny Dayton Walter professor Cognitive Science Thom
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

10:45 min | 3 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"You need to think about what you students can undo what skills and prerequisite knowledge they will need to draw upon to do the kind of pre work the homework stage and if you if you worry Oh you think they might not be able to do that independently without you there uh-huh without the guidance from parents and carries at home then it might not be the right time to use this strategy but he does say students can be trained in these skills that pay dividends later on and what he says is if you never train them? I mean those skills you will never feel confident that is going to deliver the rigor that you require when you do it yeah. I think that is a recurring theme with a lot of these things isn't it. You can't just expect pupils to be able to do these difficult things where they they work independently. You've got to put the work in. I read a really interesting article about it. Today I was looking because you have to be critical about these things. I was looking for articles which were against flipped. Learning is good overeat interestingly <hes> my first port of call was something I found an internet search basically said flipped learning doesn't work but then I discovered it was an opinion piece from a pupil in a school newspaper websites and he was basically saying come on teachers his gallon with it and teach supposed to which I found was really kind of interesting that sometimes the peoples can be quite old school about what teacher is I want to teach is for the other. One I find was was on called the flip end of a love affair by Shelley right right. It was basically saying why I don't use flipped learning anymore and I feel are here. Here's somebody who's tried flip learning and found it completely doesn't work when I read the article. It was a lot more subtle in fact she done flipped learning she'd found it really successful but then her pupils pulls had actually gone above and beyond flip learning so she didn't need it anymore and she'd moved on from actually providing the content in advance and then doing all the deep meaningful learning to a point where the pupils were actually so trained to be independent and free thinking they were going out and finding the stuff themselves lead in their own learning doing their own groupings and all of that kind of thing so that the reason that she actually gave him flip learning was that she didn't need it anymore. I think the important thing that it speaks to and that you've kind of mentioned there as well is that our pupils will need to be independent learners later on in their adults academic and employment careers so we do need to take these steps towards taking aching the rails away and taking the scaffolds away. What's wrong with me obviously having having done this with postgraduate students was that there's a lot of work to be done in prepping post sixteen students and full work undergraduate level they will often in an undergraduate program have to engage in a seminar discussion that will have been preloaded yes with a lecture or indeed they might encounter some pre work Capri reading by way of flip learning so it's kind of setting them up a with experience of that scenario and be with the skills to be able to competently engage in some of the discursive and problem solving work that can come off the back of the flip learning absolute yeah and I think a really important thing to do if you're gonNA try and get people on board with? This is just to be really straight with about why you're doing it. I think that you need sometimes to. To pull the curtain back and explain what's going on behind the scenes and so that you won't get for example a pupil like that one right in in that school newspaper thinking their teacher was kind of slacking off by giving all the work in advance explain to them that you're going to give them not resource so that they can access it in a comfortable place at home. They can look at it as many times as they like. They can do it whenever they feel they want to so that you can do something more meaningful in class and I certainly found our student teachers although they are fatty motivated crowd they were very receptive. I thought to that idea in terms of being time poor as well. I you know not to be too utilitarian about it but there's a lot of content that teachers have to cover a lot of curriculum content content and teachers often have concerns about how best to use their time that very precious time they have with the learners and I think if this can be seen as a way of still delivering that really important content nt but creating the space time to do some of that sort of higher order exploratory stuff that Sherrington talks about in the kind of mode be aspect of his book that that teaches. I'm learning really crave an I personally really crave that as a teacher and I would recommend that anyone who wants to give it a go. If you can find an appropriate moment not every single lesson not every single day but an appropriate part of your specification or curriculum I really would recommend. I commend you. Give it a try. Okay Tom. It's it's your turn this week for wellbeing slot. We have to actually do some work this week. I've just remembered why we like having guests. So what would you like to share with our listeners <hes> to help improve their wellbeing this week okay so I'm going to take you back in the preamble to this you know me. I like to make these into kind of long. jackanory episodes are going to take you back to my youth very long time ago. When I was learning to be a musician session unlike so many young musicians I joined my local youth orchestra in my town and there was scraping away on my violin and orchestra very hierarchical places? Everybody knows their place you know in the pecking order Nichols I started very low in the pecking order and towards the front of the string section worthies amazing string players who were on the county Youth Orchestra and we all looked up to them and thought they were amazing and all the rest of it after a while I became good enough to join the county youth orchestras who are vital to the county youth orchestra and low behold. I was right at the back and right at the front where people who are on the National Youth Orchestra and you know again we bow down to them. They were amazing and then after a little while I got good enough enough to join the National Youth Orchestra Wales. I was very lucky I had a fantastic time. I was somewhere in the middle never did quite make it to the front and again they were people right at the top of that tree who were in the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain. I never had a cast Johnson hell of getting his talks to Great Britain happy enough on the National Youth Orchestra Whales but the point is that as a musician. You have to make peace quite early on with the fact that there is always going to be somebody better than you. You is not quite like maybe one hundred meter runner or something like that where you could legitimately aim to be the best in the world because you know there is actually a best in the world are there are no best in the world's in music once you reach a certain point you know you might be the best. Is that something play in a particular kind of music. They'll be always somebody better at playing a different kind of music and I really genuinely think that how you kind of approach that sudden realization you come to junior formative years that there's always always gonna be somebody better than you has a really big effect on your kind of happiness and your wellbeing and I'm pleased to say I kind of did make my peace with it and once I got to university I realized that the best thing mm to do with those people who are better than me and there were plenty of people better than an awful lot of things that university was not to feel jealous of them or hate them or what to push down the stairs so that they can play any more or anything in order to kind of resent the or even to kind of not even to beat yourself because you weren't as good as them the very very best thing that you could do for your own wellbeing and actually to improve yourself was to go and work with them to go and I had some fantastic experiences playing music with people who were a lot better than me and they were the people who challenged me and pushed me on a made me better and I've gotta say actually they were usually the nicest people to work with as well absolutely unanswered so many parallels with teaching I think is a useful really useful. jackanory episodes toll made a lovely analogy but yeah you're right and this this this feeling in education. Sometimes it can be your enemy that nothing is ever finished and you're never quite the best you can be because it's always different ways that you can improve and you know there's no. I mean we do have standards. Of course we have standards but you know you can always seek to know more to enhance your people's learning better. You know it's it's never ending so I think it's a really useful sentiment to kind of be an antidote to that. That feeling of of of worthlessness that we send full. I'm not saying you know I'm not saying I was that enlightened. Every single day of the week that I never occasionally had moments where I thought Oh you know I'll never be as good as so and so but I think just trying to minimize those and and realizing that those really really genuinely great people are usually the kindest and the most willing to share and the most willing to work with people so if you're out there and you feeling a bit jaded or bit short of ideas or you. You don't think he's very are we good something rather than suffering by yourself and leading the E._U.. Up Go and find someone that you think is amazing and very very good at things and see if they'll work with you. We'll do what I do make podcast with them and I think what you'll find is that they will also have things that they feel they don't do well. You'll it'll it'll give you a human perspective on on the on the Holy Grail of teachers in your school definitely rights time for the shoutout slot on a thing you've go one Emma I have. I'm going to tee up episodes sixteen. Tom And I'm going to tee up <hes> full very special guests that we've got coming out to you an into your ears in two weeks time. They are four of my student teachers on on the P. C.. Second Drama Program is a little bit of a story attached to this because one of them brandon who you will meet in a couple of weeks time emailed me very excitedly a few weeks back having just been to listen to a talk delivered by none other than Kirsty Williams are Minister for Education in Wales and it was a very inspired person that I had on the other end of email..

National Youth Orchestra Youth Orchestra Tom National Youth Orchestra of Gr National Youth Orchestra Wales Kirsty Williams Shelley Sherrington Emma I Wales Nichols Johnson Britain one hundred meter two weeks
"emma" Discussed on Emma

Emma

10:02 min | 3 years ago

"emma" Discussed on Emma

"Teaching is is so useful in the classroom and going off piste. I read like that idea as well that you know current affairs can make even Donaldson talks about <hes> looking to what's going on in the real world to find find parallels to make it meaningful to our people's obviously links that perhaps resonate with their everyday lives and that permission to go off piste goodness uh Sir what maverick teachers do really as they feel that they can do that and that's where the students gained from it so I Guess Tomorrow Dafa Deep Discussion as we did with the Christodoulou Book. I think it'd be nice to kind of say you know aw final sort of review points are general takeaways from from this book and I'm happy to kick this off and and say what I like about it is that there's something for every stage of your career in this book whether you are a seasoned professional and as Tom said at the start you you look at those two opposite metaphors and different schools that you worked in begin to make a lot more sense or resonate with you or indeed he does Judy said if you're a novice just really great practical tips and some research leads fee to explore what about you do following on from that I think it's just a good jumping off point for various ideas and strategies. He doesn't give a loss of detail doesn't some cases more than others but actually you can take an idea. Take it away. Go and discuss it with the department and think how can we make this work. I think he did a great job of covering an enormous an enormously wide range of topics and I think he does it from a good place. I think he does it from a place where nothing is sacred in the best possible way <hes> and where we're demanding high standards and certain MARV accountability but we're also keeping that magic that makes teaching an art so while agree with everything he says I'm not entirely sure he agrees with everything he says to be perfectly honest. I I take it all and I find it really useful great now as you know due to the guests that we invite to our lovely podcast come along with some woods of wisdom on while being shy tanked and something to try so what is your well being tipped for us this week our K.. I'd like to recommend not to say that we do here at Cardiff met which is a stuff book club. We meet regularly to talk about various research books and we met today in fact and I was trying to think why I'd like it so much. It is very satisfying not only does it make you read and keep up today with books but you share and learned so much from colleagues and it's particularly satisfying because it's a non threatening environment where you can <hes> work in a non judgmental way but in developing your own knowledge etcetera and it is just very enjoyable getting together with colleagues and discussing things so having a book club in a in a previous life. I've run a writing club stuff writing club as well but anything which brings you together I would recommend for wellbeing. I would agree with that and something that you did this time around that. I thought was a really good idea for those teachers out there POPs. You've got quite heavy workload in thinking or how am I going to possibly do but crept for comfort in the whole book that you actually sent a chapter to those who hadn't necessarily tense look at the whole book but really wanted to come and join I thought that in terms of kind of differentiation and access and workload management you know you might not be able to read the whole book but take. Take a look at a chapter common habit. Listen and you can still and colleagues come who haven't read it but actually they're inspired to go away and read it yeah halls. We've had a discussion on that research. Books don't have to be heavy today. We've discovered we've uncovered but in the process of doing this stuff book club. There are a number of really accessibly written books that are full of really good stuff and I think we've all benefited from it. Thanks for that wellbeing tip Judith Okay so who you gonNA show type two this week okay. This is a shoutout shoutout to a special group of trainees and this is the trainees or as student teachers who have young kids and these I'm always full of admiration for those trainees who managed managed to get through their P._G.. Course and have a family to look after as well they are usually very driven very well organized a delight to work with and they show that it can be done absolutely absolutely and this is resonates quite nicely with an episode episode eleven. I believe it was it was the one we were talking about how to how to apply into successfully get onto a p._g.. Program and we we reference parents prince who are thinking of applying then and I think that advice kind of extends then unto those fantastic parent trainee teachers out there who do great job and finally have you got a little something for us to try over us our you're listening to try. I have an infant. I've got a little something for you to try which is and based on some work that one of my ex students did abby cooper and she was indeed one of these students who hard young children she still does have she qualified in two thousand and sixteen and her kids now are seven and eight she now works in an Orchard School in Bristol and she's made it to at second in faculty as well in the English faculty and she comes in and talks to some of our students and also students in other universities who shall remain nameless about her approach to assessment and what I want to suggest that you have a go at is using a marking crib sheet now she uses when she's doing her mocking. She has a sheet beside her where she is making notes notes about what she's not to sink within the mocking so I mean probably a loss of us do this. I have a scrap of paper where on on not and even now the common things that come up now. This is what he is doing and she she is doing a in pops a little bit more of an organized way so <hes> she has an a four sheet of you. Imagine she's got an a four sheet in front cover. It's sort of landscape and it's got seven boxes on it and in those boxes are things like there's a box hawks the praise and uh she's going along. She will put in the box those students who are due for a for particular praise for doing something perhaps haven't done before or <hes> showing a good example of something. She has another box of course for concern <hes> again. She'll note the names of students that she needs to catch up on on that she has a box for missing or incomplete works. You can see that she's tracking all the different aspects. Let's on this crib sheet as she goes along. She has another box for an dirt or dedicated improvements reflection time so that's going to be the focus when she gives back the work. These are the main themes that have come up on. This is what we're going to work on. There is a box misconceptions and actions so for example it might be getting their apostrophes wrong or issues with homophones or whatever and then the final two boxes are on spike so spelling punctuation and grammar and presentation now she uses this because as teachers we spend an awful lot of time. Mocking particularly English teachers history teachers et Cetera spent an awful lot of time putting marks on students work and be quite frank. I think Sherrington a note this as well at a very often. It's <hes> wasted time because the students don't look in detail at it but what is important is that we as teachers on noting the areas where they're learning whether they're not learning and keeping this crib sheet by makes you do they sit on an organized way so I think it sort of minimal in a moment king on the work but keeping a crib sheet while you keep an all useful information and I think with all the classes show me examples and as long as it fits in with the mark in policy the school she she likes to copy the crib sheet for the students as well so they're aware of the key issues as well so really small working on that so that's what I would suggest that you you try and have got lovely. Thank you for van that age old adage. Isn't it a quality not quantity helping you to manage that workload and doing things that are actually going to be meaningful for your people's progress do it has been an absolute pleasure as always thank you for being a guest on our lovely podcast. Thank you T- Tom and it's goodbye from all of us and we will. I'm sure see you again in the future okay but was emmer and Tom's P._G.. podcast presented by Emma and Tom Breeze. Today's special guest was me judith knee. Today's book was the learning rainforest by Tom Sherrington. We salute student teachers with small children once again with organization..

Tom Sherrington Tom Christodoulou Book Donaldson Judy MARV trainee Cardiff Judith Orchard School Bristol abby cooper emmer Tom Breeze Emma