17 Burst results for "Emily Thompson"

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:36 min | 3 d ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Are built step by step. Fire nation, you can't be everything to everyone. If you try, it's like a deck of cards. It's going to collapse that House of Cards will simply collapse. So just be something specific to a certain sector of an audience to a certain sector of entrepreneurs to a certain audience. Now Adam, how could fire nation use your specific story to achieve their own success? I would say that my journey as an entrepreneur is very specific to my upbringing, my nature, and honestly the timing and opportunity that came about with the jobs act. I hope that some of what I've shared today really resonates with people who are thinking about pursuing a venture and have the potential to really disrupt an industry. I know that there are a lot of books people are always sharing books or goodreads with me on how to be an entrepreneur how to run an organization. And many of them offer great insight. But at the end of the day, it's really important to remember there's no cookie cutter approach to starting a business. And something that I've found that's likely overlooked when you start a business is being honest with yourself. Are you willing to sacrifice certain things, including your personal time to achieve your goals. If the answer is no, that does not mean you can't be successful. It just means that the process will be demonstrably harder. If there's one thing I want aspiring entrepreneurs to take away from my story, it's that there is a way to embrace what you know and what you don't know and be willing to grow personally. And professionally. So I think at the end, the key is really at the end of the key is being willing to do the work. Learn from the people around you remain nimble and adaptive. And of course, don't forget your passion along the way. Boom. I mean, that is a mic drop fire nation and Adam. Before we let you go, what's the best way we can connect with you, learn more about you, any call to action you might have for our listeners. This is the time to share it, and then we'll say goodbye. If you create an account on arbor crowd dot com, you'll opt in to receiving our email communications. We focus on educating investors, even if you don't want to invest and you just want to learn more about commercial real estate, join our community. We do events. We send out a lot of articles that talk about how to understand the concepts and also really what's happening today in the industry and in the market. So go to arbor crowd dot com, create an account and join our community. Arbor crowd dot com fire nation join the community. And you know this fire nation, you're the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with. And you've been hanging out with AK and JL D today. So keep up the heat and head over to eo fire dot com. Type atom in the search bar. In his show notes page will pop up with all the links that everything that we've been talking about today. Best show notes in the biz, and of course, arbor crowd dot com is waiting for you fire nation. And at the moment, thank you brother for sharing your truth with our audience today for that we salute you and we will catch you on the flip side. Thanks for having me and thanks everybody for listening to my story. Hey, fire nation today's value bomb content was brought to you by Adam and fire nation. I know you understand how podcasts connect nature business, but the planning, the creating the collaborating with the guests of the producing, the distributing. I mean, take it from me. Podcasting can be intense. That's why I'm fired up for you to check out aux bus octopus has an end to end podcast creation platform for entrepreneurs adjust like you visit aux bus dot com slash J LD. And you get to try it for free. That's AUX BUS dot com slash J LD, boom, shake the room, fire nation, and I'll catch you there, or I'll catch you on the flip side. Being boss hosted by Emily Thompson is brought to you by the HubSpot podcast network and is an exploration of what it means and what it takes to be boss as a creative business owner. One recent episode on the 5 tips for better work life balance is a must listen. Listen to being boss, wherever you get your podcasts.

Adam arbor Arbor Emily Thompson
"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:12 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"<Silence> So as we <Speech_Female> slide into <Speech_Female> our two <SpeakerChange> minute countdown <Speech_Male> here, <Speech_Male> I want to <Speech_Male> just kind of reiterate <Speech_Male> something that <Speech_Male> I shared earlier, but <Speech_Male> it's definitely the reason <Speech_Male> why <Speech_Male> I was successful. <Speech_Male> Obviously, why Emily <Speech_Male> was successful. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> we actually run the biggest <Speech_Male> podcast community <Speech_Male> in the world, podcasters, <Speech_Male> Paradise. <Speech_Male> So I'm seeing <Speech_Male> this on a daily <Speech_Male> basis with <Speech_Male> members that are joining <Speech_Male> who are launching <Speech_Male> and growing <Speech_Male> their podcast, <Speech_Male> this is <Speech_Male> what's working for <Speech_Male> them and having them <Speech_Male> be successful. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Male> what's <Speech_Male> not working <Speech_Male> for them <Speech_Male> is saying, <Speech_Male> oh, this <Speech_Male> show's successful. <Speech_Male> That shows successful. <Speech_Male> I'm going to <Speech_Male> just copy that <Speech_Male> show <Speech_Male> and try to ride on <Speech_Male> those coattails and try <Speech_Male> to become a <Speech_Male> similar version of <Speech_Male> success. That <Speech_Male> goes back to what I shared <Speech_Male> earlier, <Speech_Male> nobody. <Speech_Male> Nobody <Speech_Male> wants a pale <Speech_Male> weak imitation <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> somebody else. <Speech_Male> What they want <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> is <Speech_Female> the real <Speech_Male> true authentic <Speech_Female> version of you <Speech_Male> and the value <Speech_Male> that you can give. <Speech_Male> And if you can find a <Speech_Male> way <Speech_Male> to niche your flipping <Speech_Male> face off <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Male> become the <Speech_Male> number <Speech_Male> one solution <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> a real problem <Speech_Male> in this world, <Speech_Male> you will <Speech_Male> win. <Speech_Male> Now I know <Speech_Male> that sounds kind of difficult. <Speech_Female> How am I going to become the <Speech_Female> number one solution <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> to a real problem <Speech_Male> in this world? <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> the problem is, <Speech_Male> on your side, <Speech_Male> you're <Speech_Male> not niching <Speech_Male> enough because <Speech_Male> there is a <Speech_Male> problem that is not <Speech_Male> being solved within <Speech_Male> your area of <Speech_Male> expertise. <Speech_Male> Within your knowledge <Speech_Male> bank within your <Speech_Female> passion and <Speech_Female> excitement and enthusiasm <Speech_Male> sets. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> There is <Speech_Female> a problem that's <Speech_Male> not being solved. <Speech_Male> And then <Speech_Male> you can be that person <Speech_Male> because people, <Speech_Male> they will <Speech_Female> beat a path <Speech_Male> to the doorstep. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> For the number one <Speech_Male> solution to <Speech_Male> a real problem <Speech_Female> that they have. <Speech_Female> And they will <Speech_Female> ignore <Speech_Male> the second <Speech_Male> best solution <Speech_Male> all the way to <Speech_Male> eternity. <Speech_Male> So please, <Speech_Male> if you take anything <Speech_Male> away from our conversation, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> become the number one solution <Speech_Male> to a real <Speech_Male> problem <Speech_Male> in this world, <Speech_Female> this has been <Speech_Female> Emily Thompson <Speech_Female> from being boss, <Speech_Male> John <Speech_Male> Lee Dumas from entrepreneurs <Speech_Female> on fire.

Emily Emily Thompson Lee Dumas
"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

03:54 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Book time, every single month, one day, I do ten to 15 back to back interviews on other shows. That's the one day that I book out to do that. And I know that that is worth my time because again, podcast listeners listen to podcasts. So everybody listen to that podcast. They have the podcast app on their phone. They're listening to Spotify or Apple or Google or iHeart or one of those podcasting apps that they're listening to right now. And that's an amazing targeted perfect avatar slash listener for myself. So my two tactics there, topic based shows, and podcasts, guesting. And it's a great opportunity, by the way, if you have a podcast to reach out to somebody who has a podcast that you want to be a guest on and say, hey, I love your show. I think I'd be a great guest on your show. And by the way, let me return the value to you by having you as a guest on my show. Let's do a podcast swap. We can book an hour. I'll do 30 minutes on your show. You do 30 minutes on mine. We'll both get exposure to each other's audiences. And now instead of you just saying, can I have this, you're giving a value proposition, you're giving a value swap. That can be a great way for you to get on a lot more shows because now you have something of value to give to that podcast host as well. So that can be a great little reason for you to have your podcast. Now we're going to move into the next section, which is

Spotify Apple Google
"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:27 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Became an amazing success. As I mentioned, a 126 million downloads to date over two and a half million downloads every single month. And growing, and if I launched entrepreneurs on fire with my 2012 skill sets and the exact same concept in 2022, that show fails. The show just fails. It won in 2012 because I was able to be the best podcast interviewing interviewing successful entrepreneurs 7 days a week, but it fails in 2022, much for the same reason because I wouldn't be and I wouldn't have had the time to become good at what I do before other competitors were able to kind of catch up and figure things out. So for me, when I give advice to individuals that want to launch and grow an actual podcast, I say this needs to be you. Your voice, your message, your thing. Now, I'm not against occasionally bringing on a bonus guest or finding the perfect person to come on once or twice a month to interview them if it just makes sense. That can be a great addition to your show. But listen, this is your podcast. This is about you finding your voice sharing your message in your mission with the world, and I want to give you every single opportunity to do that, to put in the reps, and one thing that I know both Emily and I have experienced being interview hosts as we are supposed to do when we're interviewing somebody, we take the spotlight as a host, and we shine it on our guests. And that guest is highlighted as the expert as the authority figure as the influencer that they are rightfully so. And with a 7 day a week podcast, interviewing entrepreneurs, that's all that I do. Now, I love the idea of somebody launching a show in 2022 and trying to grow that podcast to say, wait a second. I'm going to have

Emily
"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:47 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Because 30 minutes goes quite fast as we both know. For those people who currently have a show or soon will, what would it be to growth tactics that you'd recommend? All the ways, I feel you were to go into Google, you would find article hundreds, thousands of articles, how to grow your podcast. And in this environment with as many as there are, there's both so much opportunity and also quite a lot of overwhelm and even imagining it. And my favorite part of my first one is that the industry is still growing and figuring itself out. YouTube just jumped in the game. There's so many big moves still being made in small moves being made that my number one is to don't be afraid to try anything and everything. I feel like podcasting is still in this space where we're no single tactic is going to work for you all the time. It may work this time it probably won't work next time. So I love the idea of getting very experimental. This is something we do on the team at being boss, you know, we'll go through a recorder. We'll see what worked, what didn't work. And then we come to the table and I called these shitty ideas. This idea that we just sit down and we just throw spaghetti at the wall to see what sticks see what sounds interesting. Interesting enough to give it a go that we're all into it. We want to see if it's going to work or not. We call this also a test and change mindset and how it is that we go about anything. So when it comes to growing, I know this is like the worst non answer ever. But feel free. Bill empowered and encouraged to try any sort of weird idea you can come up with because podcasting is still in a place where there is, I think there are some wrong things that you can do, but I don't think there is the right thing that you can do. There's lots of opportunities and you have the also the opportunity to give a go to whatever it is that you want to try out.

Google YouTube Bill
"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:03 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Around your podcast topic before you launch your podcast. And there's so many different ways to do that. And this is also going to afford you an opportunity to be putting in the reps on different platforms before your podcast goes live. Because again, we like to say, you know, don't procrastinate launching your show, but the thing about a podcast is everybody's going back and listening to episode one of entrepreneurs on fire. And when they do that, I kind of cringe they're like, John, I found out about your show yesterday. I just listened to episode 37 43. It was great. I'm going to go back and start an episode one and catch up. And I'm like, well, a, you must have no life because you didn't do nothing except listening to podcasts. God bless you. And number two, I'm like, oh my God, they're going to go for me at 37 43. Is their first taste? And then go to episode one where I was like, this shaking little boy would like this piece of paper like crackling on the microphone because I was like trying to figure out what to say. That's going to be such a disparity, but it's fine, but just the point is, your podcast will lift forever in that way. So why not put in some reps on Instagram with a Facebook group on different social media platforms, LinkedIn, like actually utilize different platforms to start talking about your topic to start getting into the mode of being somebody who's an influencer and an expert in authority in that space on that topic that you're going to be an expert in when it comes to your podcast and then if you're able to over one, two, three months build up a small ish audience around that topic, all the better when you launch your podcast because then you can alert those individuals. Hey, I just launched my show. It's around all these things I've been talking about all these different platforms. I'm doing a lot of work behind the scenes with my logo with my intro, my outro, with this with that, and the show is ready. It's going to launch on this day. Come check it out. And you might have a micro audience already gathered around that which can really help you get off on the right foot. So those two things niching your flipping face off and working on building a community before your show actually launches can be too great things.

Instagram John LinkedIn Facebook
"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:12 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"It needs to be watered like a plant every single day for the rest of your life. That's not the case. Yeah, for sure. Okay, number two. Two. Number two. No. Interviews. So we both have interview shows, but I think if actually no, not even if I go back and redid it because we actually intentionally did this. I had a co host on my show when I started. So I'm going to say we a lot that's not an issue. It's a real thing. So whenever we launched our show in 2015, we very intentionally launched our show with the idea that for the first ten to 15 episodes, we would do no interviews. And this is at a time and for 5 plus years after the popular opinion is that to launch your show, you need to get the biggest names you can get in your first three episodes and do a marketing blitz and that's how you do it. But instead, we were like, what's most important to us is that we find our voice and those first couple of episodes that we are dedicating to us, proving and working out our expertise in this medium. On these topics, first, we also create that really valuable relationship that can create with your community with the people who are listening to your voice and you focus on that first. So if I were launching it again, I would do the thing that I did do, and I tell people to do this all the time. Don't follow the popular opinion of doing all the biggest interviews first and said, focus on you finding that voice, proving your expertise, making that connection. And I think then you're going to launch a podcast that has a longer runway for growth and success. And it's such great advice because so many people are intimidated about launching an interview based show because they see all the guests that they could potentially be interviewing.

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:45 min | Last week

"emily thompson" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Emily has worked closely with creatives to help them make money doing the work they love. She's also the co author of being boss, take control of your work and live life on your own terms. Did you come up with those taglines? No, I don't think do you get

Emily
"emily thompson" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

08:48 min | 3 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the Marta podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss marketing success through differentiation. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute where we invite a friend of the Marta podcast to help us answer a listener question in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is Emily Thompson, who is the host of the being boss podcast, which is an exploration of not only what it means, but what it takes to be a boss as a creative business owner, freelancer, or side hustler, and being boss podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network, and Emily has been kind enough to answer a question from Holly Anderson, who is an SEO consultant and strategist. Holly asked, what can women do to Gardner the right attention and build credibility in the marketing industry, which is dominated by men. Okay, here's Emma Lee's answer. I'm not going to lie. My first reaction is to say, don't worry about the dudes. Who cares if the industry is dominated by men, put on your blinders and do the best work you can. And dress that the world needs more of what women bring to the industry of marketing, so don't think for a second that what you're bringing to the table isn't incredibly important. But to dive a little bit deeper, here are some practical tips for you in case that doesn't quite cut it. Apart from showing up and doing the work, mastering your craft, owning your expertise and really cultivating your zone of genius, be sure to act and speak with integrity directness and confidence in all that you do. Also, never be afraid to celebrate and take ownership of your wins. These things won't only help you excel in an industry dominated by men. They'll help you excel in all that you do. Thanks, Emily. If you're interested in hearing more from Emily Thompson on the being boss podcaster or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview. Joining us is orin Hoffman, who is the CEO of safe Graf and the former CEO and cofounder of live ramp. Save graph is a geospatial data company that provides high quality data on physical places to organizations like Cisco, Domino's, citizens, bank, and more. So far this week, Oren and I talked about data priority differentiation from marketers and yesterday we talked about the data ecosystem and accessibility predictions. And today we're going to wrap up our conversation talking about whether every tech company is an ad tech company. But before we get started, I wanted to say thank you to insightly for sponsoring this podcast. Most businesses struggle to manage customer data and relationships across their teams. And site leaves unified CRM elevates the customer experience by aligning sales, marketing, and service into one platform, and this helps businesses like yourself smarter, grow faster, and build longer lasting relationships. Visit in slightly dot com slash martech for a personalized demo that's insightly in si ghl Y dot com slash martek. All right, here's the last part of my conversation with Oren Hoffman, the CEO of safe graft. Warren, welcome back to the martek podcast. Thank you, Benjamin, happy to be here. Excited to have you back on the show. So far this week, we've talked about what are the priorities for marketers and terms of their usage of data. And yesterday we talked about what's happening in the ecosystem with privacy, regulations, platform, and this notion of privacy tech or the technology associated around using data in a safe way. I keep hearing not to take a departure from that conversation, but I keep hearing that every tech company needs to be a media company. We all need content, everybody needs to start their own podcasts and think HubSpot's a great example of this. They produce a ton of content and it's leading to business growth and we're all kind of going in that direction, which kind of infers that while we should all be focused on organic growth and not performance marketing. But then there's this whole side of the technology and ad tech. That's an easy way to grow your business. Talk to me about whether every company shouldn't necessarily just be a media company. Should every company be an ad tech company? Well, certainly every company is a media company, not every tech company, but every company period is a media company and nowadays most people are their own little media companies too. Certainly, if you're a politician or a lawyer, you're in the services business or something like that, you're probably your own little media company. I think it's a little weird. If you think of ad tech companies, there's usually two kind of pieces to think about. There are companies that are much more closer to the ad part on the continuum, and there's companies that are much more closer to the tech part. If you invested in ad tech over the last 20 years, a broadly just as an index and you were an angel investor, you would have done incredibly well. You love the words programmatic. Anywhere on the ad tech spectrum, yeah, you would have done very well. However, if you just invested on the ad side, you would have done marginally okay, but not great. Probably worse than the S&P 500 are kind of maybe tracking the S&P 500. If you invested on the tech side of ad tech, you would have done extraordinarily well. And I think that's probably true going forward. The tax side of ad tech is going to be continually good place to invest. The ad side of ad tech may not be the best place to be. So I don't want to have you name names or call it specific companies, but can you give me examples of what would be an ad company in ad tech and what would be a tech company and ad tech. We've kind of depends on if you're really creating real attack or not. And a lot of companies in quote unquote ad tech, even companies that call themselves tech companies don't have much tech. And they're packaging things or they're doing things or they're putting things in or they're a bunch of salespeople who are doing stuff middleware. Not necessarily. So if they're real middleware, that's actually probably the closest to real technology, middlemen. Middlemen, so yeah, if you're a broker, if you're just a broker or something like that, then you might be much closer to the ad side of things. Not to say those are necessarily bad businesses. Some of them have become really good businesses. But as an investor, you would have done way better if you invested in the tech side about tech and not the ad side about tech. I guess there's still a little gray area for me where I'll use Google as an example. Google is in advertising company. You could buy ads through Google. They deliver the ads. You can use them to make the creative as well. They're obviously a tech company. They've got data sources and the ability to serve the ads and all of that. Google, as an example, an ad company or a tech company. There's certainly a tech company. Google has some of the best engineers and some of the best technology that's out there. If you think of companies like the trade desk is certainly a tech company live ramp, certainly a tech company. So there's a lot of companies that are much more on the tech side, but then there have been historical companies that have been on the ads. Some of them had good exits. Some of those ad companies and then maybe later got shut down or something like that. But a lot of them maybe became agencies or other types of things, which became fine businesses, but they weren't like long-term sustainable changing businesses that would be like necessarily great investments. I was just going to say that is I can't think of what an ad company is other than they're the producers of the creative. And so to me, my head went to, okay, or the ad companies agencies. Most companies and ad tech are actually more on the ad side. There's some tech in there, but they're probably overweighted on the ad side, but there are small number of companies and usually the ones that have the better outcomes that are more on the tech side. So if we go back to the original question, whether every company should be an ad tech company. My understanding is even the companies that are calling themselves ad tech companies, they're most of the time not actually tech companies. They're just ad companies. So if the notion is, yes, every company should be an ad tech company. Great, but it doesn't seem like even the ad tech industry is living up to that standard of actually having ad and tech. So do you still answer yes to every company should be an ad tech company? I don't think every company should be an object company. I don't think it makes sense to be selling ads for most companies. It's really about whether are you Instacart and you decide to like, that's going to be a core source of your revenue. And yeah, if you're a big marketplace like Instacart or Airbnb or something like that, then yeah, maybe it does make sense to monetize that. But for most companies that aren't huge marketplaces, just stick to your core product like running extra ads is probably could yield a few points in margin to your company, which is nice, but there's probably a lot of other

Benjamin Shapiro Emily Thompson Holly Anderson Emma Lee orin Hoffman Emily Oren Hoffman freelancer Oren Graf Gardner Holly Google Domino HubSpot Cisco Benjamin Warren S Airbnb
"emily thompson" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"That it's just a matter of timing. Welcome to the mar tech podcast, and I hear everything production. In this podcast, you'll hear the stories of world class marketers that use technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth, the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools, tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the Mart podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to talk about the importance of the optimal martech stack. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute where we invite a friend of the Marta podcast to help us answer a listener question in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is Emily Thompson, who is the host of the being boss podcast, which is an exploration of not only what it means, but what it takes to be a boss as a creative business owner, freelancer, or side hustler, and being boss podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network, and Emily has been kind enough to answer a question from Holly Anderson, who is an SEO consultant and strategist. Holly asked, what can women do to Gardner the right attention and build credibility in the marketing industry, which is dominated by men. Okay, here's Emma Lee's answer. I'm not going to lie. My first reaction is to say, don't worry about the dudes. Who cares if the industry is dominated by men, put on your blinders and do the best work you can. And dress that the world needs more of what women bring to the industry of marketing, so don't think for a second that what you're bringing to the table isn't incredibly important. But to dive a little bit deeper, here are some practical tips for you in case that doesn't quite cut it. Apart from showing up and doing the work, mastering your craft owning your expertise and really cultivating your zone of genius, be sure to act and speak with integrity directness and confidence in all that you do. Also, never be afraid to celebrate and take ownership of your wins. These things won't only help you excel in an industry dominated by men. They'll help you excel in all that you do. Thanks, Emily. If you're interested in hearing more from Emily Thompson on the being boss podcaster or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview. Joining us is Nicholas dohrn, who is the CEO of file stage, which is a content review and approval platform for marketing teams. And in addition to being our guest today, file stage is also a sponsor of the mar tech podcast. So we're grateful for their support. So far this week, Nicholas and I have discussed how to grow a SaaS startup in yesterday we talked about the optimal martech stack. Today we're going to wrap up our conversation talking about productivity increasing technology. But before we get started, I wanted to say thank you to insightly for sponsoring this podcast. Most businesses struggle to manage customer data and relationships across their teams. And site leaves unified CRM elevates the customer experience by aligning sales, marketing, and service into one platform, and this helps businesses like your sell smarter grow faster and build longer lasting relationships. Visit in slightly dot com slash martech for a personalized demo that's insightly in si ghl Y dot com slash martek. All right, here's the last part of my conversation with Nicholas dohrn, the CEO of file stage. Nicholas, welcome back to the martek podcast. Hi. Always good to have you back here, excited to continue the conversation. Yesterday we talked about the optimal martech stack. This mythical creature, like the Loch Ness monster that may be pokes his head out for a minute and then dips back down and we keep searching for what we think we saw. Is there a way to use technology to solve all of our problems and make all of our data flow and never change? It seems like that might be a myth and so we're constantly tweaking and iterating and trying to find a way to be more productive. So today I want to talk to you a little bit about productivity and how we can use technology to increase our output. Talk to me about how you think about productivity and where does technology fit in the productivity landscape? So since we are a remote team since 2018, productivity is quite a big thing for us. But over time, I've also recognized that productivity is more than just having all the best tools in place and a good tech stack productivity is a lot about finding the right meeting structure and making sure people on the one side communicate enough to be aligned, but at the same time have enough time for deep focus work. And I think it's a constant struggle to find that and at the same time, especially in a remote team where you work a lot in different time zones where asynchronous work is a big factor. Let's say it's important to know when to communicate and then what communicate and maybe even over communicate what you are doing in order to make people feel like, hey, something's going online. So I'm giving you an example if you work together as a team on a sprint, let's say you want to produce nice content through articles a week and maybe videos and everybody has a brief at the beginning of the week and everybody commits to do something and then by the end of the week you don't hear a thing from anybody. So people are just producing your stuff and by the end of the week, okay, they might be done with it or they might have failed on a deadline. But if you don't hear anything from them in between, you feel like, okay, is everything going right? No, I don't know. So I think it's important that people before that give updates and really inform each other and the thing each other and say, hey, I've produced the first part here, just want to let you know, give me feedback. But at the same time, I think you don't want people just spending their time on slack or teams and just telling what they are doing and not actually doing anything. And I think this is the biggest challenge. It's a balancing act. Before we get into the technology part of this conversation, let's focus on productivity and the factors that go into building a productive team. Sure, alerts letting somebody know that they're responsible for a task are very important. But you can't be productive if you're constantly being inundated with notifications and distractions. So what do you think are the big components into building a productive culture and environment where people can work the way that they want to work but also stay focused and on task? Yes, for me to make sure between culture, processes, but then also tools and culture and only starts already with the hiring process. So you want to make sure you are aligned culture wise in terms of how you like to work together, what's normal when you work together, how you communicate, how often you basically exchange feedback about how much of an ownership you take and this all makes the culture, then process wise, we recognize that it's very helpful to have communication processes in place. So this means like, okay, we have a weekly meeting for this topic if you want to share something about this topic then please add it to we work with a sauna to our asana board and we collect it and then Monday we have a meeting and then in the meeting we take time to really discuss the stuff but we don't start to discuss ideas for this topic during the week on the fly on slack because this will drive everybody nuts or it's more like okay, collect everything and then take deep time deep focus time discuss it decide on it and then continue and this is the way we've organized the entire company in terms of their meetings. We discussed topics there and then we have deep focus time to work on things and we don't shoot messages on the fly and make.

Benjamin Shapiro Emily Thompson Nicholas dohrn Holly Anderson Emma Lee file stage Emily Nicholas Mart freelancer Gardner Holly sprint
"emily thompson" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Technology to drive business results and achieve career success. Will on earth the real world experiences of some of the brightest minds in the marketing and technology space, so you can learn the tools tips and tricks, they've learned along the way. Now here's a host of the mar tech podcast, Benjamin Shapiro. Welcome to the mar tech podcast. I'm your host Benjamin Shapiro, and today we're going to discuss how to personalize marketing automation. But before we get to today's interview, we're going to kick off the show with a marketing minute where we invite a friend of the mar tech podcast to help us answer a listener question in 60 seconds or less. Here for today's marketing minute is Emily Thompson, who is the host of the being boss podcast, which is an exploration of not only what it means, but what it takes to be a boss as a creative business owner, freelancer, or side hustler, and being boss podcast is also a fellow member of the HubSpot podcast network, and Emily has been kind enough to answer a question from Holly Anderson, who is an SEO consultant and strategist. Holly asked, what can women do to Gardner the right attention and build credibility in the marketing industry, which is dominated by men. Okay, here's Emma Lee's answer. I'm not going to lie. My first reaction is to say, don't worry about the dudes. Who cares if the industry is dominated by men, put on your blinders and do the best work you can. And dress that the world needs more of what women bring to the industry of marketing, so don't think for a second that what you're bringing to the table isn't incredibly important. But to dive a little bit deeper, here are some practical tips for you in case that doesn't quite cut it. Apart from showing up and doing the work, mastering your craft, owning your expertise and really cultivating your zone of genius, be sure to act and speak with integrity directness and confidence in all that you do. Also, never be afraid to celebrate and take ownership of your wins. These things will only help you excel in an industry dominated by men. They'll help you excel in all that you do. Thanks, Emily. If you're interested in hearing more from Emily Thompson on the being boss podcaster, any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview. Joining us is Rick elmore, who's the CEO of simply noted, which is an API first platform that streamlines the creation and distribution of genuine handwritten notes. Simply noted is customer funded with hundreds of top startups, unfortunate 5000 companies that help them integrate automate and scale their handwritten outreach. So far this week, Rick and I have talked about automating personalization and yesterday we talked about handwriting AI. Today we're going to wrap up our conversation, talk about integrating direct mail into your marketing efforts. But before we get started, I wanted to say thank you to insightly for sponsoring this podcast. Most businesses struggle to manage customer data and relationships across their teams. And site leaves unified CRM elevates the customer experience by aligning sales, marketing, and service into one platform, and this helps businesses like yourself smarter, grow faster, and build longer lasting relationships. Visit in sightly dot com slash martech for a personalized demo that's insightly dot com slash martek. All right, here's the last part of my conversation with Rick elmore, the CEO of simply noted. Rick, welcome back to the mar tech podcast. Excited to be here. Excited to have you back on the show. You know, we've covered a lot of ground talking about how you and simply noted are creating this platform where people can build handwriting samples, use your artificial intelligence and send personalized automated messages through, I don't know, this novel concept of a mailbox, unbelievable. You don't actually get it in your inbox, you have to go out to the mail and get a physical letter and open it and read it and people are actually using pens to write it. I know this is a novel concept. So walk me through the process of integrating direct mail into your marketing efforts. What are the triggers? What do you send? What are the costs? How does it work? Our platform is as flexible as it can be. We have all of our clients who automate users in different ways. But really, some of the easiest ways to use us is onboarding new clients. Just saying thank you. You know, it's today's day and age. There's just a competitor for every service, doesn't matter if you're a medical company, a dental office, a real estate agent, there's just so many options. So building that relationship with your client is just incredibly important. I've built my business over the last four years. And our first clients were just incredibly important to the success of our business. And if it wasn't for them, our business wouldn't be where it is today. So taking care of your clients, maintaining that relationship, showing them that you care about them is incredibly important in today's day and age. And we think a handwritten note is a great way to do that. I understand the notion of handwritten notes and important way to say thank you. And it feels like it's personalized. It feels like it's from the heart you're sitting down in theory with a pen and a paper and thinking about what you want to write. And for guys like me, you're really putting it on the line because my grammatical accuracy is one of the main reasons why I am a podcaster. I can't spell I put the punctuation in the wrong places, let's just say the spoken word is my strong suit, not the written word. And so when I sit down to write a letter, I really gotta mean it, and I gotta pay attention because I'm probably rewriting it three or four times. But there's cost associated with this outside of just embarrassing yourself by spelling something the wrong way. Talk to me about the triggers of saying thank you. You gotta send mail, so there's a stamp. When you're doing this at low levels or at scale, how do the costs associated with sending direct mail change? I want to touch on what you just said, staying grammatically correct or staying consistent. We actually worked with the nonprofit recently. We actually thought we were going to work with them about a year ago and they decided to have all their volunteers do it. And they actually had mail bounce back and they had volunteers misspelling words. Talk about costs. Your reputation is a huge cost, especially when you're reaching out and trying to get donations from prospective people. That's why I'm not a blogger. And imagine you're having somebody handwritten note for you and they're not caring about the punctuation, the grammar, the cleanliness of the note, just like some professional. So we actually had a win back of a client who gave us the opportunity because they now saw the value, even though they had to pay a little bit upfront. They knew it was going to be consistent. They knew it was going to be nice. They knew it was going to be done on time, but I think your reputation has a cost. But yeah, there's a costar service that starts at $2 and 67 cents before postage. So three 25 shift. I don't even think you can go to the grocery store and get a thank you card for $3 and 25 cents. But it's just like any business, the more that you send, the less you pay, it can become extremely affordable depending on how user service. All right, so you're a couple of bucks per message. One of the things that doesn't go down is when you're buying postage at scale, right? Yeah. Unfortunately, I don't even know what a stamp cost these days. We bought a pack of a thousand forever stamps back in the day, and we're never making our way through it. What is postage actually cost right now? So forever stamp is 58 cents, there's international, there's nonprofit, there's marketing mail. That's another whole side of this business. You know, the post office is a mega monster in itself. We use real forever stamps. We don't do any gimmicky printed stamps. We try to make it look like you guys sat down and did it. We don't put the marketing logos, any of our branding on it. It's all real, real forever stands, real pen written. Time for a one minute break to hear from our presenting sponsor HubSpot, from ride sharing the file sharing and everything in between. If you use an app or a website to engage with your customers, you know that your platform needs to be able to keep up with their needs. HubSpot is trusted by enterprises and entrepreneurs to keep up with customers needs and deliver a seamless customer experience no matter the interaction, with easy to use web editing tools, HubSpot helps your team publish an update your website with ease. And with the developer quality code free drag and drop website editor, anyone on your team can update pages and edit content, helping your customers access the site updates as soon as they're ready. To learn more about how your business can grow better, visit HubSpot dot com..

Benjamin Shapiro Emily Thompson Rick elmore Holly Anderson Emma Lee Emily Rick freelancer Gardner Holly HubSpot
"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

03:30 min | 9 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"Working 5, 6 days a week, I will always have one off day. I am not one of those people who can work every single day. And if I'm in a season of hustle, my off day is like, I'm just going to read in bed all day. Because I need that very hardcore rest, right? In order to get up and work 50 hours the next week or whatever it may be. And that will be a cycle that I will do. I did that basically all summer wrong. Not my shining moment. In terms of what my house looks like necessarily. Or, you know, having mill plan every week or whatever about priorities, right? I knew what I was doing. I knew what I was sacrificing. I knew what the rewards needed to be. I got them, had an endpoint, but rest looks like different things depending on the season that I'm in. But throwing in a mandatory lazy day every now and then, whether you need it or not, as always, a good thing. I love that. So good. I will be incorporating all of this into my life. Yeah. Wait, I do actually want to add one thing about this breast thing. Because this is really big. Rest is not something that is normally okay. Most people. And there's a lot of judgment and shame, whether it's from yourself or others, whatever it may be. I think one of the missing elements to most people's rest, because you may say like, oh, I'm like, I'm netflixing and chilling or whatever it is that you're doing. But are you doing it without guilt? Yeah. Are you owning your rest? Because I think if you're resting but you feel guilty about it or someone is shaming you for it or whatever it is, it's not actually rest. You have to own your rest for the rest to actually benefit you to continue forward. Yeah, for you to actually enjoy it. Yeah. I love a good rest day. No deal. I'm with you there. Well, Emily it tell us where people can find you, your socials, your website, your store, tell us all the plugs. All the places. So if you want to listen to the bean boss podcast, you can find it wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also find our website, our community, the things that we've created at cost a club and as for my retail store, we make candles, sell crystals and other seasonal goods and things that'll help you connect with nature. You can find all of that at all dot com or almanac supply code on Instagram. Amazing. Thank you so much, Emily. This was awesome. Thanks so much for listening to another episode of the food having a podcast. If you haven't already, make sure to connect with us online where most active on the gram at food heaven, but we're also on Facebook and Twitter at food heaven show. If you like this podcast, make sure to rate review subscribe and share with a friend. Yup, our podcast is released every Wednesday in each week. We take a deep dive into topics like health at every size, food and culture, intuitive eating, mental health, and body acceptance. If you're looking for a sustainable and inclusive path to wellness, come hang out with us to learn how to take care of yourself from the inside out. We'll catch you next time. Bye..

Emily Facebook Twitter
"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

07:59 min | 9 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"Think once you have burnout, it's like a bad STD, right? It's always just kind of there. You can have flare ups. That's an awful lot of metaphor. Right? And that you do sort of you have to stay super mindful because burnout will just creep right back in. During like regular times, I'm probably working 30 to 35 hours a week. And that is split between two companies. I have really great teams. I have still have really great boundaries around what I'm doing and not doing, but I also know how to hustle. Coming out of a season of hustle, we opened up the first almanac supplyco retail store this summer. And once that opportunity came up, I told him, like y'all, I'm about to put post burnout Emily to the test. Like, can I turn up the heat without boiling over basically? And so it was a very mindful hustle and almost like a test for myself of can I can I hustle so responsibly that I get this done without sending myself over the edge. And I did it. And there have been weeks over the past. So I gave it definite boundaries. We started doing all the prep work in mid June. We moved in 1st of July, opened the store on July 9th. And have had this open since then. And obviously also doing things and growing being boss as well. And I gave myself a hard stop for hustle mode, mid October, Dave and I even booked a trip to a cabin. And so during that four month window, see June July August September 4 month window and was working 40 50 hours a week, which is not how I don't like that. Not my favorite. But I knew what I was doing. I knew I was doing it for something and I knew I was doing it for a very particular bit of time. And again, boundaries. Like even giving the hustle a beginning and end date of knowing that I'm going to be working, especially hard within the constraints of this time frame. And being very mindful within that of like, I was saying no to a lot of podcasts interviews. I was saying no to my friends told me in June, I'll see you in a couple of months. And I was like, yeah, catch a later. You can see Thanksgiving or whatever it may be. I definitely, I went into a pretty serious hustle phase. And I survived it nicely. And now that I'm on this side of it, new rules, right? I told the team, I actually just finished my first holiday like my Thanksgiving weekend with a retail store. And I haven't worked more than 40 hours a week since mid October. I've put myself back in this other box and I did not let my hustle spill over because the thing that makes burnout happen is that you overuse your energy without giving yourself time and space to refuel. Right? Like, you do not have an indefinite amount of energy at your disposal. And if you are hustling constantly without giving yourself time to rest. Or if you're even just like we're max a responsible max capacity without sometimes gearing it down, you're going to get to a place where you just overuse your energy, that is burnout. And that sort of cycle of work and rest is really the lesson that I learned from burnout. And it's the thing that I've taken into how I even how I plan my year is like I'll have these seasons of hustle because we're launching this thing and doing this thing and then I'm going to piece out for like four weeks y'all. And I'll be an email or I'll show up for team meetings, but if you want me here, 40 hours a week, 50 hours a week to make this thing do. I'm gonna peace out for a minute afterwards, because I have to refuel. And it is that sort of hustle culture, the gross one that has you hustling 24/7 forever that is why we're kind of all burned out and then add a pandemic on top of that where you are just like mentally hustling to survive. Right? And so anyway, all that to say, these days, I'm not working more than 40 hours. I am running a retail store while doing this. And I still have being boss in the community and all the things that we're doing there. I am taking a good break at the end of December. I'm closing the shop, January and February, because I probably myself. And I know that I need a hardcore period of rest in order to get up and do it all again. So it's been a fun process of making and breaking my own rules of redefining literally every season of my life and work of looking at every moment differently because every moment does need me to show up in a different way and it is really that I think I learned most from burnout and now being on the other side of what really was my first big hustle test since burnout and being on the other side of it and I'm fine. I actually feel great. I'm ready for that end of December rest, a 100%, but that's what it looks like for me these days. Hardcore boundaries, I show up for my own boundaries. Other people will only respect your boundaries as far as you do. I show up within the constraints of my boundary. Yes, I check in with myself. Constantly to make sure that I'm doing okay, because I do want to be over the long haul. I'm going to be an entrepreneur for the rest of my life. Whether like it or not, I'm sure. And it requires me to manage myself incredibly responsibly. I have a quick follow-up. Yeah. What is rest to look like for you? 'cause I remember on the podcast you talking about this is years ago. I think pre burnout, but you and your husband one day, a month just not getting dressed and watching Netflix all day. Is that what rest looks like or is there like an active rest that you incorporate? There's definitely layers of rest. Mandatory lazy day is what we're talking about. It's just like not getting up and doing. I do those off. Well, there are seasons where I don't need them at all. Sometimes I do need them. It's funny. We're actually doing an entire being boss community wide mandatory lazy day at least over 28. I encourage you both to join just tap out that day. Don't get out of your page, because I do think it is really important to have just those hardcore ones. Whenever we did our cabin trip at the end of our like four months of hustle this summer, I literally just laid in a sleeping bag on lounge chair for three days. That was, it was great. I felt my entire body fully relax multiple times in a way that I know was deeply healing, which was wonderful. So whenever I can, whenever I need to, I will do that. But that's not always necessary. There is a lot of there is a lot of active rest as you called it. I currently have like a little cross stitch project that I'm working on. So I said that I'm out and I'm cross stitching a lot and that for me, it doesn't require a lot of brain space to do that. I'm not critically thinking about anything I am being able to be physically still. For me, rest also looks like light hikes. I mean, I will also do like a hardcore hike, but that's not rest. But being in the Woods for me is how I know my brain switches from work mode to chill mode. There are a lot of things that I do intermittently, I will also say for my season of hustle,.

Emily Dave Netflix
"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

08:06 min | 9 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"That was one of those annoyingly simple things that took us far too long to figure out. But like we just had to get there, you know? So whenever we decide that we were going to shut down being boss, it was more of a thing of like, okay, well, you decide this, I decide this obviously is happening. Like we sort of have to have the same outcome. And we went down that path for probably 9 months of like, okay, like the end is coming, and I kept getting more and more annoyed. Like I was getting more and more angry. Every time I would go to my computer to figure out, okay, what are the things that I need to go do at almanac to replace this revenue? I also just sort of supplement until almanac grew to a place where it could. It could do what I needed it to do. I was planning on sort of relaunch launching a personal brand as a business coach and I guess I was going to have to have a podcast and I'd probably have to build some sort of newsletter, but don't I already have that and why am I having to rebuild it? And it was making me incredibly angry. He's sitting down in strategizing and sort of creating this next step for myself. And it was actually the day after my first therapy session. And again, I think those are just one of those things where I needed to show up for myself. I needed to prioritize this thing. I needed to just open the door just a little bit to something else. The day after my first therapy session, it I remember so vividly. I was sitting in my backyard at our patio table crying. And it was beautiful day outside. But I was crying and I David was sitting across from me. He wasn't saying anything 'cause I was crying. And I was like, oh my God, I just had the craziest idea. What if I buy Kathleen out? And it was just like one of those big magic moments. And again, like, the simplest solution, it doesn't have to be both of us that quits. If she's done, she can be done. If I'm not, I don't have to be. But we had just never considered that as an option. And so I immediately felt myself sort of wake up and all these cogs started turning of like, here's what it could look like. And I started visioning like I could see what this thing would become. And I almost immediately, like, it was probably two days two days later, I had my first meeting with Kathleen since I had had the idea and immediately was like, okay, I got something to tell you, and she was like, I knew it. Because we're psychic with each other, very legit. And I knew if I held it, if I didn't say anything to her, she would know, and sure enough, she knew something was coming. And I told her and she immediately was like, that's a great idea why didn't we think of that before? Because it was a solution to her problem, which is she wanted to just have one job basically. It was a solution to my problem of I was so in love with this thing that we had built that I was going to go do it somewhere else. Why not just keep the thing that we had built together? And we started working it out from there. So it was this really sort of magical moment where things sort of came together. And again, I have this page in my journal that I think I wrote the day that I had the idea that I wanted to do this where I sort of set these intentions for how I wanted it to be. I wanted to both to feel really great about it. I wanted us to end it better friends than we had started out. I wanted to I wanted to show up for the community and the audience that we had built and leave them without necessarily feeling like something was missing, though, like accepting that there was a Kathleen sized hole that was going to be there, but that I would reinvent it. And it has all sort of come to pass exactly the way I wanted it to. But it was really just about, I think that there was something magical that happened with me prioritizing myself and my own mental health of taking that step of getting a therapist, which for me was a step outside of the box that I was used to. And just continuing to show up and having developed the kind of relationship with my business partner that allowed that conversation, which could have been the most difficult conversation of my life, be one of the easiest I've ever had. That makes me so happy. Yeah, with business stuff, it can get so messy. And I just love that you all put the relationship first. It sounds like and that you put so much love and compassion and respect into what you both have built. And your friendship, you know? And I feel like when you do that, good things happen. I've just seen things go left so many times with friends becoming business partners and you all have been in the game for so long. It's like things start popping off like a few months in. It is partnerships. It's like, oh my God, you know, you all hit a crossroads and you handled that so gracefully. Yeah, I mean, every conversation that we had because we probably took us four or 5 months to go from, hey, I have this idea. I knew it to sign papers of our first and actually that was like dissolving number one. We actually did a partial buyout to begin with. And then it ended up being a full buyout. Right at a year after that initial conversation. And so it took us a couple of months to really figure out what it would be. And the partial buyout was actually can you remember the terms? I mean, it was like a 30 70 situation or something around there. And so there was like some terms we had to think about. And things like, you know, whenever we make revenue on this thing, where is the revenue going? Whenever we, if I create something new, who gets revenue for that? Those sorts of things, and so many of those conversations started with are definitely somewhere in between and actually every conversation either started with or had one of these things in between was we're Friends first. And I just want the best for you. Like both ways. And whenever you go at those sort of big conversations like that, and you're truly mean it. Truly, truly mean it. And now I want the best for myself, but I want the best for you. And if I want the best for you and you also want the best for me, then what comes out of this is going to be the best for both of us. And so we were just really open and really saying those words out loud every single time we got together to hash out sort of the next step of this of this breakup. It was the most conscious and coupling, I think, mankind has ever has ever known. And we remain really great friends. We recorded an episode of the being boss podcast yesterday. And I mean, it's just like old times, but easier, even because we're just Friends, not business partners. Yeah, and you're at a better place, too. In rapping, I would love to talk about post burnout mindset, which you've spoken about before and also just out of curiosity what your workflow looks like now. How many hours do you work in a day or in a week and more technical things like that that I think will be helpful for us? Yeah. Oh, I love that. I will say, during burnout, I think I had gone down to like, I was really ten hours a week. It was. And literally just what I had to come in to do to keep the train running or whatever. Almost immediately. Once I once I got my fire back, I was back in it. I was pretty back in it and had some things that I wanted to do. We launched the bean balls community. Really quickly after I started the buyout, there was a being false conference that got COVID that we ended up having to take online. And then we were just in 2020 and I had nothing more to do than work, basically. So I've had to stay though very mindful because really I.

Kathleen David
"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

08:10 min | 9 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"Slash food heaven. All right, let's get to it. You mentioned that this lasted a couple years ish. So I'm wondering, how does that look like work wise? What did you shift if anything? Because it sounds like it was sometimes hard to get out of bed and I know you also have at least one kid, right? Yes. Yeah. How do you navigate that and how do you make a living if you're not able to show up? Sure, I mean, it's like a black hole. I don't know. But he also do, I do. When I work for myself, so I was able to really craft my job in a way that gave me some additional support and also one of the things that Kathleen and I sort of came to after a couple of months of slogging through it. And there was a lot of I can't record today because I can't stop crying or I'm just not feeling it or whatever. There was a lot of pushing things around. And again, a lot of grace between us. And within the team, because we were really honest with our team throughout the entire thing like work kind of not okay right now. We're going to stay as openly communicative as possible throughout this process, but we need you guys to help us get through whatever couple months into it. We realize that or we made the call that what would make us feel better was actually if we shut down being balls altogether. Kathleen was very committed to the company that she was building with her sister, the branding agency, and I was building almanac. And I was worried personally because almanac was not quite in a place yet where I would pay my mortgage and help me sustain the life that I had built from myself. So we came up with a 12 ish month plan of what it would look like to, we're going to continue podcasting. We're going to start downsizing the team. We're going to start figuring out what it looks like. And again, so burned out that we can't do take any immediate action. Like we're going to take our time to do this thing. So we started winding down being boss. And so that sort of opened up my calendar for some things. And financially, we're great business owners. Every business I've ever run, especially being boss with Kathleen, like you look at the we can take care of ourselves really nicely with what we've built. And so we were afforded a bit of grace. And things got really tight. I canceled my Netflix subscription. And I downsized some things in my life. I definitely took a hit in terms of my quality of living as we made that transition. It wasn't easy and that added to my anxiety for sure of I peaked. Was this it? Like I definitely had those conversations with myself and my therapist. So it took a lot of action until it until the solution started coming up and they did at some point start formulate. And I like once I started feeling better, I had the energy back, which means I had the ideas back, which means the planing and the action started happening. But it was a long process of slowly downsizing of releasing a lot of the responsibilities from us so we could start healing. It was a long process that we gave ourselves a lot of grace around. We said no to a lot of things. We dropped a lot of projects, we stopped a lot of things, and we thought we were going to stop being boss. And that's how we were able to afford ourselves the space until the solution started showing up for us. Yeah, yeah, because when things are so chaotic, I feel like we all get into that reactionary mode or we're just like, all right, we have to put out fires. We have to do this. We have to do that. And then when you finally take a pause, it's like not only do you feel refreshed and invigorated, but like you said, the ideas start coming in and yeah, like creativity just sparks. So that's great that you were able to tap back into that. And I think setting boundaries is so important throughout that process too, because especially with people because it can be so hard to say no to opportunities to even you coming on this podcast like I could imagine if that would have happened during this phase in your life. It would have been like, okay, absolutely not. This is not a good idea. And I think a lot of people struggle with that, especially new entrepreneurs, where you feel like you have to say yes to everything, and you can't let opportunities pass by. And that can backfire really quickly if you're on the road to burnout. So what are some things that have been helpful with reinforcing those boundaries, post burnout, now that you're looking back and being like, yeah, you know, if this comes up again, this is how I would handle that. Yeah, I mean, he's just been a long practice, right? And again, it's the basics. Like being boss, our content has a couple of pillars, mindset boundaries, habits and routines, being the big ones. And so it's just been always going back to those boundaries, I think, is the biggest one for dealing with burnout and you have to get real tight with your boundaries. And then you have to deal with people being disappointed or whatever it may be, but you also have to not care. You have to care about yourself more than you care about anyone's opinion of how it is that you're managing your time to heal yourself. And so for me, it was a really long practice. And also, again, sort of having built an environment that is literally built on the idea of boundaries. Like a very lucky and that my team understands boundaries. They listen to the podcast every day too, or every week as well. Having a partner with whom I had been having conversations about boundaries. Kathleen is a boss with boundaries. So even she even modeled sometimes like I'd be like, okay, but here's a school opportunity. She'd be like, no, I was like, okay, well, then I guess it's a no. Because I might have said yes to it, but Kathleen is surely saying no. And otherwise just really prioritizing myself and thinking about what it is that I need. You also, you mentioned me having a kid and I do have a child. And that was a whole thing too. We have homeschooled forever, I feel like. And so modeling that next level for her two was my priority. And for her was a priority because between work and life, I'm going to choose life when it comes to my kid. And so it was a choice of am I going to take this one interview today? And then maybe not be able to function tonight or am I going to say no to this interview today? And have dinner with my kid this evening. And sometimes, and especially in burnout, the decisions are kind of that simple, right? You can only have one thing, which one are you going to choose? So I think in that too is just really knowing what your priorities are, which is another thing that we preach consistently. What is important to you? What do you value above everything else and making sure that you are putting your money where your mouth is, if you value family time, then say no to all the other things and just engage in the thing that gives you energy so that tomorrow, maybe you can diversify what you're doing a little bit. It's not just one thing that maybe it's one and a half things for whatever it may be. It all snowballs one way or the other. Either it's going to be a negative feedback loop or a positive feedback loop and literally a single decision can send you one way or the other. Yeah, I love that. It's so simple. It's like taking on this opportunity is going to mean saying no to another, so which one do I want to say no to now? One thing that I wanted to kind of talk about that I was curious about was so UN Kathleen started your podcast together in 2015 and then you guys both decided that you were going to kind of wind it down and then now you are the only host of being boss. I know you talked about this on the podcast, but for our listeners who haven't listened, can you share how you guys came to that conclusion and you decided that you wanted to continue on and Kathleen decided that she wanted to focus more on her other business brain creative? For sure, for sure. Yeah,.

Kathleen Netflix UN
"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

06:38 min | 9 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"Loud. But once we sort of started gathering what was happening, we started being pretty open and vocal about it. And then the journey that happened beyond that. So absolutely dealt with some really big, bad burnout. That changed the trajectory of both of our careers. It landed us in a place where we made some really big decisions for ourselves. It's really funny as I was coming out of it to sort of hit the last part of this particular question. As I was coming out of it, it was all of 2019 and I have this really sort of weird page in my journal. Has no date. It's between like I'm an SOS journaler. I only journal when I absolutely need it. So sometimes there's like weeks or months missing in my journal. And in one of these very large holes in my journal, there's this undated page that says something to the effect of, I feel like I've just gone through burnout because the whole world is about to burn out and I'm going to be able to help. And a couple months later, 2020 hits, and I watch all of my Friends lose it. All of my Friends lose it while I felt better than I had and two and a half years. And so I was able to really hold some space for some friends of mine who had a really hard time and for some who continue to have a really hard time or just now sort of hitting that hard time for themselves because I had just gone through it. And so I was able to weather what was 2020, I think a little more easily than some people because I had already that wasn't my rock bottom. My rock bottom hit about 18 months to 24 months before. And I was feeling much better by that point. So it has creeps up sometimes. Kathleen and I have likened it to sort of having a back burner on, simmer or just below summer and sometimes if you just tweak it just a little bit like if it just gets a little too warm, it's boiling hot, right? And so I have to be super mindful and there have been a couple of times over the past two years that it's like the temperature is turned up a little bit, but because I've been through it and I was super mindful and really sort of owned the journey throughout it, I can smell it coming and I know the things that I need to do to sort of take the temperature back down. Oh my goodness, I got chills when you talked about that journal entry and how you went through it to help other people. And I feel like when you guys were open about burnout, like it really helped me own my own burnout because I don't really see many people, especially back then talking about it, it's more just like Instagram caption. Self care, I take care of myself. You know, just something that's very quick. Nobody's really being vulnerable. Nobody's going deep. And to hear you two kind of workshop your burnout in real time was like therapeutic for me and also, like I said, helpful just to own it. And that way I can figure out what I need to do, moving forward. Now, I want to talk more about what were the signs that you were burn out. So for people who may be like, oh, is it burn out? What did you start to experience mentally and physically? I think the biggest one, the first time it comes out for me is I would get really mad about having to go to work. Yeah. Which for me is crazy because I love my work and I've always loved my work. I'm an entrepreneur. I own two businesses like this feeds me at energizes me and I found myself getting really pissed at the idea of sitting down on my computer. Like physically uncomfortable, incredibly angry. And I realized something, something's off. Like, why is this making me so mad to show up and do the thing that I normally love to do? And that was the first thing that really hit it for me is that something is wrong. And anger, sort of transformed into listlessness, like I wouldn't even bother getting out of bed to do it. And again, I'm not generally that person. I've dealt with depression a couple of times in my life. I've always had some pretty good tools for handling it, but this is unlike anything I had ever experienced before. This was next level. And so it started with anger then became listlessness and just like a not caring about things that I know I care incredibly deeply about. I care about my community. I care about this podcast that we've built. I care about almanac, my other company, and I didn't care. I didn't care. And it made me angry the idea of doing the work. Well, this is an alarming statistic. Did you guys know that an estimated 5 billion plastic hand soap and cleaning bottles are thrown away every year? And each bottle can be made up of more than 90% water. Now, if you're like me and you want to try to do better by the planet, then join us in stop wasting water and throwing out more plastic. Our podcast partner this week, blueland has a revolutionary refill cleaning system that you can use instead. We've actually been using it for a couple of months now. I love it because I'm someone who is always running to the store or going online to order more cleaning supplies. And it's amazing to have this refill kit that you can use pretty much forever. Blue line was founded on the belief that a cleaner planet starts at home. It's a simple idea. All you have to do is buy the bottle once, and like I said, you can refill it forever with no more plastic waste. From their bestselling cleaning essentials kit to their hand soap duo, blue land offers safe, smart options for every inch of your home. I love blueland, first of all, because the bottles are so cute. Some might say they're even instagrammable. And all I gotta do is fill the bottle with warm water and then pop in one of the hand soap or spray cleaning tablets. And within minutes, I have a really effective cleaning product. And the best part is it smells really, really, really good. My favorite smell is the lavender and eucalyptus. It's just so fresh and crisp and just one of my favorite smells in general. Those two combinations. And you guys can check it out. So right now you get 20% off your first order when you go to blue land dot com slash food heaven. That's 20% off your first order of any of blue lands products at blueland dot com slash food habit. Again, blue land, LA and.

Kathleen blueland depression LA
"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

Food Heaven Podcast

07:24 min | 9 months ago

"emily thompson" Discussed on Food Heaven Podcast

"We have an OG on the podcast today. She is one of the first business podcasts that I know of that I started listening to. Her name is Emily Thompson and she is the cofounder and host of being boz, a resource podcast and community for creative entrepreneurs. She's also the founder and CEO of almanac supply co a retail brand that makes and curates products that help people connect with nature. For over a decade Emily has worked closely with creatives to help them make money doing the work they love. And in fact, we are big fans of one of the online programs at Emily has, which is called CEO day kit, me and Wendy have been doing it for years and it's really helped our business grow in streamline. Yeah, that reminds me. It's time for us to do a CEO day kit. Yeah, it is. It's something that we regularly do. But yeah, we're going to talk to Emily about all things burnout because we have been wanting to make this into a series because it's something that we've been struggling with. We know a lot of you have been struggling with. So we talk about her experience with burnout where her process has been for preventing burnout and also just keeping it at bay. And also what all of this looks like in real life. How many hours she works per week, how she sets boundaries, which is so, so, so important. So yeah, we're really excited to share this conversation with you before we dive in. I want to share a listen to review. This is from L 37 90. I've tried to write your review literally four or 5 times, but it never seems to do justice to your show. I really admire the way you use the story of your friendship and shared business to model how we can build a work life that isn't cut off from personal life. But beautifully integrated. Thinking, especially if the tenth anniversary episode but others as well. And you model how to build more gentle relationships with ourselves, other people, food, and our bodies. This is the podcast I want with me for solo drives and rainy days. Appreciate what you do. Oh my God. First of all, I may have read this one already. I don't think so. Honest solo episode. Oh. I don't know if I did, but if I did, it's okay because it's so good. Oh my God, it's so sweet. It is. This is the first time I'm seeing it. Thank you so much. Wow, that is such a beautiful review. Thank you for taking the time to write that. Please, if you haven't already leave a review, it takes a second. And then if you want to go back and edit it, you can. Yeah, we read all of them. So make sure you get on that. And we're going to happen. We wanted to bring you on to talk about burnout. We recently had an episode on burnout and we were like, okay, we need to just make this a series because it resonated with a lot of people and also it's something that we've been struggling with, especially during the pandemic, like our creative juices have dried up. There's been so many times where we're going to go live in a cave or I don't even know, start making earrings or something. So tell us about how burnout has showed up for you throughout the course of your career. And maybe even during the pandemic, if it's showed up in any unique way. Sure. So I will say that little journey of going into a cave and making jewelry is when that resonates with me very much so. I've definitely gone down that line of thought a couple of times in my day. It is the thing and we often do find ourselves just wanting to go make something simple with our hands. You know, like just something that is like, I'm gonna put in this little bit of effort. I'm gonna get this return, whether it just be a nice pair of earrings that I can wear or that I can sell for a bit of cash. There's something about getting back down to that very rudimentary and just make this thing. This super tangible thing that's in my hand in this moment. That doesn't take a lot of effort but here it is. And I say all that to say that, yes, been there done that. Literally used to make jewelry, which is sort of a funny other thing. But yes, I've definitely struggled with burnout. A couple of years ago, my podcast, co host, Kathleen, my ex co host. I call her my ex sometimes. I think it's funny. We hit burnout. It was 20, let's see in 20 16. No, 2017 we wrote a book. We wrote the being boss book. It was one of the most amazing creative projects. I have ever endured, because I think you do have to endure creative projects at least a little bit right. It was amazing. We had such a great time doing it. We'd been doing the podcast for a couple of years. Put all of our thoughts into this thing, this little creative baby that was so beautiful and we loved it so much and we traditionally published, which was a journey in itself. We were growing the business, the side business, this podcast business that we just had initially launched as a passion project while we ran our other companies. She has a branding agency at the time I had a web design agency. And being boss was growing so much. We ended up growing a team. We had not planned any of this. We just wanted to start a fun passion project podcast on the side. All we had our individual companies and it ended up growing beyond my company was I think outpacing hers at that time. It was mind-blowing. And so we had put everything into this creative project the book. We were just accidentally building this business out of nowhere. And the book came out, we booked toward. I actually ended my web design business and was starting my retail business, which I now own and run. And it was a lot. It was a lot a lot. My co host was also struggling with sleep a bit. She has a child who has struggled with sleep, his entire life. And so she was struggling with sleeping. I had some things happening in my personal life and 20 mid 2018 is when we both realized that we were very done and just with literally everything. Everything. We didn't realize that it was coming until it was there and we hit burnout really hard. Like just crashed face first into the burnout wall. And both of us at the same time, which was kind of nice. There was like some commiserating that we could do together and also talking through it and it's not like I was holding her up all she wept in the corner or vice versa or whatever it was. We hit this very deep emotional energetic burnout that really shaped the next 18 months, 18 to 24 months of our lives and of our career, it was incredibly difficult and there was sort of like all the stages of grief happened. Like we were really angry about it. We were questioning everything. What have we done wrong? What lessons can we learn? And why can't we learn the vast enough? And let's tear it apart or maybe we should actually take this opportunity and there was fomo and all of these things, but at the same time we were just on the same crying to each other, going like, what have we done? We're so done. And it was incredibly hard and because of our podcasters and pretty open people, we were relatively open about what was happening more or less while it was happening. There was a bit of a delay. We definitely kind of quote unquote hit it for a while, but mostly we didn't know how we were processing. I didn't want to process two out.

Emily Thompson almanac supply co Emily Wendy Kathleen