15 Burst results for "Emily Pankhurst"

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

03:38 min | 6 months ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"Somehow they go quiet they go way they disappear into their homes for while we don't hear from them and then in nineteen sixty three betty free. Dan publishes the feminine mystique. Which is the launching point for the quote unquote second wave. Feminism you get people writing like germaine greer you have gloria steinem who founds ms magazine in the united states and for a while women of the second wave fight for equality in the workplace and equality in access to education. And then eventually you get something that's sometimes referred to as the third wave what we call post feminism sort of a more pop girl power kind of feminism that we see today it's sort of sheryl sandberg leeann type thing and hashtag girl boss and it's a very pat western trajectory that largely leaves out for a long time women of color women from the global south and of course my particular interest is women from the state socialist east on the western narrative has been much written about much reflected on has been archived for anyone. Who's curious about it. There's a rich repository of material to work on which i guess could amplify the sense. That really is the main event absolutely. And you know it's also sort of ria fide in other ways so when the united states decided for instance to put the first face of a woman on a piece of money of on coin was the dollar coin. They chose susan b. Anthony when time magazine decides to make a list of the hundred most important people of the twentieth century. Emily pankhurst makes that list. Very few other women do that. It's interesting that it is this sort of western liberal feminism and you know everywhere you go. Whether it's to sort of archival women's archives women's history journals kind of popular women's programming there are a few exceptions. And i would say lately. There have been some war exceptions. It generally tends to be this very western focus on western white women largely middle class women and above privileged women who were fighting for things like married women's property who we're fighting for access to professions. That had been closed to them. Who were fighting relief for certain kinds of privileges within the capitalist economic system that they felt were unfairly being held right from them because of their sex because of their gender and what. They didn't question what they really had. No interest in questioning was the economic system that kind of produced in perpetuated that inequality in the first place and so one of the big problems of the waves. Narrative is that there's a some scholars called a missing wave. And that's in the thirties. And in the forties there were many women also from the west by the way who fought in the spanish civil war and who fought as partisans against the the axis countries in eastern europe in particular. There were many women who were committed socialists and committed communists who as part of their ideals for building a better world after fascism was defeated was a world which included gender equality and many of these women go on to become quite prominent in the united nations especially during the un decade for women. Which will talk about in a bit. And that is the beginning of the erasure of this other stranded..

ms magazine sheryl sandberg leeann germaine greer susan b gloria steinem Emily pankhurst united states Dan time magazine Anthony europe un
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"Welcome to the july twenty twenty one podcast from ammonia diplomatic. My name's george. Miller and my guest is month is kristin godsey. Who's a professor of russian and east european studies. A member of the graduate group of anthropology at the university of pennsylvania. Kristen spent much of her career thinking about eastern european women feminism and female empowerment in this month's edition of iman diplomatic. She draws on that experience in a piece entitled when the women's movement went global. Kristen argues that the conventional narrative of the twentieth century. Women's movement is only half the story. The west was not always the front runner the. Ussr put valentina tereshkova into space in nineteen sixty three. The us didn't up. Its space program to women for more than another decade. But type i women in space into google and the forest head is sally ride nasa astronaut part of the challenge mission in one thousand nine hundred. Three back on terra firma. Us leaders in the cold. War worried that communism might begin to appeal to american housewives if they saw the eastern european peers. I'd opportunities they liked. Today we tend to picture soviet women bread queues and tend to forget the women engineers doctors and scientists that the soviet bloc encouraged from the nineteen seventies women's leaders from eastern europe made common cause with their counterparts in the global south seeking to broaden the debate about rights to include deep systemic. But before we discuss the overlooked and forgotten right. Grandmothers of feminism. I began by asking kristen to summarize the conventional narrative of the women's movement that she set to challenge. This is a kind of standard narrative that gets taught for instance in gender studies classes today. And you know. There's there's kind of this sort of progenitor moment with people like john. Stuart mill and mary wollstonecraft in france. Gu's and that eventually kind of feeds into the suffragette suffering gist movement which is called these days. The first wave of feminism. So you have people like emily pankhurst. Obviously the united states you have susan b. anthony and the krisha motte and then you know women get the right to vote..

kristin godsey Kristen valentina tereshkova iman university of pennsylvania Miller terra firma george sally united states nasa eastern europe google Stuart mill kristen mary wollstonecraft Gu emily pankhurst france john
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

04:55 min | 7 months ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Conversations

"We chose our ancestors and you start seeing patterns and ask questions that you would otherwise so for example. There's one my husband putting called gertrude. Bill i don't know if you've heard of the the archaeologist of the film nicole kidman was just in film better the queen of the desert but a lot of what she didn't in film lawrence of arabia was credited to him but she was this woman that we're right out but what's interesting in the memory palaces in eighteen sixty eight hundred fifty night was aided emily pankhurst who was in favor of gertrude. Bell one of these extraordinary this photos of with winston churchill. Huge leap politically influenced was against. Not only women. Voting was against universal suffrage. completely shea. dude that this didn't appear in any of the oems this you've got to read the books on. She argued that only people who are educated enough to understand what the politicians are saying should be allowed to vote. Now when you start playing around with that and the different characters that i've got round same place in the memory pellets. You can't do that if you're just looking up individuals so i've got them in the context. I've got arnstein in there. And pope john the twenty third they all round the same time comparing what was going on. You've been looking at the ancient systems memorization that were in place for very long while and these memory feats. I suppose seemed like an exaggeration when you see them record but the it seems that they went to me met the navajo native american people that you looked into in there. You had a room that they had some kind of vast database of knowledge that people were able to retain their heads about that. Yeah i found these all difficult to believe. And i read somewhere that the navajos stored a classification of seven hundred six all fully classified nord knowledge about the all in memory without the written word at all. Yeah no written down at all using these methods. Now there's a whole lot of the indigenous cultures but they match right across the world and that's seven hundred. Six of which ten will bother or fleas nets. Cicadas the only one. I ate all the rest were for interest..

emily pankhurst pope john gertrude arnstein ten Six lawrence of arabia seven hundred Bill winston churchill six navajo eighteen sixty eight hundred fifty night one twenty third nicole kidman of the american
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:58 min | 7 months ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Conversations

"Fifty night was aided. Emily pankhurst who was in favor of gertrude. Bell one of these extraordinary this photos of with winston churchill. Huge leap politically influenced was against. Not only women. Voting was against universal. Suffrage completely shea argued that this didn't appear in any of the oems this you've got to read the books on. She argued that only people who are educated enough to understand what the politicians are saying should be allowed to vote. Now when you start playing around with that and the different characters that i've got round same place in the memory pellets. You can't do that if you're just looking up individuals so i've got them in the context. I've got arnstein in there. And pope john the twenty third they all round the same time comparing what was going on. You've been looking at the ancient systems memorization that were in place for very long while and these memory feats. I suppose seemed like an exaggeration. When you see them record but the it seems that they went to met the navajo native american people that you looked into in there. You had a room that they had some kind of vast database of knowledge that people were able to retain their heads about that. Yeah i found these all difficult to believe. And i read somewhere that the navajos stored a classification of seven hundred six all fully classified nord knowledge about the all in memory without the written word at all. Yeah no written down at all using these methods. Now there's a whole lot of the indigenous cultures but they match right across the world and that's seven hundred. Six of which ten will bother or fleas nets. Cicadas the only one. I ate all the rest were for interest. Sake to no knowledge for knowledge sake aren't so these are categorized not just not just as a matter of practical knowledge just for the pleasure of it for the pleasure of it and then they used. If you look mythology they used as metaphors for stories about human behavior laws rules and all sorts of other things habitat said. There is some practicality there so you get these stories that build up and build up and this stored only memory now. That's just insects. All the mammals probably a thousand plants navigation laws regulations. You've got all this stuff all in memory. How do you fund a record of all this anyway than the navajos knowledge of this. Well i did a phd on these memory techniques and it was referred to just one line about this and then i had to get the actual which was really hard to get but li- universities have these amazing creatures called librarians can get you anything. And it took them three months to get report and it was musty and smelly as anything when it arrived but it listed so you need a whole team to put together a study like this of scientists elders linguists. So you don't get many studies. This thorough and it gave the complete seven hundred and one in six and about each one and how they matched with western classification. The medieval world medieval systems have memory. How much was a highly evolved memory valued in that many european hugely respected. A lot of people like thomas aquinas net in his day were recorded more for their ability to murmur is then all the things we know him for so it was hugely valued and the design of their books the manuscript when they came out churches everything else was done according to these memory and taught in schools. It's only since the renascent. We've stopped teaching memory methods in schools. One of the most basic systems.

Emily pankhurst pope john three months arnstein seven hundred Six one line winston churchill One ten one seven hundred and twenty third Fifty night about each one thomas aquinas net gertrude six navajo native american european
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:13 min | 8 months ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Places in who introduced us to so many different things and they still continue to teach us. Colts celebrates dad's not just on june twentieth. But every single day with gifts that will mean a lot to them. Kohl's has a bunch of gift ideas from outdoor entertaining like grills in equipment to team apparel accessories like hats jerseys in umbrella that are branded with his favorite pro and college teams to watches and baseball caps. You'll find his favorite things only at kohl's and look if if the fathers in your life always on the move. Coles has all of the top active brands to like nike under armour and adidas. This is the only place to shop for father's day so shop now at kohls dot com. It's the perfect way to thank all of the fathers in your life. Hello everyone. I'm eve's in welcome to this day in history class a show that will convince you that history can be fascinating. Even when you expected not to be. The day was june fourth nineteen thirteen. Suffragette emily davison was trampled by a horse at the epsom derby. She died four days later. The intentions of her actions leading to the accident have been a topic of debate in one thousand nine thousand six davidson joined the women's social and political union the w. p you was a militant political organization that campaigned for women's suffrage in the uk at the time davis analysts. Thirty four years old and worked as a governess but she soon left her job to work for the movement. Full-time davison was a devout christian and advocated for socialism as a feminist and stuff that she was militant and often confrontational. She was arrested and imprisoned several times. She went to jail for the first time in. Nineteen o nine. After marching to see prime minister. H h asquith. With a group led by suffragette door. Marston she and several other women ended up being charged with obstruction and assaulting police davison was later imprisoned for throwing stones at people and setting pillar boxes on fire while in prison she would go on. Hunger strikes and was forced faded in one thousand. Nine hundred twelve jumped from prison balcony and protest of her treatment and injured her head and vertebrae when june fourth nineteen thirteen davison attended the derby. She had to w. s. p. u. flags which bore the colors purple white and green to found a spot at tattenham corner. The last been for the final straight as the horses came around tattenham corner. Davison ducked under the railing onto the track. Once she made it onto the track. King george the fifth or struck. Her davidson was knocked unconscious in the horse. Bill in through. Office jockey pervert jones. The incident was caught on camera. Davison and jones were taken to the hospital. Jones had a concussion was soon sent home but davidson never regained consciousness and died from a fracture at the base of her skull on june eighth davidson funeral on june fourteenth involved a procession of thousands of people the w. s. p. pegged her as a martyr while the media questioned her mental stability and pointed to her reputation as a militant suffrage. Jet opinion is divided on whether davison intended to die or just wanted to disrupt the derby. Some historians say that she was trying to attach a flag to the horse. Other people believe that she was trying to cross the tracks in something that she was trying to pull the horse down at the time. Davidson was carrying return train ticket from epsom and had made plans with her sister for the near future. Some people point to this fact as evidence that she did not intend to die by suicide that day when world war one broke out in nineteen fourteen s. p. founder emily pankhurst system ended the organisation's militant activities and focused on recruiting women.

adidas Davidson Jones world war one tattenham davison one thousand Davison june fourteenth june twentieth fifth Nine hundred twelve Nineteen o nine father's day june eighth four days later june fourth nineteen thirteen thousands of people emily davison first time
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on the Talk 2 Q Radio Show!

the Talk 2 Q Radio Show!

04:23 min | 11 months ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on the Talk 2 Q Radio Show!

"They used to deputise the prime minister. Take working women and unexplained to the prime minister. How that life could be better if women were giving these rights and given the right to vote but it didn't start in the beginning with the right to vote was the right to education the right to fantasy in wages and the rights to and then led to the right to vote but even back when women started campaigning for the for better education Not all men could vote. I mean it was very restrictive about male suffrage as well so it was only the privilege that could boat and have have rights. And it's very very difficult to say that it was just women but there was some men that went out to vote his. Well always seem like it's been a rich. A rich man's game as far as politics goes all over the world. Said it's not just here but over there as well. Now you've already mentioned a couple of names but who some of the key figures that led the movement you know like when we when we discuss black history month here in the united states is always a focus around martin luther king and rosa parks and some of the recent civil rights leaders. But there's never really a focus on some of the people who came before them some of the The grassroots activist so to speak but so as far as women key figures that led the women's suffrage movement movement. Who are names that we probably wouldn't know in mainstream What i am not quite sure. How How well you know alice paul but she was definitely a very prominent figure in american suffrage movement for women and was an undead campaign. I'm in the cable. For 'em women's vote i went to prison. She was She was a an she did. Go on hunger strike there and she was forcibly fed But i think the main ones would be the packet lawrence's which would have been a relations to the pankhurst and also what's we don't focus on. Is that one of the leading. Suffrage sheppard jat was. Richard was a dr richard pankhurst. He was a lawyer who fought full rights. Not just women's rights but m- men's rights to he got a lot of lewis changed unamended in parliament. I'm he's also the father of suffragette. Saito christabel adela until via were. His daughters and his wife was emily pankhurst. I think adela pankhurst as well as somebody that we do. Miss out on. She was a suffragette but unfortunately her behavior was so difficult to deal with. Her mother centre. Australia was two for the militants. We must have been something else. Yes there is a lot of discussion about a sort of fringe. Group called the young hotheads. Which adela was apparently part off. And they were taking orders from other at prominent suffrage suffragettes and they story and dr fan rebel in her book. Deck and ten minutes on on on this project kitty marian and not somebody that americans might know because he wasn't just suffered that she used to come paying for both control is well women's rights to birth control and It's it is horrific..

Richard alice paul emily pankhurst richard pankhurst two united states adela both Saito christabel adela ten minutes lawrence adela pankhurst rosa parks Australia one americans lewis king martin luther couple of names
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on You Are The Media

You Are The Media

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on You Are The Media

"It'd be interesting for that reason to see how a space that clubhouse will evolve with a big enough focused on people able to find those they want to listen to. We'll get good vehicle for building communities and something to be said about surrounding yourself with a community of people who encourage have to achieve more creating excellent work in the process. People come together through shed purpose which can also end up being identified with particular place. Include such as those advocated women's right to vote this pace in the uk the late nineteenth and early twentieth century spearheaded by both the suffragettes who believed in peaceful constitutional campaign methods. The suffragette movement led by. Emily pankhurst with women to stand up to do the work themselves. Taken direct militant action and every example of people coming together risk in silicon valley a group of employees who originally worked at pay pow went on to found companies such as limited. Tesla uber youtube. Yama pay pao was a seabed. The some of today's best name brands. Nothing example of people coming together food the shad purposes the late eighties manchester music scene produced a distinctive identity with bands such as happy monday stone. Roses charlatans achieving critical acclaim and commercial success. All turning out incredible music. This begs the question who was in the same europe of when people who already part of a community stand up creating share their work because the better position to develop momentum accelerating their reach beyond what they may have achieved from a standing. Start away now. Those from the u. Of the media community as some examples. Chantey green is started his chatting with johnny podcast routine out trouble from the the media communities take palm. Matt king is taking his social change project. Place that can help others fun. Creativity in sales tricia lewis has the make podcast. And she's about to publish. Because well. Jackie god has launched the advocacy podcasts. And reach out to other you. The media members such as joseph jaffe and mac king to be guests. Klatt burdette's upcoming book. Has you the media as a case. Study as trevor. Young's book content marketing for pr which is a section dedicated to the media. Trudy creative people rarely were by themselves they know that having other people sat around them and to and is a vital part of the process. When you do something that you enjoy that springs from genuine interest intent and achieve consistency with it people will gravitate toward you for you. The media with the media. And i've discovered the significance of harnessing that creative energy that comes through shed experience people share what they are up to ask questions a tough into the knowledge and wisdom of in the group. This means that everyone benefits creating better work across the board. For instance you would immediately sessions questions and discussions have resulted in me being inspired produced articles. That tie in with the main topics.

joseph jaffe mac king Klatt burdette Emily pankhurst Matt king Tesla late eighties trevor europe Chantey green uk pay pow both johnny uber happy monday stone youtube today tricia lewis late nineteenth and early twen
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Z104

Z104

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Z104

"Certainly the in Britain. They do not have the sort of designated role of first lady but like we have in the United States. The prime minister's life doesn't have a specific role, but I think it really grows more out of historical tradition on the prime minister's wife really wasn't involved in a lot of political endeavors, and that was kind of true across the board during this time period. Politicianswives were rarely involved in and I either governmental work or the public eye and so kind of, you know, commenting Grandpa's crazy upbringing that was not unlike Winston's in many ways. But you know, she was had a keen interest in politics from her teenagers on she was a strong advocate for women. She was really a super jet in many ways, although she never engaged in any kind of direct accent. Hey, Emily Pankhurst groups did. Um, but she was She was really engaged with the world. And when she met Winston, she knew she not only kind of fell in love with him, but you kind of fell in love with his mission. To really make a change in the world. And you know, she had two engagements before that failed. And when she met him, I think she thought she knew her society was never going to allow her to rise up and claim any kind of political space. I mean, women couldn't even vote. How could they serve right in any real capacity? And I think with Winston she saw the chance to really step up and claim a political role that women were otherwise denied. And she did that, as the wife of You know, not just the prime minister. But the Hung secretary. The Lord Admiral what Winston was in power from World War one through work or too except for the 19 thirties Wilderness years period. And as she served by his side, she really served. I mean, she was not only his advisor and confidante and guide in every aspect of his political realm, But she undertook all of these key projects on her own. She really Didn't wait for people to invite her into history or into the political realm. She kind of rose up and claim claimed that space herself but that wouldn't have been. She knew a popular view at the time. A lot of the work she did was kind of behind the scenes. Um, it's interesting that you mention Eleanor Roosevelt because these women to perform a really close bonds during the war, and afterwards they were friends. Um they visited each other, and I think they learned from each other. Eleanor really took some of the projects for women that Clementine was advocating in Britain and took them home here. And put them into put them into place. And Clementine learned how to become more of a public figure from Eleanor wrote about you know, I wonder was really unique. In her time, America was probably a little bit more accepting of women in key roles. And tell Internet howto work the prize, and Clementine really learned how to do that from Elinor. So what's next? All right next January. I have a book coming out every January for the next four years on and the next January story is actually about Agatha Christie. You have always been a fan. Always fascinated with how this this woman became really the most successful novelist, succesful writer of all time, She sold more books than anybody else. And really the creator of this unique genre that lives on today, and I learned that she actually disappeared for 11 days in the early part of her career. She just published her third novel, and she disappeared in a way that was like a torrent from the pages of one of her books. It's on her car running on the side of a cliff. Nowhere to be seen. It launched the biggest manhunt in England's history. They enlisted Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to try and help find her. And then she just mysteriously reappeared. 11 days later, no one knows what happened to her during that time period. It was a tumultuous period in her life. And so I decided to dig deep into her background to take deep and for this time period and to try and reconstruct the story of what might have happened. You know, I look at all of my women is kind of like for euro. And the books I write as their origin stories, and this book is no different than that. It kind of looks at all of these pieces and uses the structure of a mystery novel, not unlike Agatha Christie's, um, the unreliable narrator that she's so familiar with, but they're really created in many ways on to write a story about a woman taking charge of her own narrative. And writing her own history. So it was in many ways. It's like all my other books, but in many ways quite different both in terms of the genre structure and the way in which I'm having a woman take reclaim her own history and her own power. Okay, So do you find out what happened during those 11 days or why she disappeared? You d'oh! I mean, of course, I write fiction, So it's my own fictional. Sense of what happened. Of course, I always believed that I write. But, yes, you do. Find out what happened to her. Interest during that time period. And then how that led to her really becoming the force that she wass The book that comes out six months after that, again is a little bit unique, co written book with a wonderful author Victoria Christopher Marie, and it's a book entitled the Personal Librarian. It explores the role that this incredible library in art historian and curator Bella to Kostya Green played when JPMorgan created the Morgan Library in New York City. I've never been there. It's toolbox beautiful structure on and it actually today holds the world's best.

Winston prime minister Clementine Agatha Christie Eleanor Roosevelt Britain Emily Pankhurst United States Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Politicianswives JPMorgan Morgan Library secretary England Victoria Christopher Marie advisor America New York City Kostya Green
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My MCATs. This is all of it with Alison Stewart. I'm going in for Alison and we are talking with Michele Ferrari filmmaker whose latest documentary miniseries for PBS's American experience. This called the Vote. Michelle in this documentary, the images. The videos are just jaw dropping. I have never seen this kind of footage from 100 years ago. Is some of it being seen for the first time And where did you find this stuff? Um, It was a pretty Herculean effort on the part of my producer County, Hunnicutt and her team on DH. You know, it comes from more than 100 archives. Historical society's private collectors. You name it, Andi. I imagine that a lot of it will be new to people in part because the story is new to people. I mean, Typically, the Story of the separate suffrage movement gets old in about a paragraph right and it begins in 18 48 in Seneca Falls, New York, and it ends in 1920 with American women being given or granted the right to vote. And the paragraph obscures the 72 year struggle entirely. So I suspect that much of the material in the film will be new. There have been other treatments of The suffrage movement documentary treatments in the past, but they tended to focus more on the 19th century movement, and we focused more on the last decade, in part because there was this tremendous wealth of material. Yeah, It's really amazing. I mean, to see the historical figures like moving around in black and white video. It's remarkable. We, You know, we touched on that earlier. But we see New York as a historically liberal state. But states on the West Coast were way faster to adopt women's suffrage than New York. It was going on the West Coast of time. Why were they States out there more open to women's suffrage. Well, I mean, there are a lot of reasons I don't think I can boil it down to one. I think it's important to remember that these were new states that they had very low population. So in some cases You know it would stop that. Extending the vote to women with service. An attraction to women on DH make Montana. You know Wyoming, whatever an appealing place to live for women. It's also that they were basically trying to establish the states. We're trying to establish their relationship to the East Coast entrenched establishment and the federal government. And they had agendas of their own at a state level that they were trying to push and the more that they had the better. It gave them more power. Visa VI, the federal government In New York, which was which was slow compared to the West Coast when it comes to suffer the suffrage movement. You describe in the film. It's described how women became poll watchers to sort of show that if women showed up at a polling place than American democracy doesn't just collapse, then women could Then be granted the right to vote. It's it's such an interesting method. It's one of like myriad methods that suffragist took Teo to break into the system, right. Yeah, they were super super creative. So that was Harriet Stanton Black. She's Elizabeth Cady Stanton Daughters, one of my favorite characters. Um and she Ahh you know, she she wanted to play the game of politics Basically. And you know, she used whatever means she could to get her foot in the door. So yes, she she finds out she doesn't need to be eligible to vote to be a poll watcher. She gets herself credentialed, And at that point, the polls are in tobacco shop and saloon. And it's a pretty raucous male atmosphere on DH. So certainly the sight of someone like Harry Stanton Block, you know, genteel middle class woman would have been disconcerting to the patrons to the voters. But it's also true that she can walk away and say, you know, Democracy did not collapse. Right right. One of one of the ways they played politics or, or at least worked within the system was even though many suffrage is didn't support the US entering World War. They compromised on that as a means of gaining support for the movement, right? Can you explain? At the time, the largest separate organization in the country. The National Woman Suffrage Association, was headed by Carrie Chapman Catt, who was an ardent pacifist. Um and she Basically sacrificed her pacifist principles recognizing that you know if women stood behind the president stood behind the war effort supported it. On, you know, they did many different kinds of work in support of the war effort that they would be able to lay claim to citizenship in a new way on DH. You Bolster their demand for the vote because of their patriotism. Yeah, Yeah, there there are other strategies made more militant strategies. Women's suffrage was particularly militant Maurin in England is that you explain the dynamic there. I mean, I know that some of the women were inspired by some of those tactics, but it was definitely More violent on the other side of the pond, right? It definitely was more violent. I'm not sure I can tell you why it was more violent because it's really sort of outside the purview of my stone. But, you know, the British suffrage movement started a bit earlier than the one in the United States by you know the league 18 nineties, women were becoming very impatient. And as you mentioned Emily Pankhurst on her daughter's founded an organization, the women's social and political union, and they started, you know, they started out small, passing out pamphlets in the street talk, speaking on soap boxes, which were Obviously unladylike behaviors on DH. Then they just, you know, they kept ramping it up. So then they would go and interrupt political meetings and allow themselves to be dragged out of the meetings. And then they started holding mass demonstrations and when that didn't work They eventually, you know, unleash what Alan bankers called guerrilla warfare and they start you know, putting bombs in mailboxes and slashing seats on trains they pour. Acid on golf screens spelling out votes for women. Um, there were bombs at the doorsteps of members of Parliament and Several of the figures in the you know, American movement had indeed been inspired by the bankers, Alice Paul in particular and then worked closely with Emily Pankhurst and her daughter, Krista Bell. Um, I think there was a lot of fear in the United States that Alice was gonna unleash those tactics here, which she and her second in command..

New York United States West Coast National Woman Suffrage Associ Alison Stewart federal government Emily Pankhurst Elizabeth Cady Stanton Michelle Michele Ferrari Alice Paul PBS Harriet Stanton Black Harry Stanton Block East Coast Wyoming Montana Carrie Chapman Catt Alan bankers
Emily Davison trampled - June 4, 1913

This Day in History Class

02:59 min | 1 year ago

Emily Davison trampled - June 4, 1913

"The Day was June fourth, nineteen thirteen. suffragette emily. Davison was trampled by a horse at the EPSOM Derby. She died four days later. The intentions of her actions leading to the accident have been a topic of debate. In one thousand, nine, hundred six Davidson joint, the women's Center and Political Union, the WSB, you was a militant political organization that campaigned for women's suffrage in the UK. At the time Davis analyst thirty four years old, and worked as a governess, but she soon left her job to work for the movement full-time. Davison was a devout Christian and advocated for socialism as a feminist in suffrage it. She was militant and often confrontational. She was arrested and imprisoned several times. She went to jail for the first time in nineteen o nine. After marching to see Prime Minister H H. Asquith with a group led by suffragette Dora Marston. She and several other women ended up being charged with. And assaulting police. Davidson was later imprisoned for throwing stones at people and setting pillar boxes on fire. While in prison she would go on hunger strikes and was forced. In nineteen twelve she jumped from a prison balcony and protests of her treatment and injured her head Vertebrae. When June fourth, nineteen, Thirteen Davison attended the derby she had to W. S. U. Flags, which bore the colors purple white and green. She found a spot at Tattenham. Corner the last bid for the final straight. As the horses came round. TATTENHAM Corner Davison ducked under the railing and onto the track. Once he made it onto the track. King George the fifth struck her. Davison was knocked unconscious in Horse Bill in through office. Jockey Pervert Jones. The incident was Connor Camera. Davison and Jones were taken to the hospital Jones had concussion. Sent home, but Davidson never regained consciousness and died from a fracture at the base of her skull on June eighth. Davison funeral on June. Fourteenth involved a procession of thousands of people. The W. S. p. you pegged her as a martyr while the media question her mental stability and pointed to her reputation as a militant suffragette. Opinion is divided on whether Davison intended to die or just wanted to disrupt the Derby. Some historians say that she was trying to attach a flag to the horse. Other people believe that she was trying to cross the tracks in something that she was trying to pull the horse down. At the time Davison was carrying a return train to get from EPSOM and had made plans with her sister for the near future, some people point to this fact as evidence that she did not intend to die by suicide that day. When World War One broke out in nineteen fourteen WSB founder Emily Pankhurst, suspended the organisation's militant activities and focused on recruiting women to the war effort.

Tattenham Corner Davison Davidson Epsom Derby Davison Funeral Dora Marston Pervert Jones WSB Prime Minister H H. Asquith Center And Political Union Emily Pankhurst UK Davis Tattenham Analyst Connor Camera King George W. S. U. Flags Founder
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Overthrowing Education

Overthrowing Education

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Overthrowing Education

"Accent. Oh well I love that. It's a woman but I don't have any will if you think about it. Okay might not still not have the name but you can give me the the milieu of the or the era thing. I'm GonNa say it again. We are here not because we are lawbreakers. We are here in our efforts to become law makers was it. Sounds like it's a suffrage totally class. A quote okay leader but I am still not likely to. I don't know that I know who it would be. It's Emily Pankhurst. Emily Pankhurst okay. Yes would not have thought but that was good you got you got a point for that at the jet bit. That was important. Great Okay. I'm really feeling like you better get this on own. There's a lot of pressure on you to get this one okay. Are you ready? Yeah I keep my ideals because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I definitely never miss an frank. Yeah yeah and during during the Holocaust. Yep you've been doing amazing I have one more these are. It's I hope that people listening like as much as I try to have fun with a game show to me these of all been really including the next one that I'm going to do are just really helpful to think about what other people have been through and how they persevered and you know just even seeing what my friends and family and all the educators across the world are doing. It just gives me hope you know. So here's the last one. The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy so the ultimate measure of a man. That's Martin Luther. King junior quotes. Yup although I don't know they don't have to specific. You could just say the general. Yeah so again so this of during the civil rights movement in the US. Yeah Yeah and I think it's really such a perfect quote so I'm GonNa say it again all I'm GonNa change the word man so I hope that he'll forgive me for doing that. But the ultimate measure of a person is not where they stand in moments of comfort but where they stand at times of challenge and controversy. Absolutely something to think about All right thank you so much. Liz really really appreciated this conversation. Thank you so much as well. There I had there was one more thing. I was hoping that I could mention please that I don't know I don't know if it's just thinking you know if we've been having a lot of conversation because April is genocide awareness month and you know with so many students out of school in just different priorities and you know so much going on there. We've had a conversation. About how.

Emily Pankhurst Martin Luther US Liz King
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

10:11 min | 3 years ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Is art an original edition of August. Rodin's iconic eighteen eighty one sculpture the thinker had occupied the front steps of the Cleveland museum of art for over fifty years when in early nineteen seventy it fell victim to a pipe bomb, which police believed was planted by the same members of the radical terrorist group, the weather underground who were later killed in the explosion of the Greenwich Village townhouse that served as their bomb-making facility. The blast tore off the lower legs and part of the boulder that the thinker sits on rendering it beyond repair. But museum officials decided to put it back in place because it was one of the last casts supervised by Rodin himself. Tangential bonus fact when the heads of the early children's television workshop which produces Sesame Street and is not owned by Disney while the Muppets on for. Fortunately, our I laid eyes on puppeteer Jim Henson with his shoulder length hair full beard and fringed leather jacket. One of the exacts worried that he might have been part of the weather underground turns out just a guy who's good at making puppets like businesses too big to fail. There are works of art that seemed to famous vandalize but fame draws taggers like roadkill draws flies. The Mona Lisa were to give her her Italian name login Kanda has long been attracting vandals and his currently one of the best protected works of art in the world. In nineteen fifty six the lower part of the painting was severely damaged when a vandal doused it with acid while it was on display at a museum in multiple France later, the same year, a young Bolivia man threw a rock at the painting, this resulted in the loss of a few specks of pigment near the left elbow, which restores later. Painted over in April, seventy four a handicapped woman upset by the museum's policies regarding disabled access sprayed red paint at the painting while it was on display at the Tokyo national museum in August of oh, nine a Russian woman. Distraught over being denied French citizenship through a mug purchased at the Liuw gift shop at the painting. Luckily, it shattered against the protective case, which is made of bulletproof glass and in both of those last two incidents. The painting was undamaged in February of nineteen seventy four a thirty year old man. Walked into the third floor galleries of the museum of modern art and proceeded to face Pablo Picasso square, neca. By spray painting, kill all lies across it in red foot, high letters coal the curator, he reportedly shouted as guards grabbed him. I am an artist you think that's brash, this vandal actually alerted the Associated Press in advance of his heart. Rather than sending him to jail though. The museum of modern art declined to press charges and the man himself later became a hugely successful. Art dealer aside from garnering, publicity, his motives were unclear with him sometimes calling it an anti war protests and other times a retroactive collaboration with Picasso. As for Waren Aqa because so it stipulated that the painting completed in nineteen thirty seven and inspired by the Spanish, civil war that led to fascist rule be repatriated to his native Spain wants democracy was restored. It was returned in nineteen eighty one and currently resides under bulletproof glass at Madrid's museum issue. Nounce central to art reenergize Afia. We're nico- was Costas reaction to the bombings by Nazi Germany and fascist Italy of the Basque village that gives it its name. It said that in occupied Paris, a Gestapo officer barged his way into Picasso's apartment pointed the mural and said did you do that? Because the replied no you did. Someone should have been on watch over Rembrandt's Nightwatch in January nineteen eleven an unemployed navy cook tried to cut it with a knife. But couldn't get through the thick varnish on the painting in nineteen seventy five William dirigistic and unemployed school teacher cut dozens of zigzag lines in the painting with a knife before he was wrestled away by guards the day before to reach. You had been turned away from the museum because he arrived after closing time. After the event he was identified as having a mental disorder and was sent to a psychiatric hospital. It took six months to restore the painting and traces of the cuts can still be seen in nineteen ninety a man threw acid on the painting but guards reacted quickly and Raval to dilute it with water. So that it only penetrated the varnish layer, not damaging the painting itself. And it was able to be restored in eighty-five Rembrandt's seventeenth century painting. DNA was attacked in the Hermitage museum in Russia. A man later judged not culpable due to mental illness. I threw sulfuric acid on the canvas then cut it twice with a knife. Which begs the question where is everybody getting all this acid from the entire central part of the composition was virtually destroyed? The restoration took twelve years from eighty five to ninety seven since then that painting to has been behind bulletproof glass in March of nineteen fourteen. Militant suffragette Mary Richardson walked into the National Gallery of London and attacked Diego. Valez tasteful nude painting rockabilly Venus with a meat cleaver, a quick aside. The name of the painting is actually twilight Venus should probably be inflicted in Spanish. But I took French in high school the original meaning of trois let or toilet did not mean the commode the place of evacuation. But more of a vanity area or the act of getting ready, which is why perfume is called ODA toilet Richardson's actions were extensively provoked by the arrest of fellow suffragette. Emily Pankhurst the previous day, although there had been early warnings of a plan to tack on the collection Richardson left seven slashes on the painting all of which have been successfully repaired Richardson was sentenced to six months in prison. The maximum allowed for the destruction of an artwork in a statement to the women's social and political unions shortly afterwards, she explained I have tried to destroy the picture of the most beautiful woman in mythological history. As a protest against the government for destroying MRs Pankhurst, who is the most beautiful character in modern history. She added in a nineteen fifty two interview that she didn't like the way men. Visitors gaped at it all day long in nineteen Ninety-seven Alexander Brener a Russian Jewish for. Silence artist and self-described political activist painted a green dollar sign on Kazimir Malevich is painting the white cross. The painting was restored and Brenner was sentenced to five months in prison during the court case he said in his defense. The cross is a symbol of suffering. The dollar sign is a symbol of trade and merchandise. What I did was not against the painting. I view my act as a dialogue with Malevich a similar excuse was offered by Mark bridge or an unemployed artist who added even more controversy to an already edgy exposition at the serpentine gallery in London, Richard targeted a Damien Hirst original away from the flock which showcases a preserved lamb set. Informality hind it looks like something you would see off to the side in an episode of Westworld in two thousand six away from the flock had sold for one point eight million pounds or about two and a quarter million dollars. Bridgier entered the gallery opened the top of the tank and added black ink to completely cover up. The lamb to live is to do things. Bridgier told the guardian I was providing an interesting addendum to the work in terms of conceptual art, the sheep had already made it statement art is there for creating awareness. And I added to whatever it was meant to say. Luckily, the peace was restored overnight and this strange idea of collaborating on art without the artist's consent. Went over a little better with Hearst than it did in our previous examples, he included a photo of the black sheep in a book. He later published even educated people made today's list, a Hungarian-born geologist Laszlo tote attacked MichelAngelo's fourteen ninety nine marble masterwork depicting, the Virgin Mary cradling, the dead body of Christ with a hammer. Shouting. I m Jesus Christ risen from the dead. Toth struck lupita fifteen times breaking off Mary's arm at the elbow as full as parts of her nose. And I lead a group of bystanders including an American who repeatedly punched him, tackle, tote almost immediately. The incident which took place during the Pentecost on may twenty first was triggered by totes long held fantasy that he was Jesus. He'd even written the pope the prior year to demand he'd be recognized as the messiah. Judge to be of sufficient mental defect tote never face jail time for his actions was committed to a mental hospital in Italy for two years and eventually deported. Name the tools of vandal spray paint knives. Hammers acid is quite popular. Apparently a shotgun while hanging in London's National Gallery, a large charcoal drawing of the virgin

Mary Richardson museum of modern art Cleveland museum of art National Gallery Rodin London Bridgier Tokyo national museum MRs Pankhurst Jim Henson Hermitage museum Disney Greenwich Village Pablo Picasso ODA toilet Richardson Associated Press France Madrid Kazimir Malevich
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

06:00 min | 3 years ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I may OMI Lewin March is women's history month today, some women from history who inspired classical music. Cleopatra was Queen of ancient Egypt just as it was being taken over by the Roman empire. Where Julius Caesar was the ruler Cleopatra is a character in lots of operas including Giulio chase at Italian for Julius Caesar by George frideric Handel. Another Queen Elizabeth I of England stayed on the throne for forty four years. A lot of great music and writing including Shakespeare's plays came out of that time in the sixteenth century the Elizabethan era. Elizabeth I was also a musician. In nineteen fifty three. When Elizabeth the second was crowned Queen of England Benjamin Britten composed an opera about Elizabeth the first the title is Gloria which was one of her nicknames. For Ben who lived about one hundred years after Elizabeth I was the first Englishwoman to earn a living as a writer Henry Purcell composed music for one of her plays. And Benjamin Britten used that as the theme for his young person's guide to the orchestra. Joan of arc was the daughter of a farmer in fifteenth century, France when she was thirteen she saw visions of saints telling her to help the teenage dough fan, the prince who was next in line to the French throne fight the English to get back control of his country. So that he could be crowned king a lot of composers wrote operas about Joan of arc including Rossini, Verdi and tchaykovsky. around the turn of the twentieth century Englishwoman, Emily Pankhurst fought hard for women's rights, especially suffrage, the right to vote composer Ethel Smyth was also part of the women's suffrage movement and wrote the March of the women for it. In america. Susan B Anthony fought for women's rights and against slavery. She's the main character in the opera, the mother of us all with music by Virgil, Thomson and words by Gertrude Stein. The most powerful anti-slavery book in nineteenth century, America. Was unable Tom's cabin by Harriet Beecher, Stowe Rogers and Hammerstein included the story of that book in their musical the king. And I. How on cool. Thomas. Journal truth escaped from slavery. She became a powerful speaker for the rights of enslaved people and for women Paula Kemper. Composed an opera about her call truth. Did you know to? What's your? In the mid twentieth. Century, Rosa Parks fought for civil rights when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white person. She helped and laws that made black people sit in separate places three from separate water fountains and use separate building entrances in Detroit Michigan. There's a street named for Rosa Parks. Michael Daugherty celebrated in music. During World War. Two race hopper. Used her Naff skills to help America win the war then in the early days of computers. She was one of the first experts in computer languages and programming. Wendy Carlos playing Bach's music on the computer next week on classics for kids famous women composers from history. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it for w g you UC Cincinnati. Please. Join me next time on more classics for kids.

Queen Elizabeth I Cleopatra Benjamin Britten america Rosa Parks Julius Caesar Susan B Anthony Paula Kemper Naomi Lewin Joan England George frideric Handel Ethel Smyth Wendy Carlos Michael Daugherty Giulio chase Henry Purcell Cincinnati Egypt Emily Pankhurst
"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"emily pankhurst" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"And so they kind of knew each other before. And so I sort of interested in how things are going now compared to how things were going then with my parents, very very happy. Stuck it out? Immigrants to this country and the children of immigrants because they felt like we were progressing full. What's hopefully, I mean, I'm presuming your parents, maybe countered some difficulties when they go. Yeah. I mean, it's. It's. My earliest memory is two and a half. And so I've got a fairly vivid memories from three almost. And so I kind of remember what they went through. And so them attempting to protect me from all. With the best intentions didn't work kind of clocks everything. So we have lived above alone in Hounslow Middlesex, west of London. And and I remember, my parents having pain over swastikas painted on their front door, and pack. He's out and all this kind of stuff. And in a way, the weird thing about the seventies. If you look through the seventies with the amount, particularly the racism, and sexism and everything else is. You kind of. That you got used to it, but it kinda toughened you up in a slightly different ways. So for me now when I see kind of the stuff that goes on social media particularly eights, I'm less affected by the name calling because I've lived through that. And I saw worse than that. And so in a way, it's not a defining badge for me, which I think it is for a lot people who younger did you say you say on Twitter sometimes huge offence at being called a name. And I go. Yeah. It's kind of it's a bunch of letters foam a word. I mean, I remember my mom saying to be when I was a kid. The an insult was only an insult once you've accepted as what up until that point is. And so so I grew up with that. But we have a we have the national from recruiting outside school and the only person ever recruited was sake kid. Seriously, there's Jugie because. Couldn't get anyone. We had about third about third of our school was was Asian and Jugie just misunderstood repatriation. He said, what do they mean? By repatriation, we said, well, they won't pay fee to go home, and he said Hounslow. And we live. That's the bus. Fair. So he went up to this guy and said you to send me home. Yeah. He said, okay. Also. Now, do I get do? I get it. When do I just got just reading confused? Any only person ever they recruited. You think do you think heading backwards forwards within this gets well, Richard? That is very big question. That you want to answer. That's why you also question. That's how questions work I think on broadly, we've moved forward. But I think the same thing applies to sexism ageism and everything else, which is the. I've been doing. Supposed to of not. So I will there's a doc series of the BBC doing and I'm doing one part of it. And. I was looking at activists. And so the episode undoing. Interviewing people about Martin Luther King. Helen, Keller blind and deaf. Helen keller. Emily, Pankhurst and Gandhi. And the interesting thing about talking to people who knew. Particularly Helen Keller and Martin Luther King. Both died in nineteen sixty eight was I asked the question. What would what would they think about the situation now, and we all of them with with Gandhi with with Emily Pankhurst, as well was everybody said be slightly depressed because the thing is that they made such huge strides at that point. Yeah. But if you got votes for women in nineteen thirty was when they got some women you fill in the next twenty years. Yeah. Women the vote they'll be equal. And then you kinda go now and things like equal pay and stuff like that. It's still a really really big issue. So I think that we have generally moved forward. Because also, I mean, I'm stunned at how you know, the the shift to the right that the world is made in the last few years. I just don't get it. You know, you've got someone president United States. Who's fact checked on a daily basis, and you got people going lies..

Helen keller Jugie Martin Luther King Emily Pankhurst Gandhi Hounslow Middlesex Twitter United States BBC president London Richard twenty years
Told in their own voices, the suffering of the suffragettes

Inside Europe

05:21 min | 3 years ago

Told in their own voices, the suffering of the suffragettes

"Kate Smith just one of the women who had engaged in militant axe. She became known. This is suffering yet. And in the nineteen seventies. Choose one of nearly two hundred suffrage campaigners who are interviewed by Oxford. University historian Brian Harrison the archive is now housed the women's library at the London School of economics. Did you do a lot of? A very mild explosive only said further the corners of the letters you see it wouldn't a straw. And it wouldn't sit father house because someone on the inside of boast office would know or realize that something's wrong and smell the slugger something you wouldn't ever hurt. Anybody wouldn't burn down the post office familiar decade from nineteen thousand five so for jet, smashed windows, blue postboxes and engaged other acts of arson and destruction. What was the explosive do, you know Onno we had their own rich cities. I don't understand the toll on ever had to do. It was made up in mild them if the. When we use it in some pools concede rel who's just woman didn't tation and one caller of one Pugh. Wasn't very powerful. No, the blasters powerful the blast Fitch down -ly dozen via accumulating from that six hundred years only Basel's launched a militant campaign in Cambridge and originates the plants burn down some empty houses. She'd recruited a local teacher to actually carry out the full her, but when the police came knocking at all of his door. She was very nearly incriminated. I went to trust the main road to post office policemen on duty there, he knew me and that I would trust. I said good nice. Me and then told we'll. Get out soon. Connecticut bid, so underst- bid and the Colson about Hoffa. Sounders knocked the dull these confident it lump tourist countries that good. And I came out to get. We'll talk negative me the policemen on duty. And did it couldn't be neat feat seen just about that time crossing the road? Live was absolved. The strong thing was that I had had in my bedroom. And I want to do with it. They went after moved pulled it down the W C, and I did or Ledley I know soaked bounds. Hit a word because mobile been all this mall. She news mostly the window smashing. Militant Sopher jets would carry out. We'll be on shops businesses, but leeann are Cohen decided to take it to the next level by staging a protest at the tower of London finding something heavy to throw proved a challenge. And they only to take about out of the great when the five, of course, and this bar was so. When Medusa talent and find this thing to to a whole net get through with the file we did made them into parcels narrow tongue. This is my protest to the government for its stretcher it the work in women of Great Britain Leonora successfully through one of her missiles, and it smashed a case containing the crown jewels. She says she was Catholic to hurt anyone in the process boost soon arrested the police came and fell on me because said what had I done this for. And I told them that the message was on the possible and was arrested and put it in one of those dungeons down. But no, I try my got out, and I was mopped to Leman street police station, and the crowds absolute with the beefeaters and the police, and then it was locked up in the filthy, sell some of the central figures in the suffer jet movements. Who had created the women social political union in the first place with a punk house mother, Emily and two of her daughters. Christabel and Sylvia, I've come to meet Sylvia's granddaughter. Helen that family home in Manchester. So we're here in the panko center, which was the home of Emily Pankhurst and her daughters and son. It was the place where the suffrage movement was born vitamin us. This is where it happened. Awesome extremes there. They were a blow. Going up. Okay. The to you. I think they're blowing up politicians houses postboxes, where do you see it's because if people were doing that today? So people would see it as being pretty extremist me. I think that you have to look at the their acts in the context of what the government was doing to them all the time. And also take the blowing up of Lloyd. George's some house that was the summer house built full him by the press baron..

Emily Pankhurst Leeann Kate Smith Pugh Sounders Hoffa London School Of Economics Oxford Brian Harrison George Sylvia Connecticut Great Britain Leonora Onno Tower Of London Arson Basel Cambridge Fitch