24 Burst results for "Emily Feng"

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:00 min | 3 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"In the city 95° with a heat index of 103 that heat advisory in effect for about another hour. It's 5 50. This is all things considered from a PR news, I'm also Chang, and I'm one of summers. Ukraine has had to take extraordinary measures to fight Russia's invasion. Among them, the government has consolidated the country's television outlets and dissolved rival political parties. It says it needs to do this to maintain a united front and fighting Russia. NPR's Emily Feng reports from Kyiv. Before the war, Ukraine had a dizzying array of television news stations. But in March, president zelensky decided to consolidate them into one 24 hour channel, but not all stations were included. This is the swanky studio for keys based television station, priyani, which means direct. It was once owned by former Ukrainian president and billionaire Petro Poroshenko. He was also a political competitor of zelensky's and Priya mi's reports have been excluded from the new national broadcast and most cable networks We were switched off from digital broadcast and excluded from the national channel. We have not been provided any reasons for this. This is svetlana orlowska, the executive producer. Before the war, she was concerned mostly with keeping her anchors happy, and the show is running on time. Now she's worried about the network's survival. We do hope we can begin broadcasting again after Ukraine wins the war. But during the martial law there are certain restrictions, we can not oppose our exclusion. Even before Russia invaded in February, some of Ukraine's opposition media outlets said they faced political pressure from president zelensky's government. The lord of Michelle ski directs one of Ukraine's oldest television stations. Channel 5. It was also previously owned by former president Poroshenko, who sold his media holdings under a 2021 Ukrainian law. After channel 5

Ukraine president zelensky Emily Feng Petro Poroshenko zelensky Priya mi united front national channel Chang Kyiv svetlana orlowska NPR government Michelle ski Poroshenko
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:00 min | 4 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And clouds 88° in the city its four O 6 From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Emily Feng And I marry the wies Kelly The Senate has voted 86 to 11 to approve almost 40 billion in aid to Ukraine today That's about triple the size of the last assistance package The house has already passed the bill So now it goes to President Biden for his signature The latest funding package includes more money for weapons for Ukraine Congress also approved more humanitarian and food aid and that's meant to help not just Ukrainians but also the country's accepting refugees from the war even those countries that typically rely on Ukraine's vast agricultural system for food and pure congressional correspondent Kelsey snow joins me from Capitol Hill Hey there Hi there Hey so 40 billion Sounds like a lot of money Is a lot of money How does it fit in with other spending bills Congress has passed Well yeah like you said this is a really huge and it is I mean part of the reason is really big because it's meant to last through the end of the fiscal year on September 30th There are a few important things to know about how funding like this specifically works though Congress passed the money as supplemental or emergency spending Now that's important because it means it doesn't need to be offset with spending cuts or tax increases And it also means that it doesn't have any impact on other spending and Congress Is this totally separate issue So it isn't uncommon for Congress to fund things that are fast moving or unpredictable this way Think about things like natural disasters or global humanitarian crises or even the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan Speaking of which how does this money compare to those worse Well I've spoken to lawmakers and security experts about it and they say that frankly this really can't compare because it's a really different way of funding things The U.S. is not involved in this war with troops on the ground The U.S. was in say Iraq and Afghanistan that's a really big differentiation because committing troops would make it dramatically more expensive But you know the funding does mark a really big uptick in money for Ukraine One expert told me the U.S. was spending about $300 million a year in Ukraine before Russia invaded This bill brings the total to more than 100 million a day Wow a 100 million a day Now the wanted to get this package passed days ago one senator held up the train How was that logjam undone Yeah it was held up by Kentucky Republican senator Rand Paul He often is the person who is in charge of holding things up in the Senate You know he was demanding a vote on amendment to assign a special inspector general to oversee all of that spending He gave this big speech this week explaining his objections where he said that he is sympathetic to the Ukrainian cause but he doesn't think Congress should be sending huge sums of money this way But if Congress were honest they'd take the money from elsewhere in the budget or ask Americans to pay higher taxes or heaven forbid loan the money to Ukraine instead of giving it to.

Ukraine Congress NPR news Emily Feng wies Kelly President Biden Kelsey snow Senate Afghanistan U.S. Iraq senator Rand Paul Kentucky
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:01 min | 4 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The city it's 5 50 This week we're talking with voters in two fast changing Georgia counties both are populous enough to decide winners in the big state A look to the midterms in Georgia On the next morning edition from NPR news Tomorrow morning at 5 on 90.1 W ABE From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Emily Feng And I'm Mary Louise Kelly Jakob Joseph or linsky says he was an active kid growing up in Poland Blake and rollerblading in a very extreme way in skate parks I will do all those tricks I did skiing with tricks snowboarding capoeira acrobatics skateboarding Also breakdancing He still does that actually I just did a little session right before our talk here Orlinski is 31 now He has a career touring the world not as a professional breakdancer not as a trick ski or but as an opera singer He has made several albums of baroque music this month he released an album of classic Polish songs called farewells And yes Jakob yosef or linsky speaks in a base baritone As you can hear I speak quite low but he's sings much higher in falsetto He is an internationally renowned counter tenor And that decision can also be traced back to his childhood when he was in a choir and they needed someone to sing the high notes We made the lottery And I lost that lottery you know So I lost a lot of it with my friend Me and my friend pyotr We were the youngest ones so I think that somebody manipulated those lottery But then I actually understood how much satisfaction it brings me to.

NPR news linsky Emily Feng Mary Louise Kelly Jakob Joseph Georgia Orlinski Jakob yosef Blake Poland skiing pyotr
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:05 min | 4 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"WAB This is all things considered from NPR news I'm Emily Feng And I'm Mary Louise Kelly A few weeks ago Eric saint Marie was taking an early morning walk on the Canadian side of the Detroit river when he saw something that no one has seen for more than a hundred years so he grabbed his phone shot a video A straight up river otter in the Detroit river Have you ever heard of something so controversial You couldn't believe his eyes At first he thought the large round furry animal was probably a mink or a muskrat or maybe even a beaver But when it dove I saw that its tail wasn't flattened like a beaver's would be And so that really only left otters as what it could be which I didn't even think was an option in the Detroit river as an animal to see So I got really excited That is because the river was notorious for its pollution Factories on both sides of the border had dumped oil in there before there were laws against doing that It was a toxic mess There was so much oil floating on the river and the waterfowl would come through on their migration They would land in the few pockets of open water during winter And that was filled with oil and they 11,000 ducks and geese would die in a single day because of that That's John hartig He's a scientist who has studied this ecosystem his entire career He didn't think it was clean enough for river otter And during the 40s 50s 60s and 70s because of all that oil and petroleum products river otter could not even have survived in that because the oil would map their fur and they couldn't thermal regulate and they couldn't keep warm and they would die But in recent years John hartig says the river has come a long way You can see bald eagles peregrine falcons Lake sturgeon and now river otters a mammal that can only survive when water is clean In this journey of revival of the river it's so important that we have something like the river otter return because this gives hope If they Detroit river is now cleaner for river otter it is indeed cleaner for you and me and others who visit here or live here because we share the same ecosystem This morning our colleagues at morning edition got to make the big announcement The winner of the 2022 tiny desk contest is One moment when they'll meet my friend I'll grab it that is a Lisa amador and her song accidental But I just think it's so good And I want to note this was the 5th time.

Detroit river NPR news Emily Feng Mary Louise Kelly Eric saint Marie John hartig Lake sturgeon Lisa amador
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:36 min | 4 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"A beautiful Tuesday afternoon out there right now We have clear skies 82° but it's really going to warm up quickly tomorrow look for a high of 92 We'll be at 95 by Thursday 94 for Friday Still in the low 90s for the weekend but a chance for showers and thunderstorms for Saturday might cool us down just a bit Amplifying Atlanta this is 90.1 WAB It's four 50 This is all things considered for NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly And I'm Emily Feng President Biden is lifting some of the sanctions placed on Cuba during the Trump administration The move is intended to ease an economic crisis in Cuba And the situation there is certainly dire right now Record numbers of Cubans are fleeing the island where inflation is high and food is scarce We are joined now by NPR's Carrie Kahn who just returned from Cuba and joins us now from Mexico City Good afternoon Kerry Good afternoon Emily So Carrie which sanctions exactly are being eased and will this make things easier for Cubans on the island Travel sanctions are being eased There will be more direct flights allowed from the U.S. to Cuba The U.S. will restart what's called family reunification Visa program and that allows for up to 20,000 visas to be issued a year And a $1000 cap on money sent from the U.S. to individual Cubans is also being lifted and those so called remittances are just a lifeline to Cubans and now they can get more money from relatives and friends abroad It's tricky how that will work since the company that processes those remittances in Cuba is run by the military and that company still remains on the U.S. sanction list The administration says that these measures will help ease a very very tough situation on the island and it is very tough Prices are just up for everything And that is even if you can find food and medicine to buy And so how are people finding food in Cuba You were just there last week so what did you see It is a daily struggle Everywhere you go there are lines and I've been to Cuba for years now and this is the worst I've ever seen it You just see crowds gathering everywhere They're always under a tree or in a small little piece of shade 'cause it's just so hot and the Caribbean right now And you know there must be a store nearby People line up early in the morning sometimes before dawn and wait hours And then they're not even sure they're going to get something here I want you to listen to this man I met He's 51 year old Williams scenario and he was in a line in Havana where he had already been waiting three hours when I finally talked to him He says every day it's a new line another line another line and every day.

Cuba NPR news Mary Louise Kelly Emily Feng President Biden Trump administration Carrie Kahn U.S. Mexico City NPR Atlanta Carrie Kerry Emily Travel Caribbean Havana Williams
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:07 min | 6 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Dot gov do work to pick up omicron There's usually a day or two delay between when you might test positive on a PCR versus when you might test positive on one of these at home rapid antigen tests But they do work to pick up an infection and they should be used frequently especially if you have symptoms to try to screen yourself Okay so bottom line you trust them You just said if I have symptoms so if my nose is running or my throat is sore if I take an at home test and it is negative do I need to wait a day or two and then follow up with a PCR test Not necessarily what I would suggest is use both of the rapid home tests that come in the box use them a couple days apart and if you're still worried at that point then go out and get a PCR test What about the scenario that I take a test And it is positive because the guidance for this is different now than it was two years ago when we were all starting this We now have treatments against COVID-19 How do I get them To access treatment you can also go to COVID dot gov you can look up where in your area you can access pats levied monoclonal antibodies what facilities currently stock them and how you can go about getting that If you already have a primary care physician they can also help you navigate that Should everyone be getting treatment If I test positive but I feel fine I have no symptoms Do I still need to do this Right now we have a pretty short supply of treatment and so we're really trying to target that supply to people in whom it would really have the most benefit because we really want to make sure that we're using these treatments to keep people out of the hospital People who are young healthy who don't have significant symptoms are probably not going to end up in the hospital regardless and so that's not the best use of that short supply that we currently have What is the latest guidance on isolation time The CDC shortened the window it's now 5 days Is there consensus among experts that that is long enough Well what we're seeing is that people very often test positive for longer than 5 days You have maybe about half of people who are negative by 5 days But then the other half are positive out to even 12 14 days And so I think the way to address that is repeated test if you're still positive really try to stay at home And if you absolutely can not stay at home that's a situation where you really should be masking when you're around other people so that you're not infecting others Doctor Celine gounder of Kaiser health news always a pleasure thank you My pleasure Shanghai is under pressure as the entire city goes into a second week of lockdown to contain COVID-19 Authorities are separating parents from their children in an attempt to test and isolate all cases and their close contacts Meanwhile quarantine wards and nursing homes are overwhelmed with patients and Emily NPR's Emily Feng reports From the start China's insisted parents and young children quarantined separately if one or both parties test positive for the coronavirus The consequences of the policy have become horrifyingly clear as Shanghai struggles to contain its biggest ever outbreak of the virus in state quarantine facilities fill up More families are being separated The doctor said for an extra $300 a day I could see him Then they said if I didn't pay on time they would not let my child out of quarantine Isn't that a bribe This is suki Wong She traveled to Shanghai in late February just as cases started to crop up She tested positive and so did her 7 year old son Authorities quarantined them in separate hotels After more than one month apart Wong and her son were finally reunited He's traumatized beset by daily nightmares about being abandoned again Some of the toddlers quarantined with him lost the ability to speak Another friend 6 month old came out with his legs covered in scratches graffiti on his hands and opened sores She's now in an online support group with more than 300 other parents who were separated or are currently separated from their young children Other parents in this group say they're still unable to contact their children during isolation and are sharing pictures and videos to support their claims Many of their infants do not have COVID but are coming out of these quarantine centers with other illnesses because the conditions are filthy Their milk bottles are returned to the parents covered in mold After a public outcry Shanghai set this week that family members who boast has positive can isolate together But elsewhere in Shanghai another family is still trying to reunite A brother and sister have been desperately trying to relocate their mother from the tonghai nursing home in Shanghai We're not using their names and distorting their voices because they fear legal repercussions for speaking to foreign media Here's the brother We are ordinary workers We only watch state TV we support the Communist Party but this time we have lost hope No government office picks up our calls All of us are extremely worried because there are at least 20 people who tested positive for COVID in the nursing home Their mother is still living with two other people who have tested positive and pure verified his account with other families and with two orderly still working inside the nursing home Here's one of them Their voices are also distorted because they fear state retribution for speaking to us We were tricked into working here The employment agencies said they were looking for cleaners and would pay us extra They told us we would not be working with COVID patients just changing bedsheets for close contacts We are exhausted only after we threatened to go on strike did they give us food and fix the running water The orderly say they're now.

Shanghai Celine gounder Kaiser health news Emily NPR Emily Feng suki Wong CDC tonghai nursing Wong China Communist Party
"emily feng" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 8 months ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pouring gas in the atmosphere I'm Michael hill It's morning edition from NPR and double you in my sea Amazon workers in Alabama vote again on whether to unionize a New Jersey court considers whether to free an 85 year old man in prison for 48 years for his involvement in the killing of a state trooper on the turnpike And after a record drop in 2020 western monarch butterflies make a slight comeback It's Friday February 4th the news is next Live from NPR news in Washington I'm core of a Coleman The opening ceremony of the winter Olympic Games is underway in Beijing The event features the traditional parade of nations as athletes stream into the stadium China's and Russia's leaders met in Beijing today Vladimir Putin is in China for the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games and bears Emily Feng reports he is seeking closer ties with China as Russia mass's troops on its border with Ukraine On Friday Putin became the first leader Xi Jinping has received a nearly two years Chinese and Russian state media coverage of the meeting show the two leaders shaking hands without masks A sign of how important China regards the meeting The Kremlin released a statement after the meeting saying the two men had agreed to cooperate and defend their version of democracy from foreign pressure The two leaders have also agreed to cooperate more in national security efforts and to bring Russia and China closer economically Russia strengthening ties with China could be used as a buffer should the U.S. impose more sanctions on Russia over its Ukrainian troop buildup Emily Feng and peer news Beijing The U.S. is accusing Russia of planning fake attacks in eastern Ukraine to justify a false reason for invasion Pentagon spokesman John Kirby says Moscow is working on a false flag video They would manufacture an atrocity an event A killing Perhaps a mass killing And they would they would do it with a slick video that would show corpses on the ground Perhaps corpses that they took out of other places mortuaries or something like that They would have actors as mourners You know they would they would even we think stage imagery of military equipment that would make it look like it was actually Ukrainian instead of Russian He spoke to NPR's morning edition Economists are not expecting to see strong hiring numbers today when the Labor Department reports on January employment and Paris God horsley reports economists believe the omicron wave is responsible The Labor Department conducted its latest jobs tally right around the time the coronavirus infections were peaking last month with more than 800,000 cases a day Senior economist at least school of the economic policy institute says that likely depressed employers demand for workers it also probably kept some would be workers on the sidelines I would certainly be surprised if we don't see the fingerprints of the pandemic This recent amaran surge on job growth Forecasters think employers likely added fewer jobs in January than the month before and it's possible the economy even lost jobs and let's expect the employment outlook will soon improve though now that infections are coming down It's got worse the impair news Washington The massive winter storm that has pummeled much of the nation this week is pulling into the northeast It's left heavy snow and dangerously icy conditions behind as far south as Texas The national weather service has posted wind chill advisories as far south as the border with Mexico This is NPR This is WNYC at 8 O four good Friday morning I'm Michael hill Light rain and some fog out there The national weather service now says the temperature in Central Park has dropped to 38 this morning Falling temperatures will freeze The Rain in ice streets and roadways alternate side parking suspended through Saturday but we still must pay the parking meters delays on NJ transits northeast quarter this morning and flight aware now reports at least a 120 flights have been delayed.

Russia Emily Feng China Beijing NPR news Olympic Games Michael hill NPR John Kirby Ukraine Xi Jinping Vladimir Putin Labor Department Putin Alabama New Jersey Amazon U.S. least school of the economic p Washington
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The west wants to deny India and other low and middle income countries the right to develop quickly But actually India might be able to develop more sustainably than the U.S. did I mean Indians went for example from no phones to cell phones So skipped to the landlines And it's something that economists call leapfrogging So theoretically Indians could go from no car to an electric car India is not asking for decades to run gas guzzling cars They're just asking for a bit more time to make this incredible transition for nearly 1.4 billion people What about China Emily China is struggling with a really complicated situation because it's one of the biggest carbon emitters because it manufactures so much of the world's goods and that has not changed during a global coronavirus pandemic At the same time there has been building pressure domestically not just internationally on China to clean up its act its own citizens want cleaner soil and safer food And so the sense here in China is trying to do more but it also might need to take even more initiative internationally because it can't count on countries like the U.S. anymore to do more in terms of carbon emissions because of the political gridlock in the U.S. And Brazil Well you do hear that argument that Lauren just mentioned in India you know that you in the west got rich by exploiting your forests and now you're trying to stop us doing the same You particularly hear that on the right But despite Bolsonaro's dismal environmental record I think key institutions in Brazil understand that the world has changed Also Brazilians are actually suffering firsthand from climate change We have the worst drought in nearly a century here and an energy crisis because hydropower reservoirs are at very low levels So Brazil's position ahead of the summit might be partly to do just with negotiation tactics After all it's pushing for international funding to support emissions reductions which were promised in the past but far from fully delivered That's Philip Reeves and Rio de Janeiro Emily Feng and Beijing and Lauren freyr in Mumbai thanks to all three of you You're welcome Thanks sorry Thank you President Biden is about to attend that UN climate summit in Scotland as well But first he's in Rome meeting with G 20 leaders As emperor Scott detro reports Biden's day began with a deeply personal meeting and ended with an important makeup session Biden landed in the middle of the night After just a few hours of sleep he launched into a long day Biden's massive 85 vehicle motorcade snake through Rome's narrow streets trundling from meeting to meeting to meeting to meeting The first stop a visit with a man Biden has made it clear he idolizes Pope Francis You are the most significant warrior for peace I've ever met He'll be my contract With your permission I'd like to be able to give you a coin Biden is just the second Catholic U.S. president He and Francis have both focused on many of the same key issues including confronting climate change as well as a global rise in nationalism and populism Biden and Francis are also both older men at the end of their long careers They both face their sheriff's skeptics That's something Biden seemed to be addressing when he told the Pope about another famous American who had an unexpected final act Baseball's satchel page a Negro league pitcher who wasn't allowed into the major leagues until he was in his 40s Lose their arm when they're 35 In general he pitched a win on his 40 7th birthday The meeting comes as a group of conservative American bishops pushes to bar Biden from communion because of his support for abortion rights Francis has previously brushed off this effort asked later in the day if it came up Biden said the Pope told him he was a good Catholic and that he should keep receiving communion After sessions with Italy's president and prime minister it was on to the day's final meeting The summer Biden enraged French president Emmanuel Macron by making a defense deal.

Biden India China U.S. Brazil Bolsonaro Philip Reeves Emily Feng Lauren freyr President Biden Scott detro Pope Francis Rome Lauren Rio de Janeiro Francis Mumbai Beijing UN Scotland
"emily feng" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And AMA 20 NPR news and the New York conversation Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Windsor Johnston The Supreme Court in Virginia is expected to take over redistricting in the state after an independent commission tasked withdrawling maps failed to meet a deadline on Sunday Jack Khalil of member station wvtf reports the move creates even more uncertainty about what the maps will eventually look like The commission's evenly split between Republicans and Democrats and they couldn't agree on issues regarding race and the Voting Rights Act two weeks ago They haven't discussed the legislative map since then And decided to focus on their other task of drawing U.S. congressional districts But the issues that caused that failure on state maps could easily derail that effort If commissioners don't draw a map for Congress Virginia's Supreme Court will draw that map to Chad Khalil reporting Vermont has been praised for handling the coronavirus pandemic better than other U.S. states But that's changed As Vermont public radios and a van dyne reports cases in the state rose significantly this fall COVID cases in Vermont increased by almost 40% the second two weeks of October More cases were among unvaccinated people with the highest rates among children who aren't yet eligible for vaccination Still Vermont leads the country with its vaccination rate close to 90% of eligible residents have received at least one shot Governor Phil Scott a Republican has ignored calls for a mask mandate That's Anna van dyne reporting This is NPR news Amnesty International the human rights organization says its closing down its office in Hong Kong at the end of this year because of the region's national security law NPR's Emily Feng reports the organization is the latest advocacy group which has either disbanded or moved out of the region because of greater Chinese political control Amnesty said in a statement that it was moving out of Hong Kong because the national security law had made it effectively impossible to work freely and without fear of serious reprisals from the government The law criminalizes very broad categories of actions including subversion and secession with up to life in prison That said a huge chilling effect on the ones vibrant activism of Hong Kong Amnesty had been in Hong Kong for about 40 years It's among about 35 civil and advocacy groups which have shut down in the region because of the law Emily Feng and peer news Beijing Tensions are escalating in Sudan The nation's ruling council head has declared a state of emergency across the country and the dissolution of the transitional sovereign council and the government Military forces have arrested the country's acting prime minister and other senior government officials They've also disrupted Internet access and blocked bridges in the capital Khartoum Sudan's information ministry is describing today's actions as a coup This is NPR news in Washington And it's WNYC at 7 33 in New York good morning Michael hill 62 mostly cloudy mostly cloudy today in 72 with a flash flood watch this evening Delay is on the BDF Q and R trains right now due to staff shortages in downtown Brooklyn pair of crashes on the BQE or blocking all lanes 50 minute delays inbound at the Lincoln and long inbound outbound delays on the GWB New York City's department of sanitation will pick up compost from the sidewalk as well as trash and recycling in 6 more areas soon The recently reinstated program now requires people to opt in and is currently only offered to a single community board district It's now adding three more districts in November and another three in December Bridge.

NPR news Vermont Windsor Johnston Jack Khalil Emily Feng Chad Khalil Hong Kong Supreme Court Phil Scott NPR Anna van dyne Virginia Amnesty International the huma AMA U.S. Washington transitional sovereign council government Military
"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"emily feng" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Have never have been a political game from the start Republicans should never have brought us to the brink of default like they did addressing the debt limit shouldn't be a partisan football separately The White House says President Biden has met today with one of the holdouts in his party over the proposed multi $1 trillion spending package Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia had called for the price tag to be slashed by half A new study in the journal pediatrics estimates more than 100,000 children in the U.S. have lost apparent or grandparent caregiver to COVID-19 That's more than previously thought and BR's read through chattery reports the majority of these orphan kids are from racial and ethnic minorities Between April 1 of 2020 and June 30th of this year an estimated 140,000 children lost a parent or a primary caregiver to COVID-19 Susan hillis is an epidemiologist at the CDC and an author of the new study This means that for every four COVID-19 deaths one child was left behind without a mother father and or a grandparent who provided for that child's home needs and nurture Two thirds of these children belong to racial and ethnic minorities The study authors call for a fourth pillar to COVID response which would include efforts to find and support orphan children and their families retoucher and peer news China is expanding influence on the global stage as a CIA's full attention to that and the central intelligence agencies creating a new center that focuses on the security implications of China's policies CIA director William burns announced that China mission center would address the most important geopolitical threat we face in the 21st century The U.S. says China is expected to remain a security concern for many years to come This is NPR The Chicago council survey finds more Americans worried about how China's growing military and economic strength affects the U.S. and Pierre's Emily Feng with details The survey pulled more than 2000 Americans across the country and found anxieties over China's growing might translate into support for more aggressive actions against China For example nearly 60% of people said they supported higher tariffs on Chinese goods even if that meant they would pay more at the store for products NPR's Emily Feng The Tokyo area was shaken by magnitude 5.9 earthquake Thursday night local time local officials say at least 17 people were injured one seriously Rail service was temporarily halted but no immediate.

President Biden Senator Joe Manchin Susan hillis China U.S. China mission center West Virginia White House CIA Emily Feng football CDC Chicago council William burns NPR Pierre Tokyo earthquake
India-China clash: 20 Indian troops killed in Ladakh fighting

Morning Edition

05:43 min | 2 years ago

India-China clash: 20 Indian troops killed in Ladakh fighting

"Why did Chinese and Indian troops fight in a remote valley along their shared border this happened high up in the Himalayas with thousands of troops from both countries have been stationed for decades at least twenty Indian troops died in the fighting and China won't disclose how many casualties it suffered for some explanation we've got NPR's Emily Feng in Beijing and NPR's India correspondent Lauren Frayer on the line learn this is a very specific part of the world the very remote part of the world what's this place like and what does India say happens there right so no well this is at fourteen thousand feet up in the Himalayas subzero temperatures there's almost no civilian population there and so that we have to rely on the two militaries to tell us what happened and they have different versions of the story both say the other started it we do know it was hand to hand combat with stones and wooden clubs because they have this agreement not to carry guns in that borders on an Indian Army colonel is among the dead India has been building a road in the area that could be used to deploy a future troops more quickly China may see that as a provocation both sides have been pouring in more troops and building more infrastructure there recently and so that's led to some scuffles in recent weeks have also been some high level military talks as recently as last weekend actually to try to defuse tensions but you know the opposite appears to have happened okay so that's from India's perspective Emily you're in Beijing what is China saying about what happened China says it bears no responsibility for what happened and it says it was Indian soldiers who first crossed into this no-man's land that separates the troops stationed in this valley yesterday night China's military put out a statement in which they accused Indian troops of cloak deliberately launching a provocative attack and big knowledge that tensions have been simmering for a while I spoke to retired colonel and and China's army his name is you have gone about why he thinks this clash happened here sure I'm not sure sure sure gallantry you know it's also one of them he said it was inevitable given tensions that people were going to die in a border clash between India and China and he put the blame on Indian prime minister Modi's who as a leader he said taking a more aggressive expansionary approach colonel yeah believes like many people in China that India provoked this clash so they could score points with more nationalistic voters in India and as Lawrence of we don't have that many details about what actually happened unlike India China's been very real to to share any information I asked the foreign ministry today white they can't give us casualty numbers and they said verbatim they didn't need to why is this so sensitive in China most likely it's because Chinese soldiers were killed in the clash and that's an embarrassing and very rare occurrence China's military last night admitted that there were casualties in general stemming from this clash but they didn't say which side in which they occurred China also says they're not releasing casualty numbers because they don't want to infuriate their own citizens and much of the escalate learn I want to ask you about what is at stake for India here because we're talking about the world's two most populous countries and both of them have nuclear weapons it is worried about its own territorial integrity I mean it doesn't want to lose land on this border to China China has been pretty aggressive in India's backyard of China is a close friend an investor in Pakistan which is India's arch rival next door China's building ports and infrastructure in places nearby like Sri Lanka Nepal across Southeast Asia and even farther afield India is the world's largest democracy Washington sees it as a buffer to China's influence in the region and if India suffers a stinging defeat at the hands of the Chinese military really challenges that idea so what is the Indian government saying so prime minister narendramodi had a coronavirus meeting today and at the start he observed a moment of silence for the slain soldiers he also made his first public comments about this clash hi from the doctor he said India wants peace but that if provoked India is capable of giving a fitting reply and he said India would never compromise its integrity and sovereignty so that sounds pretty tough but it may be aimed more at his domestic audience actually because here's what it sounds like when you turn on the TV in India today he was DVS China devious China has broken the peace after forty five years the consequences our great so that's a TV news anchor sounding pretty angry there's a hashtag trending today trying to get out so there's a lot of emotion in India right now the Indian Army however has been very measured urging commented actually noted that it was the cold that killed the majority of these troops that were wounded in battle but then they succumbed to subzero temperatures is what the army said to technically not killed by this Chinese soldiers the army made that distinction and so seems to be trying to de escalate here okay so in India at least at the government level and attempt to de escalate Emily what is China's government saying what are they telegraphing China is trying to de escalate as fast as possible first of all the average Chinese person is not paying attention to this clash it simply is not a story in China there's been no coverage in state media beyond this military statement and second China's foreign ministry said today that Beijing is maintaining close communications with India and that they both agree dialogue as the way

Himalayas
"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

"And song for the most part hundreds of people of all races come together each day in a somber remembrance of George floor and to reflect and pray hundreds of floral bouquets and circle this Minneapolis intersection at the spot Floyd was pinned to the ground there is a white painted body outlined in the words I can't breathe forty two year old yada Catchings explains why she brought a teenager here that video that came out really show America and I show my daughter what hate looks like and so we came here today to show my daughter what love looks like catching says Floyd staff is affected the whole world and she hopes it can lead to lasting change David Schaper NPR news Minneapolis Hong Kong's chief executive Carrie lam will visit Beijing Wednesday to discuss with Chinese leaders a proposed national security law Beijing wants to impose it on Hong Kong and beers Emily Feng reports the visit comes as Hong Kong grapples with a potential loss of its limited autonomy from China Lamoille spend Wednesday in Beijing talking to top Chinese leaders about it national security law that when passed in the coming months would likely outlaw most forms of dissent this week lamb called the criticism of that law a double standard in security standards pointing specifically to police violence in the US deployed to quell protests now rocking major cities there NPR's Emily Feng reporting on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrials are up one hundred points at twenty five thousand five hundred seventy five you're listening to NPR it's eight oh four on cherry Glazer with KCRW news another day of demonstrations in parts of southern California Hollywood alone was the heart O. three protests last night thousands of people marched along Hollywood Boulevard carrying signs with words like say their names about the victims of police brutality case here W. strong Campbell walked with the marchers and ask them why they came out and if they were prepared to break the six PM curfew and go to jail let me love is a musician who was performing with a friend at the demonstration on sunset and vine for.

cherry Glazer California KCRW chief executive David Schaper Minneapolis George W. strong Campbell Hollywood Floyd NPR US China Lamoille Emily Feng Beijing Carrie lam Minneapolis Hong Kong America
"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news in Washington I'm winter Johnston even as the US marks a grim milestone of this pandemic today surpassing the one hundred thousand dead mark scientists say the corona virus appears to be less deadly than some early studies suggested NPR's Jon Hamilton has more the conclusion comes from studies that use a new kind of test for corona virus the test detects antibodies rather than the virus itself and it's revealing lots of people who were infected at some point but never had severe symptoms in Indiana for example scientists found that the number of infected residents was eleven times higher than indicated by earlier research near mena Cammy of Indiana University says that allowed them to reassess how deadly the viruses we calculated the infection mortality rate to be almost points six percent that's still about six times higher than mortality from seasonal flu but it's much lower than what tell what he estimates made before anybody testing came along Jon Hamilton NPR news the head of China's center for disease control and prevention says the novel coronavirus did not originate from a seafood market in Wuhan nor did it began as a laboratory leak and P. R.'s Emily Feng reports the investigation is the most extensive effort yet to dispel theories supported by American officials the pandemic was intentionally started by China Dr go food told reporters during high level political meetings in Beijing this week that the novel coronavirus was not found in samples taken from the Wuhan wine and seafood market the virus was found in sewage water near the market the market is with the first cluster of human infections was reported NPR's Emily Feng reporting from Beijing stocks closed higher today on Wall Street the Dow was up five hundred fifty three points the nasdaq up seventy two this is NPR news in in Washington.

Washington US Jon Hamilton Indiana mena Cammy Indiana University China Wuhan P. R. Emily Feng Beijing NPR Johnston
China's Jilin in lockdown after coronavirus cluster

All of It

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

China's Jilin in lockdown after coronavirus cluster

"Not not a ground zero of the pandemic more than a dozen new cases of corona virus are confirmed now in China impairs Emily Feng reports that as a result the government is partially closing major city in the northeastern region T. lane city shut down its train station today and anyone leaving my car has to show a negative test for covert nineteen taken no more than two days ago China's northwest has seen new smaller outbreaks since April particularly in border cities with Russia authorities are especially sensitive to the possibility of a new epidemic as major political meetings in Beijing are set to kick off next

Emily Feng China Beijing Russia
"emily feng" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Announcement may have been a surprise because Clinton made no mention of it in his dinner time address announcing the month long lockdown will last another three weeks the U. S. aid will come weeks after Russia China Cuba and Albania sent medical supplies and teams of doctors to help Italy fight the epidemic so people Jolie NPR news Rome the Chinese city of Wuhan is emerging for more than two months of being sealed off from the rest of the country to prevent the covert nineteen from spreading but NPR's Emily Feng reports some restrictions are still in effect taxis are now running again and more people are venturing out of their houses to parks in take out any restaurants but health officials are still telling the public to stay home as a second reason factions is still possible one residents must scan a government after verify no recent contact with the sick to enter public spaces and many are limited to leaving their houses for only two hours at a time China's also reporting a rise in new cases it says mostly in people arriving from abroad this is NPR live from KQED news I'm Queenie Kim the Marin county sheriff's department will be enforcing an emergency resolution that designates areas around parks and open spaces in unincorporated parts of the county as no parking zones it's the latest in a series of moves to stop recreation sites from becoming overcrowded and preventing safe social distancing Marin county sheriff's sergeant Brendan Schneider says that while people should go outside to get fresh air do it in your own neighborhood if you can walk or bike or use other non motorized means to get to a trailer park in your house please do it meanwhile residents of Oakland we'll have lots more places to get fresh air the city is closing seventy four miles of neighborhood streets to through traffic of cars and trucks mayor Libby Schaaf said yesterday that the closures will let people walk run bike and skate more safely in their own neighborhoods and she says it's also a message to drive slowly and cautiously we have got to eliminate car accidents we have got to keep our health systems open and ready for a surge that we believe is coming due to the corona virus pandemic Shah said local residents and the central workers will still be allowed to drive on closed streets and that the.

Brendan Schneider Marin county KQED Jolie NPR Albania Russia Libby Schaaf Oakland Clinton Queenie Kim China Emily Feng NPR Wuhan epidemic Italy Cuba
China to expel New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post reporters

All Things Considered

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

China to expel New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post reporters

"China announced today its expelling American journalist with The New York Times Washington post and Wall Street journal NPR's Emily Feng explains the journalists will have ten days to hand to the press credentials and will be forbidden from reporting in China Hong Kong Macau the move is a direct response to the US decision to designate five Chinese state media entities as for emissions and cap their numbers at one hundred that decision was made because of decades of Chinese the harassment and obstruction of foreign media outlets in China that's NPR's Emily

China Wall Street Journal NPR Emily Feng China Hong Kong Macau United States Harassment The New York Times Washington
What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

Reveal

09:57 min | 2 years ago

What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

"News covered nineteen what you need to know about coronavirus I'm Lucas Univar now we're going to look at the ways authorities around the world are responding to this pandemic the trump administration's handling of the crisis has been heavily criticized the president has given confusing advice contradicting his own experts and misleading the public about timelines for testing and vaccinations morning edition's Rachel Martin spoke to three of NPR's international correspondents about how other countries are handling the coronavirus Sylvia Julie is in Rome Anthony kun is in Seoul and and Lee Fang is in Beijing Emily I'm gonna start with you because you were covering the crisis in Wuhan from the beginning can you just give us a sense now about what was the trajectory of the Chinese response to this well for the first month after that initial cases of the current affairs sure there wasn't a response there is local cover up in a delay and during that time of about five million people left the virus epicenter in like the spread it to the rest of China but then the country mobilized it did so very quickly imposed very stringent self isolation and quarantine measures and by self isolation I mean people sort of waiting densely populated areas they canceled all public events they shut down factories and offices and by quarantine measures and that the they still sealed off cities and villages completely Anthony how does what and we just say said compared to what's been happening in in South Korea while South Korea got hit right after China and because of south Korea's experience with previous epidemics they decided that rapid mass testing for the virus was going to be the key to their strategy and so they've been testing around fifteen thousand people a day S. three thousand six hundred people per million of population compared to five people per million in the US results also focus on transparency putting out daily statistics and press briefings Sylvia in Italy I mean now Italy is has replaced South Korea as the number two in the world after China when it comes to the the scope of of this pandemic what has been the Italian response drastic curbs on freedom of movement and there's been overwhelming compliance only food shops pharmacies and you stands are open people can go out but if stopped by police they must show kind of affidavit that states the purpose either work grocery shopping health or emergency police are carrying out random checks they face either three months in jail or a fine of two hundred thirty dollars the purposes social distancing keep people apart Italy's following China's lead the Wuhan model so Emily the Wuhan model hasn't worked I mean transmission has decreased there has not yeah and experts pretty much unanimously agreed that's because of social distancing it will destroy your economy as it temporarily has in China but it quickly slows the virus's spread another thing China did was it built these makeshift centers where they sent six people and sending instead of sending them home and researchers in both the US and China have now said this week that that was critical to slowing down the outbreak but this could be a measure that western democracies may be unwilling to take as for quarantine measures though sealing off the ledges and cities that's the jury's still out on the efficacy of of that because quarantines meet harder for medical medical resources to reach heart the hardest hit areas and that's probably why fatality rates in the epicenter in China are nearly four times higher than the rest of the country so Sylvia how have the measures worked in Italy what's the situation right now is there any slowing well nationwide it's too early to say it hasn't hit the peak yet the quarantine that was put in place a few weeks ago in the contagion epicenter in Lombardy eleven pounds fifty thousand people local authorities say it's working the contagion rate has dropped and that's why the quarantine was extended to all of Italy to try to prevent a spread to the south which has much weaker health systems than those of the north which were among the best in Europe but they are severely strained by this crisis now I'm Anthony South Korea chose not to take measures like we've seen in Italy or in China with these dramatic quarantines are lockdowns and yet it seems like the have still been able to to keep the crisis at bay right yeah well okay so numbers have been declining for two weeks in a row and sexualities of been at less than one percent compared to about four percent for China and six percent for Italy and you know doing this without having to log huge regions down is also a kind of effectiveness kind of accuracy was or something specifically about South Korea that made it possible for them to avoid large scale large scale quarantines well it's you know testing capacity is not just about cats it's about investment in basic healthcare infrastructure lab technicians chemicals machines logistics and if any one of those areas has a bottleneck it's going to mess things up and people are going to lose lives and it's just you know at the end of the day it's investment in in a healthcare system hospital beds you know national health insurance and this shows up in survivability for all diseases including covert nineteen and lastly Emily and Sylvia I'd love for you to talk some about how the different political systems in China and Italy have affected the coronavirus responsibly you alluded to this earlier but really how much of China's success in mitigating the spread has to do with the fact that this is this is a country frankly with a long history of human rights abuses it is an authoritarian state we've seen transparency is critical for a fast response that wasn't present in China but because China is a very centralized government one might say authoritarian it was able to mobilize quarantine measures and self social distancing very very quickly the problem is quarantines may have cost more lives than we know but we'll never know the secondary costs of people who are not able to get timely medical care and suffered from it because they were sealed into their villages or cities right and still be obviously Italy is a democracy what is been just the people's response to these kinds of drastic measures the crisis has totally turned the world upside down Italians notorious for cutting into line not very beaten to rules are become the most compliant people I've ever seen in my life and French correspondents based here sent a petition to French president Emmanuel MacColl telling him France underestimates the gravity of the epidemic and failed to prepare French public opinion they say look at Italy it's our duty to tell you there's no time to lose NPR's Sylvia patrolling Anthony kun and Emily Feng talking with rich mark fears about the impact of coronavirus have sparked a financial crisis in the markets Austin Goolsby who chaired president Barack Obama's council of economic advisers says that as the virus spreads American markets might be hit even harder than China's and here's our Shapiro asked him why if you look at the economy of the United States or of the rich countries in Europe they're much more dominated by these face to face services that are exactly the things they get pulled down whether their leisure and entertainment and sports or going to the gym or all sorts of services so if everyone stops doing that that's a bigger hit on the U. S. economy even that it was in China we went when they shut down he also said that virus economics are different from regular economics explain what you mean by that yeah by that I mean the closest thing in our in our collective memories to this moment was a financial crisis right into my house I natural crisis economics and business cycle economics is a little different than the virus in that the main thing that is paralyzing the economy is this year and withdrawal and so in a way the best thing you can do for the economy has nothing to do with the economy with virus economics and that is things like paid leave for people that are sick is actually not stimulus it's paying people not to come to work but anything that slows the rate of spread of the virus is the best kind of stimulus so if we have to get on top of this as a public health matter I think before you can effectively deal with this as an economic except if we do so the rate of the virus in this epidemic continues for weeks or months is there anyway to turn around the financial slide yes and no no in that look if there's going to be a substantial slowdown our goal is and should be allowing us the opportunity to bounce back it as this thing passes over us and that means you can't let everybody go bankrupt or starve or have these persistent lasting problems from what we hope to be a temporary shock and so do you see the crunch that we're experiencing now as an irrational panic or an appropriate response to the cancellation of big economic engines like pro sports like Broadway lever like school like the economic activity that goes on in major cities every day yeah a bit of both as we in fear the withdrawal and have social distancing to try to slow the virus there is going to be a substantial slowdown of economic activity right but I can never get out of my head from the two thousand eight crisis Paul Volcker's words over and over at that time that during a crisis the only asset you have is your credibility and as the U. S. government has not made credible statements that contributes to fear that makes it go down and we've we've got to do better we need the president to

Lucas Univar President Trump
"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

"So that you can identify five folks who are infected get them to self isolate and stop the spread meantime the mayor and federal lawmakers are demanding that the transportation security administration released more information about three TSA airport officers at San Jose international have tested positive for covert nineteen including whether they were ever in direct contact with the airport travelers Eric Westervelt NPR news San Jose in China the pandemic of corona virus seems to be ebbing and peers Emily Feng reports officials are now concerned that cases might be imported back into China by travelers returning from other infected areas earlier this week China's leader xi jin ping visited Wahat the city with the virus began and declare the outbreak basically correct most new cases are coming now from people infected overseas who returned to China the country was able to impose quarantines quickly but censorship and bureaucratic fumbling delayed initial response that experts say allow the virus to spread across China and leader of the world NPR's Emily Feng this is NPR starting Saturday Nepal will shut off access to Mount Everest amid the global corona virus pandemic suits me to a potluck reports from Mumbai expeditions from the Chinese side of the peak have already been suspended Nepal's government says it won't allow anyone to scale Mount Everest the end of April spring is speak Everest climbing season and climbing permits are an important source of revenue for anybody Nippon has only one confirmed case of coronavirus that attracts a lot of tourists from countries like the United States China and South Korea which are hard hit by the writers meanwhile the balls neighbor India has suspended tourist resisted April fifteenth the seventy six year old man became India's first good enough I'd instead he had recently traveled to Saudi Arabia India has at least seventy five confirmed cases for NPR news I'm socially the partake in Mumbai the U. S. military says it has carried out a series of airstrikes in Iraq they're against a militia that is supported by Iran the airstrikes are apparently in response to a rocket attack on Wednesday that killed two U. S. troops and one British service member repeated rocket attacks by Iranian backed militias in Iraq at the end of last year and the beginning of this year prompted the US to launch drone strikes that killed a top running in general north Korean state media says that leader Kim Jong un has supervised another round of live fire artillery exercises it's the latest of several exercises thought to be intended to improve the country's fighting ability earlier this week North Korea fired what are believed to be three rockets toward the northern part of its country.

Iran Kim Jong Saudi Arabia San Jose Eric Westervelt TSA North Korea US Iraq Mumbai India South Korea Mount Everest Nepal NPR Emily Feng China
"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

"Well king good morning Chinese leader xi jin ping visited Wuhan this morning that's the city where the new coronavirus started NPR Beijing correspondent Emily Feng is on the line good morning Emily good morning awhile this is a she's first visit since the virus outbreak started what does it signify it signifies that she believes China has successfully contained the virus and as one state tabloid described his visit China is quote a sending out of the darkest moment and that the outbreak so it was a moment of celebration she's first stop in the city was this new hospital built last month for critically ill patients and we don't have that much about his visit yet but pictures from China's state news agency showed she giving what was like a really stern pep talk to these doctors outside the hospital and then he video chatted with patients inside and then he also went to a local neighborhood to see how quarantine policies were being implemented and the reason why his his visit so important is there have been really conflicting signals at the provincial level about whether businesses and factories can reopen during the outbreak and that's been exacerbated that's exacerbated the economic impact of this whole lockdown so she is now saying from the very top we shouldn't let down our guard but we should also restart normal economic activity and it's also a bit of a passive aggressive dig up the rest of the world which is now just starting to deal with outbreaks in other countries China has repeatedly said it's more centralized authoritarian model of governance is better equipped to deal with an outbreak in that was implied again today's visit E. she's saying the virus is contained in the medical sense like eaten do people in China no longer have to worry about getting the corona virus how hello I'm if that's a remarkable thing to say given how worried countries and the rest of the world are is everything alright in China she and other officials have reiterated that people should still be very careful about prevention efforts but today is the third day that China has reported no new cases of the virus outside of this one province where the virus began that's that's way so when I say contained I mean it's been contained to this one province where it all began the rate of infections actually is so low even in that province that state media reported today that all of these temporary quarantine facilities had been shut down because they're just not needed anymore but bay is still under complete lockdown meeting that businesses are clues that people can't leave their homes without express permission but then again this week officials also said they were planning on how to let some people in the province start to travel again as long as you filled out these apps that monitor your movement throughout the country and then assign you a color to determine your risk of infection that was actually developed in another province but the rolling it out across the country now so they can track people as they return to work how do people feel about that people are critical about how the local government in Wuhan initially covered up the corona virus and then let it spread to the point where they had to steal off an entire city but the anger is more targeted towards local officials and the cover up central officials have been able to commend themselves for their aggressiveness and containing the virus and people actually surprisingly pretty supportive of quarantine measures and and his mandates to wear masks everywhere last week I spent most of it talking to people from Han who were really disappointed that China had basically sacrificed their entire city to save the country but people also said this is one way to do it it has come at a great cost but it's been successful okay NPR Beijing correspondent Emily Feng Emily thanks so much for your reporting thanks Noel here in this country the twenty twenty census is rolling out nationwide this week now for decades the U. S. government has categorized people with roots in the Middle East or in North Africa as white despite an ongoing push from some advocates that is not changing for this year's census we're bringing you an updated report about the controversial decision first may two years ago here's NPR's Hansi lo one they seem okay body left Yemen as a young girl with her family seventeen years ago and after they settled in New York City she noticed that when you fill out an official form here in the U. S. they're always seem to be a question about race and ethnicity everywhere you can see when you go to a doctor will schools you always get this option and but he said she wasn't sure which check boxes for her honestly it was hard for me to pick I was like oh my god what should I push I put Asian or the other about he says because Yemen is on the continent of Asia she settled on Asian and when she can on form she writes in Arab but she says on the twenty twenty senses she would have like to mark a box for middle eastern or north African it should be there because they had many nationalities so why is not there is unbelievable in twenty eighteen the U. S. census bureau decided against adding a middle eastern or north African category now because officials said they need to do more research and disappointed Mohamed Barakat he works at the Arab American family support center based in Brooklyn every member is grappling with the race question as a first grader my parents came from Palestine I didn't really know English and so whenever there is paperwork I had to do it and on one of those forms I remember seeing white and then in parentheses anyone from the Middle East or North Africa which are the regions along with Europe that the U. S. government defines as white the better catch was perplexed he went to school and ask the teacher if you could answer Asian is like well if you want to put Asian go ahead but I think you should polite and so I went around asking other teachers and they all said your white your what and look but look at me that I can't says he doesn't look white and he's culturally not white but sometimes he marks white if he sees the Middle East and North Africa listed next to it or he looks for a box for others so we can write in Arab this makeshift way of answering surveys means that information about people with roots in the Middle East or North Africa is often hidden within data about other groups the fight right now is to say the category should be there because it will arrive at a better account Maya berry is the executive director of the Arab American institute which is trying to get a category added to the twenty thirty census form it's an issue that touches on a sensitive topic especially after president trump's travel bans against countries such as Iran Libya Syria and Yemen federal law prohibits the census bureau from releasing census responses identifying individuals for seventy two years but many in the middle eastern or north African communities in the US worry about giving the federal government more personal information that's the burden that our communities had to bear trying to make a determination about do you advocate for the inclusion of a category or not Terry says getting a middle eastern or north African check box on.

Wuhan Emily Feng Beijing
Coronavirus: China reports 125 new cases

1A

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus: China reports 125 new cases

"China is reporting a hundred and twenty five new coronavirus cases its lowest figure since the country began keeping count as global infections rise NPR's Emily Feng reports that Chinese officials are now concerned about new coronavirus cases being imported from other countries will hand the epicenter of the Chinese outbreak of the new coronavirus said this week would close down the first of the sixteen treatment centers and built a tree coronavirus patients citing the decline in overall numbers of active cases but in Beijing one of China's most cosmopolitan cities controls over movement and business operations have intensified to prevent new infections from

China NPR Emily Feng Beijing
"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KCRW

"Was a video he posted on YouTube singing about his homeland it's become sadly a common Iraqi story poor kid was telling but no education and no prospects killed almost before is a chance to live that's what the protesters beaten down in under attack because they are so they will keep struggling to change Jane around NPR news Baghdad a prominent Chinese legal activist has been arrested after spending fifty days on the run from Chinese authorities NPR's Emily Feng brought us his story how shoot to you'll manage to evade capture for nearly two months in a country at least with facial recognition cameras and digital surveillance is still unclear what is clear his friends tell NPR is that she was ready for when he never really was caught in southern China on the evening of February fifteenth what's a film director based in New Jersey said she left her videos to post for after he disappeared don't usually going to be arrested sooner or later he knew his freedom was dangerous to authorities she helped found the new citizens movement an influential coalition the cold for rule of law and civil rights protections work that earned him a four year jail sentence in two thousand fourteen his life as a fugitive began December twenty sixth as one by one nearly a dozen of the twentieth so participants of an activists dinner meeting he attended disappeared here's what again you know we may send you mail the meanings contents were not secret it was only because such a group of controversial personalities got together that authorities took notice while on the run she published a steady stream of political commentary on line he taunted president xi Ching painfully deemed quote helpless in the face the corona virus outbreak this calamity could only happen without democracy and freedom of speech you wrote in a post on Wednesday.

YouTube Jane Baghdad Emily Feng NPR China director New Jersey president xi Ching
"emily feng" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"emily feng" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is a chance to live that's what the protesters beaten down in under attack because they are so they will keep struggling to change Jane around NPR news back down a prominent Chinese legal activist has been arrested after spending fifty days on the run from Chinese authorities NPR's Emily Feng brought us his story how shoot to you'll manage to evade capture for nearly two months in a country at least with facial recognition cameras and digital surveillance is still unclear what is clear his friends tell NPR is that she was ready for when he never really was caught in southern China on the evening of February fifteenth what's a film director based in New Jersey said she left her videos to post for after he disappeared don't usually going to be arrested sooner or later he knew his freedom was dangerous to authorities she helped found the new citizens movement an influential coalition the cold for rule of law and civil rights protections work that earned him a four year jail sentence in two thousand fourteen his life as a fugitive began December twenty sixth as one by one nearly a dozen of the twenty years of purchase pens and activists dinner meeting he attended disappeared here's what again you got what you need certain yet mail the meanings contents were not secret it was only because such a group of controversial personalities got together that authorities took notice well the run she published a steady stream of political commentary on line he taunted president she's in pain he deems quote helpless in the face the corona virus outbreak this calamity could only happen without democracy and freedom of speech you wrote in a post on Wednesday it.

Jane Emily Feng NPR China director New Jersey president
China backs decision to exclude Hong Kong candidate Wong

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

China backs decision to exclude Hong Kong candidate Wong

"A pro democracy activist in Hong Kong is being barred from running in next month's local elections NPR's Emily Feng says the decision follows months of anti government protests in that city Hong Kong's government ruled that Josh along can not run for office in this district because he violated the region's constitution by advocating for quote self determination for independence from mainland China the decision comes after the normal election officer for longs districts and on the quit after taking medical leave last week one does not advocate for independence but support stronger protections of Hong Kong's limited autonomy from mainland China voting takes place November twenty fourth to choose representatives for the city's eighteen districts this year's elections are expected to be more heated than usual as several pro democracy candidates challenge pro Beijing incumbents I'm only saying NPR news Shandong

Hong Kong NPR Emily Feng Josh China Officer Shandong
China Is Urging The US To Stop Upcoming Tariffs On Chinese Goods

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

China Is Urging The US To Stop Upcoming Tariffs On Chinese Goods

"China is urging the trump administration not to implement its next series of trade tariffs NPR's Emily Feng says the US and China are holding their thirteenth round of trade negotiations next month China sees these new tariffs as a betrayal of general trade agreements made only in July part of the terrorists will take affect September first and could endanger the next round of trade negotiations which are also being held in September China is releasing soon what it calls an unreliable entities list of US companies and individuals president trump recently push back schedule tariffs on billions of dollars worth of Chinese goods until mid December

China NPR Emily Feng United States President Trump