35 Burst results for "Emily Fang"

"emily fang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:15 min | 5 d ago

"emily fang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Emily Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing You're listening to NPR news. Parts of the U. S. Southwest are still grappling with the stifling heatwave. Phoenix has tied a record by reaching 115 degrees two days in a row, and the National Weather Service is forecasting even higher temperatures they are going into the weekend. No real relief is expected from the excessive heat warning until at least Sunday. Namibia and South Africa are introducing tougher measures to contain the spread of Covid 19 from Ferrari Ishmael Fund equal reports that complacency and dropping temperatures are being blamed for spike in cases. Namibian President Hage Again group has put the capital Windhoek, the epicenter of the pandemic in the country under lockdown for two weeks. He also suspended all in person classes in affected areas until June. 30. The Namibian parliament is suspended after staff members and parliamentarians tested positive for Covid 19. Game. Gab is Namibians to avoid unnecessary gatherings now limited to 10. People in neighboring South Africa President Cyril Ramaphosa tightened measures that came into effect two weeks ago. He said. For out of the countries, nine provinces and now officially in a third wave for NPR news, I am ish my friend equal in Harare, China has launched the first three man crew to its space station. During their three month mission. The crew will perform experiments, test equipment to conduct maintenance and prepare for the arrival of two additional modules at the station next year. I'm Shane Stevens. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Walton Family Foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems to improve lives today and benefit future generations. More information at Walton family foundation dot org. Talking is the nearest thing to flying in this world. There you sit high up.

Emily Fang Walton Family Foundation 115 degrees Shane Stevens National Weather Service June. 30 two days two weeks NPR Beijing next year Windhoek U. S. Southwest three month two weeks ago Sunday nine provinces NPR NEWS Harare, China Walton family
"emily fang" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:51 min | 5 d ago

"emily fang" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Emily Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing You're listening to NPR news. Parts of the U. S. Southwest are still grappling with the stifling heatwave. Phoenix has tied a record by reaching 115 degrees two days in a row, and the National Weather Service is forecasting even higher temperatures they are going into the weekend. No real relief is expected from the excessive heat warning until at least Sunday. Namibia and South Africa are introducing tougher measures to contain the spread of Covid 19 from Harari ish buffoon. Dickwad reports that complacency and dropping temperatures are being blamed for spike in cases. Namibian President Hage Again group has put the capital Windhoek, the epicenter of the pandemic in the country under lockdown for two weeks. He also suspended all in person classes in affected areas. Until June. 30. The Namibian Parliament is suspended after staff members and parliamentarians tested positive for Covid 19 game gab aged Namibians to avoid unnecessary gatherings now limited to 10 people. In neighboring South Africa President Cyril Ramaphosa tightened measures that came into effect two weeks ago, he said. Four out of the countries nine provinces are now officially in a third wave for NPR news. I am ish my friend in Harare, China, has launched the first three men crew to its space station. During their three month mission. The crew will perform experiments, test equipment to conduct maintenance and prepare for the arrival of two additional modules at the station next year. I'm she Stevens. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Walton Family.

Emily Fang 115 degrees June. 30 two weeks National Weather Service 10 people two days NPR Beijing Harare, China three month Stevens next year Windhoek U. S. Southwest two weeks ago Four nine provinces Dickwad Harari
Eric Carle, Author of the Very Hungry Caterpillar, Dies at 91

Morning Edition

00:19 sec | 3 weeks ago

Eric Carle, Author of the Very Hungry Caterpillar, Dies at 91

"Emily Fang NPR NEWS Beijing The beloved Children's author and illustrator Eric Carl, has died at the age of 91, according to a family statement. One of his most loved works is the very hungry Caterpillar. The Vividly illustrated book was published in 1969. Eric Carle also

Emily Fang Npr News Eric Carl Beijing Caterpillar
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On Moon will help us process what's happened so that we can get our heads right? As we launch into the big days ahead. This is Kelly Corrigan wonders and we'll be right back after a short break. Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. President Biden is urging Congress to pass gun control legislation following the latest high profile mass shooting. Public transit worker fatally shot nine co workers at a light rail yard in San Jose, California as Ezra David Romero reports the suspect is among the dead. When law enforcement arrived at the scene, the gunman took his own life. Later, bomb sniffing dogs detected explosive material at the railyard. California Governor Gavin Newsom referred to mass shootings in the US as a sickness. This timeto deal with the endemic before this pandemic of gun violence, the pre existing condition it somehow sort of pushed aside last year. Now is raised its ugly head again this year. The investigation is ongoing. Federal authorities say the crime scene is very large, and we'll take a significant amount of time to process. Red Cross Victim Reunification center has been set up for family members. For NPR News. I'm Ezra David Romero in San Jose. U. S Trade representative Catherine Tie says the U. S. Is still facing very large challenges and its economic relationship with the China. NPR's Emily Fang reports that Hi shared her concerns and a virtual meeting with her Chinese counterpart on Thursday. In an official statement, the U. S trade representative Catherine Ties that her talk today with her Chinese counterpart You Ho was candid. She said They discussed the importance of the US China trade relationship, and she also voiced unspecified issues of concern with you as well. But there was no mention of the tariffs that are still in place from both sides. The legacy of a damaging US China trade war under former President Trump NPR's Emily Fang reporting the World Meteorological Organization says Planet Earth is barreling.

Emily Fang Thursday Shea Stevens World Meteorological Organizat Congress San Jose Kelly Corrigan Ezra David Romero NPR US last year San Jose, California Red Cross Victim Reunification Catherine Tie this year Catherine Ties both sides today Planet Earth NPR News
"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:39 min | Last month

"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

"Says he's scared to go. Emily Fang. NPR News Drew Hi, China. If you count up all the different kinds of birds, mammals, fish, amphibians and reptiles you get about 70,000 species, and an ambitious group of scientists wants to understand the full genetic makeup of every single one of them. Today, they unveiled the complete DNA's sequences of 25 species, including the platypus and the zigzag Heal NPR's Nell Greenfield. Voice reports They've found some surprises. The vertebrate Genomes project wants to get the genetic code of every known species with a backbone that's alive today. 71,657 named species. Erich Jarvis is a scientist at the Rockefeller University who heads this effort. He says it should take about a decade and will ultimately cost something like $100 million.100 million dollars is a lot of money. But if you can Capture all endangered species Catcher all vertebrates on the planet and be you know a new model for how to do genomes. I think it's worth it. Over the last few years, The group has been refining their strategies and processes for taking a sample from an animal and figuring out it's Edna code, Jarvis says. They're now able to sequence six species a week and can get high quality complete results. I think it's unconscionable to generate the lower draft quality genome sequences. It's a waste of money. It's a waste of time. You get decent science you can, but you get lots of errors. You missing lots of things. Take the zebra Finch, For example, A songbird studied to help understand vocal learning in birds and people. It turns out, these finches have seven more chromosomes than previously thought. Platypuses have eight more chromosomes. Each chromosome carries a ton of different genes. People thought these genes were missing and birds and platter place, right? But they weren't missing. They just weren't sequence with the older technologies. Their new technologies also avoid the opposite error, seeing extra genes that aren't actually there, Jarvis says. It turns out this was a problem for tracing the evolution of the so called love hormone. Oxy Tose in people in the past had incorrectly named additional genes of the oxytocin receptor and different fish and vertebrate lineages. Any reports in nature and other scientific journals include the genetic code of wild species that are currently at risk, such.

Erich Jarvis Emily Fang Jarvis $100 25 species Rockefeller University Nell Greenfield Today NPR News Drew Each chromosome 71,657 named species seven more chromosomes eight more chromosomes China NPR about 70,000 species six species a week million Oxy Tose
"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

"Law enforcement efforts to better protect Asian American in Pacific Islander communities from hate crimes in the U. S. The measure was approved by a vote of 94 toe won. The vote marks a rare moment of bipartisan unity in the evenly divided Senate. Following the expected House passage will go to President Biden's desk. Biden had urged approval for hate crimes legislation in the wake of a March shooting in Georgia. On this first day of the virtual global climate summit, President Biden's hosting Washington's promising to cut greenhouse gas emissions by half from 2005 levels by the end of the decade. The mayors of a dozen major U. S. Cities from New York City to Los Angeles, or asking Biden to consult them as the administration studies how to identify and resettle people displaced by natural disasters resulting from climate change. And the head of the United Nations Antonio Guterres. Rish is calling on the United States another wealthy nations to deliver on promises of climate financing for poor countries in the upcoming G seven meeting. We need a green planet, but the world these on red alert. We are at the verge of your peace. We must make sure the next step is in the right direction. At the summit, Chinese leader Xi Jinping's call for controlling Cole used to reduce carbon emissions, but NPR's Emily Fang reports, she stopped short of setting a hard cap on coal consumption seeding thing called for quote harmony between nature and man. He is among 40 world leaders attending the virtual climate summit this week. And his video speech, He said China would quote strictly controlled new coal fired projects and gradually reduced call You starting in 2025. China is aiming to be carbon neutral by 2060. But she did not commit to how much call used China plans to reduce China said said a broad economic policy document every five years and it's last one published last month also did not set a cap on coal use. Emily Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing The man who tried to set off a bomb in a New York City subway station. 2017 has been sentenced to life in prison. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports the bomber was found guilty of providing material support. To Isis. In 2017 a k a duel. I strapped a pipe onto his body and detonated it in a crowded subway tunnel near Times Square. The bomb did not go off as planned, and the explosion did not kill any people, but it did injure Lula and others nearby. Failed suicide bomber later told law enforcement he quote did it for the Islamic state, according to court filings Hula Now 31 became radicalized through watching online videos that supported Isis and went online to learn how to make an improvised explosive device. Judge Richard Sullivan rejected a request from Lula's attorneys for the minimum sentence of 35 years in prison after receiving a life sentence will apologized in court. This is NPR. The schools were you open to in person learning they're focusing on more than academics..

Emily Fang Lula Los Angeles New York City Hansi Lo Wang Xi Jinping 2060 2025 35 years Biden Times Square Antonio Guterres 2017 NPR Georgia 2005 last month Richard Sullivan NPR NEWS 94 toe
Despite Tensions, U.S. And China Agree to Work Together on Climate Change

The Splendid Table

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Despite Tensions, U.S. And China Agree to Work Together on Climate Change

"Had pledged to cooperate with each other to tackle climate change. They released a joint statement today after a last minute meeting between the climate on voice of both countries and Shanghai. Over the last three days. NPR's Emily Fang reports on the pledge amid tensions the US China relationship, the U. S envoy, John Kerry, met his Chinese counterpart, CIA journal PLA. They agreed the two countries were quote firmly committed to working with each other to keep global temperatures from rising another two degrees Celsius, as outlined in the Paris agreement to which both countries Air Party China and the U. S also said they would release more detailed strategies for achieving carbon neutrality. The U. S wants to cut carbon emissions to half of 2005 levels by 2030. China wants to be completely carbon neutral by 2060. President. Bidet is hosting an online climate summit for 40 World leaders next week. It is unclear of Chinese leader Xi Jingping will join

Emily Fang U. Air Party China NPR John Kerry Shanghai PLA CIA Paris United States Xi Jingping
China Detains Delivery Worker Who Tried To Improve Working Conditions

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 2 months ago

China Detains Delivery Worker Who Tried To Improve Working Conditions

"Of 2020. As the year of the delivery worker. Delivery workers helped millions of Americans stay safer during the pandemic, and in China, they fed hundreds of millions of people who were in quarantine. One delivery worker in China tried to improve working conditions, and now he's in detention as NPR's Beijing correspondent Emily Fang reports China has three million delivery workers, and they are everywhere. Outside every apartment complex, an office building. You see them with their bright windproof jackets and scooters. She was young or Mongol, as he is popularly known, was one of them. He worked all sorts of jobs and Beijing food delivery, package delivery and wholesale logistics. But he also made short videos about life as a delivery worker. He put them on throwing the Chinese version of Tic Tac woman. Sure they will make what the teacher he says, is this video delivery workers are people, not robots, but delivery platforms treat us like hogs in the machine, so he tried to organize delivery workers, one of China's fastest growing groups of gig workers here. He is in the podcast interview last September, about how he was detained for a month for trying to set up a strike. Failure only about Italian here he says they could do everything to arrest you fix you with a criminal charge. Sentenced to two years in prison and you change nothing. So do other delivery workers still dare to complain? Well, I dare And then, as big annual political meetings kicked off in Beijing this February, he simply disappeared. Nobody saw you should heart. So NPR went looking for answers. That search took us to remote beat CIA Prefecture and China Southwest infamous for being one of the poorest places in the country. They're in a village tucked amid lush green mountains. We found Mum Drew's father, Jin won Pa. In a small concrete house amid fields of corn. The elder Chen visibly tears up when we asked him about his son.

China Emily Fang Beijing NPR China Southwest Mum Drew CIA JIN PA Chen
Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

Snap Judgment

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

"Tech giant Alibaba's being fined $2.8 billion for what Beijing calls monopolistic behavior, NPR's Emily Fang says the fine comes is Chinese leaders reportedly are investigating how the company and its charismatic founder Became so powerful Alibaba's troubles really began after its founder, Jack Ma, I'll give a speech criticizing Chinese financial regulators from Muslim on Turner's like him. The I. P O of a second company of financial technology firm called Aunt Group was then abruptly canceled, and his executives called into meetings with regulators. Ma has now not been seen in the public eye since last October.

Alibaba Emily Fang Jack Ma NPR Beijing Aunt Group Turner MA
Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

"Tech giant Alibaba has been slapped with a nearly $3 billion fine. Chinese regulators say the company has engaged in anticompetitive behavior. NPR's Emily Fang reports. The fine comes as Chinese leaders are reportedly investigating how Alibaba and its founder became so powerful Alibaba's troubles really began after its founder, Jack Ma, give a speech criticizing Chinese financial regulators from Muslim entrepreneurs like him. Hypo of a second company financial technology firm called Aunt Group was then abruptly canceled, and his executives called into meetings with regulators. Ma has now not been seen in the public eye since last October.

Alibaba Emily Fang Jack Ma NPR Aunt Group Hypo MA
US sanctions 24 China and Hong Kong officials ahead of talks

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

US sanctions 24 China and Hong Kong officials ahead of talks

"After China passed new rules giving it more control over Hongkong's elections. The 14 individuals being sanctioned include Chinese senior legislative officials. These officials helped pass or implement new rules approved in Beijing this month that give Beijing much more control over who can run and Hongkong's elections. That brings the number of Chinese and Hong Kong officials. The U. S a sanction to 24. The sanctions are designed to punish those who undermine Hongkong's limited autonomy from mainland China. Those measures were taken after China passed in national security law that has led to dozens of arrests in Hong Kong and made political dissent. They're effectively impossible Emily Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing court in Japan has ruled that the Japanese government's ban on same sex marriage is unconstitutional.

Hongkong Beijing China Emily Fang Japanese Government NPR Japan
China passes Hong Kong election law despite US warning

Closer Look

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

China passes Hong Kong election law despite US warning

"Beijing has passed a law giving it effective control over Hongkong's election system. NPR's Emily Fang reports. The new law comes on the last day of big political meetings in China. Dubbed as quote perfecting Hongkong's electoral system. The new law in practice does something very different. It allows Beijing to expand an election committee with its own appointees that can pick the region's top leader and a chunk of its legislators. Guaranteeing pro Beijing factions control and both institutions.

Emily Fang Hongkong Beijing NPR China
China set to revamp Hong Kong's electoral system

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

China set to revamp Hong Kong's electoral system

"It effective control over hong kong's system npr's. Emily fang says the law comes on the last day that china is holding big political meetings dubbed as quote perfecting hong kong's electoral system. The new law in practice does something very different. It allows beijing to expand an election committee with its own appointees that can pick the region's top leader some legislators and veto election candidates guaranteeing pro-beijing factions control in both institutions and two thousand eighteen massive anti-government protests against beijing's rule rock hong kong since then beijing has used laws to eliminate room for dissent hundreds of activists journalists and politicians have been arrested under a national security law passed last and today's law passed. An annual legislative and political summit in beijing makes it impossible for pro-democracy parties in hong kong to win control of the legislature as they had hoped to do last autumn. Emily chang. Npr news beijing. Today is the tenth

Beijing Emily Fang Hong Kong NPR China Emily Chang Legislature
China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

Fresh Air

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

"Details from NPR's Emily Fang. Both China's and Russia's National Space Agency, said in separate statements that they would begin planning a joint international lunar research station. Ross Cosmo's Russia's Space agency said the station could orbit the moon or it could be on the moon itself. Neither agency said when construction and such a station might begin, though. China has invested heavily in its base conditions. It successfully sent a probe into orbit around Mars this year, and it could begin construction on an international space station as early as this year. Current international space station has been in orbit around Earth since 1998 but is set to be retired by 2030. Emily Chang. NPR NEWS Beijing Another glance at Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial Average is now up 1.5%

Emily Fang National Space Agency Ross Cosmo Russia NPR China Emily Chang Beijing
"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:10 min | 4 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

"In Houston still do not have safe drinking water. This is two weeks after winter storms and power outages shocked Texas used in public media's Laura Eisen See reports the recovery is slow because there's a shortage of plumbing supplies. Mayor Sylvester Turner says the number of Houstonians without running water in their homes probably reaches into the tens of thousands. He says plumbers are stretched thin and it's hard to find supplies to replace broken pipes, licensed plumbers, materials and supplies. Literally needed all over the state of Texas. So it's not like you can pull from Austin to pull from San Antonio Turner says he's asked FEMA toe help you supplies. He spoke at a Mass a distribution site this weekend. Where about 3000 people received food, water and blankets. Part of ongoing efforts to get basic resource is two Texans still recovering from the Winter Storm. I'm Laura I. Cincy and Houston in Hong Kong 47 Opposition politicians have been charged with sedition today under a national security law that China imposed on the region last year. It's the largest such wave of charges in the laws. Short history. NPR's Emily Fang reports. Among those charged today, Ray chant, a pro Democratic lawmaker, and Betty tie, a professor who helped organize informal elections last year. Those charged to be held without bail until their trial. Charges me. Nearly the entire opposition of Hong Kong is now either in jail under arrest or in exile. Passed last June. The national security law criminalizes vaguely defined crimes like succession and collusion with foreign forces. It has already been used to charge and influential publisher behind Hongkong's most critical and well known newspaper. Dozens more activists and politicians have been arrested or disqualified from office after the law was passed. Emily Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing This is NPR news. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has handed out its Golden Globe awards. NPR's Bob Mondello has more on some of the film winners. Nomad Land Thies Story of a woman who must live in her van after losing her job won best picture drama and also best director for Chloe Zhao, who is one of a record three women nominated in that category. Thies satirical romp Borat. Subsequent movie film won Best Picture, musical or comedy. And also actor, musical or comedy for Sasha Baron Cohen on the drama Side. Oddly enough, the two acting winners have musical roles under a day as the title blues singer in the United States, vs Billie Holiday and the late Chadwick Boseman as a jazz trumpeter in Marini's black bottom. Pixar's soul about a black jazz musician. One The animated feature and score categories. Bob Mondello. NPR News. Iran is rejecting a meeting with the U. S and European countries to discuss reviving the 2015 nuclear agreement, and Iranian statement says that's due to actions by the U. S and three European powers. But the statement did not specify further. Former President Donald Trump withdrew the U. S from the nuclear agreement. Protestors are out again today in Myanmar, a day after deadly clashes between demonstrators and Myanmar police and military personnel. The United Nations reports that it has evidence that at least 18 people were killed on Sunday. Demonstrators continue to protest against the military junta in Myanmar. It overthrew the democratically elected civilian government. February 1st. I'm Corbett Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American People and the E. C. M. C Foundation, Working to improve postsecondary educational outcomes for underserved students through evidence based innovation. Learn more at E. C. M C Foundation died award A century ago, the shipping industry recorded the daily ebb and flow of tides.

Emily Fang Corbett Coleman Chloe Zhao Bob Mondello Chadwick Boseman February 1st E. C. M. C Foundation Ray chant Houston United States Myanmar E. C. M C Foundation Hong Kong Sunday American People Austin Betty tie NPR Sasha Baron Cohen Laura I. Cincy
Buzzy new social media app Clubhouse appears to have been blocked in China

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

Buzzy new social media app Clubhouse appears to have been blocked in China

"China is blocking the social media APP clubhouse, NPR's Emily Fang reports. The APP exploded in popularity this month with users across greater China and Taiwan. Well Pastor Golf in China after Elon Musk gave a talk in the invite only app last month. Chinese users then joined clubhouse by the thousands every hour to discuss sensitive topics. Topics that included relations with Taiwan, which China has threatened to invade and master tensions in the region of Xinjiang. Chinese Internet remains heavily censored so direct online interactions between mainland Chinese, Hong Kong and Taiwan, the citizens are difficult. Clubhouse provided a limited window for these groups to talk. It is only available to iPhone users with non Chinese APP stores, a demographic that does Q upper middle class. But this brief moment of open has ended. China blocked clubhouse and Monday, meaning it is no longer accessible on Chinese

China Emily Fang Elon Musk NPR Xinjiang Golf Hong Kong
"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KCRW

"An update on vaccinations in the country where the corona virus spread. First, China has overcome the pandemic more quickly than other countries. But getting people vaccinated has been a struggle. NPR's Emily Fang asked Why Across Beijing long lines are forming for the country's first commercially approved Corona virus vaccine. It's made by state firm sign a form and Chinese companies and hospitals are now jostling to get their employees the vaccine. Each other together a garden. This Beijing vaccination site reassurance the unvaccinated. Their turn will soon come. China is great at mobilizing hundreds of millions of people into home isolation or from mass covert testing. But like many countries, China is struggling with vaccines. Spend 1.6% of people in China have been inoculated so far, and Beijing School is modest to get about 50 million or less than 4% of people vaccinated by mid February. Part of the reason is it's had very few outbreaks over the last few months, people perceived as a low risk of covert infection. Esso you know, they really not a lot of people, you know that feel like the urgency of getting vaccinated that Seon Jeong Wan, a public health expert at Scene Hall University. Right now. Surveys show 60 to 80% of people in China are willing to be vaccinated. That's a problem. China needs to vaccinate basically everyone. That's because its two main vaccines are only between 50 and 80% effective. To inoculate 1.4 billion people with two shots. Vaccines means manufacturing will be the biggest bottleneck China made of vaccines. Based on the inactivated viruses, you know, so you know that this subject to constraints of scale up By contrast, M or any vaccines like Fizer and Madonnas are faster to make. China says it's made about 600 million shots already sign a farm says they're adding production lines to make another 1.8 billion covert shots by the end of this year. But even based on that number, given the vast to needs of domestic vaccination, you know that number is still not sufficient and about 400 million of those doses have been promised to other countries. So For now, the vaccine is a hot commodity. Beijing is prioritizing healthcare in transportation workers. Unlike other countries, it is not vaccinating anyone above the age of 59 yet Chinese student studying abroad can also be part of this lucky first batch to get the vaccine. Amy is one of them. She's hoping to get her second shot in Beijing soon so she could return to the U. K for her master's program, I think is as normal as taking other vaccines that have taken before, though she did have some muscle soreness. Amy did not want to give a last name because her parents are government workers and could get in trouble because they pulled strings that sign a farm to get her. Her second vaccine shot faster. The reason why my mother, she fucked someone for me is maybe there are too many people in Beijing want to take the vaccine and she don't want me to queue for very long time for others and China, they might have to wait to the end of this year before their turn comes.

China Beijing Amy Beijing School Seon Jeong Wan Emily Fang NPR Fizer Scene Hall University
China marks one year since Wuhan's COVID-19 lockdown

It's Been a Minute

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

China marks one year since Wuhan's COVID-19 lockdown

"One year ago, 11 million residents in the Chinese city of Han went into lockdown for the next 76 days, they were shut inside their homes to contain the pandemic. Today, China is still discovering dozens of new coronavirus cases each day. But Wuhan has gone months without reporting new cases and life has mostly gone back to normal. NPR's Emily Fang has more from Wuhan. Last year. It was a ghost town there. Where no people on the streets when people did venture outside, many still decided to Werfel has Matt suits. But the last few days I was back in Wuhan. The commercial areas were full again. Traffic was back. People were eating out in restaurants. Of course, there are still restrictions. You have to wear face masks, and you cannot gather in numbers of more than a dozen. NPR's Emily Fang reporting.

Wuhan Emily Fang HAN Werfel NPR China Matt
China says its economy grew 2.3% in 2020, but consumer spending fell

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

China says its economy grew 2.3% in 2020, but consumer spending fell

"Despite the worldwide pandemic. China says its economy grew 2.3% last year, NPR's Emily Fang reports it was the only major economy to expand last year. Things looked grim at the beginning of 2020. China had posted its first quarterly drop in economic activity ever because of widespread lockdowns but a strong recovery, particularly consumer spending during the last few months of the year. And China was able to overcome the initial economic slump. Trying to continues to maintain strict lockdowns and regions that experience just a handful of virus cases. But that is allowed China's businesses to reopen at pre epidemic levels. China's exports in particular have bounced back as global demand for medical supplies and HomeGoods grows. Chinese policymakers have pledged to continue policies that support private businesses in consumer demand, but will scale back some credit boosting policies in the coming months. Emily Fang. NPR NEWS

Emily Fang China NPR Npr News
China Issues New Rules Aimed at Trump's Sanctions

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

China Issues New Rules Aimed at Trump's Sanctions

"US threats of more sanctions on Chinese officials, China's taking action Beijing as published rules banning compliance with foreign sanctions if they heard Chinese interests. Here's NPR's Emily Fang. The rules from China's Commerce Ministry allow China to tell firms not to enforce or comply with the sanctions. The new rules come days after U. S Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the U. S was looking into sanctioning more Chinese officials responsible for mass arrests in Hong Kong. This is NPR news.

Emily Fang China Commerce Ministry Beijing NPR Secretary Of State Mike Pompeo United States U. Hong Kong
Hong Kong arrests 53 activists under national security law

Morning Edition

03:35 min | 5 months ago

Hong Kong arrests 53 activists under national security law

"Another way that China is using a national security law that it imposed last year on Hong Kong, China promised that law would be used in a way that preserved Hongkong's limited autonomy. But today, police used the law to arrest more than 50 activists and lawmakers. Their alleged crime was participating in an independent election primary. NPR's Emily Fang reports. All across Hong Kong. In the predawn hours, Dozens of activists and lawmakers woke up to scenes like this one. I they all out. Why these air Hong Kong police officers outside lawmaker Incan wise door earlier today. And in this case, he lets the police in the arrest him under a sweeping new national security law imposed last summer. Police tell the lawmaker he's averted state power by participating in a primary to quote force. Hong Kong chief Executive Carrie Lam to resign. The police are referring to a primary election opposition politicians held in July. Michael Davis, a legal scholar who teaches in Hong Kong. Explains. The opposition wanted to find the most popular candidates to run for Hong Kong 70 Person Legislature. Historically, that legislature is pro Beijing, The gold was at 35 seats. Then have the power to block whatever the government's agenda is now the government's claiming well. This is some kind of violation, the offense against the government and national security 600,000. Hong Kong residents came out and voted in July's primary despite threats from pro Beijing officials in Hong Kong. Aging, which controls Hong Kong is sending a clear message I primary. This kind of plant is now being turned into a crime where the sentence the minimum sentence is 30 years on the maximum his life. Imprison the arrests target a wide range of people involved in the primary, including 10. Former lawmakers. Benny Tai, a prominent academic who first came up with the idea of the primary was taken. U. S citizen lawyer, John Clancy was also arrested. He's the treasure for a political party that helped organize the primary, which officials say is subversive. Joey Su Hong Kong student leader says This is a complete roundup of the region's remaining opposition. Oh, just Lansky activist arrested this morning are very, very important and focus voices in Hong Kong right now, the opposition says their ability to participate in Hong Kong politics is now illegal. Essentially what the arrest today means Is that if you want to win an election You are subverting the state's power. This is Samuel to Ah, Hong Kong democracy activists now living in the U. S. There were 600,000 Hong Kongers voted in the primaries. So we're not talking about sort of this little gathering that a few people attended. We're talking about a public event. This means anyone who has ever tangentially involved with Hongkong's beleaguered opposition is in danger, says Tommy Chung. He was a young leader in 2000 fourteen's umbrella revolution protests in Hong Kong and is now a local politician. You know the next political bureau walls powerful going nowhere. We say they would not be arrest anymore. No one can say they won't be arrested. Meaning. Expect more arrests. Emily Fang NPR NEWS Beijing

Hong Kong Emily Fang Carrie Lam Person Legislature China Beijing Michael Davis Benny Tai NPR John Clancy Joey Su Hong Kong Government Legislature Lansky Tommy Chung Samuel Npr News
China delays WHO team's visit to probe COVID-19 origins

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

China delays WHO team's visit to probe COVID-19 origins

"An international group of scientists from entering the country to investigate the origins of the Corona virus pandemic has NPR's Emily Fang reports Beijing and the World Health Organization say they're still negotiating 10 person team was supposed to visit this month, but the W. H O said they were denied entry to WH are scientists had already begun traveling to China before realizing they would not receive a visa. Foreign Ministry spokesperson for China said Beijing in the W. H O were still figuring out arrangements for the visit. Referring to the coronavirus, a spokesperson said the origins problem is very complex. She added The delay in admitting the investigators was not about visas, but rather about agreeing unquote the necessary procedures. Chinese officials have repeatedly denied the virus originated in China, and the second Foreign Ministry spokesperson has even falsely alleged the virus spread from the U. S military. Emily

Emily Fang W. H O Foreign Ministry Beijing World Health Organization NPR China U. Emily
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:11 min | 7 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman. Good morning. It's 7 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Up to now, the United States and its democracy have enjoyed the rule of law. The president has tried for weeks to overturn a democratic election on Lee to see multiple states certify his defeat. The law has also protected those who wanted to protest that defeat. In Hong Kong Democratic protections are fading in line with the wishes of China's national government. Hong Kong authorities who solidifying control and three pro democracy activists in Hong Kong have been sentenced. Among them is Joshua Wong, a 24 year old who was given 13.5 months prison time. NPR's Emily Fang is covering this story from Beijing. Hi there, Emily. Good morning, Steve. What did the activist do? They had earlier pled guilty to organizing a protest that surrounded the Hong Kong police headquarters last year. And if you remember this protest was part of these months long demonstrations, which began over an extradition bill with China, but then snowballed into this much bigger movement about protecting Hongkong's vanishing autonomy sentences today were relatively light. Long as you mentioned, the most prominent leader got just over a year. A second. Activate activist Agnes Child got 10 months Ivan Lamb got seven months They're not being charged under the national security law. What they're being charged under is general civil and criminal law in Hong Kong. But their arrest signals you know a huge blow to the remainder of the opposition movement in Hong Kong, and it's part of this rapid and quite effective legal demolition of Hongkong's opposition and you mentioned the National Security Law isn't being used here. But it's in existence and makes it much harder to conduct democratic activities. Where does that leave the opposition? It's been basically obliterated. Beijing has been very clear that it wants to make opposition virtually impossible well before 2047, which was originally the deadline that Hong Kong head to enjoy semi autonomy under Beijing's rule. But in the last few months alone while the rest of the world was in the grips and still is in the grips of this corona virus pandemic, Beijing has done the following with the national Security law. It's used the law to dismantle the legal barrier between Hong Kong and mainland China. Several protesters and smaller political parties have already been charged under the law. Beijing's legislature has expelled for opposition lawmakers just last month, and then the rest of the opposition camp resigned in protest, meaning that Hongkong's legislature is now entirely populated by industry or pro Beijing factions. There is no Lawmaking opposition in Hong Kong anymore, and as a result, Hong Kong's law enforcement feels emboldened to arrest more activists and protesters. What steps might the central government and its allies in Hong Kong take next we should pay attention to the education system. There are already hundreds of secondary school teachers who are being investigated for Anonymous complaints that they support last year's protests, and they're teaching politically incorrect material and universities, which were hotbeds of protests last year are similarly under scrutiny. And then also look to the judicial system in Hong Kong was much vaunted court system. There have been no removals of sitting judges just yet. But these judges are the most important vanguard that prevent more of this legal blurring between name than China and Hong Kong. Which is supposed to have legal autonomy of sorts under its own mini constitution, called the Basic Law and Third There will be a growing exodus of Hong Kongers. We're looking for a new home. Countries like the U. S. Australia are starting to accept them now as political refugees. But just the first time that Hong Kongers have had to seek that protection refugees from a place that was considered one of the freest places in Asia, Emily Thank you very much. Thanks, Steve NPR's Emily Fang in Beijing. Here at home. The National Guard is often called in to help when there are emergencies, and this year there have been many man that's meant they've been busier than ever. And it's taking its toll. Frank Morris of member station case you are has more Talk about bad timing. Louisiana agin in General Keith would L took command of the Louisiana National Guard in January. 2020. You know the first day I was on the job. We have a tornado warning. In the second day I was on the job. We have a tornado in north Louisiana, and it really hadn't stop saying all year guard troops around the country been running to help with hurricanes, wildfires, floods, civil unrest and, of course, the pandemic. In fact, more National Guard troops were activated this year than it any time since World War 2 2020 has been an absolutely unprecedented an incredible year for the Wisconsin National Guard. Captain Joe Trovato says the pandemic response there started in March when covert exposed cruise ship passengers from Wisconsin needed a ride home. The guard is actually the ones who Physically drove them from the airport, where they landed back to their homes. And that was that was our initial mission, And it was just the beginning. Wisconsin guard helped us set up in the auxiliary hospital jumped in to Steph call centers and haul supplies. It's conducted nearly one million covert tests. Across the country. Guard troops have administered more than nine million tests package served or delivered a staggering 584 million meals, plus hundreds of millions of protective masks, gloves and gowns. More than 47,000. National Guard troops were actively fighting the pandemic this spring, less than half that many are now so this is not our high point. Colonel Michael's minority director of joint staff of the Kansas National Guard. State and local agencies have now ramped up to take over some of the testing, food distribution and other things that guard troops took on. Initially, that's AH good example of communities stepping up and finding Permanent solutions, as opposed to the temporary solution that really are our soldiers and airmen can provide and well, hospitals are filling up with covert patients in many parts of the country. The guard's ability to help with that crisis is limited..

Hong Kong National Guard Beijing China National Security Law Kansas National Guard Hongkong Hong Kongers Emily Fang Louisiana National Guard Wisconsin National Guard NPR News Steve Inskeep Lulu Garcia Navarro Wisconsin Dave Freeman NPR United States
Taiwan says F-16 fighter jet goes missing during training

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 7 months ago

Taiwan says F-16 fighter jet goes missing during training

"In Detroit. Taiwan says that one of its fighter jets has disappeared during a nighttime training exercise that was set for this week. The island has invested in its military defenses in case of an attack from China. But NPR's Emily Fang reports a Syriza tragic military accidents has raised concerns about Taiwan's defense capabilities. Massive air and sea search is underway in Taiwan after an F 16 fighter jet has gone missing. The fate of the pilot is unknown. In July, 2 military pilots were killed after their helicopter crash landed into January. Taiwan's military chief of staff was among eight dead after a Black Hawk helicopter went down. China has said repeatedly it could invade Taiwan, which Beijing considers part of China. In response, the U. S. Has upped arms sales to Taiwan this year. Only thing.

Taiwan Emily Fang Detroit NPR China U. S. Beijing
'We Are Shipping To The U.S.': Inside China's Online Synthetic Drug Networks

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:36 min | 7 months ago

'We Are Shipping To The U.S.': Inside China's Online Synthetic Drug Networks

"One of the things that outgoing president trump did during his term was pressured. China over the drug kills tens of thousands of americans each year and much of it does come from china so more than a year ago. China banned all types of feno related compounds. Now we have learned that it sellers have adapted. They are selling the individual chemicals that can be used to make the drug and they. You're selling those ingredients more or less openly online. Our beijing correspondent. Emily fang looked into this with help from data collected by the center for advanced defense studies analyst. Michael low muller worked together that data. We spoke with both of them. What exactly to china. Due in may two thousand nineteen they decided to ban any synthetic that resembled sentinel which was a big departure from what they did. Before of banning only specific at a time a few months after this band there was a big drug bust of drug trafficking ring in china. One person was sentenced to death other people sentenced to life in prison but then there was quiet and i was curious as to wear all these people who had been selling earlier had gone and what that world look like now with this span in place how do you go about trying to find that seemingly underground world. Well that's where michael comes in. We're interested in seeing how the supply chains were operating from the point of production through sale to us and when we're looking at The salen of things we found that a lot of this activity was occurring on the open normal internet so we were looking into various advertisements that go up on these different marketplaces platforms like alibaba and other chemical and pharmaceutical marketplaces that companies reposted for in advertisements for that no one other related substances so we saw that. It was a very much out in the open. You're telling me that you could just go to a normal website Maybe not exactly amazon but alibaba's a pretty big platform mean you could go and find these things. Yes we observe that. The bulk of federal related sales activity appeared to be occurring on the clear web on ecommerce websites such as alibaba but there are also other websites that vendors use a little maintain independent websites on also using social media to facebook. It's all current very much on the open. Was it easy for you to begin. Finding the exact locations even of people who were selling ingredients offended all vendors will rarely use the actual name for drugs. So you're not going to necessarily see an advertisement that says fennel for sale. But if you know that any no holly substances are being advertise. It's very easy to find even via a simple google search. Many of these company names that are listed alongside of these advertisements are real companies. You can look them up and the chinese registry and find identifying information for them including addresses. Emily thing in beijing. What did you do with that information. Because michael had found all of these vendors with addresses. I then went to see whether these people really existed in the places. They said they were on me. Found that many of them in fact were operating in clear daylight. Many of them had offices to do sales in the middle of quite large cities in apartment buildings in shopping malls in cubicle office buildings and it speaks to how difficult it is to stop factional compounds that are cheap to make you can ship thousands of doses at a time undetected sometimes and because of the internet. These people can directly reach clients in the us and mexico and europe from an apartment building and industrial china. Would you describe your visit to one of these places. One of the main vendors that i visited calls himself. Benjamin chen line and he was one of the more active anders that see for eighty s and npr. Were able to identify. I was able to find him in remote region which is in china's northwest and during the day he worked as a salesperson selling legitimate products used in steelmaking process out there but in addition to his regular job he was also selling sentinel precursors so the type of chemical ingredients used to make fennel as well as other synthetic drugs when i met chen and his employers office. He was very nervous. He ushered me into a conference room so his colleagues couldn't hear our conversation on when i confronted him as a person who secretly dealing deadly synthetic drugs on the internet. He denied everything you know. He said he himself was not involved in any of this however headshots of him linked to fennel precursor advertisements. Do match the man that i met the phone number provided on these advertisements matches the one that chen answered and that i texted him on as did the address that he listed for some of his websites so a bottom line question then has the flow of fentanyl from china to the united states been significantly interrupted in any way by china's law enforcement. I think when it comes to finish fennel reach in the united states from china. I would speculate that. There has been a decrease in that is tough to know for sure. Though we reached out to china for comment we reached out to the national narcotics control commission which is in charge of enforcing this ban. They said that they had not seen any legal sales of sentinel class. Chemicals online within chinese borders since the ban but due to the openness and cross-border nature of the internet. Any country would have a difficult time completely eradicated illegal information. So they're saying that they have not seen illegal activity but they cannot rule out that it's not happening what we've seen in china though. Is that some kind of online activity to sell. Fennel ingredients is still happening. The us drug enforcement administration does say that. Mail shipments attentional from china to the. Us have dropped dramatically since the ban but the also says that more and more of the essential ingredients are being shipped from china to mexico where the ingredients are made into finished venture capital and then sold again into the us so the flow has not stopped but the manner by which it's reaching. The us has changed realistically synthetic drugs. Vendors are finding ways to work around the spin and some ways that are technically legal even if the effect is to be selling deadly poisonous medic drugs to people outside of

China Alibaba Emily Fang Center For Advanced Defense Michael Low Muller Beijing Donald Trump Benjamin Chen Michael Chen Amazon Emily United States Facebook National Narcotics Control Com NPR Mexico Google Europe
"emily fang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 7 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"China, hundreds of thousands of people have already gotten shots of the vaccine is being developed Their NPR China correspondents Emily Fang and John Ruit, take a look at why China's pressing ahead on what's at stake. On a chilly morning earlier this November. Hundreds of people line up and wait for their names to be called summer from the state owned China Railway Group are waiting to get their second shot of an experimental Corona virus vaccine produced by Sina Farm. China's biggest state on vaccine maker. We'll pay you as a China railway construction worker about to be sent abroad for a project in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, qualifying him for a vaccine. Don't worry. There is no problem at all. Lots of our colleagues have a shot very early as early as July. They had no problems whatsoever for cool access to a Corona virus vaccine, albeit one without regulatory approval and which is still undergoing the last phase of human trials. Is a perk that comes with a state job. Your company is giving a guarantee of safety in exchange for sending you abroad after all, if you don't have your health Who cares how much money you earn of the hundreds of thousands now inoculated 56,000 vaccinated people have already gone abroad, but deploying unproven vaccines carries huge risks. For one, China's covert 19 vaccines target the disease. The vaccination prevents bad outcomes from infection, but it may not prevent infection itself. That's Jerome Kim, director general of the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, South Korea, and that could mean that a person could still transmit the virus after they've been vaccinated. The worry is that vaccinations will give people who've had them a sense of invincibility. And that could actually help spread the virus. There may also be unexpected reactions to the unproven vaccines or late complications. China justifies the experimental vaccines for what it calls emergency use. Shot into the arms of people deemed vulnerable to Cove it such as frontline medical workers and critical service providers at home. China has four experimental vaccines now going through the last phase of human trials sign a farm in sign of AC are two of the major contenders and they make the vaccines being used on an emergency basis. Tinge away a director. China's CDC, speaking in November, said this was a necessary measure Number woman she won't call it. The decision to approve emergency use came after rounds and rounds of strict debate in evaluation after relatives show regulations were fulfilled What Jim did not specify how the emergency vaccines are being distributed. At the vaccination site in Beijing, NPR met a wide range of people who were lining up to get a job. They included dozens of state employees such as white collar bureaucrats and office workers, with no plans to travel abroad. And even a Peking duck cook at a state owned restaurant chain, a Peking duck cook. It's inoculations like these that have some observers concerned. Indonesian researches molecular virology at Hong Kong University. There is no emergency in China because there are basically zero confirmed cases over many months already in China, rolling out vaccines without all the data is a gamble for China. Already a string of quality scandals over the years has people inside the country and out skittish about made in China vaccines. If something goes wrong with these vaccines, it would be a PR disaster. Again Hong Kong University's Jin If they choose to do this, shock her and they ruin the reputation that will just make things worse. And no one there to use a Chinese waxing anymore.

China China Railway Group China railway Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Fizer Emily Fang Sina Farm John Ruit Congo
China Treats People Deemed Vulnerable With Experimental Coronavirus Vaccine

All Things Considered

03:45 min | 7 months ago

China Treats People Deemed Vulnerable With Experimental Coronavirus Vaccine

"China, hundreds of thousands of people have already gotten shots of the vaccine is being developed Their NPR China correspondents Emily Fang and John Ruit, take a look at why China's pressing ahead on what's at stake. On a chilly morning earlier this November. Hundreds of people line up and wait for their names to be called summer from the state owned China Railway Group are waiting to get their second shot of an experimental Corona virus vaccine produced by Sina Farm. China's biggest state on vaccine maker. We'll pay you as a China railway construction worker about to be sent abroad for a project in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, qualifying him for a vaccine. Don't worry. There is no problem at all. Lots of our colleagues have a shot very early as early as July. They had no problems whatsoever for cool access to a Corona virus vaccine, albeit one without regulatory approval and which is still undergoing the last phase of human trials. Is a perk that comes with a state job. Your company is giving a guarantee of safety in exchange for sending you abroad after all, if you don't have your health Who cares how much money you earn of the hundreds of thousands now inoculated 56,000 vaccinated people have already gone abroad, but deploying unproven vaccines carries huge risks. For one, China's covert 19 vaccines target the disease. The vaccination prevents bad outcomes from infection, but it may not prevent infection itself. That's Jerome Kim, director general of the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, South Korea, and that could mean that a person could still transmit the virus after they've been vaccinated. The worry is that vaccinations will give people who've had them a sense of invincibility. And that could actually help spread the virus. There may also be unexpected reactions to the unproven vaccines or late complications. China justifies the experimental vaccines for what it calls emergency use. Shot into the arms of people deemed vulnerable to Cove it such as frontline medical workers and critical service providers at home. China has four experimental vaccines now going through the last phase of human trials sign a farm in sign of AC are two of the major contenders and they make the vaccines being used on an emergency basis. Tinge away a director. China's CDC, speaking in November, said this was a necessary measure Number woman she won't call it. The decision to approve emergency use came after rounds and rounds of strict debate in evaluation after relatives show regulations were fulfilled What Jim did not specify how the emergency vaccines are being distributed. At the vaccination site in Beijing, NPR met a wide range of people who were lining up to get a job. They included dozens of state employees such as white collar bureaucrats and office workers, with no plans to travel abroad. And even a Peking duck cook at a state owned restaurant chain, a Peking duck cook. It's inoculations like these that have some observers concerned. Indonesian researches molecular virology at Hong Kong University. There is no emergency in China because there are basically zero confirmed cases over many months already in China, rolling out vaccines without all the data is a gamble for China. Already a string of quality scandals over the years has people inside the country and out skittish about made in China vaccines. If something goes wrong with these vaccines, it would be a PR disaster. Again Hong Kong University's Jin If they choose to do this, shock her and they ruin the reputation that will just make things worse. And no one there to use a Chinese waxing anymore.

China Emily Fang John Ruit China Railway Group Jerome Kim International Vaccine Institut NPR Sina Democratic Republic Of The Con Seoul South Korea CDC Hong Kong University Beijing JIM Again Hong Kong University JIN
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are legal because of section 2 30, Both President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden support revoking the law. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco This is NPR news. Hurricane Zeta is headed for the Louisiana coast. Its top sustained winds or 85, MPH, a category one. Storm Zeta is expected to make landfall later today, not far from New Orleans. Then it's expected to rapidly lose strength. This is the third Hurricane Louisiana has had this season. It's also faced an additional two tropical storms. Hurricane warnings are up from east of New Orleans to the Alabama border. Chinese officials are reporting their highest number of new Corona virus cases in more than two months. Most of them stem from a mysterious outbreak in the western region of Xin Jiang. NPR's Emily Fang reports, officials there have locked down a major city. China reported 49 cases Wednesday. 27 of those cases came from travellers returning from overseas. The remaining 22 stem from cash car, an old silk road town 138 asymptomatic cases have been discovered in cash card, but China does not count them and it's covert statistics until they developed symptoms. Authorities dispatched to investigate the outbreaks that it began in a small clothing factory. Thousands of such satellite factories as they're called, have been set up in the last three years across singer where hundreds of thousands of minorities have been detained. Many of those detainees were sent to such factories after being released. Family. Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing The Los Angeles Dodgers are this year's winner of the World Series defeated the Tampa Bay raised 3 to 1 in Game six of the fall Classic. It was played at a neutral field in Texas at the end of a pandemic shortened season. Just two weeks ago. The Los Angeles Lakers also clinched the MBA championship. This is NPR. Support for NPR comes from I drive providing cloud backup full system back up.

NPR New Orleans China Hurricane Zeta Hurricane Louisiana Los Angeles Lakers Bobby Allen Hurricane Joe Biden Emily Fang Xin Jiang Dodgers President SAN Francisco asymptomatic Louisiana Alabama border Tampa Bay Los Angeles
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I away Louisiana, which is just east of Lake Charles. Everything is ripped up and most of the damage was caused by the trees, which you know there are a lot of very big trees. So I found, you know people outside with their chain saws, tryingto You don't cut these large trees crushed their pickup trucks smashed through their roofs. NPR's waved Goodwin reporting the storm has left at least six people dead. President Trump has formally accepted his party's 2020 presidential nomination. NPR's Mara Liasson says the president wrapped up the Republican National Convention last night at the White House with a speech attacking Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. Trump spoke before a crowd of mostly massless, not socially distant supporters. He made clear that for him, the pandemic is in the rear view mirror. He told the crowd that if he's reelected, the best is yet to come. He mentioned Biden's name 42 times, calling him weak and completely in the dark. Joe Biden is not a savior. Of America's so He is the destroyer of America's jobs. I have given the chance you will be the destroyer. Of American greatness. The president attacked Biden for being both a creature of the Washington establishment. And at the same time, a Trojan Horse for the radical Left. Mara Liasson. NPR NEWS MILITARY Tensions between the United States and China continued today. China says it warned off a US destroyer in the disputed waters of the South China Sea. NPR's Emily Fang reports. The incident happened the day after China allegedly launched anti aircraft missiles in the area. Chinese military spokesperson said. China sent naval and air forces after US destroyer that sailed into waters claimed by China. U. S. Pacific Fleet said in a statement that it had sent the USS Mustin into waters near the Paracel Islands on Thursday. As part of stepped up freedom of navigation operations and a signal to Beijing. The U. S is ready to head off any naval conflict in the region and anonymous US defense officials that China had previously fired off four missiles in that area the day after China accused US of sending a spy plane over live fire military Jules held recently off China's coast. Emily Fang. NPR NEWS Beijing You're listening to NPR news. Nearly 181,000 people have died of covert 19 in the U. S. That's according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Researchers say that 5.8 million people in the US have been infected with the Corona virus. That's nearly a quarter of the world's virus cases. Heavy rainfall across parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan this week have killed around 170 people. Hundreds of others have been displaced People in some areas are still looking for more bodies as the water recedes. NPR's DEA Hadeed reports from Islamabad. The worst affected area was the province of per one near the Afghan capital, Kabul, where the floods mostly occurred at night, residents were unable to safely flee in the dark, and officials said in that area alone, more than 100 people perished, many with Children. Across the border in Pakistan. Some of the heaviest recorded rain in decades hammered the port city of Karachi, where years of neglect have caused the infrastructure to badly decay. The military and other security forces rushed in to help. But in one incident captured on video residents had to rescue police who clambered onto the roof of their vehicle, which risk being washed away on a road that turned into a rushing stream. More rains expected in coming days Day Hadeed NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo and bay says he's going to leave office. He cited a chronic health concern. Just this week on base that the record is Japan's longest serving prime minister, holding the office for eight years vote for his successor will likely.

NPR China Joe Biden United States President Trump Mara Liasson Emily Fang America South China Sea president Pakistan Lake Charles Louisiana Beijing prime minister Karachi Chinese military ISLAMABAD
"emily fang" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"emily fang" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"After overreaching and censoring too much, it's the same thing. But in either way what it is is the government reacting to public opinion. I guess what I'm also thinking of the instances where people tried to express dissent were silenced and punished for example our own Emily Fang NPR's. Emily Fang has reported on how on residents were threatened by the police and silenced after they tried to sue the Chinese government for the way things were handled. Their lawyers were told to stop their pro bono work on these cases and and so when people are silenced and fear stricken in this way. You can't really make a generalization that the Chinese population is happy with the government's course of action right. I agree. I agree I agree that. These incidences are very worrisome and there are huge holes in the Chinese justice system in the way that the Chinese local police actually carry out justice and. Enforces justice. And, these are problems that exist in Chinese society, there is no way to deny that and yet I think it comes back to this idea that you have talked about which has no translation into the English language, so I wonder if you can explain it to us, and if you think that is the reason why people are willing to accept some changes, this the word is why did I say it correctly us. Yes. I think. The trainees are taught to think for greater goods. Ever since we were born. To get good grades, not necessarily for your own benefit, but because you don't want to lose face for your parents for your family and so the collective thinking is very. Buried deep down. You really are facing a different creature. In terms of a nation and in terms of race and the people. First of all China has been homogenized. I mean it's like ninety percent of the population is Hun. So On saying is that the Chinese? Government is terribly lucky that they get to. Rule a people which actually has a culture of collective thinking. They have an easier job. Them Western politicians. Let's put it that way. yeah. Do, you think there could be a middle ground to be found between that collectivist sentiment that you described, but without the extreme measures to enforce it. I think there has to be a middle ground. And I think this is why U. S. China relationship is so important that it's not a breakdown because that middle ground is somewhere between. The Western world and the Chinese world We're all. Together in the same problem. So, it's about the human race either moving on to a higher platform where we recognize our collective good as a human race. or We actually die fighting. Who System is better turn. So from that point of view, I do think that the West has a lesson to learn in terms of collective thinking. that's hung. She's a writer and the publisher of the magazine I look. You can hear more of her thoughts at Ted.

Chinese government Emily Fang NPR Emily Fang writer China Ted U. S. China publisher
"emily fang" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"emily fang" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Laurie London. China has shut its border with Russia after officials discovered a new wave of cove at nineteen cases among Chinese nationals crossing into the country from Russia's Far East. Npr's Charles means reports from Moscow. China says the outbreak was detected in its border town of Sufen. Hey the Chinese gateway to the Russian city of lead. Vostok some three hours drive away. It's there that the Chinese nationals arrived on flights from Moscow this week before heading to the border on Friday. Moscow mayor Sergei Gotten identified some as Chinese tourists and packing for violating the city's ongoing self-isolation measures with the Russian officials new members of the group also had covert nineteen isn't clear but China has since puts often. Hey on lockdown. It's also building the city of six hundred beds isolation hospital to be completed in the coming days in contrast Russian officials in the Far East continued to document minimal cases of coveted nineteen Charles means. Npr News Moscow. The Chinese city of Wuhan is emerging from more than two months of being sealed off from the rest of China to prevent the spread of the corona virus. Npr's Emily Fang reports on the city's slow return to life amid ongoing restrictions. Taxis are now running again and more people are venturing out of their houses to parks and take out only restaurants but health officials are still telling the public to stay home as a second wave of infections is still possible. One residents must scan a government after verify not recent contact with sick to enter public spaces and many are limited to leaving their houses for only two hours at a time. Npr's L. Emily Fang reporting. The world's oil producers spent two days in intense negotiations but those talks ended without a completed deal to cut production as NPR's Camilo Domino ski reports. Oil Demand has collapsed because of the pandemic. The world has a massive oversupply of oil caused by both the corona virus and by geopolitics for more than a month. Russia and Saudi Arabia have been waging a price war now. The two sides are ready to call a truce but reaching a deal has been complicated. Opec and its allies held a marathon video conference and came close to a historic deal to cut crude production but then Mexico balked and the deal wasn't finalized then oil ministers from the Group of twenty met on video chat for another long meeting but no specific targets. Meanwhile president trump has been calling up various leaders trying to strike some sort of deal. Camilo dominancy. Npr News New York. City's nine one. One system is being overwhelmed. Emergency operators say panicked residents are calling every fifteen seconds or so. The city has started sending text and tweet alerts urging people to only call nine one one for life threatening emergencies this is. Npr News in Indonesia. The Crocodile Volcano has erupted again. Sending a column of Ash into the sky. Michael Sullivan reports. Indonesia Center for Vulcanology says. The volcano started erupting late. Friday night and kept at it continuously until early Saturday morning. A level two alert status is in place as authorities monitor the volcano. It's the longest eruption. Since the two thousand eighteen eruption and partial collapse of the island that triggered a deadly soon nominee that killed more than four hundred people along the coast of Western Java and southeastern Sumatra. No casualties have been reported from this latest eruption on a crocodile the name means child of Cockatiel formed out of the remains of the volcano who's mentally eruption in eighteen eighty. Three killed more than thirty thousand for. Npr News Michael Sullivan Chiang Rai Thailand in the UK. Boris Johnson remains in a London hospital but his condition is said to be improving. Johnson's father says his recovery. We'll take some time in. The prime minister is unlikely to be back to work anytime soon. The fifty five year old leader spent three nights in intensive care before being moved back Thursday evening to a regular ward. Meanwhile the country reported almost a thousand new cove nineteen deaths Friday taking the total number of fatalities in the UK to almost nine thousand. This while Spain is reporting its lowest number of daily deaths in nearly three weeks this is NPR news..

Npr NPR Crocodile Volcano China Moscow Russia Laurie London Michael Sullivan Boris Johnson Washington Camilo dominancy Emily Fang Wuhan L. Emily Fang Opec Sufen Charles
"emily fang" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"emily fang" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR. News in Washington. I'm Lakshmi Singh Harvey. Weinstein is found guilty on at least two counts including third degree rape and a Criminal Sexual Act But New York City jury has found the former. Movie Mogul not guilty. On two charges of predatory sexual assault and another count of rape. Weinstein was charged with sex crimes against two women in two thousand six in two thousand thirteen. Npr's Rose Friedman reports on the legal battle involving a powerful man whose crimes fuel the rise of the METOO movement worldwide. The seven men and five women of the jury sat through weeks of testimony hearing from six women who accused Weinstein of rape or assault. The testimony was often wrenching. One witness broke down on the stand forcing court to adjourn for the day. But Weinstein's defense did their best to poke holes in each story. Introducing doubts about details and timelines. They accused the women of reframing encounters that had been consensual at the time as rape or assault with little physical evidence to present. Prosecutors asked the jury to listen closely to the women's stories to lend their attention and their patients to a complex case ultimately the jury had to decide if they thought the women were telling the truth. Rose Friedman. Npr News. New York is not over. Weinstein still faces. Sex crimes charges in Los Angeles. A joint task force from the world. Health Organization has completed a two week survey of Corona virus containment efforts in China. Npr's Emily Fang. Reports that Task Force has concluded that China likely prevented hundreds of thousands of more cases of the corona virus. Dr Bruce Alward an Assistant Director General Organization said that strict quarantine measures locking down more than half a billion people in China should be replicated by other countries to stop the viruses global spread. Here's Dr Ward. Who helped lead the mission at a press conference in Beijing on Monday? There's no question that China's bold approach to the rapid spread of this new story. Pathogen has changed. The course of what was a rapidly escalating and continues to be deadly epidemic. His boss the W. H. O. Director came under fire last month after praising Chinese leader Xi Jinping's quote transparency despite initial local cover up that likely hastened the spread of the virus. Emily Fang NPR news Beijing President. Donald trump addressed the biggest crowd of his presidency. Today in India was a rally at a cricket stadium in Indian Prime Minister Narendra. Modi's home state of jarred and Peers Lauren. Fair was there. President trump.

Weinstein NPR rape China assault Rose Friedman Emily Fang New York Npr Lakshmi Singh Harvey Beijing Donald trump Washington Dr Bruce Alward Prime Minister Narendra President Los Angeles Dr Ward Assistant Director General Org Xi Jinping
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One of the world's biggest economy is an economy at the heart of global supply chains and here's Emily Fang one two an electronics making hub in southern China to see why it has been so hard to get back to business outside the gate of the vast factory quench on a city of mostly migrant workers near Shanghai the home of production continues but just barely looking at this on a sometimes it'll we have some real conflicts with labor supply right now the problem is we don't want to come to work but our boss having given a choice this thirty four year old worker from Henan province is part of the factory so cold winter breakroom skeleton team hired to work over the January lunar new year like all the factory employees in this piece he declined to provide his name for fear of retribution at work since the holiday local governments began sealing off villages and mandating fourteen day quarantines for anyone who travels meaning many of China's three hundred million migrant workers now can not returned to work even if they did apartments are keeping out recent travelers social for you know that that why don't we do that my apartment is guarded by police now because of the virus might has a curfew so strict that get back to late after your shift don't even let you in I had to sleep in a park before and so the skeleton crew was extended their shifts indefinitely the staff factories that normally account for more than half of the world's electronics manufacturing inclusion on the workers and here spoke to work for peta tron and Foxconn there the Titans of global electronics manufacturing your smartphone they helped make that collectively the two firms normally employ more than one million people across China most of them have not returned according to fox com workers I mean it's the lower one production line used to have four thousand people now there are about a dozen fox is trying to get workers from an infected areas back to it's factory but as this worker explains that won't solve the labor shortage even if you came back to the factory you have to spend fourteen days warranty we have some long time workers that haven't even returned these labor shortages have global implications Lewis Carroll's Asia economic headed consultancy Oxford economics sees the affects of court in nineteen as far more long term and more global than that of the two thousand three sars epidemic when China's role in the world economy was much smaller there seems to be in financial markets the understanding that yes it's very serious but it's going to be short lived and soon will be back to normal this month China announced policies to help smaller firms from going bankrupt but as firms can alter are told not to open up and as long as people simply stay at home expansionary microeconomic policies I don't think we'll have a lot of impact Foxconn and pick a trans Quinn Shaun factories has managed to make do because of another source of temporary labor student workers drawn from China's thousands of occasional colleges who interned as poorly paid assembly workers during holidays but most student workers are heading back home this student worker from Gansu province explains why he is not staying longer at peta tron clinicians within human person yes we have to do two weeks quarantine at home it ends just in time for us to begin the late start of the spring semester early March production did shut down briefly but **** kind of package on run some of the largest factories in the world and local government had an interest in getting them running again at least in stages smaller manufacturers have a harder time this paper has been submitted to to the local government and that includes guaranteeing you know masks some other protective gear that employees can look at where disinfecting scheduled Jenny Ambrus is one of the few Americans who works at a rare earths battery maker in China if you are a south the condition they sent thousands buying a large disinfectant machine as mandated but some of their other Chinese suppliers are closed if one of those crazy web that's like one of those spiders that make this web that make no sense that crazy weather supply chains made it possible for tiny parts meeting Chinese factories to power our phones and cars halfway across the world now that delicate balance has been broken family Fang and pure news quench on China football and baseball traditionally dominate the talk about high school sports in southern California but not this year it's been like a carnival of basketball gyms across the region thanks in part to kids of NBA royalty who are leasing it up for local schools Matt dental Antonio from member station KPCC in Los Angeles reports on a school were celebrity sightings and TV crews have become the norm.

Emily Fang
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Janine hers China the USA an interim trade pact will soon be official and years Emily Fang reports the two countries are planning a White House signing ceremony China's foreign ministry told reporters that it was a quote close communication with US counterparts to plan a signing ceremony for the first phase of a trade deal the US is that the ceremony could be the first week of January China has refused to give a specific date details of the agreement are also unknown China has set the terms of the agreement would be disclosed at the signing ceremony and here's Emily Fang measure tucked into the defense spending love has this month is aimed at making it easier for people with criminal records to get hired by the federal government and here's a usual Roscoe reports advocacy groups pressed Congress to expand opportunities for former prisoners the measure is known as a fair chance act the legislation blocks the federal government in federal contractors from asking about criminal history early on in the application process instead federal employers will have to wait until they make a conditional offer to inquire about a criminal record there are exceptions for law enforcement positions and those involving classified information it was sponsored by Democrat Cory Booker and Republican Ron Johnson in the Senate and the house it was backed by former congressman Elijah Cummings before he died last year Congress passed the first step back which cut sentences for certain drug offenses and offer training programs for prisoners ice Rasco MPR news shoppers spent more online this.

Elijah Cummings congressman Ron Johnson Roscoe Emily Fang official Janine NPR Washington Senate Cory Booker Congress federal government US China White House
"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"emily fang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News I'm David green and I know well king good morning China is firing back in the trade war with the United States it announced new tariffs this morning on US products and opened a new front in the dispute the US auto industry now this is all happening as the U. S. has levy terrace on China in an attempt to get it to lower its trade surplus with the United States and here's Emily fangs online from Beijing hi Emily hi good morning so tell us about what these new Chinese tariffs cover what the tears are in two rounds and in total they cover seventy five billion dollars of US goods and more than five thousand product categories that include everything from consumer products to notably American cars and car components the first round of tariffs go into effect September first the second December fifteenth and then on December fifteenth there will be additional tariffs of five to twenty five percent on American cars and car components these car terrorists have been suspended in December and then again in April back when relations between the two countries and trade negotiations have been going better so this announcement that American made cars and car components are going to be taxed again is a restart of tears that had been previously suspended the reason why there are these two rounds is it these date September first and December fifteenth match perfectly the schedule for new American tariffs that are going to be imposed on about three hundred billion dollars of Chinese goods okay resonant trump announced in July making my next question to you Emily kind of redundant but his trying to explicitly said why it's doing this have they said this is in response to what the U. S. is up to there are very conflicting narratives according to China's narrative the US brackets promises president trump and president she's in pain had met at the G. twenty summit in July and Osaka Japan and they had patched things up on the trade front and agreed that they would not announce new terrorists if China made new purchases of US agriculture products and those agreements were reiterated in July but then nothing happened China never made a move to buy more agricultural products and so a week after Shanghai trade talks in July president trump said he was going to impose new tariffs and China has responded us according to the Chinese the US sprint promises if you ask the US they say trying to break its promises first thing never bought agricultural products the US rating shooters and China's trade negotiators are supposed to meet soon for another round of trade talks one of these new terrace mean for those negotiations it means that they're currently deadlocked the US wants Beijing to buy more US goods and also to get rid of state subsidies to tech sectors in China Beijing wants the US to get rid of all of its terrace keep in mind the two countries are just announce new terror of someone another and China's not buying anymore US goods so all this is not looking great for trade talks that are supposed to be scheduled for September before that face to face meeting happens they're supposed to be a phone call that schedule between the top negotiators from both countries that has not yet happened and so there is a possibility that trade talks do not happen in September and I'm only just one last thing we know we have learned throughout this trade war that a tariff is a tax that is often in the end paid by consumers so to some extent I would imagine that Chinese consumers will be preparing to pay more for American goods is that right they are but China has prepared its citizens well over the last years state media has put out a lot of content saying that China needs to fight this trade war that China is capable of being dependent and I think that China is China has always said that its economy under a centralized leadership is better at at lasting at is better at withstanding the economic pressures of a trade war and here's Emily Fang in Beijing and we think so much no well it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm David green seven forty nine and Joe McConnell is back with traffic.

David green China three hundred billion dollars seventy five billion dollars twenty five percent