26 Burst results for "Emily Dickinson"

Read a poem

Before Breakfast

03:00 min | 3 months ago

Read a poem

"Today's tip is to build a reading habit by tackling a poem a day. Poems tend to be short, but can take you to amazing places. And so can help you find space in life for a little bit of beauty. As I talked to people about their schedules over the years I've learned that many people want to find more time to read. Along with volunteering and. Doing reading something that we know would improve our lives. But when life gets busy, it's easy to let it go. And once you let it go. Getting back in the habit can seem intimidating. Most books demand at least a few hours of time. Reading and little bits might not be very satisfying. Hence the beauty of poems. Unless you're reading T S Eliot. Elliott's the wasteland. Most poems are relatively short. You can easily borrow e books of poetry from your library through an APP like Libby, and then read through them on the kindle APP. Or. You can go to a website. such as poets dot, Org or Poetry Foundation Dot Org and find poems selected by their editors. In any case, you can get free poems on your phone quickly. And I'm guessing that you always have your phone nearby. And for the cause of building a poetry reading habit. This is actually a good thing. Notice when you pick up your phone. What do you do? Many people check texts or emails first and then look at social media APPS. As you find yourself doing this. Consciously clip to the poetry website or your daughter instead. In about three minutes. You can read a poem. A whole poem. which will give you at least some feeling of accomplishment? Whatever else you did or didn't do during the day you are the sort of person who reads poetry. Now, of course some poems are better than others. I've read through volumes from some of my favorite poets like Mary Oliver. Billy Collins Classic poets such as Emily Dickinson, and sometime stuff is awesome, and sometimes even with the vaster. Sit doesn't always speak to us. But. Poems do have away of going places that pros can't always follow. Dunwell upon can conjure up an image and a feeling. You can ponder that image and feeling as you go about your day. That image and feeling can take you outside your life for a few minutes. An elevate your experience. Putting a little beauty and to the moment. Not Bad for three minutes right. And as you find yourself finding three minutes here and there you'll start to see that you do in fact, have time to read. You just have to choose to do so. And so poetry can become a gateway to literature of all kinds. So today find some poetry. Put, it where you can read it. And, if nothing else, you'll end the day feeling like you put something a little special into your life.

Poetry Foundation Dot Org Mary Oliver Emily Dickinson T S Eliot Libby Elliott Billy Collins
How Do I Find the Courage to Be My Own Guide?

Dear Sugars

08:37 min | 4 months ago

How Do I Find the Courage to Be My Own Guide?

"Let's get to the letter I'm gonNA reach to you. Do your sugars a thirty four year old woman and I'm recently coming to terms with the fact that I spent my life being too afraid to do what I WANNA do time after time. I've let social norms guide me where I've looked others for their opinions about my next step my purpose while I've learned a lot from many teachers writers philosophers and therapists. It seems crucial at this point. I learned how to listen to my own heart and be brave enough to follow it. I WANNA be my own guide. It may seem ironic then for me to be asking for your advice. But I'm not asking you to tell me what I should be doing. It's how how do I learn to trust myself the way I did when I was a kid before I decided that other people knew better than me and gave them all the power. How do I learn to recognize my heart's voice and stand up for what it wants? How do I avoid falling back into that safe prison of what someone else thinks? I should but not what I truly want to do. Emily Dickinson wrote the heart. Wants what it wants or else it does not care. I know this to be true and I don't WanNa find myself back in a job or relationship or pursuit. My heart doesn't care about. How do I tend to my heart and keep it bay? The people the thoughts the fears that threaten this fledgling relationship between my heart and me sincerely hardward bound powerful interesting Have you asked yourself these questions when I first read it? I thought about our very first episode. And you know you're saying you're saying well. What what. What sort of been guiding precept in thinking about these questions of how you kind of get actualized and start building a life that feels more authentic. And what you. WanNa be doing on earth. Because you don't have a long time and I feel like we gotta as quickly as we can get to the things that really are meaningful to us and I thought about that. John Prion lyric that. I told you so many years ago. Your heart gets bored with your mind. And it changes you and heart bound is describing that my heart is bored with my mind But it's something even more than that in this case it's the there are other people and other voices. They're getting in the way of what she wants to do to whom she is been obedient and finds herself being obedient. So Hartford bound. You know when I read your letter there these questions that are kind of big abstract questions and I'm going to ask you to be more concrete about them on read back a couple to you. How do I learn to trust myself the way I did? I was a kid before I decided that other people knew better than me and gave them all the power. So my question to you is what other people. And how did you give them power? And how are you in your life? Giving them power you write how to avoid falling back into that safe prison. I love that safe prison of doing what someone else thinks I should do. Who are these someone else's you have to be specific about who they are and how to try to counteract them actively and specifically and there's only one way to really genuinely counteract them and that is to decide that they are not the voices who will determine what you do with your life at this point where you're at heart bound you're still bound up actually in those other voices in those other. People are those social conventions the fact that you wrote this letter. It's an indication that you're stepping away from that. And so you ask how do how do you learn how to trust yourself and the first thing I wanna say is that this is not something you learn one time. Do One time right. It's something that you do every day over and over again for years and years and years and the meaning of life that you put into action looks different at different times but it's always returning to the idea that you really need to trust yourself and I'll say that for me. I love this phrase brave enough I mean aside for the fact that actually a title one of my books. I love that you used this phrase. I need to learn how to listen to my heart and be brave enough to follow it and the way you do that as you just get brave enough not to have some big glorious life that you just cast off all conventions and other voices but you're brave enough to make one step in the direction that you WanNa go and that is for you. Heart rebound. I actually think it's your writing us this ladder that you've even popped your head above that sort of surfaced a enough to say you know what. I'M NOT GONNA listen to all these people anymore. I need to trust myself. That's the first step in my life. You know in really practical terms in every arena. I've had to do this as most. I'm sure Steve. You've done as well. Were you have to say this would be the thing that would be like the conventional the norm the thing that would be easier for other people around me and and some waste for myself to do? I mean any writer sample. We stepped into this profession knowing that it was probably a bad idea because you know most people need a career because they need to pay their bills right and the minute you decide to be a writer or an artist of any sort. You're you're you're saying okay. I'm going to take this risk and I'm not gonNA listen to the voices of reason and and security and all that stuff. I'm going to walk this. Paf heart bound. You mentioned relationships too. You know we're supposed to make nice. Were supposed to be in relationships. Please people around us. Sometimes you have to step off that path. You adopt a position in relation to all the people who love you that disappoints those people in your case. You're like keep thinking about you have to go off and do something that's crazy. Yeah and it's not just the going the idea of having going off and hiking the trail and it's not the inspiration the realization. The moment you say I'm leading lights. That doesn't feel real enough to me. It's the perspiration of at every point where it seems impossible and doomed battle through it. The backpack is ridiculous. You brought all this stuff along. Your feet are bloody your reason wild resonated with so many people because at every point you ran up against the real hard work of making an a difficult inconvenient decision. I would also say that within this letter this idea of how do I get back to a childlike state? A state where I trust myself and instinctual state and what I say oftentimes to writing students and try to say to say it to myself is look. Consciousness is by nature obsessive children. Come into the world obsessed that is they care about things too much and what happens with obsession. Is that socialized. We beat down the voices that care about things too much in that feel too much and part of the artist's journey. I guess is to say screw that I do care about it too much. I am to invest in. I'm obsessed with it and I'm going to be honest about obsession rather than trying to lead a safer more. Conventional approved life but it's an emotionally and psychologically inconvenient arrangement because you feel more and you face certain things about yourself that bring you away from arrangements that are there and especially in our culture to kind of keep you insulated from deep feeling. Yeah but you know. I love that you singled out this this phrase because I thought the same thing I I want to trust myself the way I did when I was a kid and you know kids will sometimes be at play and they will say these absurd things and create these sort of outlandish scenarios imaginative play worlds. Don't make sense to the people around them. They absolutely make sense to them. I remember you know like my son. One time you know he just. He found a deck of cards in a room and sort of far off room in the house and one by one he. He took one card at a time and ran to the other end of the house until he had stacked them at the end of the House and he was so determined it made sense to him in the only person. It didn't seem crazy to him. Yeah because he was so engaged in doing and you know when you said Al Gough. Maybe you have to go off and do something crazy what I think about that is. It doesn't matter if what if what you're doing seems crazy to other people right to you. It's right and that's how my hike was you know. Never did I feel so right then when I went off and did something that many others perceived as crazy that can like I agree you. That can be a very hard life when you first step off the path but I think the harder life is never stepping off the path while always to do

Writer Emily Dickinson Al Gough Hartford John Prion Steve
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:59 min | 6 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Of her time so very few of her poems published during her lifetime. Her work has had an immense impact on subsequent generations. Let's talk about Emily Dickinson. Emily was born in Amherst Massachusetts on December tenth eighteen. Thirty two Edward and Emily Dickenson. She was the second of three children. Emily's father Edward an ambitious lawyer native son of Amherst prided himself on playing a large role in the community as an elected state congressman the treasurer of Amherst College and the chairman of the annual cattle. Show he also served one term as a US congressman much. Less is known about Emily's mother though her survive correspondence suggests a quirky intelligence that belies her reputation as a passive wife. Emily her older brother Austin and younger sister Lavinia all attended the one room elementary school in amherst before moving to amherst academy a prestigious school out of which amherst college has grown after graduation from amherst academy. Emily enrolled at Mount Holyoke female seminary now Mount Holyoke college but her experience. There was not a happy one. She found the strict and invasive rules and religious requirements to be problematic. Emily was homesick so she left Mount Holyoke after just one year and returned to her family home at Mount Holyoke as well as at home. Emily was surrounded by the religious tradition of strict evangelical calvinism which centered on the belief that humans are born totally depraved and can only be saved if they accept Jesus. Emily had a hard time with these beliefs and was the only member of her family to never join the church. Instead she believed in the soul's immortality and the concepts of transcendental ism she was disinterested in less symbolic conceptions of religious truth this would become an important component of her poetry. Emily started writing poetry during her teen years. Mostly and letters to friends and none of it meant publication or public ewing. A surprising number of these letters still exist today and show. Emily's humor gift for relying anecdotes and her sense. Her correspondence responding to her letters with less interest than she would have liked. This would become a bit of a constant theme by her early twenties. Emily starting to become more reclusive. She restricted her social activities and reduced her correspondence to a select few with whom she maintained intense relationships through in eighteen fifty five. Emily's mother fell. Ill because neither emily nor her sister were married. The two subsequently required to spend significant time on domestic pursuits taking care of the Dickinson household during that period. Emily increased her self-imposed isolation even further between eighteen fifty five eighteen fifty eight. Emily wrote a lot of poetry in the summer of eighteen fifty eight. Emily began compiling her work into little books. She wrote clean copies of her poems onto find stationary and then so the sheets together at the fold to create small booklets over the course of about seven years. Emily created forty booklets with about eight hundred poems. Home Forty five from Emily's collection entitled snowflakes reads. I counted today dance. Their slippers the town and then I took a pencil to note the rebels down and then they grew so jolly. I did resign. The pray and ten of my once stately toes are Marshall for a big. Because Emily never left any instructions regarding these booklets. We can only guess what her intentions were for them. Some believe that she was simply organizing her poems for convenience others believe that. Emily want these booklets to eventually be published after death in the late eighteen fifties and early eighteen sixties. Emily seems to have suffered through some kind of personal crisis. That may have been partially due to romantic rejection. We don't have a clear record of exactly what was going on. But this along with other issues in her family lead emily heavily distressed and further increased her isolation instead of succumbing to whatever she was going through. Emily wrote extraordinary poems at an even more prolific rate during the civil war era. Emily explored the ironies of humanity often. Tragic such as the constant denial fulfillment and the search for the divine and the every day in her poems. She also wrote profoundly about what it meant to be a woman during her time women subjectivity and subordination and the need for self reliance and greater liberty in her last fifteen years. Her social life was nearly completely conducted by correspondence after her father's death in eighteen seventy four. Emily even had a passionate romance with Massachusetts Supreme Court judge entirely by letter. She continued to write about thirty five poems per year in the eighteen eighties. Emily experienced tragedy after tragedy as I. Her mother died and then many of her closest correspondence. One after another this culminated in the sudden death of her beloved eight-year-old nephew after that she stopped seeing almost everyone emily. Dickinson died of a stroke in eighteen. Eighty six. She was fifty five years old. After Emily's death her sister Lavinia put extraordinary effort into getting Emily's poems published with the help of Emily's remaining literary friends poems by Emily Dickinson was published in eighteen. Ninety the volume receive significant public interest and was acclaimed by famous author and critic. William Dean howells's as a distinctly American voice because Emily's poetry both in terms of content and especially style was really quite ahead of its time it took years before her greatness fully registered with the American poetry community and with the world at large by the nineteen fifties leading poets like Hart Crane Allen Tate and Elizabeth fish as well as the new critics were in thrall with emily's brilliance and were instrumental in establishing her place in the Pantheon of great lyric poets tune. In tomorrow for the story of another Beautiful Mind Special. Thanks to my favorite sister and co-creator Lizzy Caplan. Talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about another show. I think you'll like think about the books that have changed you. The ones that made you see the world in a whole New Light on the. But that's another story podcast. Bestselling AUTHOR WILL. Schwab talks to influential guests about the moments and books. That have been transformative for that job. Here jodie foster talk about how reading Franny and Zoe by J D. Salinger convinced her to put her acting career on hold so she could go to college and form a community here. How Joan diddy essay inspired crazy? Rich Asians author Kevin Kwan. To move to New York. We love celebrating the books that have changed our lives. Just like we love honoring the women who've shaped our history checkout. But that's another story wherever you get your podcasts..

Emily Dickinson Amherst College Amherst Mount Holyoke Amherst Massachusetts congressman Mount Holyoke college US Lavinia jodie foster Edward chairman ewing Joan diddy Massachusetts Supreme Court Schwab Kevin Kwan William Dean howells one room elementary school Lizzy Caplan
Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

After The Fact

06:03 min | 8 months ago

Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

"Ken Burns has been called America's storyteller a title earned over more than four decades and thirty three films including his most recent one on country music. We traveled his barn. That is his office in Rural New Hampshire talk about how he creates art from history. My first film was on the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and when I started fundraising forward in seventy seven. I looked about about twelve years old and people delighted in turning down saying that. This child is trying to sell me the Brooklyn Bridge and when I finally amassed a a can't say a critical mass But some money to film I started filming and I finished most of the principal photography in the summer of nineteen seventy nine and realized allies with all this footage and no money that I needed to get a real job and I had a really nice offer for a job but I felt in my bones in my guts that if I put the footage up on top of the refrigerator on a shelf I'd just wake up. Twenty twenty five years later and having not finished it so I wanted to move to someplace where I could live for nothing and figure out how you made a film about a bridge. How you how you told stories in history how you animated old photographs how you use sound effects and music and I moved here to the house? I'm living in now. I rented it for a couple of years. My oldest daughter was born there and so I had to buy hi it. The best professional decision I ever made was deciding to stay here. Once that film was nominated for an Oscar. Everyone said Oh you come back to New York and I said no I think. Can we stay here. The work I do is so labor intensive it's like academic or medical scientific research takes years and years and years to do it right and and it was more important to put the very difficult still to this day grant money and I'm very grateful for for pews involvement for for decades in the work that we've done put that all on the screen to have zero overhead in essence So that we can tell the funders that look. It's it's on the screen if we're take ten and a half years to do Vietnam or eight and a half years to do country music or the war. The history of the Second World War that we did that that the the felt that their money was going not some costly rent in midtown Manhattan But in a rural area where it's very clearly all all up on the screen. The work clearly energizes you. Are there things outside of work that allow you to have the energy and vitality and creativity the practices that you do yourself that allows you to sort of grows beyond as a filmmaker that also influences you as a filmmaker. Being a father is the most important activity. Yeah I have four daughters. I'm blessed I'm rich and daughters who ranged from the late thirties to a nine year old. They're the greatest teachers. I live in the spectacular. Her place that nature continually Reminds me of my insignificance and so the humility that comes from understanding the ending. How much nature us is actually makes you bigger just as if you if you think that you can say to somebody you know? Don't you know who I am. Doesn't commend you to the smallest and weakest little place and first of all in Walpole New Hampshire any notoriety variety award celebrity plus fifty cents. Gets you a cup of coffee. I do the New York Times Crossword puzzle in INC in physically. I buy the paper everyday we day and I read novels or magazines and watch television mostly for news and sports rabid baseball fan and then mostly I walk and I do that at least once a day. If not twice a day by the end of the day I have about ten miles. What happens in walking is very interesting hosting its meditative? Sometimes it's it's it's social. I can talk to daughters. I can talk to colleagues but mostly it's so lower with my dog and we've just sort of watch things leaves falling from trees SUNSETS and sunrises. That's what Emily Dickinson called the far theatricals of day which I still think is one of the greatest phrases of all times and I am very much addicted to the far theatricals a day. One of the things we want to do is talk just about your creative process. That's how you go about doing what you do. We start with the most basic question. Which is how you pick your topics? You've talked a lot about how you've got a whole range going out for the next next ten twenty years which is amazing. But how do you decide you know the glib answer is that they choose me. I I'm just looking for good stories in American history and that's what I want to say I is that I'm a storyteller. I'm not looking to make a political comment on the present though I know is Mark Twain is supposed to said that history doesn't doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes that is to say I've never finished a project where I haven't lifted my head up at the end of this long usually multiyear process and not seen the way in which the themes the important themes are not only evergreen but are resonating in the present. We do get completely distracted by the idea. That history repeats itself it does not it never has please show me where it has you know. Are we condemned to repeat what we don't remember no. It doesn't seem team that that's the case is knowing history thing. Of course it is so I think we just come to it from the sense that we have an amazing story to tell in our country. I feel that too often. It's it's been sanitized and that the real version which is incredibly diverse. An incredibly complicated is the one we ought to be focusing on and that in no way does does it diminish the positive aspects to give Some of the negative stuff the novelist Richard Power said the best arguments in the world won't change. I'm just single persons mind. The only thing that can do that as a good story so I'm not in the business of changing people's minds but I am in the business of trying to figure out what a good story stories

Brooklyn Bridge Rural New Hampshire Ken Burns New York Times Principal America Walpole New Hampshire Emily Dickinson Oscar New York Vietnam Mark Twain Manhattan Richard Power INC
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

14:33 min | 8 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"As we come back mortar shares more about Emily Dickinson's actual garden preserved in part at the Emily Dickinson Museum in Massachusetts so the garden on her property. Imagine a big brickhouse brickhouse. It's painted the sort of yellowish light. Yellow color and it's a fairly formal looking houses houses up on a hill on main street and the property is big. There's three acres on one side of the road. That's that's got both her home and then the home next door at the her father built for her brother Austin in his wife and then across the street. There was about a ten acre meadow. That the Dickinson's owned so she's looking out to this real. No Meadow area that they would have paid but you know would have grown up in the summer and people neighbors said it was just full of birds and bees and butterflies allies so full of pollinators. The House had a little conservatory that was on the southeast corner and the garden itself went down kind of gentle slope. There was a big flower garden and then beyond that a big vegetable garden and an orchard. Now I will say Emily Dickenson probably did not attend the vegetables. You know she mentions mentions them a timer to but it wasn't really a woman's pursuit in their social class and I will say you know the Dickinson's had help they. They had they had household help. They had help outdoors as well. So that also gave her time to pursue her poetry tree. If you WANNA know more about the help this wonderful book by also a California her name is Eva. Murray and the book is called made. Ma I D as has muse and it's all about sort of the household help and how they influenced Dickinson both in her output and her language so fascinating fat anyway but that was the the garden and there was also a big barn and it was a barn with livestock. So you know the livestock. DOC would have produced great fertilizer. You know a lot of well composted manure and would have probably eaten all the garden and kitchen refuse so no need for a composter there and you know would have also there would have been a certain earthy nece out the property. It was the farm basically. Yeah and the years again. Remind us of the her life dates most of which were spent in this House on. This property There were a few years within the same town but still in this region. Yes Emily Dickinson. Jason lived from eighteen thirty to eighteen. Eighty six. She died when she was fifty five years old. She spent all but fifteen years in. What is now the Emily Dickinson Museum in the House that was called the homestead her grandfather built it? For fifteen years they lived essentially around the corner about maybe half a mile quarter mile half mile away in another house. That is no longer there But basically she wrote. I'm going to say almost all her poetry while she lived at the. What is now the museum in the hamster and some of the the? They've done quite a bit of archaeological work there on site because because some was renovated at a certain point when the house went out of her family and before it became a museum. Yes yes so the conservatory. which is this little glass in room? it was taken off in nineteen seventeen so built built in eighteen fifty five it was probably falling down by that and and they removed it. I will say good Yankee fashion. They saved saved most of the parts so in twenty seventeen when they unveiled the reconstructed conservatory. It actually a lot of the pieces were able to be reassembled after a good amount of archaeology was done and they found the original original footings. And you know were reassured about the placement of it They've been doing a lot of archaeology. Over the years they partner with the University of Massachusetts In amherst that has an archaeology team. I'm an archeology school so basically any summary go up there. You'll find dig which people can volunteer for. It's a lot of fun. And you realize y most archaeologists start out when they're college age because it's really tough on the knees but they found things like the corner are of the barn so now they know exactly where the board was located. They know that the garden path is where it was originally. So we've been able to establish that and we keep waiting because we know from descriptions that there were things like a summer house you know summer house being like a a gazebo you know what kind of open structure with a roof that they trellis roses on and I don't know where it was. Unfortunately there are no photographs in the garden at the time At least nothing that surfaced. So there's still always hope that there's something something in somebody's trunk that will serve as pop up. Yeah Yeah and they know through some carbon dating of of remains in the soil like where shrubs were where Delilah looks where the flower borders. Were this right. Well we're hoping so. They're doing that analysis at the University of Pennsylvania. They found some things like they've found grape seeds. We did know that they grew grapes rape so we keep hoping for more specifics and some of it is just waiting for that analysis to get done so still a lot of work going on right described the orchard. Because I think that's one of the places. They've had some really good success in restoring what they believed to have been original. Yes so over the past going to say five years there has been extensive work on trying to put an orchard back onto the Dickinson Property There is a lovely orchard. EST who comes and you know prunes these young entries and tries to get them to bear. It's not in the same place because there is a wonderful huge food white oak tree that we know that Emily Dickinson's brother planted. That's now shading a good part of that slope the eastern side of the house. So that's taken you know. A lot of care is taken around that tree so that orchard is down in the corner where there's more sun but they have gotten one of the trees to produce an old tree that had just just hadn't born apples for years but then once it was properly pruned. It bores egg kind of apple called a sweetening which is an heirloom APP. Kroll and we do know that they are worse weeding apples on the property in fact Emily Dickenson rights to a friend. The golden sweets are are from grandfather's tree. So boy how wonderful Right right and so part of how you know. All of this information is not just research you served as Gardiner in residents. Tell us about what what this was how it came to be if you're still doing it and what being a gardener in residence is Marta. Yes well I have a confession Shen to make and that is I sort of made it up and it's sort of perfect. It's sort of permanent. I I want to picture it's about I guess it's the summer of twenty seventeen and at a meeting. There is an annual meeting of something called the Emily Dickinson International Society. This is a group of scholars and Dickinson Lovers. They put out a scholarly journal and they organize conferences and scholarship on Dickinson. So that year it was in Amherst and Jane Walled. WHO's the executive director of the museum? Gets up you know. Sort of gives a report and talks about their poet in residence. You know that they they have someone who is going to be the reds and after this meeting I said Jan.. Can we have lunch and I said would you consider a gardener in residents. It's Now I will say you know Massachusetts from New Jersey. It's a four hour drive on a good day so I can't commute but and I couldn't didn't up there the whole summer but I said you know I'll come. Let's say once a month and I'll work in exchange for for some kind of accommodation so we worked that out and I did that in twenty eighteen so I was up there much more more frequently than my normal which would be to go up once or twice a year. I almost I think every year for for a really long time. I've been going up in June and we have a garden kind of weekend where we get volunteers and we dig and we try to shape the place up Because like most museums the major part of the resources go into the houses which need a lot of attention and so there's not as much resource to put into the garden But this let me see the garden in a new way through the entire growing season from you know seeing the very early bulbs in spring during all the way to planting more bulbs in the fall. And I can't recommend too much the idea of creating kind of internships for yourself if you are in a position to do it it because it's a wonderful way to learn by doing and you know college students do it. So why can't I it just because I am in my six decade will and what. I love also about this. Marta is that the term term Gardner in residents puts the act of gardening. In what I would consider its rightful place as an expression of of art of literacy of cultural values and of scientific research and progression yes. And you know it's it's often viewed as something like housework. How housework but really it is a much more creative? I suit and you know. It's allowed me to really connect with some of the the regular kind of volunteers around the museum and some of the doses will out and help me and so we do things like when we plant something important. A new rose acclimatised vine bulbs we read needed. A poem so that marks the event whether it helps them actually grow. I'm not sure but you you know I have my. I have my hopes I feel pretty sure it does and so with that I would love to end by having you pick another another one or two poems to share with US okay. Well I wanted to read my favorite and it's short and and that is because it is one of the poems that I do think is a little like a recipe and yet it's a recipe with twist and it goes like this to make a prairie. It takes a clover and one B. One clover and to be and reverie the referee alone will do if bees are few so I do love that one and then I'm going to read an autumn poem because I feel that it is again one of these examples where Emily Dickinson's poems are generally a fairly simple structure. The people have made the analogy there like a hymn tune but it's a structure that she turns on. Its head ahead in the same way that you know yes. Schubert used the Sonata Form But he made it into something spectacular. Just you know even though its the structure so it goes like this. The name of it is. Autumn.

Emily Dickinson Emily Dickinson Museum Emily Dickinson International Massachusetts Dickinson Lovers Amherst Austin California apple University of Pennsylvania Murray University of Massachusetts rape Jason Delilah Marta Schubert B. One Gardiner
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 8 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 8 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 8 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
Emily Dickinson's Gardening Life, Marta McDowell

Cultivating Place

09:00 min | 8 months ago

Emily Dickinson's Gardening Life, Marta McDowell

"Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse Emily Writer New York Botanical Garden Marta Mcdowell New Jersey Massachusetts Laura Ingalls Wilder Book The New York Botanic Tena Gard Jennifer Wanna President Trump America
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:00 min | 10 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Ideas way ahead of her time so very few of her poems were published during during her lifetime. Her work has had an immense impact on subsequent generations. Let's talk about Emily Dickinson. Emily was born in Amherst Massachusetts on December tenth eighteen. Thirty two Edward and Emily Dickenson. She was the second of three children. Children Emily's father Edward an ambitious lawyer and native son of Amherst prided himself on playing a large role in the community as an elected elected state congressman the treasurer of Amherst College and the chairman of the annual cattle show. He also served one term as a US congressman and much less is known about Emily's mother though her surviving correspondence suggests quirky intelligence that belies her reputation as a passive wife. Emily her older brother Austin and younger sister Lavinia all attended the one room elementary school in Amherst I before moving to amherst academy a prestigious school out of which amherst college has grown after graduation from amherst academy. Emily enrolled at Mount Holyoke female seminary now Mount Holyoke college but her experience. There was not a happy one. She found strict strict and invasive rules and religious requirements to be problematic. Emily was homesick so she left Mount Holyoke after just one year and returned to her family family home at Mount Holyoke as well as at home. Emily was surrounded by the religious tradition of strict evangelical calvinism which centered on the belief that humans are born totally depraved and can only be saved. They accept Jesus. Emily had a hard time with these beliefs and was the only member of her family to never join the church instead. She believed the soul's immortality and the concepts of transcendental ISM and she was disinterested in less symbolic conceptions of religious truth this would become an important component of her poetry. Emily started writing poetry during her teen years mostly and letters to friends and none of it meant for publication or public. Viewing a surprising number of these letters still exist today. You and show Emily's humor gift for relying anecdotes and her sense. Her correspondence responding to her letters with less interest than she would have liked. This vissel become a bit of a constant theme by her early twenties. Emily started to become more reclusive. She restricted her social activities and reduced her correspondence to a select few with whom she maintained intense relationships through letters in eighteen fifty five. Emily's mother fell ill because neither emily nor her sister remarried. The two were subsequently required to spend significant time on domestic pursuits taking care of the Dickinson Pinson household during that period. Emily increased her self-imposed isolation even further between eighteen fifty five and eighteen fifty eight. Emily wrote a lot of poetry in the summer of eighteen fifty eight. Emily began compiling her work into little. It'll bucks. She wrote clean copies of her poems onto find stationary and then sewed the sheets together at the fold to create small booklets over the of course of about seven years. Emily created forty booklets filled with about eight hundred poems home. Forty five from Emily's collection entitled entitled snowflakes reads. I counted till they danced. So they're slippers. Leap the town and then I took a pencil to note the rebels down and then they grew so jolly I did resign. The Craig Antenna. My once stately toes are marshalled for Jay because emily never left any instructions regarding these booklets. We can only guess what her intentions were for them. Some believe that she was simply organizing her poems for convenience others believe that. Emily wanted these booklets to eventually be published after death in the late eighteen fifties and early eighteen sixty S. Emily seems to have suffered through some kind of personal crisis. That may have been partially due to romantic rejection. We don't have a clear record of exactly what was going on and this along with other issues in her family laid emily heavily distressed and further increased her isolation instead of succumbing to whatever she was. He's going through. Emily wrote extraordinary poems. And even more prolific rate during the civil war era. Emily explored the ironies. As if humanity often tragic such as the constant denial fulfillment and the search for the divine and the every day in her poems. She also also wrote profoundly about what it meant to be a woman during her time women's subjectivity and subordination and the need for self reliance and greater liberty in her last fifteen years. Her social life was nearly completely conducted by correspondence after her father's death in eighteen. Seventy four. Emily Emily even had a passionate romance with the Massachusetts Supreme Court. Judge entirely by letter. She continued to write about thirty five poems per year breath in the eighteen eighties. Emily experienced tragedy after tragedy as I. Her mother died and then many of her closest correspondents Indi- one after another this culminated in the sudden death of her beloved eight-year-old nephew after that she stopped seeing almost everyone emily Dickinson died of a stroke in eighteen. Eighty six. She was fifty five years old. After Emily's death her sister Lavinia Aena put extraordinary effort into getting Emily's poems published with the help of Emily's remaining literary friends poems by Emily Dickinson was published in eighteen ninety the volume receive significant public interest and was acclaimed famous author and critic William Dean Howells's as a distinctly American voice. Yes because Emily's poetry both in terms of content and especially style was really quite ahead of its time. It took years before. Her greatness fully registered with the American poetry community and with the world at large by the nineteen fifties leading poets. Like Hart Crane Allen Tate. It was with Bishop. As well. As the new critics were in thrall with Emily's brilliance and were instrumental in establishing her place in the Pantheon of great lyric poets. No it's tune in tomorrow for the story of another beautiful mind special. Thanks to my favorite sister and co-creator was Kaplan. Glenn Talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about another show. No I think you'll like think about the books that have changed you the ones that made you see the world and a whole new light on the but that's another story podcast. bestselling author Willisch. Welby talks to influential guests about the moments and books. That have been transformative for that here. Jodie foster talk about about how reading Franny and Zoe. Jd Salinger convinced her to put her acting career on hold so she could go to college and form a community here. How Joan diddy ends ends essay inspired crazy? Rich Asians author Kevin Kwan. To move to New York. We love celebrating the books that have changed our lives just like we love honoring the women in who've shaped our history. Check out. But that's another story wherever you get your podcasts..

Emily Emily Emily Dickinson Amherst College Amherst Massachusetts Amherst Mount Holyoke congressman Mount Holyoke college US Lavinia Aena Amherst I Dickinson Pinson ISM Jd Salinger Jodie foster Edward Craig Antenna chairman Joan diddy Massachusetts Supreme Court
"emily dickinson" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:59 min | 10 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"And we return to the story of Emily Dickinson here on our American stories and faith is bringing it to us and she had a good conversation with Brooke sign Hauser the program director at the Emily Dickinson museum in Amherst Massachusetts we learned in the last segment and Emily Dickinson and only publish ten poems in our lifetime we returned to Brooke talking about Dickinson's love of poetry and her battle with the idea of publication she was very serious about poetry issue she wrote in one poem I reckon when I counted all first poets then the sun then summer then the heaven of god and then the list is done so you know poetry really came first for her and while she you know she also writes things to her sister in law like if I could make you an Austin proud someday a long way off to to give me a taller feet which is a very nice thought but then she also writes things like publication was as foreign to me as for moments to fit in or you know publication is the auction of the mind of man so it's clear that she is grappling with this all her life and I do think it's a really interesting thought exercise to imagine a family Dickinson had tried to publish in her lifetime her poetry and you know her at her correspondence with Thomas Wentworth Higginson kind of illustrates this that her poetry did not quite look like poetry of her time for contemporary moment she's doing something a bit different and that really has to do with Emily Dickinson's incredible vocabulary her lexicon was her best friend she was mining that source to be able to pull together really spend seis succinct poems that are able to somehow make tangible is very is our shared human experience.

Emily Dickinson Hauser program director Emily Dickinson museum Amherst Massachusetts Brooke Austin Thomas Wentworth Higginson
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"And we return to the story of Emily Dickinson here on our American stories and faith is bringing it to us and she had a good conversation with Brooks sign Hauser the program director at the Emily Dickinson museum in Amherst Massachusetts we learned in the last segment and Emily Dickinson and only publish ten poems in our lifetime we returned to Brooke talking about Dickinson's love of poetry and her battle with the idea of publication she was very serious about poetry issue she wrote in one poem I reckon when I counted all first poets then the sun then summer then the heaven of god and then the list is done so you know poetry really came first for her and while she you know she also writes things to her sister in law like if I could make you an Austin proud someday a long way off to it give me a taller feet which is a very nice thought but then she also writes things like publication was as foreign to me as for moments to fit in or you know publication is the auction of the mind of man so it's clear that she's grappling with this all her life and I do think it's a really interesting thought exercise to imagine a family chickens and had tried to publish in her lifetime her poetry and you know her at her correspondence with Thomas Wentworth Higginson kind of illustrates this that her poetry did not quite look like poetry of her time for contemporary moment she's doing something a bit different and that really has to do with Emily Dickinson's incredible vocabulary her lexicon was her best friend she was mining that source to be able to pull together really spend seis succinct poems that are able to somehow make tangible is very ease our shared human.

Emily Dickinson Hauser program director Emily Dickinson museum Amherst Massachusetts Brooke Brooks Austin Thomas Wentworth Higginson
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

09:36 min | 11 months ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"No All right well. It's fun to talk about Emily Dickinson. And it's especially fund dog bit. Emily Dickinson with someone who spent so much time thinking seriously about her And so I wanted suggest share an emily Dickinson poem. The first one not the first one I ever read but one of the ones where I felt absolutely absolutely electrified by her ability to capture. How what my new mundane experiences actually feel like in one of those ways that does make you feel like Whoa the past? They thought they were in the present All all right. So here's here's an old. Save a narrow fellow in the grass occasionally rides. You may have met him. Did you not got his notice. Instant is the grass divides as with a comb. A spotted shaft is seen and then it closes at your feet eight and opens further on. He likes a boggy Acre. A floor to cool for corn but when a boy and barefoot I more than once at noon have passed I thought a whiplash unb raiding in the sun when stooping to secure it it wrinkled and was gone. Several live nature's people I know and they know me. I feel for them a transport of cordiality. That's missing the last a bit. It is the last. The last line is zero at the bone. Two Zero Ricky iphone the thing that Madrid. Excuse me. This is all apples fall but never met. This fellow attended or alone alone without a tighter breathing and zero at the bone.

Emily Dickinson Madrid
Apple TV+ Hits Friday. Its Series (Mostly) Miss

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

05:35 min | 11 months ago

Apple TV+ Hits Friday. Its Series (Mostly) Miss

"Let's start out with the explanation of apple TV this is a relatively new thing what we need to know about apple TV yeah this the views today actually if you bought an apple device after September ten graduations you already have it absolutely free for at least a year you can get a free trial by going to the apple TV app if not you can check out apple TV plus for four ninety nine a month it is launching a bunch of big buzz he shows the top of them is the morning show it's a drama starring Reese Witherspoon Jennifer Aniston and Steve corral and it's a dramatic show despite the stars that are in it about a morning show that separate the meat you scanned all all of the today show and throws it into turmoil there's also CD which is a game of thrones style drama about a world where everybody is blinds starring Jason Momoa from game of thrones bunch of other shows on there it's I watch all of them at this point it is very much a mixed bag the only one that I really liked and I really can't recommend to everybody this show called you can send the stars Hailee Steinfeld as young Emily Dickinson and it's kind of like euphoria beats thirty rock meets his drama beats a million different things uncategorized of all but I was fascinated I and like to at least one joke perhaps said the morning show is ridiculously entertaining but supercell Sirius spend fifteen million dollars an episode which is an insane amount of money but apple so they're putting all of their chips in the US but so far I think everybody in the office here to senator greens the shows are not great so if you have a free trial and do you want to check it out certainly I would suggest sampling the morning show sample taken standing if that all sounds interesting if you're into sci fi there's a show from Ronald D. Moore who created it Battlestar Galactica calls for all mankind was about an alternate history where America lost the space race very well made but also reporting frankly but it the other thing if you don't have a free trial I would hesitate to recommend spending even before ninety nine the account just because I've been plagued by a lot of tech issues today people have been proud of had problems logging into free trials finding the shows except for so give it some time listen to the bison that baby check it out in a couple of weeks if you're interested what are they doing on the morning show that's costing fifteen million per episode is that for the kids a great cast is is that a lot of that money goes out to them is that what it is I think a lot of money wanted to them it's also it's a gorgeous looking show it's beautifully shot by being the letter who started director jail for awhile after she corrected the action movie the peacemaker mess and she did deep impact immediately after that but you don't ton of TV since then it's at the starting the shot was very clearly spent a ton of money on this and again the ID it's kind of trashing it's like very much a trashy soap operas so I don't know why they spent that much money on it but I I don't have a lot of time I sat down to watch three solid hours this nonstop back to back yes I could not stop playing so just in terms of entertainment value I think it's worth it for that I'm trying to think of the track record of other networks when they rolled out a new schedule I remember when fox first became a network years ago it was kind of a slow rollout they just did a couple shows at the beginning and then build from there it's got to be tough to come up with a full schedule of shows and have a mall be successful and and great right that's almost impossible it's almost impossible and this is a big problem with apple TV plus right now that they're not taking the lessons but a lot of the other streaming that works done even Netflix did that very slowly enabled out house of cards then they had arrested development arch new black before they wrapped up to you thirty five new television shows every single day of the week apple TV plus is trying to be all of that media plea almost wanting more of their own each be within their own Netflix because the other thing that you should know about this for the apple TV plus price you're only getting the shows you're not getting everything that he is on TV that you would normally get from the iTunes store the TV store or anything like that yeah it's just the additional shows so I wish there were better it seems like they just gave people blank Jackson said to everyone we don't know what's going on the TV so again some of the stuff is get service desk very bad hopefully it'll get better they're certainly not giving it up anytime soon because all the shares regardless of quality have been picked up for a second season I gotta tell ya I'm surprised that that your stars like a Reese Witherspoon Jennifer Aniston and Steve Carell are selling out to apple like that it just seems weird to me you know they've found a big screen the alignment and that I think they said was they want to give creators the chance to really express themselves so this case it's it's produced by Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston it's been playing very different parts I will say they're both fantastic at the show Jennifer Aniston is unlike you ever seen her before so I think that's what they're going for the chance and the same thing that other folks are jumping at is actually a new version of Oprah's book club the diffuse its first absent today and again I think it was just this blank check that apple had into them and said you do what you want you follow your muse and some people follow their views and absolutely wrong direction and hopefully of course correct a little bit and that somebody will give them a little more guidance going

Apple Fifteen Million Dollars
Apple, Disney Enter Streaming Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:11 min | 11 months ago

Apple, Disney Enter Streaming Market

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply it is not about us I assure you so this joins almost a half dozen new high profile streaming great sitcom out of sticking a camera in your offices this is like a competitor Netflix or what well you know in a way I mean big outfits like Disney and Warner media built their own streaming platforms and apples joined in own and it offers original commercial free shows to draw consumers deeper into about us how does the pay that's called the morning show on his new service Emily Dickinson and The Best Apple TV pilot I've seen is this anthology it for the two point overs just give it some time Yeah okay so in less than two weeks November out there that are going to try to serve all most of your TV needs and it feels like Disney pluses that seven dollars a month for about seventy dollars a year I mean I think sometimes it's tough for critics like me Well can you give any advice about what to do here I mean we've all Amax this year from or this week for more media they're promising like ten thousand hours of content diary to see what you actually watch a be aware of what's out there they're streaming platforms when the season is over and and go somewhere else and the combined costs could easily be less than like you're getting a cut loose at an awesome library or mazing grocery store and just enjoy.

Netflix Disney Emily Dickinson NPR Warner Media Apple Ten Thousand Hours Seventy Dollars Seven Dollars Two Weeks
Apple TV Plus early reviews: Are the new shows any good?

The Frame

06:17 min | 11 months ago

Apple TV Plus early reviews: Are the new shows any good?

"This Friday apple will launch streaming service apple TV plus with four very expensive original shows the tech giant isn't the only big name marching into the streaming battlefield next month Disney will launch its own Perform Disney plus NBC HBO Both Have Plans to follow suit Friday TV critic Caroline Fram key check out apple's new series and she gave me her down road I've seen at least one episode of four shows launching the morning show See for all mankind Dickinson all of which have producers who have come from TV they're not totally new The morning show obviously features probably the busiest stars Reese Witherspoon Steve Carell and Jennifer Aniston which is probably the biggest actor coup for any of the apple show's coming synthesis Jennifer Aniston's first regular TV role since friends good morning I'm bringing you some sad had upsetting news and while I don't know the details of the allegations to throw me under the bus Mitch Kessler my co host and partner of fifteen years was fired today you know see and for all mankind are both alternate history shows that I think is actually a very interesting see is as an alternate future in which almost all humans have lost the ability to see some say site was taken from them by God to heal the air for all mankind as an alternate history of what if the Soviet Union made it to the Moon I was about being first turns out the stakes are much bigger those are interesting concepts but what they do with it isn't particularly interest thing that was really striking to me in your views in an a two way you had with one of your other variety critics is that felt that they weren't daring that given what else is out there on streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Amazon prime that they weren't willing to go the extra mile and actually take a risk yeah and I think that would obviously agree disagree with me I think the morning show particular feels like it did belong on network six years ago despite trying upbringing timely elements they obviously had to bring in some of me to Dickinson shirts trying for those who don't know Dickenson is about emily Dickinson but it's about her as a feisty teenager played by Hailee Steinfeld one purpose that is to become a great writer it definitely does a lot stylistically it has a lot of you know bass heavy rap music that comes in every so often is played by wiz Khalifa it's very cw in the vein of Riverdale but I do think looking at the four shows overall there's this weird sense I got that all these shows might have been more interesting if they came out five years ago you know they're all very shiny expensive versions of things I feel like we've seen before or that have been innovative previously but in twenty nineteen I don't know I feel like I need a little bit more from them to really stand out when there are so many shows if you were to step back and say this is clearly the market that apple is going after could you define what that audience might be I don't know that I can say that because I'm not sure apple can either think that this first of shows is a confusing one because all seem to be sort of going for a different audience Dickinson's kind of going for a CW teen thing for all mankind feels very AMC to me morning show I think I said my column feels sort of ABC CBS all access question mark and see is like a game of thrones got lost I I just don't know where what they were trying to do with the four of them combined I think feels like they were casting a wide net and it just feels like some of these shows are kind of splitting the difference in not playing it very safe they're not really taking aside and maybe that felt safer apple but it it's not very interesting TV no in one of the challenges for apple is they don't have the library that say Netflix or Disney plus has so they we are making almost a pure play on these shows and if they don't have a show that people have to watch the question is I guess would people spend five bucks a month just to watch Jennifer Aniston and that seems to be the proposition doesn't it the content library is a big part of streaming services and I feel like Apple has kind of underestimated that they to their credit are pricing it relatively low five dollars a month is definitely the lowest price by pretty wide margin for any of the streaming services right now though I believe that Disney plus will not be much more expensive and again they have all these movies all these other shows that will be available just for people to have so even if you're not interested in one of the original shows you you're probably gonNA subscribe so you can watch all the Disney stuff right and that's the issue right because even as people are cutting maybe their direct TV subscription or their cable subscription if you start doing ala carte pricing where you're getting Netflix Amazon prime you're getting Hulu Oh you're getting Disney plus a couple of bucks here pretty much your back to a hundred plus a month patch what would be the argument for subscribing to apple right now or maybe are there other shows that they're hoping will continue generating momentum and he you have to imagine it's the latter especially because they have been signing more and more overall deals with other creators or shows down the Line Affonso Koran recently assigned TV deal which I find very interesting Jason Kanaan's and Friday Night Lights signed an overall deal there and in general these overall deals for creators like Ryan Murphy if it can get people

Apple Disney Fifteen Years Five Dollars Five Years Six Years
"emily dickinson" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"He stopped what she was just announced as the star of a new series coming apple TV plus called Dickinson which is a totally different look at the life of nineteenth century poet Emily Dickinson if you like to star in the series she's also recorded an original song for the soundtrack called afterlife we've got it up at eighty four dot com if you wanna give it a listen Dickinson premieres on apple TV plus November first back to the numbers number nine boyfriend Arianna Grande and social house. again. and. so. one. don't. just to. boyfriend Arianna Grande social house number nine.

Arianna Grande apple Emily Dickinson
Apple Lifts the Veil on TV+

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Apple Lifts the Veil on TV+

"Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as is Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter and Matt as as we have long known apple has this TV thing people have been waiting for apple to come in to the entertainment business for a long time and they they did set up a thing. They have finally announced. I mean they've trickled out some stuff about their shows. They had this event where the people who were making those shows is were brought to talk about them. They didn't show any footage which struck a lot of people is very weird but finally apple is ready to drop the veil so November November. I it's subscription service. TV plus will launch for the cheap price and this is undercutting the Disney cheap price which I would call a price to lure you in in and get you hooked. Disney's is seven dollars. That's obviously a lot less than net flicks apple five dollars and apple. It's not just five dollars. It's free if you buy a new iphone or MAC or other various apple products that they want you to buy so this is a very very low price point and the design line here. It's very clear now is to keep you in the apple ecosystem. They are at their core a hardware company a products company and if they can can put all these other bells and whistles on apple music and news and a video game service and now television they can keep you in the apple ecosystem. I am buying apple products and they hope makes money on this new. TV service yeah about that okay so they have a bunch of shows with you know impressive talent reese witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston or in something called the morning show is supposed to be a very expensive show. There was a lot of noise about production and was alleged alleged to be troubled. We haven't seen too much yet and we've seen a trailer. of course this will launch soon. There's something with Hailee Steinfeld called Dickinson when she looks like a very very dramatic reconstruction of the poet Emily Dickinson who was reclusive and not Haley. This looks different. Let's just put it that way and a whole bunch of other stuff now. I'm just going to be skeptical. Matt you know I. I don't know that people are going to feel like Oh. I've got to have that five dollars. A month is cheap and free is is cheaper than that but you know there's a lot of competition for eyeballs right now. I don't know that apple can start from scratch and launched something. I don't know how compelling they feel. They needed needed to be but if they really WANNA be in this game. I think ultimately they're going to have to buy some studio. Maybe I'll take the other side on this one because I think that apple isn't starting from from scratch. They're starting with the most powerful and well loved brand in the world and when people say oh there's a TV service coming from apple a a brand that I know and I have in my pocket all the time and I buy things from and I interact with. That's what they want and if you think about the model here we're moving away from on the traditional television model where it's all about valuing the content and the advertising you can sell against the content here. The content is secondary. Gary just like it is on Amazon prime where they're not actually selling you video shows. They're selling you toilet paper and bath creams and all the other things that that you buy on Amazon and if you pay for prime you get this other thing along with. It and apple is really in the same boat here. They're not actually selling you a reese witherspoon show. Oh they're selling you more apple products and they're selling you an ecosystem that they want to control and have you buy all of your other stuff whether it's HBO and Showtime Oh time or potentially many other different things through the apple ecosystem just to be clear apple. TV plus is not a TV. It's a thing that you get on your devices and as you say maybe that's going to be successful formula for Apple. I mean one of the interesting things to note. Is that win. This was announced in the price point was announced announced the stock of Roku went way down why was that because roku cells rival hardware to apple TV so the thinking is is that this is going to encourage more people to buy the Apple TV device which allows you to connect to a smart television and put apple programs on and you're going to be less likely likely to buy Roku all. I already have Roku so at least for me. I'm either way right. That's felony aditorial director of the Hollywood reporter. He joins me this Monday. At one thirty on the business. I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown.

Apple Hollywood Matt Bellamy Kim Masters Roku Reporter Disney Jennifer Aniston Gary Amazon Hailee Steinfeld Emily Dickinson HBO Director Haley Five Dollars Seven Dollars
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Extra Hot Great

Extra Hot Great

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Extra Hot Great

"American level winner you up and will not tolerate a little bit of his time for winner. And loser of the we have adopted a cat named her Emily Dickinson damn. Damn her Emily Dickinson. This is a really new news. The show was announced about a year ago. But apple just had. It's what is apple thing? Be plus terrible. But what is there the whole thing? If that wasn't it wasn't a part of a larger apple announcement is just for apple TV. Plus, I don't know what you're saying scrap. I know no, I thought it was I I know apple has been which you can get these TV show is called apple TV. Plus, okay. I thought it was part of like Apple's annual. Here's all our hardware that we're no it was all just about. All this bullshit stuff. That's not hardware. I will get to because it was really stupid thing anyways. Okay. Well, apple TV plus is Apple's net flicks. Basically. And so they had an announcement this week that's all of their new shows and one of them is about Emily Dickinson. If so that's really the only news let you excuse to play that thirty co it It was. was also a eight it's yeah. It's a comedy. It's from Elena Smith who is a playwright and also formerly we wrote on the news room and was like one of the people that got into it with Aaron Sorkin about the terrible campus, rape plotline. So she's behind this. And she's great. I follow her on Twitter, you should too at internet Alina. But yeah, this is this is one of the many offerings that apple is going to be putting on their service, which is available for question Mark dollars. That was not part of the announcement. Cool we've gone from cable being the terrible aggregate or to the internet being the terrible aggregate or another. We have twelve streaming services. You know that you have quality shows spread around on. This service really sells like as stinks fill the scuttle button. All this is that apple is sort of trying to have their cake and eat it too. All the shows that they're hiring big talent..

apple Emily Dickinson Aaron Sorkin internet Alina Twitter Elena Smith rape Mark
"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"Plane woman with two smooth bands of reddish hair with no good Beecher. Now, we have to remember that he was talking to his wife Higginson wrote. She makes all the bread for her father only likes hers and says quote and people must have put in. Playwright Thornton wilder talking about Emily Dickinson and reading some of her poems. January thirteenth nineteen fifty one. At New York's ninety second street, y I can see a woman white the upstairs of our house an afternoon's dorm. She goes upstairs window upstairs window watching to moat outside. The storm is over and it come by her dog. She goes into garden in the woods the back of the house. And she listens to the new silent and one bird three. She comes back for dinner. She cooks famous Charlotte russe for her father after supper, she reads, aloud to the Springfield Republican. And then she slips up upstairs. The women took up the northern things and pile them in the south. Then then the east upon the west Higginson and discouraged her to publish when she first submitted to him saying that her verse was a little awry, she ride him. And she said you call my gate spasmodic as though the rhythm was off in her poetry. She says you advise me not to publish and she says that his far from my ambitions as Ferber too thin as as a fish on land. He saw publication that she wanted to be published. But at a certain point, she recognized that publication is the auction of the mind of man, she she wrote that she didn't want to have to sell out not selling out for her was doing her self published job of organizing these facet goals and getting them into the draw. Four and that was going to be like a scene. She knew it the end of eighteen sixty five teach writing almost the equivalent of opponent day, Margaret O'Brien leaves..

Higginson Ferber Beecher Emily Dickinson Thornton wilder Margaret O'Brien New York Springfield Charlotte ninety second
"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"They both wrote love letters to her. They were both in chanted with her. After Austin and sue were married. Austen's? Father basically paid them to stay in Amherst by building a house for them gorgeous evergreens next door to the homestead season. An Emily would Mark passages. They liked him books. They sent them back on fourth cross the lawn. One sister have I in our house and won a hedge away. There's only one recorded but both belong to me. One came the way that I came and war my past years gown the other as bird her nest building our hearts mung, Emily Dickenson sends more of her poems to Susan than to any other correspondent most of her emotional charge list toward Susan because Susan was so much reader. She's affectionate. She she calls herself daisy to sue. And it's very flirtatious and very sweet and at times. Scared of sues judgments. I split the Jew, but took the morn. I chose this single start from out the wide nights numbers. Sue forevermore? You can see how it goes from almost up like sweet Victorian poem. One sister. Have I enter house in one hedge away, that's sort of a sweet. And then it gets more and more wild. I split the do. But took the more I chose this single start for out the wide nights numbers. Sue forever would have like completely erotic pagan love affair by the end. She just was out of control at some amazing. What do you do you read the Atlantic monthly in the April issue eighteen sixty two an article appeared inviting young writers to submit their work. Charge your style with life said the author Thomas we're taking. When she first got in touch with Thomas Higginson in eighteen sixty two and asked if her poems breathed, he sent her back his judgements on the palms, not very encouraging. But he did what a lot of hornell literary men would do. And he said send me a photograph of yourself. She wrote could you believe me without I had no portrait now, but I'm small like their Ren. And my hair is bowl like the chestnut. Burger, and my is like the Sherry and the glass that the guests leaves with this Stu just as well. When Higginson came to visit Emily Dickinson Higginson wrote in glided, a little.

Sue Thomas Higginson Susan Emily Dickinson Higginson Emily Dickenson Austen Amherst Atlantic monthly Austin hornell Burger Sherry
"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"He's bound booklets that Dickinson copied her poems into and sewed with kitchen twine, some of her poems were published in her lifetime. But they changed Emily's plan rhymes and gave the poems titles to make them more conventional, and that's not how she wrote her poems. My life had stood a loaded gun in corners. She called him bulletins from immortality. You know, a bolt would come down sky pardon. She was given this message people have wanted to turn her into nice lady poet, a romantic version of her that is not untrue. It's just probably partial. I'm Brenda Hillman. I am poet. She did stay in her room. And she did have what she refers to as her white election, but he on her white dress and going upstairs not going out anymore. What choice did? Did she have in her time? She couldn't have gotten her writing done by being the spinster in the community that takes care of bodies coming home from the civil war goes on being a nice church lady in she wrote seven hundred poems in two years. I mean seven hundred for Pete's sake. This poem six six eight by Emily Dickinson, nature is what we see the hill the afternoon, squirrel. The clips the Bumblebee may nature's heaven nature is what we hear the Bob link the C thunder. The cricket may nature's harmony nature's what we know yet have no art to say so impotent our wisdom is to her simplicity. She actually would right on chocolate wrappers, right envelope. Poems sort of in the flotsam and jetsam of her life. The words move in the fragment of that paper. This poem was composed on the back of coconut cake recipe. The things that never can come back are several childhood some forms of hope the dead superb Lanson, prematurely, her cooking and her poetry. We're one the way in which she gave friends not only points, but gifts of cake, they were offerings attentions. That's what people call them between houses when friends gave something that they had made in the kitchen in the bedroom. These secret spaces where she could be alone or with her own select society that really was freedom. When Emily Dickenson bakes bread. There's something almost ecstatic about it satisfaction of creativity. In one of her early letters and eighteen fifty to her best friend by a route. She says twin loaves of bread have just been born into the world under my auspices. Find children the image of their mother, and here, my dear friend is the glory. Act to the soul selects its own society. There were two kitchens and Emily's life. She lived in a house on pleasant street next to the cemetery, and that is the kitchen where Emily learned to cook. How to make bread how to make desserts how to make wine her mother largely teaching? Oh, the mother and the parents really both are very old fashioned. They think they have such a small family. The girls can do everything. It's good training for them. Emily Dickenson or sisters at boarding school. Her brother's gone who's managing three meals cooked meals a day on the table and washing the dishes. She would start a letter it would take her another week or so to get back to it. She had this drive to right. And she was so th ward it, that's when the lobbying starts to hire a may've wanted to hire a girl or woman who is capable of doing the entire work of a small family Edward Dickinson Amherst, March seventh eighteen fifty I'm Yvonne Murray, author of made his muse how servants changed Emily ticket since life and language eighteen fifty five Emily was twenty five when they moved in. Into the mansion this demanding household. Her father was a leading lawyer. The mother was not well, she turned over the social and housekeeping regime to her daughters. Emily missed the pleasant street has terribly. She said I'm out with lanterns looking for myself within months of that move the first long-term made Margaret O'Brien who's an Irish emigrant comes. She's there for nine years. There's an immediate impact Emily has time to think in right when she felt more confident about herself as a poet, then house became more hers with her garden was the proximity to sue when Susan Gilbert came back to town after going away to school, Emily Dickenson enter brother Austin, both fell in love with her..

Emily Dickinson Brenda Hillman Margaret O'Brien Edward Dickinson Amherst Pete Bob Yvonne Murray Susan Gilbert Austin nine years two years
"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

The Kitchen Sisters Present

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on The Kitchen Sisters Present

"Hi. We knew nothing about Emily Dickinson. Maybe a few lines from the old penguin poetry classic. I'm nobody who are you are you nobody to and I think David remembered hope is the thing with feathers, but these librarians these keepers of the story Lord US in the kitchen sisters present Emily, Dickinson's hidden kitchen chapter one black cake. Is Emily Dickinson herself a left she's about eight or nine in. That painting sister Lydia is holding picture of a cat. And we was Merv dog person. We don't often think of her as being a redhead, but there's a little lock of her hair. And it's definitely that color. Referred to as the myth, not often steam Natori for wearing white some people's knew that she wrote was what she was known for. He was probably better known as a Baker a poet in her lifetime her gingerbread. The first thing that struck me. I'm gene McClure, mud writer. I live in Emily Dickinson's house in Amherst as a faculty wife, I resident curator Emily would break. Gingerbread little oval cakes. Put little flowers on top and lower them breadbasket from her window to the children below. They couldn't see her a mystery. Emily Dickenson liked to shock people. She liked to break rules. There was a kind of rebellious freedom in her inner world. She has a poem that begins. They shut me up in prose as when a little girl when they wanted her to be still and she says, boy, they should have seen the wheels. In my brain, go round. My name is Christopher Ben Fe. I teach at mount holyoke college where Emily Dickinson spent a year of her life. She's very well educated for a woman of her time. She liked science and botany what she did not like was one of the stated purposes of the college to convert young women to be Christian 'cause finding Christ as their personal savior. Christ is calling everyone here all my companions have answered even my darling Vinnie believes, she loves and trusts him. And I am standing alone and rebellion and growing very careless. She was one of the students. Who were declared without hope she said, some keep the Sabbath go into church, I keep it staying at home with a Bob link for a chorister an orchard for a dome. My name is Emily Elizabeth Dickinson. Julie Harris in the Belle of Amherst, this is my introduction black cake. It's my own special recipe. I do all the baking here homestead. I even bang the spice for this cake. It's black cake of flour. The black cake is a cake that calls for nineteen x five reasons to of current two pounds of butter in one and a half pounds substantial cake always nineteen pounds than agencies. That's before he put the brandy. Five teaspoons of close black cake. First appears in the eighteen forties in cookbooks. It's Caribbean in its origin. The cinnamon the Mace it's very tied up with the sugar trade and Lassus yen, please sprinkle in all eight pounds. When you think about Emily Dickinson, the myth in the white dress anything about her in the kitchen, the physicality of making that cake. This is a social Kate. So counter to Emily and her remove from the world. I found the one Emily Dickinson poem that mentions a cake. I'm Heather coal. My name.

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson Amherst mount holyoke college Lydia Merv David gene McClure Julie Harris Caribbean Baker Christopher Ben Fe Vinnie Kate Lassus writer Bob nineteen pounds Five teaspoons eight pounds
Who is Bruce Ohr, the Justice official Trump keeps tweeting about?

Sean Hannity

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Who is Bruce Ohr, the Justice official Trump keeps tweeting about?

"Springfields chief development officer says the casino already is helping. Spur new investment others say it's too soon to know if the casino can. Meet its lofty financial. Promises and Carrick. Fox News Amsterdam city officials out with, an advisory about elevated lead levels in the city's drinking water officials with the city's water treatment plants say recent, monitoring is, found higher than normal lead levels in drinking water and some homes. And buildings water samples taken back in may now show, lead, at sixteen parts per billion one part per

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"emily dickinson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mm w n y c independent journalism in the public interest 939 fm and am 820 npr news and the new york conversation oh even the work award festival poets like john pete's emily dickinson walt whitman t s eliot lanks in his it seemed confusing intimidating and daunting at first reading in his new book why poetry matthews uproot or explains why people are so afraid of poetry how to read it and why it's him portent he is the former poetry editor for the new york times magazine and a professor in the mfa programme at st mary's college in california and and awardwinning poet himself his books published by echo press i'm very pleased that has brought matthews uprooted to our show today welcome thanks so much for having me it's an honor when people learn that you're poet you say had they frequently confessed you that they don't get poetry how do you respond to them while at first i used to get a little you know iritated are founded offputting but then i realized that there was a lot of um there was a lot of real stuff behind that question or those questions and so that's why i wrote the book to try to address those questions directly do you think the part of the problem is away poetry's taught in schools i do but i think that's understandable given the time restraints and the lack of preparation the teachers have and just the pressures they have from test standardized test so i try to talk a little bit about that in the book so what can be done to make poetry more accessible to the average reader i bake luxury winery poetry i think poetry is a good shape right now i think the the problem is is that there's a kind of intermediate mist of occasion between readers and poetry and so one thing poets can do is try to talk a little bit more about what they do in why well some of the more popular poets are criticised for being too accessible by other poets he can't win manipur you elected three epic graf soap in your book walt whitman road stop this day and night with me and you shall possess the origins of all paul adams ima mood darwish extreme clarity is a mystery and virginia woolff this one i'm not sure i understand at all the poet is always our contemporary yacht so that the.

john pete poetry editor the new york times magazine professor st mary california matthews new york emily dickinson eliot lanks virginia
"emily dickinson" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"emily dickinson" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"This podcast of course i it's a good time to mention is brought to you by slowly dismantling cultural preconceptions overtime inside yourself slowly dismantling cultural preconceptions within yourself hard timeconsuming but recommended by it would be great if a ideas like that hank could actually sponsor podcast maybe in the future that is why i guess is also brought to you by cat birthdays cat birthdays john supports them any apologizes for whatever he said that offended cat people i love cat people pleased by turtles all the way down available at probably sign turtles dot com right now this podcast additionally is brought to you by quivering of squandering dow's apparently they give life earth i i got that line for my friend empty anderson and i don't know when he says it it's it's so extremely compelling but then when i say it i just so kinda like a doofus i just things that i i assumed it was like emily dickinson or something i was so lovely i know what that's that's how that's how empty anderson speaks he speaks constantly as if he is inside of an emily dickinson poem he's one of the most eloquent people i have ever encountered hake yes we also have an actual sponsor today we do it's hopper hover and i wanted to ask you if you remember your first ever like website that was years your first ever personal site i mean i ha so back in the day it was much harder to get domain names in so my first thing was was on the the.

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