9 Burst results for "Emily Blanchard"

"emily blanchard" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on WBUR

"Kind of rebel It is Tuesday. Today, the eighth of June. Get as always to have you long, everybody. We are going to do a 12 to start things off today. A macro micro thing. Big picture and then granular look inside the gears of this economy. The case study at hand is the supply chain on which we have spent, as you know, no small amount of time the past couple of months, shortages and price spikes, logistical bottlenecks. Well to that end, the Biden administration says it has a plan. The supply chain disruptions Task force will the thinking goes Increased domestic production of critical inventory, like semiconductors and batteries that was announced today. It is also by the way, an admission that we are not going to be able to make everything we need. Ourselves. Marketplaces Justin Ho is on the macro desk today. What the Biden administrations really doing here is trying to reduce the economy's dependence on China. They're talking about trying to reduce dependence on other countries for rare Earth That's mainly China. Katie Rust is an economics professor at U. C. Davis. They're talking about trying to safeguard and encourage domestic sources of key pharmaceutical ingredients. Here. We import a lot of those from China. So the idea instead is to rely more on American allies as trading partners, says Rachel Brewster at Duke Law School. When we're discussing semiconductors are major allies will be South Korea, JAPAN, Taiwan When we move on to pharmaceuticals, it's going to be made much more in Europe. But there's a problem with that, says Emily Blanchard at Dartmouth. We have been antagonizing many of the same trading partners for a number of years, The Trump Administration slapped tariffs on trade with a lot of these countries, and even now, tariffs on European metals remain in place. I think here we are sensing a very deliberate and intentional policy shift by the Biden administration to say Let's deal with some of these national security concerns with our neighbors, not despite our neighbors, Blanchard says. We don't have the capacity to manufacture. Everything we need in the U. S. Would be a fool's errand, she says to try to go it alone. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? Micro Part of this supply story today comes to us from the National Federation of Independent Business, which released its small Business Optimism index this morning. The group's monthly survey of business owners in retailing construction manufacturing also services Among the highlights. 40% of small business owners plan on raising prices the most since 1981 marketplaces, Kristin Schwab made some calls. Bobby Williams in Columbia. South Carolina, is facing some tough competition not for who can make the best catfish or country fried steak. But who can Lauren workers like they say if you can fog a mirror? We will hire. Yeah, well, we just need some bodies. Right now. Williams raised starting wages at his restaurant Lizard's thicket to $10 an hour, up from eight. Meanwhile, prices of everything from pork to plastic goods are soaring. Bacon has doubled food prep gloves quadrupled because manufacturing processing trucking everything is backed up. Every week. There's five or six items that are out of stock. Williams has had to pass the costs on to customers because he simply can't sell more to make more money. Labor and supply shortages are holding business owners down. The big issue is that they aren't able to take advantage of that increasing demand for their good or service. Holly Wade is with the National Federation of Independent Business, which found half of small business owners had unfilled job openings in May, and of those more than 90% say there were few or no qualified applicants. That's jeweler Becky Bush inculcate problem in a chemist Michigan her Goldsmith moved to Hawaii during the pandemic. She needs sales associates to I can train people to sell, but I can't train people to have a personality finding people with that, you know. Hi, How are you in the it's more of a high She, too has had to raise wages, and that's not her only problem. Her suppliers are raising prices because mines and manufacturers overseas are still dealing with pandemic disruptions. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm either way, really, We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Bitcoin is trading today in the $32,000 range well off its recent highs, but more to the point down 8% or so from just yesterday. Perhaps probably most likely because the Department of Justice announced yesterday it has done something never before done in the fight against ransom, where they traced and got back some of the ransom the colonial pipeline paid. In Bitcoin to the hacking group known as dark Side that the tracking and tracing and reclaiming its not supposed to happen with Cryptocurrencies, at least not very easily. Marketplaces supreme ensure as more now and what this might mean for the epidemic of hacking that a lot of companies are dealing with right now. James helps run a small business in the Midwest with about 35 employees were not using his full name to protect his company showed up in the office one morning early last year Plane basically Couldn't do anything on our computers. It was a ransomware attack. They sent us kind of a cryptic ransom notes with broken English, asking for tens of thousands of dollars and Bitcoin. Hackers have been holding companies hostage since long before Cryptocurrencies were invented. But Cryptocurrencies can offer anonymity or at least a method of payment outside the control of law enforcement. It's allowed digital ransom and extortion to explode in recent years. Nick Weaver is a lecturer and computer science at U. C. Berkeley. It's probably in the couple billion dollar a year. Revenue for the ransom work gangs and collateral damage is probably 1 to 2 orders of magnitude greater on the face of it. The fact that the FBI was able to crack into a Bitcoin wallet and take back the money would appear to threaten one of the foundations of this criminal industry. But Mark Rash isn't so sure. He's general counsel of Cyber Security Threat Intelligence company unit to 20. And be part of the reason they they are successful in being able to claw back. A specific transaction is likely that they work closely with colonial pipeline in making the payment in the first place. The FBI recovered about $2 million that presumably could not get back the many tens of millions the hacking group took from countless other companies. It will probably take years of effort and regulation before the tide turns in the cat and mouse game between law enforcement and hackers, James, By the way, the guy whose company was act, he didn't end up paying a ransom. He had backups of all his data. In New York. I'm simply vanish or for marketplace. Always back.

Emily Blanchard Rachel Brewster Mark Rash Katie Rust Kristin Schwab Bobby Williams $32,000 James Nick Weaver New York Holly Wade Columbia Hawaii Duke Law School 8% Becky Bush yesterday Today May National Federation of Indepen
"emily blanchard" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"In Los Angeles. I'm calling Ridsdel it is Tuesday. Today, the eighth of June get is always to have you long, Everybody. We are going to do a 12 to start things off today a macro micro thing. Big picture and then granular look inside the gears of this economy. The case study at hand is the supply chain on which we have spent, as you know, no small amount of time the past couple of months, shortages and price spikes, logistical bottlenecks. Well to that end, the Biden administration says it has a plan. The supply chain disruptions Task force will the thinking goes Increased domestic production of critical inventory, like semiconductors and batteries that was announced today. It is also by the way, an admission that we are not going to be able to make everything we need ourselves. Marketplaces. Justin Ho is on the macro desk today. What the Biden administrations really doing here is trying to reduce the economy's dependence on China. They're talking about trying to reduce dependence on other countries for rare Earth That's mainly China. Katie Rust is an economics professor at U. C. Davis. They're talking about trying to safeguard and encourage domestic sources of key pharmaceutical ingredients. Here. We import a lot of those from China. So the idea instead is to rely more on American allies, his trading partners, says Rachel Brewster at Duke Law School. When we're discussing semiconductors are major allies will be South Korea, Japan, Taiwan. When we move on to pharmaceuticals, it's going to be made much more in Europe. But there's a problem with that, says Emily Blanchard at Dartmouth. We have been antagonizing many of these same trading partners for a number of years. The Trump Administration slap tariffs on trade with a lot of these countries, and even now, tariffs on European metals remain in place. I think here we are sensing a very deliberate and intentional policy shift by the Biden administration to say Let's deal with some of these national security concerns with our neighbors, not despite our neighbors, Blanchard says. We don't have the capacity to manufacture. Everything we need in the U. S. Would be a fool's errand, she says to try to go it alone. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? Micro Part of this supply story today comes to us from the National Federation of Independent Business, which released its small Business Optimism index this morning. The group's monthly survey of business owners in retailing construction manufacturing also services Among the highlights. 40% of small business owners plan on raising prices the most since 1981 marketplaces, Kristin Schwab made some calls. Bobby Williams in Columbia. South Carolina, is facing some tough competition not for who can make the best catfish or country fried steak. But who can Lauren workers like they say if you can fog a mirror? We will hire. Yeah, well, we just need some bodies. Right now. Williams raised starting wages at his restaurant Lizard's thicket to $10 an hour, up from eight. Meanwhile, prices of everything from pork to plastic goods are soaring. Bacon has doubled food prep gloves quadrupled because manufacturing processing trucking everything is backed up. Every week. There's five or six items that are out of stock. Williams has had to pass the costs on to customers because he simply can't sell more to make more money. Labor and supply shortages are holding business owners down. The big issue is that they aren't able to take advantage of that increasing demand for their good or service. Holly Wade is with the National Federation of Independent Business, which found half of small business owners had unfilled job openings in May, and of those more than 90% say there were few or no qualified applicants. That's jeweler Becky Bush inculcate problem in a chemist Michigan her Goldsmith moved to Hawaii during the pandemic. She needs sales associates to I can train people to sell, but I can't train people to have a personality finding people with that, you know. Hi, How are you in the it's more of a high She, too has had to raise wages, and that's not her only problem. Her suppliers are raising prices because mines and manufacturers overseas are still dealing with pandemic disruptions. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm either way, really, We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Bitcoin is trading today in the $32,000 range well off its recent highs, but.

Emily Blanchard Rachel Brewster Katie Rust Bobby Williams Kristin Schwab $32,000 Justin Ho Columbia Hawaii Holly Wade Los Angeles Today Becky Bush May Williams Blanchard Duke Law School Tuesday National Federation of Indepen five
"emily blanchard" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on KQED Radio

"C three A. I c three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems. I I This is Enterprise a I and bipac the tax compliance tax jar. In Los Angeles sometime rebel it is Tuesday. Today, the eighth of June. Good as always, to have you along, everybody. We are going to do a 12 to start things off today, a macro micro thing. Big picture and then granular look inside the gears of this economy. The case study at hand is the supply chain on which we have spent, as you know, no small amount of time the past couple of months, shortages and price spikes, logistical bottlenecks. Well to that end, the Biden administration says it has plan the supply chain disruptions Task force will the thinking goes Increased domestic production of critical inventory, like semiconductors and batteries that was announced today. It is also by the way, an admission that we are not going to be able to make everything we need ourselves. Marketplaces Justin Ho is on the macro desk today. What the Biden administrations really doing here is trying to reduce the economy's dependence on China. They're talking about trying to reduce dependence on other countries for rare Earth That's mainly China. Katie Russell is an economics professor at U. C. Davis. They're talking about trying to safeguard and encourage domestic sources of key pharmaceutical ingredients. Here. We import a lot of those from China. So the idea instead is to rely more on American allies as trading partners, says Rachel Brewster at Duke Law School. When we're discussing semiconductors are major allies will be South Korea, JAPAN, Taiwan When we move on to pharmaceuticals, it's going to be made much more in Europe. But there's a problem with that, says Emily Blanchard at Dartmouth. We have been antagonizing many of the same trading partners for a number of years. The Trump Administration slap tariffs on trade with a lot of these countries, and even now, tariffs on European metals remain in place. I think here we are sensing a very deliberate and intentional policy shift by the Biden administration to say Let's deal with some of these national security concerns with our neighbors, not despite our neighbors, Blanchard says. We don't have the capacity to manufacture. Everything we need in the U. S. Would be a fool's errand, she says to try to go it alone. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? Micro Part of this supply story today comes to us from the National Federation of Independent Business, which released its small Business Optimism index this morning. The group's monthly survey of business owners in retailing construction manufacturing also services Among the highlights. 40% of small business owners plan on raising prices the most since 1981 Marketplaces. Kristin Schwab made some calls Bobby Williams in Columbia, South Carolina, is facing some tough competition not for who can make the best catfish or country fried steak. But who can Lauren workers? Like they say, if you could fog, a mirror, we will hire. Yeah, well, we just need some bodies right now. Williams raised starting wages at his restaurant Lizard's thicket to $10 an hour, up from eight. Meanwhile, prices of everything from pork to plastic goods are soaring. Bacon has doubled food prep gloves quadrupled because manufacturing processing trucking everything is backed up. Every week. There's five or six items that are out of stock. Williams has had to pass the costs on to customers because he simply can't sell more to make more money. Labor and supply shortages are holding business owners down. The big issue is that they aren't able to take advantage of that increasing demand for their good or service. Holly Wade is with the National Federation of Independent Business, which found half of small business owners had unfilled job openings in May, and of those more than 90% say there were few or no qualified applicants. That's jeweler Becky Bush inculcate problem in a chemist Michigan her Goldsmith moved to Hawaii during the pandemic. She needs sales associates to I can train people to sell, but I can't train people to have a personality bringing people with that, you know. Hi, How are you in the it's more of a high She, too has had to raise wages, and that's not her only problem. Her suppliers are raising prices because mines and manufacturers overseas are still dealing with pandemic disruptions. I'm Kristin Schwab for Marketplace on Wall Street today, not a whole lot of enthusiasm either way, really, We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Mm. Bitcoin is trading today in the $32,000 range.

Emily Blanchard Katie Russell Rachel Brewster Bobby Williams Kristin Schwab $32,000 Hawaii Becky Bush Europe Holly Wade five National Federation of Indepen Tuesday Blanchard Today Los Angeles Earth 40% Justin Justin Ho
"emily blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To start things off today. A macro micro thing. Big picture and then granular look inside the gears of this economy. The case study at hand is the supply chain on which we have spent, as you know, no small amount of time the past couple of months, shortages and price spikes, logistical bottlenecks. Well to that end, the Biden administration says it has plan the supply chain disruptions Task force Will the thinking goes increased domestic production of critical inventory, like semiconductors and batteries that was announced today. It is also by the way. An admission that we are not going to be able to make everything we need ourselves. Marketplaces. Justin Ho is on the macro desk today. What the Biden administrations really doing here is trying to reduce the economy's dependence on China. They're talking about trying to reduce dependence on other countries for rare Earth That's mainly China. Katie Rust is an economics professor at U. C. Davis. They're talking about trying to safeguard and encourage domestic sources of key pharmaceutical ingredients. Here. We import a lot of those from China. So the idea instead is to rely more on American allies as trading partners, says Rachel Brewster at Duke Law School. When we're discussing semiconductors are major allies will be South Korea, Japan, Taiwan. When we move on to pharmaceuticals. It's going to be maced much more in Europe. But there's a problem with that, says Emily Blanchard at Dartmouth. We have been antagonizing many of these same trading partners for a number of years. The Trump Administration slap tariffs on trade with a lot of these countries, and even now, tariffs on European medals remain in place. I think here we are sensing a very deliberate and intentional policy shift by the Biden administration to say Let's deal with some of these national security concerns. With our neighbors, not despite our neighbors, Blanchard says. We don't have the capacity to manufacture. Everything we need in the U. S. Would be a fool's errand, she says to try to go it alone. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? Micro Part of this supply story today comes.

"emily blanchard" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In los angeles. I'm kai ryssdal. It is tuesday today. The eighth of june. Good as always to have you along everybody. We are going to do a one to to start things off today. A macro micro thing a big picture and then granular look inside the gears of this economy. The case study at hand is the supply chain on which we have spent as. You're no no small amount of time. The past couple of months shortages and price spikes logistical. Bottlenecks well to that end. The biden administration says it has planned the supply chain disruptions task will thinking goes increase domestic production of critical inventory like semiconductors in batteries. That was announced. Today it is also by the way admission that we are not going to be able to make everything we need ourselves. Marketplace's justin hose on the macro desk. Today what the biden administration's really doing here is trying to reduce the economy's dependence on china talking about trying to reduce dependence on other countries for rare earth. That's mainly china. Td russ is an economics. Professor at uc davis. They're talking about trying to safeguard and encourage domestic sources of key pharmaceutical ingredients here. We import those from china. So the idea instead is to rely more on american. Allies is trading partners. Says rachel brewster at duke law school when we're discussing semiconductors. Our major allies will be out three. Ed japan i wan when we move onto pharmaceuticals. It's going to be maced much more in europe. But there's a problem with that says emily blanchard at dartmouth. We have been entangled in many of the same trading partners for a number of years the trump administration slap tariffs on trade with a lot of these countries and even now tariffs on european metals. Remain in place. I think here we are sensing a very deliberate and intentional policy shift by the biden administration to say let's deal with some of these national security concerns with our neighbors not despite our neighbors blanchard says we don't have the capacity to manufacture everything we need in the us. It'd be a fool's errand. She says to try to go it alone. I'm justin how for marketplace. The mark part of this supplies story today comes to us from the national federation of independent business which released its small business optimism index this morning. The group's monthly survey of business owners in retailing construction manufacturing also services among the highlights forty percent of small business owners plan on raising prices the most since nineteen eighty-one marketplace's kristen schwab made some calls bobbi williams in columbia south carolina is facing some tough competition not for who can make the best catfish or country fried steak. But who can lauren workers like. Say if you could bog mirror we will hire well. We just need some bodies right now. Williams raised starting wages at his restaurant. Lizard's thicket to ten dollars an hour up from eight. Meanwhile prices of everything from pork to plastic goods are soaring. Bacon has doubled food. Prep gloves quadrupled because manufacturing processing trucking. Everything is backed up every week. There's five or six items that are out of stock williams's had to pass the cost onto customers because he simply can't sell more to make more money labor and supply shortages are holding business owners down. The big issue is that they aren't able to take advantage of that increasing demand for their good or service. Hollywood is with the national federation of independent business which found half of small business owners had unfilled job. Openings in may and of those more than ninety percent say there were few or no qualified applicants. that's jeweler becky. Both problem in oak michigan her goldsmith moved to hawaii during the pandemic. she needs sales associates. Too i can train people to sound. But i can't train people to have a personality binding people with that you know. Hey how are you in the. It's more high. She too has had to raise wages. And that's not her only problem. Her suppliers are raising prices because minds and manufacturers overseas are still dealing with pandemic disruptions. I'm kristen schwab for marketplace on wall street today. Not a whole lot of enthusiasm. Either way really..

five hawaii Today rachel brewster forty percent europe emily blanchard los angeles uc davis today Williams bobbi williams williams kai ryssdal six items tuesday today duke law school more than ninety percent eighth of june columbia south carolina
"emily blanchard" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Private sector survey that hints about the official hiring and unemployment reports came in today much stronger than expected. Nine hundred. seventy eight thousand more. People landed on payrolls in may according to the paycheck processor. Edp diane swonk is chief economist. At the tax advisory firm grant thornton. She helps us many a thursday good morning. good morning. well. I mean the. Adp data doesn't always track with the official jobs report due tomorrow but certainly interesting today certainly encouraging closed a million jobs created with big gains and leisure and hospitality in small businesses. Now we've learned to be a little humble rather than user hubris when it comes to forecast you monthly and plummer reports but the good news is we've seen a slew of data that suggests that momentum is shifting regarding hiring and people accepting jobs now fitting into the adp payroll numbers today. Is that People signing up for unemployment benefits for the first time. That number dropped again. It's been happening every week now for over a month. It's done not where it needs to be. Were still high and there. Some workers that are just losing their extensions on benefit but the good news is the initial claims are coming down and that means some people are getting hired. The thesis that no one's going back into the labor force because of all the government benefits they might get for staying out of the labor force. Somebody's getting work absolutely. And you know that studies. On that. I mean does san francisco fed just did a study on whether or not the three hundred dollars. Supplement is a deterrent and it's one of the least of deterrence is a small deterrent but the biggest issues are a whole litany of things of everything from how long it takes for a vaccination become Effective with two jabs to the fact that a lot of people actually didn't realize vaccines were free. And then of course. There's the other issue of these are now called. Frontline workers a war and the mass mandates have made it even harder when you see viral videos of people spitting on frontline workers because they don't wanna wear masks. When asked diane swonk. The chief economist at the tax advisory firm grant thornton. She had chicago. Thank you very much. Thank you now. It's factories waiting longer for the inputs. They need to make the stuff. We by the institute of supply management says while factory output has been going up steadily month over month since last spring. Plants are waiting now. Eighty five days on average for their inputs. That's the longest average weight and the thirty four years they've tracked this here's marketplace's justin ho manufacturers are facing shortage of steel and aluminum says the ism's theory he says tariffs on imported. Metals are pushing up prices. That means manufacturers are leaning more on domestic steel and aluminum and then sucks all the capacity out fury says north american. Steel mills are strained. What used to be you know ten weeks or so in lead time is now twenty. That's causing manufacturers to order more medals. So they don't run out since dartmouth trae professor. Emily blanchard which means there are further. Shortages blanchard says retailers are paying attention and trying to anticipate whether manufacturers will start charging more for finished products. And if i think prices are gonna rise in the future when i get stock back on my shelves. I raised my sticker price to consumers as well. Leonard says she's optimistic that these delays and shortages or short term disruptions. The tariffs on the other hand aren't likely to go away anytime soon. I'm justin how for marketplace and food prices. Keep going up both in your town and around the world. There's news that united nations reading on the global cost of food went up again in may making it a year of higher prices each and every month higher demand in china drought.

Emily blanchard Leonard Nine hundred china tomorrow thirty four years ten weeks diane swonk Eighty five days twenty blanchard three hundred dollars today justin Edp diane swonk thursday both two jabs last spring each
"emily blanchard" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"emily blanchard" Discussed on KCRW

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind of result is Wednesday. Today the 31st of March. Good is always to have you along everybody. And look, I know that was a big set up the idea that the era of big government being over might be over the original quote, of course, coming from Bill Clinton's 1996 state of the Union. Given the news of the day. It is not outlandish to imagine that maybe it is over. President Biden rolled out his second multi trillion dollar economic plan today, the American jobs plan infrastructure As you've seen already is the headline about $2 Trillion worth of investment into Yes, sure roads and bridges in the power grid and building out green energy infrastructure. But here's the turn into the hole over thing. The White House is taking an expansive view. Shall we say of just what's included? When we say infrastructure marketplaces? Kimberly Adams gets us going. One of the things under Biden's broader umbrella of infrastructure, more funding and resource is for home health care workers. Bill Dombey is president of the National Association for Home Care in Hospice. As a matter of policy coming out of the White House, this is not a surprise, just simply the vehicle in which it's contained at the moment. Putting health care into an infrastructure package is unusual, he says, but he hopes it works to address the very low level of compensation that many home care aides receive. Although I love my work and what I do, and Home care. It really doesn't Hey, enough. Terrell Cannon has worked for decades in home health care where the median salary is just above the poverty line. Now she's director of training at Home Care Associates of Philadelphia. She says she totally understands why home healthcare shows up in the Biden plan, just like the rules in the streets and the energy and things of that nature. That's there. We should have been because we are the essential workers to keep the quality of life going. But having such a broad concept of infrastructure could make it harder to actually pass a bill, says Diana Furchtgott Roth, who teaches at George Washington University and worked at the Department of Transportation during the Trump administration. There are going to be people who are gonna want to break it up into different kinds of bills because it's hard to be against an infrastructure bill, she says. But it could be easier for some lawmakers to oppose same a climate change bill or one to pay home health care workers Higher salaries in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. So that's the setup, right? The broad conceptual piece of the story, But you spend $2 trillion There is a certain amount of show me the money that is expected. And this bill remember is about improving infrastructure, broadly defined to improve the economy. Part of the American jobs plan is $17 billion for inland waterways and fairies and coastal ports. And we have been telling you About how those ports been struggling to handle the imported stuff we have been buying for the past year. But as marketplaces Justin whole reports American ports have been in need of upgrades since well before this virus hit American parts could really use the help, says Dale Rogers, professor of supply chain management at Arizona State University. He says. When you look at the design of some foreign ports like Shanghai or Rotterdam, it's really brilliantly designed and engineered. And what we mostly have in the U. S. Is infrastructure left over from an earlier time U. S ports have been improving some the handle more imports and bigger ships. Mario Cordero is the executive director of the port of Long Beach, which is part of the country's busiest port complex. He says the port is now prioritizing rail construction, which will help move cargo without burning as many fossil fuels but also in a more experienced manner to get the containers from the terminal and out of the harbor district, Cordero says Maurin vestment in port infrastructure won't just let the port handle more capacity. It'll also help create jobs at the port itself and throughout the supply chain, what jobs and a truck in community jobs and warehousing and of course jobs Even when we talk about rail That could help pull in manufacturing and construction workers who have been out of work. But Dartmouth economics professor Emily Blanchard says there aren't as many unemployed workers in manufacturing or construction as in the service sector, which was disproportionately hit by Cove in 19. It's probably not the case that if you're waiting tables a year and a half ago, you're gonna be jumping right in line to get involved in the reconstruction of the Baltimore port. Four supply chain jobs to boost the overall economy. Blanchard says the U. S will have to invest in skills training that she says will help unemployed people get better jobs and move up the income ladder. I'm Justin. How for marketplace? Let's do a little context here, Shall we Before we go any farther on the premise of the top half of the program today that what we're seeing with Biden and the spending and the government getting Maurin to this economy? Is maybe actually the end of Reaganomics. The idea that smaller government is better the tax cuts of the way to go trickle down and supply side all of that, Molly wouldn't I put basically that question Mark Life yesterday on our podcast Make me smart. Mark is a professor of political economy at Brown. I really think a lot of this comes down to this. Like Let's run this giant $2 Trillion experiment on if we can generate inflation or no on if we get real wage growth without any significant inflation. And I think that Baida nomics will actually become a thing just is Reaganomics that I mean We'll see. Right? You could hear that whole conversation. It was a good one. I am H o wherever you get your podcasts on Wall Street Today, Tech was up. Most of the rest was mixed. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. There.

Bill Dombey Terrell Cannon Bill Clinton Emily Blanchard Mario Cordero Dale Rogers Washington $17 billion Mark Kimberly Adams Los Angeles Wednesday Cordero $2 trillion Shanghai Today $2 Trillion Rotterdam Biden Blanchard
United States Can't Arbitrarily Impose Tariffs, Despite Mnuchin's Threats

Marketplace

01:45 min | 3 years ago

United States Can't Arbitrarily Impose Tariffs, Despite Mnuchin's Threats

"All right so the second piece of that mission quote the deserves a second look is the bit where he said the United States is going to arbitrarily imposed tariffs which is not the way it works marketplace a dealers on that one despite what the treasury secretary said in Davos this administration can't arbitrarily imposed taxes on whatever it wants the imposition of tariffs on any foreign goods for national security reasons falls under section two thirty two of the trade expansion act there is a procedure for going through section two thirty two and claiming national security that's Emily Blanchard she's an economics professor at Dartmouth College she says the argument the trump administration put forward back in may of last year was unprecedented in US trade policy that automobiles our national security issue because they are important for the US economy and US economic security is part of the broader national security the administration produced a report on why auto imports threaten national security but the White House has refused to release the report to Congress saying it would limit the administration's ability to negotiate further trade deals with Europe Japan and others Jamie Butters at automotive news says in theory he could see national security claims for auto imports if we imported all of our vehicles and we didn't have the ability to manufacture vehicles anymore than we would be at a disadvantage from a defense standpoint but he says that's a tough line to walk given how globally inter twined the auto industry has become an Emily Blanchard Dartmouth says that's exactly why any auto terrace would hurt American workers kind of ripple up and down the supply chain to parts producers and then to to further parts purchasers in alternately to the people buying those cars the American consumer I'm a dealer for market

United States Davos Emily Blanchard Dartmouth College White House Congress Europe Japan Jamie Butters Emily Blanchard Dartmouth
US companies hunt for loopholes to beat China tariffs

Marketplace

02:24 min | 3 years ago

US companies hunt for loopholes to beat China tariffs

"We begin today where we often have lately the trade war the escalating tariffs between the u._s. and china perhaps you've heard that mentioned here before now yes for sure those tariffs have had an impact on trade between the two nations and during the g twenty summit that starts on friday and japan president trump and president xi jinping will meet to talk about their relationship issues but meanwhile business finds a way to go on as usual and many businesses have resorted to work arounds loopholes shall we say that helped them avoid paying these tariffs marketplace's eric embarrassed has that story work arounds on tariffs sometimes called transshipments have been around as long as terrorists have existed says emily blanchard professor at dartmouth but right now they're having a moment when tariffs were lower before this trade war it wasn't a profitable strategy now that tariffs are going up we would definitely expect to see transshipment becoming more popular and not all transshipments are created equal practices like shipping furniture made in china to a third country with lower tariffs like vietnam and then removing the made in china sticker that's a legal but doing most of the production in china and the finishing touches elsewhere that's arguably legal says michael moore who teaches economics and international affairs at george washington university if you bring the product in and you use a screwdriver to screw in the last screw that doesn't mean it's made in vietnam it has to be a substantive change in the product like assembly new kind of paint or a crucial part since the beginning of the trade war a lot of goods made in china have been shipped from sapient nam or other southeast asian countries entering the u._s. via transshipments mary lovely and a communist and fellow at the peterson institute says industries like footwear toys and steal can use transshipment but others can't like industries that have to be certified so called life and death industries artificial knees any kind of medical products that are made in china those that whole supply chain is certified by u._s. regulators you can't all of a sudden just say oh i happen to get any from someplace else that leaves those industries with no option but to pay those terrorists or move their production elsewhere altogether america bears from

President Trump Professor Dartmouth China Vietnam U._S. Peterson Institute Japan Jinping Emily Blanchard Michael Moore George Washington University America