18 Burst results for "Emily Ben"

"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:59 min | 4 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Audie Cornish in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Ah, court ruling that overturned a federal moratorium on evictions is on hold that will come as a relief to millions of tenants behind on their rent during this pandemic. A federal judge said today that her own ruling is on pause because of the public health risks posed by lifting the eviction moratorium. But the outcome of this high stakes court case is still uncertain. We're joined now by NPR's Chris Arnold. Hi, Chris. Hey, Elsa. So just catches up on this latest development. What did the judge say? Right, So the judge here is federal District Judge Dabney Friedrich, and she was appointed by former President Trump. And just last week, she ruled that the Centers for Disease Control Prevention did not have the power. To tell landlords that they cannot evict their own tenants, even during a pandemic and a public health crisis. So last week, she put a short term stay in place after the Justice Department appealed. There was a lot of worry, though, that she might lift that stay and really opened the floodgates to a lot of evictions pretty quickly, But late today, she said, no, The stay will be in place longer as theater peel moves forward, and the judge wrote that the CDC quote Or that the CDC demonstrated that quote lifting the national moratorium will exacerbate the significant public health risks. Interesting. Okay, So what kind of reaction have you been hearing so far from housing groups and others who are worried about the CDC is order getting thrown out? Well. Many are very happy about this. Emily Ben for as been writing a court brief along with Yale Law School in support of the CDC. This is extraordinary news. People across the country are going to stay house, at least throughout the next month, and hopefully throughout the entire CDC moratorium. They can apply for rental assistance and they can stay housed and what she's saying. There is that look, we don't know how long the case will ultimately take to turn out or or how it will turn out. But the appeals process could well take his long as the CDC moratorium is in place anyway. Well, I know that you've been talking to families facing eviction. While all of this litigation has been playing out. What have you been hearing from those tenants? Yeah, One person I've been checking in with during the pandemic is a single dad. He's got a 10 year old daughter They live in Atlanta is his name's Miran Masa Dodd, and he just worries about this all the time. When I put my daughter to bed, I lay down. I can't sleep. I think about these things. I get there with me on my heart races, my limbs going on it. I've been under distress for for this whole whole year. It's been really tough. And he drives uber for a living. So business was down and he's 59 years old. He was also afraid to work and he couldn't work. Alaska's He's got a 10 year old at home, and s so now he owes more than $15,000 in background. He's got that hanging over his head worrying about eviction. At the same time, they're like, like a lot of us. Some things were getting better. His his daughter had been struggling with remote school. She's back and in person school now and seeing friends. Now she's doing excellent. She's gone from the bottom of the class to summer On top of the class. She come from smiling, telling me that she got 100 on all subjects that My biggest fear is letting her down. And there still is that fear but But with this ruling people like my said Dodd now have more hope in me. He's applied for rental assistance. It hasn't come through yet. Now he gets more more weeks, maybe months more. Get that money. Avoid infection, So he and his daughter can catch up on Renan. Don't end up being homeless. Yeah, well, what do landlords say about all of this? I imagine they hope courts will Eventually uphold the ruling and throw out the eviction moratorium. Yeah, many landlords say, Look, things are getting back to normal. They want control over their properties again. I talked to Bob Pinegar. He's the head of the National Apartment Association. We've been encouraging people to work with the residents, but ultimately 90 cents of every rent dollar that has received has to pay for things like a mortgage. Property taxes, upkeep of the property. We end up in a situation that is not viable, she says. Look, you know, let's get that rental assistance money to renters and landlords as soon as possible. That is NPR's Chris Arnold. Thank you, Chris. You're welcome. Firefighters across the country where some of the first to be offered the cove in 19 vaccine, But many don't want it in New York and Chicago. Only about half of firefighters have gotten vaccinated. Some places aren't even keeping track. Jacob Margolis, from member station KPCC reports on how one fire department has helped its crew overcome its hesitancy. Back in the fall. Talk of a covert 19 vaccine was ramping up science and technology looked like they could pull off the impossible. A ray of hope in the darkness as a cure appeared to be on the horizon. Not for everyone. Well when it first came out, I was definitely skeptical. Los Angeles County Firefighter Mickey Juarez wasn't so sure he wanted the vaccine for a number of reasons, the biggest of which was his worry that it could be worse for him than Cove it What is the long term effects? I have pre existing conditions. With our immune deficiency if you will, and I was skeptical whether it would affect me adversely or if it would make my condition worse. He wasn't alone on early survey done by the Los Angeles County Fire Department showed that about 45% of their employees weren't sold on getting the vaccine. Just about around where national trends were At the time. It was a big red flag for L, a county fires medical director Dr Clayton Kazan. He was hearing all sorts of vaccine conspiracy theories and misinformation coming in from his roughly 3000 firefighters, so the department had to figure out a way to change minds. We were all over them about explaining the science. Doing live Q and A's answering any questions People had trying to compete against the noise of some of the social media rabbit holes and putting out regular informational videos. How everybody I'm coming to you from Kobe Bunker. Today. We're gonna talk a little bit about understanding the stars Cov two vaccine, but they didn't stop there. They decided that if a firefighter wanted to refuse the vaccine, they couldn't just take a box online saying No, thanks. Kazan says firefighters had actually go into a vaccination site and decline in person. If you're sitting on the station with five people who are all kind of grumpy and don't want to get it, it's a lot easier to say no that when you have to show up to an area where You see your friends stepping up and taking it. And now you have a chance to ask your questions, and maybe you'll just kind of roll your eyes and roll up your sleeve..

Bob Pinegar Chris Elsa Chang New York Emily Ben Elsa Los Angeles Chris Arnold Mickey Juarez Yale Law School Atlanta Jacob Margolis Washington Chicago Clayton Kazan National Apartment Association KPCC Renan Centers for Disease Control Pr Miran Masa Dodd
"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 4 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

"Hold on evictions during pandemic, saying the CDC didn't have the authority marketplaces. Nova Sappho is here. What's the immediate effect? Well, David. The judge struck down the evictions moratorium, but then granted a stay on her ruling after that, so right now no immediate effect, while the Justice Department appeals The CDC moratorium is still in effect. The concern is what happens shouldn't appeal court struck down the moratorium, too. Then we could start to see some serious consequences. We spoke about this with Emily Ben for She chairs the American Bar Association's covert 19 Task Force Committee on Eviction. It has the potential to cause widespread eviction to open the floodgates to increase. Health and equity among black and Latin next renters across the country. All right. Don't overdo renters have other protections from eviction. They do. A lot of renters are protected by states of dozens of them have their own moratoriums. Here's Emily bumper again. There are just over a dozen state moratorium remaining across the country at the same time, 19 State governors and state supreme courts have adopted or amended and added to the CDC moratorium locally. So all of this concern about potential evictions and the stay of the judge's ruling. All of this could be blunted by some $50 billion in assistance for renters that Congress has funded. It's been slow rolling out, and groups representing landlords say that's really the answer at this point rental assistance, not more eviction bands, David All right? No, but thank you,

David Sabrin Benesch Adam Segal New York Emily Ben James Lewis David Hanky Chris Greiner Mark American Bar Association 498,000 Lewis Council on Foreign Relations Center for Strategic and Inter Congress 2016 early April Justice Department Ben 19 Task Force Committee on Evi
Judge Strikes Down Federal Moratorium on Evictions

Morning Edition

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Judge Strikes Down Federal Moratorium on Evictions

"Hold on evictions during pandemic, saying the CDC didn't have the authority marketplaces. Nova Sappho is here. What's the immediate effect? Well, David. The judge struck down the evictions moratorium, but then granted a stay on her ruling after that, so right now no immediate effect, while the Justice Department appeals The CDC moratorium is still in effect. The concern is what happens shouldn't appeal court struck down the moratorium, too. Then we could start to see some serious consequences. We spoke about this with Emily Ben for She chairs the American Bar Association's covert 19 Task Force Committee on Eviction. It has the potential to cause widespread eviction to open the floodgates to increase. Health and equity among black and Latin next renters across the country. All right. Don't overdo renters have other protections from eviction. They do. A lot of renters are protected by states of dozens of them have their own moratoriums. Here's Emily bumper again. There are just over a dozen state moratorium remaining across the country at the same time, 19 State governors and state supreme courts have adopted or amended and added to the CDC moratorium locally. So all of this concern about potential evictions and the stay of the judge's ruling. All of this could be blunted by some $50 billion in assistance for renters that Congress has funded. It's been slow rolling out, and groups representing landlords say that's really the answer at this point rental assistance, not more eviction bands, David All right? No, but thank you,

Nova Sappho CDC Emily Ben Task Force Committee Justice Department American Bar Association David Emily Congress
"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:53 min | 4 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A federal judge has struck down the nationwide hold on evictions during pandemic, saying the CDC didn't have the authority. Marketplaces. Nova Sappho is here. What's the immediate effect? Well, David. The judge struck down theory actions moratorium, but then granted a stay on her ruling after that, so right now, no immediate effect, while the Justice Department appeals The CDC moratorium is still in effect. The concern is what happens shouldn't appeal court struck down the moratorium, too. Then we could start to see some serious consequences. We spoke about this with Emily Ben for She chairs the American Bar Association's covert 19 Task Force Committee on Eviction. It has the potential to cause widespread eviction to open the floodgates to increase. Health and equity among black and Latin next renters across the country. All right. Don't overdo renters have other protections from eviction. They do. A lot of renters are protected by states of dozens of them have their own moratoriums. Here's Emily bumper Agan. There are just over a dozen state moratorium remaining across the country that the same time 19 state governors and state supreme courts have adopted or amended and added to the CDC moratorium locally. So all of this concern about potential evictions and the stay of the judge's ruling. All of this could be blunted by some $50 billion in assistance for renters that Congress has funded. It's been slow rolling out, and groups representing landlords say that's really the answer at this point rental assistance, not more eviction bands, David All right now, but thank you, Mark. It's good news on people signing up for unemployment benefits the job market there. It's lower. Still in the last week 498,000 new pandemic low The Dow is up 33 points the S and P is down to 10%. The NASDAQ is down 6/10 Percent. Now the U. S government recent years has kept a closer eye on foreign companies buying US firms as well as the export of certain technologies. Transactions involving China are a key part of this. The Biden administration is keeping to the policy, but it's some cost marketplaces, Sabrin Benesch or has that Chris Greiner is an attorney. It struck and struck in love on he represents companies when they have to go before Sofia's the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U. S. This is the government office that vets foreign acquisitions of U. S companies. Raina remembers one tech company whose acquisition by Chinese investors was rejected by the committee. The client keeps going back to the Chinese investors. I said, Well, you just got turned down. Why you doing this? Well, they're offering three times the value of the company's okay, maybe we have think about. Is this a real business? Fiore? What's what's behind that. Buying a company is a way to access technology. And if the technology is sensitive, say aye, or quantum computing related That compose a national security threat in the view of the U. S government, particularly if the buyer is in China or has links to the Chinese military. Adam Segal is with the Council on Foreign Relations. There were some legitimate security concerns about the tips technologies the Chinese were acquiring and how they would have an impact on Chinese military capabilities. In 2018 Congress expanded Citius at one point it had four employees that now has upwards of 50. Its largest division, is now sifting through past deals that have already been completed to make sure none got through. That shouldn't have. David Hanky is a partner of errant Fox law firm. He worked on the city's expansion. The pandemic has really, I think expanded the focus of Cynthia's to consider things that previously might not have been thought of his national security. Pharmaceuticals, for example, even real estate. Separately, the Commerce Department has started to pay closer attention to what the U. S exports to China, For instance, it blocked the export of certain supercomputers in early April at a concern it would build up Chinese military technology. Increased scrutiny has led to an intended chilling effect. Chinese Foreign Direct investment in the U. S has slowed since 2016. We know the direction this is going. James Lewis is a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. It's towards greater splitting of the two supply chains. But if we do it, the wrong way will hurt hurt ourselves. Lewis says. U. S and Chinese supply chains are deeply intertwined and disentangling them too far is a risk. When you talked to American chip companies or the equipment makers, they feel like they need to sell the China to keep the revenue streams that let's do the RND on the next generation of technology. As the Biden administration completes a review of U. S supply chain vulnerability, It will have to consider just how far decoupling should go in New York. I'm sorry Ben. Ashore for Marketplace.

David Sabrin Benesch Emily Ben New York Adam Segal James Lewis David Hanky Mark Chris Greiner American Bar Association Council on Foreign Relations Congress Emily bumper Agan 498,000 Center for Strategic and Inter Lewis Fox Raina 2016 Nova Sappho
"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:46 min | 4 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

"A federal judge has struck down the nationwide hold on evictions during pandemic, saying the CDC did not have the authority to order it. Marketplaces. Nova Safra is here. What is the immediate effect? Well, David, the Department of Justice says it will appeal and seek an emergency stay so that could stop any immediate effect right there, at least for now. Also, a lot of renters are protected by states having their own moratoriums, so they're probably okay again for now. Here's Emily Ben. First he chairs the American Bar Association's covert 19 Task Force Committee on Evictions. There are just over a dozen state moratorium remaining across the country. At the same time, 19 state governors and state supreme courts have adopted or amended and added to the CDC moratorium locally. There's a big butt here, David, Florida and Texas big populous states. They don't have their own moratoriums, so renters there are potentially exposed. Also, there is concerned the judge's ruling yesterday could embolden landlords elsewhere to go ahead with evictions. What about longer term? What happens if an appeal supports eviction? Well, then we could start to see some serious consequences. Here's Emily Ben. For again. It has the potential to cause widespread eviction to open the floodgates to increase. Health and equity among black and Latin next renters across the country. All of this could be blunted by some $50 billion in assistance for renters that Congress has funded and groups representing landlords say that's really the answer at this point rental assistance, not more eviction bands. Over. Thank you. Good news on people signing up for unemployment benefits, The number is lower. Still in the last week we learned today 498,000 new pandemic low. The S and P future flat at the moment, the Dow future up 28 points, the NASDAQ future Down about a 10%. The U. S government in recent years has kept a closer eye on foreign companies buying US firms as well as the export of certain technologies. Transactions involving China are a key part of this The Biden administration is keeping to that policy. But it's some cost marketplaces, Sabrin Benesch or has that Chris Greiner is an attorney at struck and struck in love on he represents companies when they have to go before Sofia's the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U. S. This is the government office that vets foreign acquisitions of U. S companies. Raina remembers one tech company whose acquisition by Chinese investors was rejected by the committee. The client keeps going back to the Chinese investors. I said, Well, you just got turned down. Why you doing this so well? They're offering three times the value of the company. Okay, maybe we have think about. Is this a real business deal or what? What's what's behind that. Buying a company is a way to access technology. And if the technology is sensitive, say aye, or quantum computing related That compose a national security threat in the view of the U. S government, particularly if the buyer is in China or has links to the Chinese military. Adam Segal is with the Council on Foreign Relations. There were some legitimate security concerns about the tips technologies the Chinese were acquiring and how they would have an impact on Chinese military capabilities. In 2018 Congress expanded Sofia's At one point it had four employees. It now has upwards of 50, its largest division, is now sifting through past deals that have already been completed. Make sure none got through that shouldn't have. David Hanky is a partner of errant Fox law firm. He worked on the city's expansion. The pandemic has really, I think expanded the focus of Sylvia's to consider things that previously might not have been thought of his national Security Pharmaceuticals, for example, even real estate separately, the Commerce Department has started to pay closer attention to what the U. S. Exports to China. For instance, it blocked the export of certain supercomputers in early April, out of concern it would build up Chinese military technology. The increased scrutiny has led to an intended chilling effect. Chinese foreign direct investment in the U. S has slowed since 2016. We know the direction this is going. James Lewis is a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. It's towards greater splitting of the two supply chains. But if we do it, the wrong way will hurt hurt ourselves. Lewis says. U. S and Chinese supply chains are deeply intertwined and disentangling them too far is a risk. When you talked to American chip companies or the equipment makers, they feel like they need to sell the China to keep the revenue streams that let's do the R and D on the next generation of technology. As the Biden administration completes a review of U. S supply chain vulnerability, It will have to consider just how far decoupling should.

David David Hanky Emily Ben Adam Segal Sabrin Benesch James Lewis Congress Chris Greiner American Bar Association Council on Foreign Relations Lewis today Center for Strategic and Inter Texas Fox yesterday last week Florida 2016 early April
"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:46 min | 4 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A federal judge has struck down the nationwide hold on evictions during pandemic, saying the CDC did not have the authority to order it. Marketplaces. Nova Safra is here. What is the immediate effect? Well, David, the Department of Justice says it will appeal and seek an emergency stay so that could stop any immediate effect right there, at least for now. Also, a lot of renters are protected by states having their own moratoriums, so they're probably okay again For now. Here's Emily Ben. First he chairs the American Bar Association's covert 19 Task Force Committee on Evictions. There are just over a dozen state moratorium remaining across the country. At the same time, 19 state governors and state supreme courts have adopted or amended and added to the CDC moratorium locally. There's a big butt here, David, Florida and Texas big populous states. They don't have their own moratorium, so renters there are potentially exposed. Also, there is concerned the judge's ruling yesterday could embolden landlords elsewhere to go ahead with evictions. What about longer term? What happens if an appeal supports evictions? Well, then we could start to see some serious consequences. Here's Emily Ben. For again. It has the potential to cause widespread eviction to open the floodgates to increase health and equity among black and Latin next renters across the country. All of this could be blunted by some $50 billion in assistance for renters that Congress has funded and groups representing landlords say that's really the answer at this point rental assistance, not more eviction bands. Over. Thank you. Good news on people signing up for unemployment benefits, The number is lower. Still in the last week we learned today 498,000 new pandemic low. The S and P future flat at the moment, the Dow future up 28 points, the NASDAQ future Down about a 10%. The U. S government in recent years has kept a closer eye on foreign companies buying US firms as well as the export of certain technologies transactions involving China or a key part of this The Biden administration is keeping to that policy. But it's some cost marketplaces, Sabrin Benesch or has that Chris Greiner is an attorney. It struck and struck in love on he represents companies when they have to go before Sofia's the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U. S. This is the government office that vets foreign acquisitions of U. S companies. Raina remembers one tech company whose acquisition by Chinese investors was rejected by the committee. The client keeps going back to the Chinese investors. I said, Well, you just got turned down. Why you doing this? Well, they're offering three times the value of the company's okay. Maybe we should think about Is this a real business deal or what? What's what's behind that? Buying a company is a way to access technology. And if the technology is sensitive, say aye, or quantum computing related that compose a national security threat in the view of the U. S government, particularly if the buyer is in China or has links to the Chinese military. Adam Segal is with the Council on Foreign Relations. There were some legitimate security concerns about the tips technologies the Chinese were acquiring and how they would have an impact on Chinese military capabilities. In 2018 Congress expanded Sofia's At one point it had four employees. It now has upwards of 50, its largest division, is now sifting through past deals that have already been completed. Make sure none got through that shouldn't have. David Hanky is a partner of errant Fox law firm. He worked on the city's expansion. The pandemic has really, I think expanded the focus of Sylvia's to consider things that previously might not have been thought of his national Security Pharmaceuticals, for example, even real estate separately, the Commerce Department has started to pay closer attention to what the U. S exports to China, For instance, it blocked the export of certain supercomputers in early April, out of concern it would build up Chinese military tech. Ology. The increased scrutiny has led to an intended chilling effect. Chinese Foreign Direct investment in the U. S has slowed since 2016. We know the direction this is going. James Lewis is a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. It's towards greater splitting of the two supply chains. But if we do it, the wrong way will hurt hurt ourselves. Lewis says. U. S and Chinese supply chains are deeply intertwined and disentangling them too far is a risk. When you talked to American chip companies or the equipment makers, they feel like they need to sell the China to keep the revenue streams that let's do the R and D on the next generation of technology. As the Biden administration completes a review of U. S supply chain vulnerability, It will have to consider just how far decoupling should.

David Sabrin Benesch Emily Ben David Hanky James Lewis Adam Segal Chris Greiner Congress American Bar Association Council on Foreign Relations Lewis today Texas Center for Strategic and Inter yesterday 28 points last week Florida Fox Committee on Foreign Investmen
"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:35 min | 4 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Marketplaces Nova Safia is here Live What's the immediate effect? Well, they would. The Department of Justice says it will appeal and seek an emergency stay so that could stop any immediate effect right there, at least for now. Also, a lot of renters are protected by states having their own moratoriums, so they're probably okay again for now. Here's Emily Ben. First he chairs the American Bar Association's covert 19 Task Force Committee on Evictions. There are just over a dozen state moratorium remaining across the country. At the same time, 19 state governors and state supreme courts have adopted or amended and added to the CDC moratorium locally. There's a big butt here, David, Florida and Texas big populous states. They don't have their own moratorium, so renters there are potentially exposed. Also, there is concerned the judge's ruling yesterday could embolden landlords elsewhere to go ahead with evictions. What about longer term? What happens if an appeal supports evictions? Well, then we could start to see some serious consequences. Here's Emily Temper again. It has the potential to cause widespread eviction to open the floodgates to increase health and equity among black and Latin next renters across the country. Could be blunted by some $50 billion in assistance for renters that Congress has funded groups representing landlords say that's really the answer at this point rental assistance, not more eviction pants. All right Now, this offer Thank you. Checking markets. Dow and S and P futures to reach up 2/10 of a percent. The NASDAQ future of 4/10 Percent Now The U. S government in recent years has kept a closer eye on foreign companies buying US firms as well as the export of certain technologies. Transactions involving China are a key part of this. The Biden administration is keeping to the policy but at some cost Marketplaces, Sabrin Benesch or reports Chris Greiner is an attorney at struck and struck in love on he represents companies when they have to go before Sofia's the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U. S. This is the government office that vets foreign acquisitions of U. S companies. Raina remembers one tech company whose acquisition by Chinese investors was rejected by the committee. The client keeps going back to the Chinese investors. I said, Well, you just got turned down. Why you doing this? Well, they're offering three times the value of the company's okay, maybe we have think about. Is this a real business deal or what? What's what's behind that? Buying a company is a way to access technology. And if the technology is sensitive, say aye, or quantum computing related that compose a national security threat in the view of the U. S government, particularly if the buyer is in China or has links to the Chinese military. Adam Segal is with the Council on Foreign Relations. There were some legitimate security concerns about the tips technologies the Chinese were acquiring and how they would have an impact on Chinese military capabilities. In 2018 Congress expanded Sofia's At one point it had four employees. It now has upwards of 50, its largest division, is now sifting through past deals that have already been completed. Make sure none got through. That shouldn't have. David Hanky is a partner, Eric Fox law firm. He worked on the city's expansion. The pandemic has really, I think expanded the focus of Sylvia's to consider things that previously might not have been thought of his national security. Pharmaceuticals, for example, even real estate. Separately, the Commerce Department has started to pay closer attention to what the U. S exports to China. For instance, it blocked the export of certain supercomputers in early April that a concern it would build up Chinese military technology. The increased scrutiny has led to an intended chilling effect. Chinese foreign direct investment in the U. S has slowed since 2016. We know the direction this is going. James Lewis is a senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. It's towards greater splitting of the two supply chains. But if we do it, the wrong way will hurt hurt ourselves. Lewis says. U. S and Chinese supply chains are deeply intertwined and disentangling them too far is a risk. When you talked to American chip companies or the equipment makers, they feel like they need to sell the China to keep the revenue streams that let's do the R and D on the next generation of technology. As the Biden administration completes a review of U. S supply chain vulnerability, It will have to consider just how far decoupling should go in New York. I'm sorry Ben. Ashore for Marketplace Marketplace.

Adam Segal New York Emily Ben Sabrin Benesch James Lewis Chris Greiner David Hanky Emily Temper Council on Foreign Relations Congress American Bar Association Lewis Center for Strategic and Inter Texas early April 2016 Committee on Foreign Investmen yesterday Florida Sylvia
"emily ben" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

LBC Election 2019

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

"This will any more than i already have done when you were chief whip did you. Did you go through a reshuffle remember. Should not be spiked my guns. Because i i've often wondered exactly what the role of chief whip is during a reshuffle. Because i certainly in the tory party and saudi margaret thatcher stay. The chief whip would be the one that effectively chose most of the junior ministers. But i think under tony blair and gordon brown. That was less so. I think there was much more influence from the top. That was what you mean by that the top but there was once again when i became the home secretary Some people essentially hadn't been reshuffled. So i inherited them in my ministerial team. But then i had some flexibility over. Who else i had into ministerial team. And when i became chief whip. I had quite a lot flexibility in in getting people into the whips office. Well while People come to reshuffles is about to be one. Which i do well. There will be one. I'm although a lot of people say it won't be till november rather than out the local elections lip service point in doing it while the pandemic is still on because it would be quite difficult to reshuffle matt hancock while the pandemic is really still in full force i think and i think that's what they want to do So anybody that's for another day right. Let's finish off the other subjects before we move onto questions. Have we finish that. Yes the only other thing. I wanted to talk just briefly about what's to recommend a piece in Toys by emily ben on toys told tortoise flow to the scannon scoring moment. Isn't it you say toys. I pronounce it properly. As i told us usually say toys actually now slightly was overcome by Anyway is very good piece by emily benn. Who of course is the bed. Political family and essentially her contention in this piece is that parliament has been both sidelined and submissive during the course of the covert pandemic and the needs with the exception of some select committees..

emily benn emily ben tony blair november gordon brown both one secretary margaret
"emily ben" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

LBC Election 2019

05:03 min | 6 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on LBC Election 2019

"Town funding two point six million pounds to the downing street briefing emily ben. I don't know what that is watching that interview question mark. Oh you do you mean The the making harry. Yes yeah okay. and then if you bet some bulbs as a well. I've got here. I i might mention at some point. The thirteen point tori co-lead. Because i think that's a that's a matter for discussion. Yeah i'm i'm a single poll. I might mention the twin. The twenty five point lead that the consensus among working class voters. I might mention that at some point during the puck. I just might. I mean komi old-fashioned say hot is an aunt you know it's it's a legitimate legitimate matter for coleman does not. It's not being parties on. Okay let's come to it and then we will discuss you. Don't wanna talk about it over. His partisan reasons put me back in about again now. I'll come back a bit grumpy again. Listeners all taylor up over the next hour right. Let's talk about dc ritchie and his Very successful budget. Apparently how i have to say. I was quite surprised at the polling on this budget. The two polls i saw forty six and fifty two percent in favor an eleven and twelve percent against. I'm thinking what was there in that budget that caused people to think that it was a really good one wasn't what there wasn't in the budget that made people signing with relief when people slightly thinking to themselves always gonna whack me tax up because the public finances have taken a beating from the pandemic and then he didn't answer then everybody's sort of went phew good and Everybody thought he was going to also increase corporation tax and then he didn't four or e signaled it but not until twenty twenty three so it's essentially a quite good handling of expectations. Budget isn't it but actually not no. I was a little disappointed because said on wednesday that was to be a reset budget. A transformation of budget in it certainly wasn't that it was quite slick budget in the sense that he delivered it. Well and i thought the press conference. He did extremely well from his point of view. It was a great marketing effort but in terms of substance. I'm not so sure. I'm gordon brown. Or even lawson nigel lawson or normandy. Well i'm not sure that norman. Lamont bogota history's most successful. Chancellor willy north larson larson thing successful. Incidentally well he was..

eleven two polls wednesday fifty two percent six million pounds forty six twin Lamont bogota twelve percent two point single poll lawson nigel lawson dc ritchie coleman twenty five point lead twenty twenty three thirteen point emily ben north larson larson gordon brown
"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:18 min | 8 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Arema phrase in for Kyra SDL. It is Monday, January the 18th that Zahavi all along. So we're going to start off the show with evictions, which surely is on the minds of millions of people, consuming them, making it hard to focus or sleep or do much of anything. At least 14 million people are currently behind on rent. That's according to the latest data from the center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Only thing keeping many of them in their homes is the CDC says Eviction moratorium. But that s set to expire at the end of the month. Now President elect Joe Biden. He says he wants to extend federal eviction protections through September and as market places to meet the field reports. He is also proposing billions and rental assistance. Congress just approved $25 billion in rental assistance as part of the latest covert relief package in December. Douglas Rice at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, says that money can be used both for background and future rent payments. My estimate is that anywhere from 2 to 6 million households This year will be helped. Yet it's still just a fraction of the more than 14 Million adult renters who report being behind on rent. President elect Biden has proposed an additional 25 billion. But it will likely take a while for rental assistance to actually reach people. That is why housing advocates are pushing Biden to extend and strengthen federal eviction protections before they expire this month. Emily Ben for chairs the American Bar Association's Cove in 19 Committee on eviction, She says the current CDC moratorium isn't protecting everyone, many tenants they're not aware of their rights under the eviction moratorium, or they feel intimidated in triggering their rights. Strengthening the federal moratorium would give state and local governments time to get rent relief out to the people who need it, says Zack Newman. An attorney with the Denver based Cove in 19 Eviction defense project. It just seems like a really terrible outcome of this moment. Have hundreds of thousands or millions of people evicted around the country when money is on the way that, Newman says, is his biggest fear that tenants will be evicted right before rental assistance arrives. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. I know taxes can be uncomfortable to think about and talk about. Yes, that may or may not be a shameless plug for my marketplace Podcast. This is uncomfortable. But this year, Texas are going to be even more of a head scratcher from stimulus checks to unemployment, insurance marketplaces and dealer has more on what accountants and folks like me and you. To be wary of Doing your taxes in a normal year is something a lot of folks dread. Patrick Thomas has the tax clinic at the University of Notre Dame, he says. This year is gonna be especially tough. There are so many factors that Go into the determination of state tax residency, but this year, it's going to be even more complicated, he says. Because so many people work from home this year, taxpayers may have to do more research and paperwork states are fighting over who gets to collect tax revenue from people who live and work across state lines. There are a couple of things that we do know, though. Stimulus checks are not taxed, but unemployment benefits are at the federal level and buy some states Aerial tour. Oh, Kleiman teaches tax law at the University of San Diego. So when you get your unemployment Check. You want to make sure that taxes are being set aside or the taxes are being withheld to pay the federal taxes, she says. With 10.7 million people out of work. There are a lot of folks who've never collected unemployment before, so they need to be aware of that. Another difference this year, the iris won't be accepting federal tax returns until February. 12 Andrew Hayashi of the University of Virginia Law School says. That means people will have to wait longer for that check from the I. R. S low income households who claimed the earned income tax credit rely on that to get current on some of the their holiday bills. He says many would file their taxes the first week in January. Now they can't Theo April. 15th deadline, though, currently remains unchanged. I'm a dealer for marketplace on Wall Street today. Well, the markets are closed because of the holiday. But we'll have different kind.

Joe Biden Zack Newman President CDC Kleiman Zahavi Patrick Thomas Congress Andrew Hayashi Emily Ben Douglas Rice Texas University of Notre Dame Samantha Fields Denver based Cove
"emily ben" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on WTVN

"Story with Alison Wyeth. Congress is closing in on a coronavirus relief package designed to help some of those suffering because of damage caused by the pandemic on the economy. It's part of a bill being discussed that includes more money for unemployment benefits are a lot of lines drawn in the sand. Fierce lines drawn in the sand where Democrats were pushing for I need to state and local governments and Republicans were pushing for liability protections for any coded 19 related issues for businesses. As of right now, it looks like both of those things will be dropped. Both sides say they're very disappointed in that, but they had to reach some type of an agreement. Meanwhile, unemployment numbers are on the rise. In Ohio, the Department of Job and Family Services reports. Nearly 39,000 people filed first time unemployment claims last week. That's about 2000 more from the week prior and the CDC eviction moratorium is set to end in two weeks nationwide warning to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a nonprofit organization and estimated 6.7 million renter. Households are currently unable to pay their rent in the midst of the pandemic. Emily Ben for a law professor at Wake Forest. Calls it the greatest eviction crisis in American history, and this is something that our country will be recovering from for generations to come. Andrew Dember ABC News in Washington, D. C, the first person to get the covered 19 vaccine and Cincinnati said she only experienced mild side effects from the shot. You see health registered nurse Katie Walt says she had a headache and mild shakiness after she got her shot, which is similar to how she said she feels when she gets her yearly flu shot. Meanwhile, though the personal information on those who are receiving the vaccine is being tracked by government agencies as the vaccine rollout begins nationwide, according to the data use agreement, the CDC has asked states to sign the data would serve for research to find patterns and even help and redirecting vaccine shipments to areas Maurin need. The conflict some have is the data is personal names, addresses, ethnicities and Maurin. Some cases in letter sent to the federal government, the National Governors Association and Forge it. In public health groups lay out their privacy concerns. Theo government responded, saying the data is crucial to keep track of doses, side effects and for research. However, it would not be available to the CDC or other federal agencies for other uses. CDC is also exploring other ways to share data while protecting personal details. And Franklin County is extending its stay at home advisory. Now through January. 2nd that coincides with the end of Governor Mike DeWine statewide 10 p.m. to 5 A.m. Curfew Your ABC six first warning weather cloudy skies tonight with some flurries through the overnight we'll see a low drop down to around 26. Currently it's 30 degrees and Alison Wiant. Our next report at six o'clock here about it was gonna be coming after American.

CDC Katie Walt Alison Wyeth National Low Income Housing Co Alison Wiant Congress federal government Mike DeWine Theo government Ohio Andrew Dember Department of Job and Family S Franklin County Emily Ben Wake Forest Cincinnati flu National Governors Association Washington
"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 10 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bupkis from Congress on a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs as me not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of addiction, just like about 14 million other households. Says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus even after someone is evicted. The debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impacts of debt owed by renters across this country. For years to come. Deborah Throat his deputy director at the National Housing Law Project, It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people at risk of eviction prior to the band Emmick and that number has on Lee grown Throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March. 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly. In about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home. Permanently home. I have a window by where I worked like an opening to get fresh air. Just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. You. Research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're going to operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that this idea of being in the office five days a week. I think is a bygone era for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics, says the company's she's talking to in tech law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it. After the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it That if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it. You're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people in industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who are in the most for.

Kimberly Adams Congress Jonathan Deborah Throat Centers for Disease Control Justin Draeger Kate Lister Census Bureau Federal Reserve Bank American Bar Association Emily Ben Wade Chicago deputy director Samantha Fields Global Workplace Analytics Washington National Housing Law Project
"emily ben" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:30 min | 10 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From Congress on a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for a 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs. Had lied. Not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of eviction. Just like about 14 million other households, says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task Force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus, even after someone is evicted, the debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impact of debt owed by renters across this country for years to come. Deborah Throat is deputy director at the National Housing Law Project. It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people at risk of eviction prior to the band Emmick and that number has on Lee grown Throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March, 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly in about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home permanently home. I have a window by where I work, so I can open it and get fresh air or just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T Department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. Few research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're gonna operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that. This idea of being in the office five days a week, I think is a bygone era for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics says the company's She's talking to in Tak, law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it after the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it that if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it, you're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people in industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who are in the most for most people working from home isn't an option. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. If your social media feed is anything like mine, you're seeing a whole lot of people posting their Spotify 2020 playlists the past couple of weeks, the details of all the listening they did this year. But for a lot of the artists behind those playlists, especially the smaller, independent ones. 2020 hasn't been so great. So with a year about toe mercifully wrap up We've got the wrapper and writer Desa back on the phone. Hey, it's good to have you back. Thanks, Esso. When we spoke at the beginning of this thing Back in March. Your calendar you're good calendar had just like vaporized on. I wonder eight months nine months later on How it's been through this whole summer and fall. E mean, in some ways, I think most musician they're still looking at, you know, at calendars that air don't have too much in condom. Yeah, I remember talking to my agent, and he was like, you know, use this time when this is all over. You want to look back and be able to say you really spent this time making something wonderful. And I remember like a month after getting that council I was just like This is not a writer's or treat, man. This is like a global crisis. I don't I don't want to know. I don't want to spend my days thinking what rhymes with plague, you know, like, just so In the beginning, there was sort of alone. But now eight months in You can. You can hear the wheels humming again. You know people of writing rad stuff, And I think it is a consumer of music, too. I think I've found myself leaning harder. On art for comfort and distraction and all the things that we turned to art for, so Yeah, Yeah, well, So look, we all turned to art for comfort and distraction. Those of us on the consuming and those of you on the producing end turned art to pay the rent. Um and I don't imagine you been able to do that. I mean, maybe you're making your and I don't know that's none of my business. But but the point is, you can't You can't really Profit off your art when your gig calendar has gone away. Right. And even before the pandemic, like the alchemy of turning music into groceries had gotten really complicated it had and for all the reasons that a consumer can anticipate most of us Listen to some streaming services. Very few of us have two walls of our bedroom covered in vinyl, and so In the beginning, there were a lot of virtual concerts, then I think a lot of us got pretty screened out, you know is this thing rolled on, But there have been some exceptions, the cultural phenomenon that is vs Where artists kind of battle it out. You know what I mean? That's that's been a big win, obviously, but also patri in. Oh, yeah, yeah, like the subscription models fart. Essentially those of really that is really boomed, which which is cool, right? I mean, that's great that there's that resource. For artists and musicians and others, but at some point You're going to have to and you're going to want to, and you're going to be able to get back into actually performing and there are going to be clubs it open and venues that open what you anticipate that's gonna be like because so many things in this economy have changed. And you have to believe that that Sector. That space has a swell. You know the scene in a movie where, like someone is sitting alone trying to figure out where the other survivors are. So they're tuning a radio might still be out there. Yeah, I think we're approaching that scene like We've got all these artists out here who are going to be watching the news to try to figure out what you know What's the timeline for the vaccine? What is it gonna be healthy and safe to go back on the road? But of course we're all gonna want to go..

Congress Kimberly Adams Samantha Fields writer Centers for Disease Control Justin Draeger Census Bureau Chicago plague American Bar Association Deborah Throat Federal Reserve Bank Wade Emily Ben Washington Spotify Jonathan
"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:52 min | 11 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Right now, for reasons that I would hope her obvious, but millions of Americans are facing more stress and anxiety. Run on literally by the roof over their heads, especially renters. According to our latest marketplace, Edison Research poll. 18% of Renters in this economy have missed at least one payment in the past six months, as compared to 14% of homeowners renders also tend to work in occupations that have been hit harder by shutdown like hospitality in retail, and they have fewer protections. His marketplaces, Amy Scott reports that leaves a lot of people at risk of losing their housing during a public health crisis. Charles White runs an ice cream truck business in Memphis, Tennessee, boss screams spelled with a Z and he says, Compared to this time last year, you'd been down a news even in the heat of summer, he says. Fear of the Corona virus kept a lot of customers away. He had to idle two of his three trucks and lay off three workers. His wife just had hip surgery and can't work. And now that the weather's getting cooler job, But I can't do nothing into my life, You know, a really beautiful love around. White is one of the nearly 20% of people in our poll, who said they'd missed a rent payment in the past six months. 64% nearly two thirds fear they'll miss one in the future. White is three months behind. His landlord is an old friend. So he's been patient, Anthony Pinos landlord has not He's even been charging me late fees. He raised my rent on all those. Pino runs a tile business in Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, which had to shut down for a few months when the state put a halt to most construction. He's been back at work since June, but says business is still half what it should be this time of year. Now, two months behind on rent, Pino says he may have to find another place to live. Well, me my land. We're going to go to court because I know we can't evict me right now with this pandemic going on, But I don't know what I really don't right now. A national moratorium on evictions from the CDC protects renters from being removed from their homes if they can't pay But Emily Ben for a law professor at Wake Forest University, says the Trump administration is allowing property owners to start the eviction process by filing with the court. In doing this, they thwarted the purpose of the order itself to prevent the spread of covert 19, she says. Many renters will do anything to avoid the eviction system. So the moment they receive a notice they leave, and that's what starts the crowded living environments. That's what starts the Increased contact with others in the inability to social distance in the 17 cities tracked by the eviction lab landlords have filed for more than 60,000 evictions during the pandemic. And Ben for says when the CDC moratorium expires at the end of December. We can expect that evictions will increase to unseen heights. Even when the rent does get paid often something else doesn't back In June, we talked to Julianna Sandridge from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma outside Tulsa. She'd lost her job and was facing eviction. While she waited for unemployment benefits to come through. They finally did. But in order to catch up on her rent, she missed utility bills. My water was shut off for about 2.5 3 weeks, maybe My leg tricks been shut off, Probably three or four times for a few days at a time. Sandridge has four kids still at home in a 15 month old granddaughter. She still hasn't found a new job. I've gained weight from just stress. I broke out. I can't believe you know, saw it so much. I'm worried about myself because I could get by. But you know you don't want that for your Children. She's counting on Congress to make a deal for more relief. Jamie Scott for Marketplace. Coming up thing once it starts producing some money and jobs, then People start talking about him. Yeah, it sounds about right, huh? First, though, let's do the numbers. I'm not sure I was expecting the walls today. What do you know? Down del shows down 410 points. 1.4% closed at 1 28,095. NASDAQ Down 192. 1.6% finished four 11078th E S and P. 500 down 56.1 point. 6% 34 26 tech companies led the decline. Apple dipped 2.5%, Microsoft and Google is parent company alphabet. Oh, she is the 2.4%. Maybe I'm just getting jaundiced Buy all this stuff anyway, has grown over cases rise. Target says he's going to hand out a fresh round.

Charles White Julianna Sandridge Pino Jamie Scott Emily Ben CDC Edison Research Amy Scott Memphis Tennessee Anthony Pinos Apple Wake Forest University Pennsylvania Tulsa Oklahoma Microsoft
"emily ben" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:23 min | 11 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"To gentrification. I'm just in how the marketplace Nobody needs more stress and anxiety right now, for reasons that I would hope her obvious, But millions of Americans are facing more stress and anxiety brought on literally by the roof over their heads, especially renters. According to our latest marketplace, Edison Research poll. 18% of Renters in this economy have missed at least one payment in the past six months. That's compared to 14% of homeowners renders also tend to work in occupations that have been hit harder by shutdown like hospitality in retail, and they have fewer protections. His marketplaces, Amy Scott reports that leaves a lot of people at risk of losing their housing during a public health crisis. Charles White runs an ice cream truck business in Memphis, Tennessee, boss screams spelled with a Z and he says, Compared to this time last year, you'd been down and loose even in the heat of summer, he says. Fear of the Corona virus kept a lot of customers away. He had to idle two of his three trucks and lay off three workers. His wife just had hip surgery and can't work. And now that the weather's getting cooler job, But I can't do nothing until my wife, you know, a really beautiful love around. White is one of the nearly 20% of people in our poll, who said they'd missed a rent payment in the past six months. 64% nearly two thirds fear they'll miss one in the future. White is three months behind. His landlord is an old friend, so he's been patient. Anthony Pinos. Landlord has not these even been charging me late fees. He raised my rent on all this. Pino runs a tile business in Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, which had to shut down for a few months when the state put a halt to most construction. He's been back at work since June, but says business is still half what it should be this time of year. Now, two months behind on rent. Pino says he may have to find another place to live. Well, me my land. We're going to go to court because I know we can't evict me right now with this pandemic going on, But I don't know what I really don't Right now. A national moratorium on evictions from the CDC protects renters from being removed from their homes if they can't pay, But Emily Ben for a law professor at Wake Forest University, says the Trump administration is allowing property owners to start the eviction process by filing with the court. And in doing this, they thwarted the purpose of the order itself to prevent the spread of covert 19, she says. Many renters will do anything to avoid the eviction system. So the moment they receive a notice they leave, and that's what starts the crowded living environments. That's what starts the increased contact with others and that inability to social distance In the 17 cities tracked by the eviction lab Landlords have filed for more than 60,000 evictions during the pandemic, and Ben for says when the CDC moratorium expires at the end of December. We can expect that evictions will increase to unseen heights, even when the rent does get paid often something else doesn't back In June, we talked to Julianna Sandridge from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma outside Tulsa. She'd lost her job and was facing eviction. While she waited for unemployment benefits to come through. They finally did. But in order to catch up on her rent, she missed utility bills. My water was shut off for about 2.5 3 weeks, maybe My electric's been shut off, Probably three or four times for a few days at a time. Sandridge has four kids still at home and a 15 month old granddaughter. She still hasn't found a new job. I've gained weight from just stress. I broke out. I can't sleeve. You know, it's not so much. I'm worried about myself because I could get by. But you know you don't want that for your Children. She's counting on Congress to make a deal for more relief. I'm Amy Scott for Marketplace. Coming up thing once it Starts producing some money and jobs, Then people start talking about it. Yeah, it sounds about right, huh? First, though, let's do the numbers. Ah, I'm not sure I was expecting the well us today. What do you know? Down del shows down 410 points. 1.4% closed at 1 28,095. NASDAQ Down 192. 1.6% finished four 11078th E S and P 500 down 56 points. 1.6% 34 26 tech companies led the decline. Apple dipped 2.5%, Microsoft and Google is parent company alphabet. Oh, shaved off 2.4%. Maybe I'm just getting jaundiced Buy all this stuff anyway has grown over cases rise. Target says he's going to hand out a fresh round of employee bonuses heading into the holiday season more than 350,000 workers. We'll collect. $200 target, of course, has seen big gains Target shares, though, lost a half percent..

Julianna Sandridge Charles White Pino Amy Scott Emily Ben CDC Edison Research Anthony Pinos Target Apple Memphis Tennessee Wake Forest University Pennsylvania Tulsa Oklahoma Microsoft
"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:43 min | 11 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are facing more stress and anxiety brought on literally by the roof over their heads, especially renters. According to our latest Marketplace. Edison Research poll. 18% of renters in this country have missed at least one payment in the past six months. That's compared to 14% of homeowners. Brenda is also tend to work in occupations that have been a big that have been hit harder by shutdowns like hospitality in retail, and they have fewer protections as well. Marketplaces Amy Scott reports that leaves a lot of people asked risk of losing their housing during a public health crisis. Charles White runs an ice cream truck business in Memphis, Tennessee, boss creams spelled with a Z and he says, compared to this time last year, there have been down even in the heat of summer. He says. Fear of the Corona virus kept a lot of customers away. He had to idle two of his three trucks and lay off three workers. His wife just had hip surgery and can't work. And now that the weather's getting cooler man, there's no second job, but I can't do nothing until my wife you know, able to give a little love around. White is one of the nearly 20% of people in our poll, who said they'd missed a rent payment in the past six months. 64% nearly two thirds fear they'll miss one in the future. White is three months behind. His landlord is an old friend, so he's been patient. Anthony Pinos. Landlord has not these even been charging me late fees. He raised my rent on. Although Pino runs a tile business in Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, which had to shut down for a few months when the state put a halt on most construction. He's been back at work since June, but says business is still half what it should be this time of year. Now, two months behind on rent, Pino says he may have to find another place to live. Only my landlord are going to go to court because I know we can't evicted right now with this pandemic going on, But I don't know what's going on. Right now. A national moratorium on evictions from the CDC protects renters from being removed from their homes if they can't pay But Emily Ben for a law professor at Wake Forest University, says the Trump administration is allowing property owners to start the eviction process by filing with the court. And in doing this, they thwarted the purpose of the order itself. To prevent the spread of covert 19. She says. Many renters will do anything to avoid the eviction system. So the moment they receive a notice they leave. And that's what starts the crowded living environments. That's what starts the increased contact with others in that inability to social distance in the 17 cities tracked by the eviction lab landlords have filed for more than 60,000 evictions during the pandemic. And Ben for says when the CDC moratorium expires at the end of December. We can expect that evictions will increase to unseen heights. Even when the rent does get paid often something else doesn't back In June, we talked to Julianna Sandridge from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma outside Tulsa. She'd lost her job and was facing eviction. While she waited for unemployment benefits to come through. They finally did. But in order to catch up on her rent, she missed utility bills. My water was shut off for about 2.5 3 weeks. Maybe my leg has been shall probably three or four times. For a few days at a time. Sandridge has four kids still at home in a 15 month old granddaughter. She still hasn't found a new job. I've gained weight from just stress. I've broke out. I can't sleep. You know, It's not so much. I'm worried about myself because I could get by, but I know you don't want that for your Children. She's counting on.

Charles White Julianna Sandridge Emily Ben Pino CDC Edison Research Anthony Pinos Brenda Amy Scott Memphis Tennessee Wake Forest University Pennsylvania Tulsa Oklahoma Bridgeport professor
"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:13 min | 11 months ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KCRW

"Are facing more stress and anxiety brought on literally by the roof over their heads, especially renters. According to our latest Marketplace. Edison Research poll. 18% of renters in this country have missed at least one payment in the past six months. That's compared to 14% of homeowners. Brenda is also tend to work in occupations that have been a big that have been hit harder by shutdowns like hospitality in retail, and they have fewer protections as well. His marketplaces. Amy Scott reports that leaves a lot of people asked risk of losing their housing during a public health crisis. Charles White runs an ice cream truck business in Memphis, Tennessee, boss screams spelled with a Z and he says, Compared to this time last year, you have been down in news. Even in the heat of summer, he says. Fear of the Corona virus kept a lot of customers away. He had to idle two of his three trucks and lay off three workers. His wife just had hip surgery and can't work. And now that the weather's getting cooler job, But I can't do nothing to my wife, you know, able to get a little love around. White is one of the nearly 20% of people in our poll, who said they'd missed a rent payment in the past six months. 64% nearly two thirds fear they'll miss one in the future. White is three months behind. His landlord is an old friend, So he's been patient, Anthony Pinos landlord has not even been charging me late fees. He raised my rent doing all this. Pino runs a tile business in Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, which had to shut down for a few months when the state put a halt to most construction. He's been back at work since June, but says business is still half what it should be this time of year. Now, two months behind on rent, Pino says he may have to find another place to live. Well, me my land. We're going to go to court because I know we can't evict me right now. With this pans I'm going on. I don't know what I really don't Right now. A national moratorium on evictions from the CDC protects renters from being removed from their homes if they can't pay. But Emily Ben for a law professor at Wake Forest University, says the Trump administration is allowing property owners to start the eviction process by filing with the court. And in doing this, they Thwarted the purpose of the order itself to prevent the spread of covert 19, she says. Many renters will do anything to avoid the eviction system. So the moment they receive a notice they leave, and that's what starts the crowded living environments. That's what starts the increased contact with others and that inability to social distance in the 17 cities tracked by the eviction lab landlords have filed for more than 60,000 evictions during the pandemic. And Ben for says when the CDC moratorium expires at the end of December. We can expect that evictions will increase to unseen heights, even when the rent does get paid often something else doesn't back In June, we talked to Julianna Sandridge from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma outside Tulsa. She'd lost her job and was facing eviction while she waited for unemployment benefits to come through. They finally did, But in order to catch up on her rent, she missed utility bills. My water was shut off for about 2.5 3 weeks. Maybe my lecture has been shut off, Probably three or four times. For a few days at a time. Sandridge has four kids still at home and a 15 month old granddaughter. She still hasn't found a new job. I've gained weight from just stress. I broke out. I can't sleep. You know, It's not so much. I'm worried about myself because I could get by, but I know you don't want that for your Children. She's counting on Congress to make a deal for more relief. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. Coming up. Think once it starts producing some money and jobs, then people start talking about. Yeah, it sounds about right, huh? First, though. Let's do the numbers. I'm not sure I was expecting the well us today. What do you know? Down del shows down 410 points 1.4% closed at 1 28,095. NASDAQ Down 192. 1.6% finished four 11078th E S and P 500 down 56 points. 1.6% 34 26 tech companies led the decline. Apple dipped 2.5%, Microsoft and Google is parent company alphabet. So she ate 2.4%. Maybe I'm just getting jaundiced. By all this anyway has grown over cases rise. Target says he's going to hand out a fresh round of employee bonuses heading into the holiday season more than 350,000 workers. Collect. $200 target, of course, has seen big gains Target shares, though, lost a half percent. You're listening to marketplace marketplaces supported by Lifelock, reminding consumers that they could miss certain threats by only monitoring their credit like their info for sale on the Dark Web, Learn more.

Emily Ben Charles White Amy Scott Pino Julianna Sandridge CDC Edison Research Brenda Lifelock Anthony Pinos Apple Memphis Wake Forest University Tennessee Target Pennsylvania Tulsa Oklahoma
"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"emily ben" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. When the pandemic first started shutting down parts of the U. S economy, measures were passed to ease the pain for people who suddenly had no income. Things like eviction moratoriums an extra unemployment assistance. But many of those protections are set to expire at the end of this month, and that's leading to fears that millions of Americans could become homeless. Here to tell us more is Emily Ben for She's a law professor at Wake Forest University and co creator of the eviction lab coated 19 housing policy scorecard. She joins us from New York City, Emily Ben for thanks for being on the program. Thank you so much for having me, Emily. I saw a tweet of yours from just a few days ago. That got a lot of attention. And in it, you referenced ostrich syndrome. Would you explain what you were referring to once these moratorium and financial assistance programs end? So I think the United States is on the brink of mass evictions across the country. The Aspen Institute estimates that approximately 20 to 24 million people are facing eviction right now, and yet, by the end of July, the cares act federal moratorium, the majority of state level moratoriums and unemployment insurance will expire. These are the on ly stopgap measures in place to prevent eviction. And yet we're not seeing the level of urgency necessary to prevent them from happening from the federal government. So to me, that is a non ostrich syndrome that we need to really address to prevent this type of widespread addiction, homelessness. You made reference to hell. Evictions can start a cascade of other woes. I mean, it's it's it's off. In the beginning of many other bad things happening to people. Can you talk a little more about the lasting impact evictions can have. Addiction is incredibly devastating. It leads to unemployment, residential instability. Homeless is academic decline. It has well studied negative consequences in health for both adults and Children. It's also an adverse childhood experience so it can result in long term health and chronic problems for Children well into adulthood. Including cardiac disease, pulmonary disease, and more and numerous studies have shown that eviction actually results in respiratory disease, which could be a compounding factor of summer to contract covert 19. It also increases mortality rates, depression suicide, There's no good outcome from eviction. And I've read that you've pointed out that once you have an eviction on your record that sometimes makes landlord to the future, not want to rent to you. That's correct. We call it the scarlet E. Once a person has an eviction on their record, their credit scores plummet. They're often routinely blacklisted in the rental market, even if they ultimately won their case because usually, property owners don't want to bend to someone who has an eviction on their record. And that includes filing and so these states across the country that have allowed for filings of eviction during the pandemic. All of those renters air put in a particular place of hardship, because it will be very difficult for them to find suitable housing going forward. Are there any groups of Americans particularly vulnerable to infection? Yes, much like covert. 19 people of color have been hardest hit by eviction. One survey found that after controlling for education, black households are more than twice as likely as white households to be subject to eviction. And the single greatest predictor of an eviction is the presence of a child in these households. You know, I'm sure their listeners thinking landlords have expenses, too. They may have mortgages and taxes to pay. And if their tenants aren't paying rent, that's a problem. What about the landlord? Perspective of this? That's such a good point. Renters are not the only ones bearing the brunt of the crisis. And we can't expect property owners to carry the economic depression in place of renters when rent payments stop so to property taxes and mortgage payments, building maintenance employee salaries. And declining rent payments. They're more likely to affect small landlords who like their renters, they lack of financial cushion to write out the pandemic or to carry the economy. Could you list the top two things you think need to be done to prevent a mass housing crisis in this country, the most critical thing that weaken Dio as a stopgap measure an immediate measure, the federal government should create a nationwide moratorium on evictions. And it must also couple that with the rental assistance that will sustain renters, state, local governments and the housing market so that we can stabilize throughout the pandemic once that's in place. We have to start thinking about long term interventions to address and prevent the affordable housing crisis. It's clear that the pandemic is not going away any time soon that we're going to be in this for some time, and that means that these tertiary stopgap measures will not be enough to prevent widespread eviction and homelessness. That's Emily Ben for co creator of the eviction lab coated 19 housing policy scorecard and a law professor at Wake Forest University. Emily Thank you, thank you. Now to California, which is home to a multi $1,000,000,000 wine industry. But like other sectors of the economy, it's taken a big hit from the corona virus pandemic and the resulting business shutdowns. Saul Gonzalez from member station has more Jobless Creek Winery is located on California's central coast, about three hours north of Los Angeles manager and co owner Jason Haas really likes showing off his vineyard that were fairly early in the growing season. The Berries Irv smaller than peas right now. I'll probably be picking this sometime in the beginning of October. But instead of focusing on future grape harvests, Haas like other California, Bittner's of winery owners, has spent the last few months dealing with the damage done to his business by the Corona virus pandemic. I mean, I've been doing this for 18 years, and there's been nothing like this when we had to have our tasting room closed for three months. So this is a whole different order of magnitude in terms of challenges that we've had to overcome. Haas says. He lost about 1/4 of the sails with the closure of his winery and Mohr when you factor in the fall in restaurant orders, and he's not alone. The Wine Institute, a trade group says California's wine industry will likely lose more than $4 billion this year because of the pandemic, and a new study by Sonoma State University projects the loss of more than 40,000 wine related jobs in the state. But many California wineries got some good news last month when the state allowed them to partially reopened if they follow Corona virus guidelines. So the serving staff a topless has come backto work block again. Bright acidity will taste a lot of different fruit, but I picked up a lot of tart green apple on it. It's just a nice, refreshing wine, and visitors here can only comment. They make reservations. First, drink outside and maintain social distancing. The staff wears masks and face shields. And gloves as he served the wine. Although California has again shut down wineries and bars in some parts of the state to help stop an uptick in Corona virus cases, big parts of one country have been spared. Haas argues the precautions his industry has taken, make visiting a winery or vineyard safer than other activities safer than going to movie theaters safer than going to an indoor restaurant's safer than going to get a pedicure or going to a gym. Topless customer, Dorothy Schultz says she feels safe and is elated. Wine country is partially reopened, She and a friend made him more than five hour drive from San Diego to sip wine flights and soak in the scenery..

Emily Ben California Jason Haas Wake Forest University federal government professor NPR Sasha Pfeiffer New York City United States Aspen Institute Dorothy Schultz Wine Institute Saul Gonzalez San Diego Sonoma State University Jobless Creek Winery