17 Burst results for "Emily Basil"

"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | Last week

"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A long time to come. McConnell fast track the confirmation of judges under Republican President Donald Trump, almost 1/4 of all active federal judges in the United States were appointed by Trump. Senator McConnell relishes that lasting influence. The person who sits on the bench on the Supreme Court really matters. Emily Basil on writes for the New York Times Magazine and his senior research fellow at Yale Law School. And I think people on both sides have woken up to the degree to which the party affiliation of that person. Tends to predict the way they're going to rule that was less true until the 19 eighties. But then you start to see Republicans in particular through the Federalist Society, which has been very successful. It Moving the bench to the right. You start to see them be much more intentional about picking very conservative judicial candidates for the Supreme Court, and you see some response to that. Among Democrats, you see more reliable liberal picks from them. But the conservatives and the Republicans have had more of the choices to make more of the nominations. The Democrats As Emily points out, the Republican Party has not won the majority of votes in six of the last seven presidential elections. And yet vacancies on the court from deaths and retirements have allowed Republican presidents to a 70.6 of the last 10 justices. The question is whether this skews the court in a way that's out of step with public opinion. Professor Jonathan Adler of the case. Western University Law School thinks ideology is the wrong way to analyze judges. We expect that justices are trying to answer the questions before them to the best of their ability, faithful to the Constitution faithful to Other sources of legal authority and the more they are evaluated not on their ability to do those things. But on whether or not they will rule in a particular case in a particular way that's favored by a particular interest group were particular party, then It's harder to view them as being different or distinct from those who we elect to, you know, let for Congress or like for the presidency, which has the effect of politicizing the court. And there's little question the intense polarization of American life. Has spilled over two nominations for Supreme Court justices in recent years. Reached the boiling point during the bitter clash and 2018 over the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh by President Donald Trump. The battle over America's judiciary had been region for years. Rulings by the courts touch so much of the way Americans live. Healthcare, immigration, elections, abortion, climate change, civil rights, gun ownership and so much else in our constitutional republic. Decisions by judges have consequences. Which is why so much is on the line and how the judiciary operates. Kimberly Atkins in Washington and attorney and journalists now.

Emily Basil Kimberly Atkins Brett Kavanaugh Trump Emily United States Congress McConnell 2018 Jonathan Adler Republican Party Senator President Western University Law School Yale Law School Republican 70.6 19 eighties six Washington
"emily basil" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"emily basil" Discussed on KCRW

"Tio elected lawmakers into the president who signs laws right and less power to the court to strike them down. So those air to possible ideas that fall short of expanding the number of justices on the court. You know what I would generally say in line I think with Michael's points is that when the court gets far out of step with the American public things don't go. Well, It just doesn't work very well. We know that from The early part of the 20th century, and especially the new deal. When a very conservative court struck down major pieces of the new deal, FDR threatened to do court packing. It actually was a perfectly popular idea. Briefly then it started to get less popular with people as there was more resistance to it, But what really saved the court from court packing were the justices. One, and then Maura of the conservative justices started switching their votes. And then they retired and FDR made a whole lot of appointments. So there is a way in which Supreme Court justices who are themselves institutionalist and care about preserving the role of the court and the legacy of the court, and I count very much Chief Justice John Roberts among these people, right. It's the Roberts court. It has his name on it. If you care about that, a Supreme Court justice, you have a reason to temper what might otherwise be your ideological goals. And so there is a way in which that is goingto potentially prevent the court from going completely out of step with the public and the way that Michael's concerned about you. Let's take a quick break. I'll be back with Michael Brendon Doherty of National Review Jemele Buoy of The New York Times and Emily Basil on of The New York Times Magazine to talk about what a change at the court might mean for some specific policy.

Roberts court Supreme Court Michael Brendon Doherty FDR Chief Justice John Roberts president The New York Times Magazine Maura The New York Times Emily Basil
"emily basil" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on Here & Now

"Let's go to Maryland. Or the case focuses on that state's sixth congressional district and Republicans they're saying that then governor Martin O'Malley democrat over. Overseeing the redistricting process tried to dilute the power of Republican voters to ensure a democratic victory. So what's their proof? I mean, this is basically the flip story from North Carolina. Where you have the Democrats drawing a map that splits Maryland's congressional seats seven to one favoring Democrats. They did that by taking a lot of people from the heavily democratic areas near Washington d Tim D C and putting them into Maryland's six district turning it from red to blue. And so again, the question is whether this is okay or not well in many states the party in power does get to redraw the boundaries of congressional districts. It is legal for them to consider politics when they do this. But we understand there's a limit to how partisan you can be. So with these two states in mind what's currently allowed. And you know, how might that be taken into consideration when they're ruling on constitutionality not sort of state legality, right? Some states set their own rules for this. Florida, for example, has a limit on the amount of political partisan preference than can go into drawing maps, and the Pennsylvania supreme court struck down congressional map in Pennsylvania for the same reasons. The question though, for the supreme court decide is whether the United States constitution allows this kind of partisan gerrymandering. And so the more, particularly the issues are, okay. If you're a voter, and you live in a district that's been packed with members of the opposite party. So your preference is never gonna win. You don't have any chance are you being punished for your political views in a way that would violate the first amendment and have the people who've drawn the map, basically violated the spirit of the part of the constitution that makes house elections frequent because they're supposed to be responsive to the American people. So those are the kind of underlying constitutional concerns here. And some people are saying throw the whole damn thing out and make it a slate where you vote, you know, one two and three, but we'll just take that up. Another time. This is happening. The court considering the. Cases ahead of congressional elections. Next year could the court's rulings impact the twenty twenty races in both North Carolina and Maryland. Oh, absolutely. I mean, if the supreme court were to say that partisan gerrymandering is illegal in some way, were two sets and boundaries North Carolina and Maryland would have to redraw multiple districts to comply. The question is how likely that is given the current composition of the supreme court. No-one ask you about that. Because the last time around the court passed up an opportunity to weigh in on gerrymandering was different this time. And what's your sense of how the court's new makeup will affect a ruling what's different this time. Is that Justice? Anthony Kennedy has been replaced by Justice Brett Kavanagh Kennedy, kind of punt it the last time around he had an earlier case years ago said, you know, maybe partisan gerrymandering is unconstitutional may be courts could weigh in on that. But he never sealed the deal, then he retired Justice Cavanaugh is in his seat. And. Cavenaugh has not expressed views on political partisan gerrymandering, but other aspects of his record involving voter ID and a case about racial gerrymandering that the court heard out of Regina last week. Those cases in his stances suggest that he is not going to be eager to limit partisan gerrymandering. And that would mean that the supreme court could say to all federal courts in the country. You know, what this is a political problem courts have no role to play in limiting partisan gerrymandering hula this'll starts tomorrow. But for now the soldier's remains very mysterious Emily basil on Steph writer for the New York Times magazine of fellow at Yale Law School ahead of two gerrymandering cases that will go before the supreme court tomorrow. With twenty twenty approaching. We're talking with the candidates who are jumping into the race. Bill. Weld is the only Republican challenging President Trump next year. He's the former governor of Massachusetts. And he's announced an exploratory committee for a presidential run Bill. Well, joins us now from concord New Hampshire..

supreme court Maryland North Carolina Justice Brett Kavanagh Kennedy Martin O'Malley United States Trump Pennsylvania Anthony Kennedy concord New Hampshire Cavenaugh Washington Massachusetts Tim D C Florida Weld Emily basil Yale Law School Regina
"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Smith, New episodes. Start streaming January twentieth. Only on Showtime. Okay. Next topic the ethics of mommy, blogging. Should you blog right post? Pictures of your children online, a really difficult question for the official, mommy blogger the celebrity and then just regular moms who write about their kids usually people come to the subject when a child turns a little bit older and asks or starts to wonder if their mom could stop writing about them recently this happened Kristie Tate in the Washington Post. But when her daughter asked her to stop writing about her she said, I can't do that. And I'm not done exploring my motherhood in my writing, so. I'm going to jump in here. Having had this problem. I am you guys didn't know that. I'm a professional, mommy blogger I go by different names. But I have now and again written a thing or two about my children and having dived into this debate. I would say, you know, I don't think I I I don't think I handled it that way. Well, and the reason I don't think so is because what became clear to me in reading Tate's essay is there's a great power dynamic here. I'm like she talks about how she negotiates with her children. Well, let me lay out the issues a little differently issues of memoir like lots of people write about their parents. Right. There isn't a great debate about that people write memoirs, and I know working in a show that does intense emotional pieces about people that memoirs are like legally. Okay. Does legally. Okay to tell your story when your story involves another person. Like if you guys wanted to write a. Modern like modern love columns, for example. Right. So you can write about people close to you. But what is different about writing about children? Well, it's sort of obvious. I mean, they're children. They they don't have power. They don't have power. They're not form people in the world yet. Right. Also, there are people that you have power over. It's not just that. There's a power inequity just in general. It's that the people writing about them are, you know, are shaping them too. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I think the sense that I think the way she described it really irritated people because there was a real blow back to this. It was basically her daughter got a laptop for Christmas must have googled herself. She's in fourth grade. And she said, why are these pictures of me on the internet, and she had Google them and asked if she could be taken down, and she said, I told her that was not possible. I'm not done exploring, my motherhood and writing I think that's the sentence people. Crazy. Well, it's the her feel self absorbed. I feel like it's the ultimate, mommy blog posts. Because part of the Gina is inviting people to judge you, and there's nothing that's going to make people judge you more than saying. Yes, I'm doing this. In defiance of my daughter's wishes because I am more important than my children. Right. Like, it goes against they'll sacrifice the ethos of I guess, but then shouldn't we like shouldn't. We shouldn't we resist the blowback like like she. I I I read this story. And I was like, oh, I see what she like motherhood is is how are you supposed to write about the experience of motherhood without ever writing about your children, and the blowback was complete actually gave the story to my daughter. And she was like, no she's like a self absorbed. She had the same response that everybody on the internet hat like this is ridiculous. No, like, if your child turns a certain age and ask you to take something like you do not have the right to write about your children. And I think partly it's because kids have a better sense of pride like they have a more. Well, developed kind of what is my public self, and what is my private self? And like, what can you say? And what can you not say? And how do you control that? Whereas when mothers are writing about motherhood, they're being honest to honest. A lot of the time. I mean, there's another question too of like, I remember Emily basil on like, no ten years ago when she often wrote about family and her family specifically for slate talked about how.

Kristie Tate Washington Post Smith Emily basil official Google Gina slate ten years
"emily basil" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on KPCC

"Element to drop that out Christian messages, redemption bury Paul, thank you, very much Paul, and Bismarck, and Jason and Saint Louis on opposite sides of this one and David in Philadelphia has a personal experience. I think David you're on America on the line. Hi, hello. How are you? Good. What happened? Two months ago. I just caught convicted of a felony. I'm sixty years old in Pennsylvania. We had seven scrawny plants amongst our huge vegetable garden that we were just both family members. And then the neighbor called in and we got convicted of manufacturing conspiracy intensive deliver and statutes here a felony so fourteen between them all fourteen felony counts and seven misdemeanors got reduced to a couple of felonies felony for life. And now, I don't want to and it's just outrageous. When there's thirty states around me there that are legal, David. Thank you very much David banned from voting because of what he called scrawny marijuana plants. So we've been talking about Florida where lifetime disenfranchisement for convicted felons is on the ballot and indirectly a remnant of slavery. Aballah question in Colorado is even more direct on paper at least certain crimes. Can still be punished with slavery in Colorado. Believe it or not and repealing that language is on the ballot with us to explain that. As Emily basil on remains to react. If we have time is Jim, okay. Emory director of campaigns for progress now and the initiator of the abolish slavery ballot measure in Colorado. Thank you so much for some time tonight. Welcome to come on the line. Thank you for having me. What do you mean? Slavery is a legal form of punishment in Colorado. How's that even a thing on paper in twenty eighteen? Well, it's also a legal form of slavery in the nation in the United States constitution the thirteenth amendment reads. Almost exactly the same way that article two section twenty six of the Colorado state constitution reads, and that is there. So never be in. This state are the slavery nor involuntary servitude except as punishment for crime where the party should have been duly convicted. There was a ballot question. And of course, there's there's a bit of the constitution that a lot of people don't know unless the person has been duly convicted. There was a ballot question to repeal it in Colorado two years ago. I see and it failed. What happened? In two thousand sixteen similarly to this year in two thousand eighteen we had the Colorado state legislature. Both the house and Senate voted unanimously to put this before voters. What happened is in the process? The wording was real confusing. There was this odd sort of double negative wherein people who wanted to actually abolish slavery. We're voting to keep it and and vice versa. Folks were folks weren't sure they were voting for in two thousand sixteen and so we've made a huge effort to clear up the language this year to make it clear that yes on amendment. A is a yes to abolish slavery is this photo about something that's purely symbolic at this point. When we talk about the constitution on whether that's the national constitution or the state constitution. Nothing about that is symbolic. The constitution isn't a symbolic document. It lives is the it's the foundation for for both our moral in our at our and our legal standing in this country. So when you when you start changing the constitution, it's. You can't talk about it as being a symbolic move. Emily Basilan as a scholar of the supreme court, your by extension, a scholar of the constitution. Do you think? Most Americans would be shocked to learn that slavery is a legitimate form of punishment to this day at least on paper in the United States constitution. Yeah. I mean, it's just amazing. The things that remain on the books that we kind of never got around for racing. And I think this is a crazy example of that. We obviously don't enforce this law, but I understand the motivation to to officially eliminated because it's just is not how we think about punishment today. And certainly not how we should think about it. Are there other states? Jim, okay. In addition to Colorado where this is still on the books at the state level. There are several in fact, there are it's kind of half and half cross country. There are several that still have this wording in their state constitutions of their several that do not. And yet we all find ways to incarcerate. Just about the same right? And beyond that, I gather the kind of work assignments that prisoners can be given while not technically slavery in the traditional sense is an issue, by implication. And that's an issue in a lot of places. Right. So that's a question. We've gotten a lot is that if we take this language out of the constitution while we still have the ability to enforce community service or work programmes things that have proven to reduce recidivism. And the answer is is if we take this language out, it will have no effect on those programs in many ways was programs are voluntary or folks are compensated for those and they're also clarified mistakes you and again, there are many states in this country. That did not have this language in their constitution that all and still have the ability to enforce work programs, and volunteer volunteer community service. So it sounds like you wanna. Reassure people that prison labor programs can continue exactly. And yet Emily there have been protests at prisons around the country over this issue. I don't know if you follow the story at all. But raising the question of when is prison. Labour a form of slavery as opposed to a legitimate form of a forest or a monkey says voluntary in many cases contribution back to society by someone who has who has wronged it you wear that issue. Yeah. I am. And I thought it was really interesting that that contributed to the strike. I think if I understand it, right? What's at issue? Here is compensation. It's not that a lot of people are in prison. Don't wanna work. It's that they feel like they're effectively working almost for free. And that they're doing it away that they don't see the money is going back to the general public. They see it as sort of going to feed the president Austrial complex. I think that's their complaint here. One clarification from the earlier issue on the Florida felons are calling from Pennsylvania who got a felony conviction and couldn't vote we think it's not a lifetime ban right in Pennsylvania. So we didn't want to leave that implication, especially for listeners in Pennsylvania who may be in that position of having served time for something. And leaving this impression that you can't vote for the rest of your life. That's not the case as we just heard Emily confirmed and the keystone state, okay is repeal. Of legal slavery gonna win this time. We have twenty seconds. I absolutely I certainly hope so. You're supposed to take twenty seconds. Thank you very much. We'll be watching on election day. Another thing listeners for you to follow on November. Sixth will Colorado repeal the right to punish people with slavery in the state constitution. Jim, okay. Emory director of campaigns for progress now in the initiator of the abolish slavery ballot initiative. Thank you, very much, Emily basil on from the New York Times magazine with the article about Florida's ex-felons voting laws. Thank you very much..

Colorado Jim David Emily basil United States Pennsylvania Emily Florida Emory director Emily Basilan Paul America Bismarck Senate Philadelphia marijuana Jason
"emily basil" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Has claimed that he saw her coach the FBI agent friend of hers, Monica McLean. He also went on to say, Dr fraud never mentioned anything about judge Brad Kavanagh. In fact, never mentioned the thing about sexual assault. In fact, when they broke up she ran up his credit card so calling into question some of her character, not one alphabet network or one left wing cable channel printed his letter before the Senate Judiciary committee, not one not one covered it. Nobody interviewed him. Nobody published it. They said he was a bitter ex. Yeah. Well, that doesn't mean he's not telling the truth, right? MBC news accused supreme court nominee. Brad Kavanagh perjury in the Monday article before editing, the peace with additional context that disprove their claim CNN's anchor. Jim shuto? Rushing off accusations of sexual misconduct against judge cavenaugh, simply politics, quote, to be honest with you, I think judge cavenaugh reacted exactly the way most Americans would react to being smeared. If somebody said that things about me they said about him. I think I would have asked somebody to step outside. But he said, look, this is just politics. No. It's not. I mean, it explains the politics of the Democrats, but this is way beyond politics. Right. New York slimes published a news article on Monday co-authored by Yale Law School, fellow Emily basil on about supreme court nominee. Brad kavanagh. Despite previously declaring her opposition to the judge's nomination. So she comes out and says, I'm opposed to the nomination. So the New York slimes thought it would be good to assign her to write an article about him. Talk about media bias in media morons Chuck Grassley headed ride yesterday when he called out the media right to their faces that they're just absolutely disgusting. And disgraceful. You know, these demonstrations are going to continue even if a judge capital is approved due to be on the supreme court bench. And it just you know. Reminds me that these these people that are against him. We're not going to stop right now. If he is approved there's going to be continued demonstrations as well, in fact, capital could be one of the youngest guys ever appointed to the supreme court and could be one of the youngest guys to retire. If I'm him and I'm seated on the bench. I would. I would which one of the justices was Pasi Ginsburg. Or who was the does the leg presses. Surname, big moms. No, not egging. The judge not the judge. It was the secretary of State Madeleine have in half right now. I was one of the justices that still. You think it'd be keagan Hagan Schillaci could bench press? Looks like she's been bench breast. Oh, my when I think you should do is if he gets sworn in the minute he goes, so help me God, drop your pants..

Brad Kavanagh judge cavenaugh Chuck Grassley Senate Judiciary committee New York Hagan Schillaci FBI Monica McLean assault Jim shuto fraud Pasi Ginsburg CNN secretary State Madeleine Yale Law School perjury Emily basil
"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"And in fact, at this point, there is no organized opposition which seems crazy given what's at stake for the Republicans. Are you afraid that? Well, I'm guessing that you support this, but if this article comes out and President Trump season you, the Republicans are aware of this that actually it's going to galvanize. And opposition because everything is partisan these days that there's going to be this realization like, oh my God, we could lose Florida. We'd better, we'd better mobilise against it. We better do something about it. That is possible. I guess I always try not to ascribe too much power to myself. I mean, this thing, the big thing that's happening in Florida, like presumably, President Trump could hear about it from someone else, not. Especially someone who writes for the failing New York Time Times. getting through a magazine article seemed like he's not on the cover. Is he on the cover. But someone that FOX is going to read it. Yes. No, that's true. I mean, if you heard what this liberal Emily basil as the lawn said, and the New York Times. I mean, it is possible that by increasing the profile of this issue there, you know, I somehow contributed to a backlash. I did think about that. I'm a reporter in the end, not an advocate, so I feel like that's fair enough. That's what happens. But it has been really interesting in the governor's race. So Andrew gillum who's the democratic mayor of Tallahassee. He's guys like him. He's come out really strongly amendment for and and you know, that seems unsurprising except that in the past Democrats have been very wary of this issue. They didn't want to be labeled soft on crime or the party of felons. They were super nervous about it. Now that's starting to change on Rhonda Santa's. The Republican running against Gillam has said nothing about this measure. He's been ducking questions for months when return my calls won't talk to local media about it, and he is getting coke money. So I wonder if there's a connection there and he's willing in the short term. To stay out of this for the sake of trying to win or at least not alienate the. Yeah. Well, it's also because he has he is not just gotten the support of the president, but he's sought most closely to to repeat and and utilize the tactic said that candidate Trump used, and so you would you would think that incentive would cause him to make some notion of makes them note of this. But yeah, so I mean, it sixty percent remains a high bar. So I look at those polls. And then I still think like, wait when people actually get to the polls and they think about this if they see it in partisan terms at this point, what will they do? But can I say one more thing that I found really surprising. So Desmond too. I just mentioned to you went on Tucker, Carlson show a couple of weeks ago with the political director of the campaign was named Neil Volz who turns out to be the guy who like made the Jack Abraham Abramov scandal happened so volts was aid to Bob ney the congressman who like went down and Abramov land and volt. This is the person who cooperated with the FBI and pled guilty. That's why he has a felony record. Now he is, you know, very much like are formed person who has found God and done a lot of work with homeless people and people in recovery, and he's part of this campaign. So he and Desmond are this like great pair. So they go on Tucker, Carlson show, and Tucker starts out. I think he, he thought he had them..

Andrew gillum President Trump Tucker president Florida Gillam Desmond FBI New York Times New York Emily basil FOX Rhonda Santa Tallahassee reporter Neil Volz Bob ney Jack Abraham Abramov Carlson
"emily basil" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And also with us is emily basil lon she is a writer for the new york times staff writer for the new york times magazine and co host of slates political gabfest podcast and the truman capote fellow for creative writing and law at yale law school emily welcome to wnyc welcome back i should say thanks for having me well we're going to the cause of course we're already coming in my twitter feed has been full all day and of your arrival but first let me begin by asking you both y this departure is so important why is it such a big deal l e let me start with you yeah the night is dark and full of terrors i would expect that with kennedy leaving and trump being able to pick his replacement that affirmative action is dead within a year i would expect that within twenty four months half the states perhaps have outlawed abortion and i would expect that anything and i mean anything that donald trump can fantasize about doing an executive order is now legal that's and that's just the top level obvious impacts of his decision to retire emily can you light a match in this very dark and bleak cave well sure because we started off in just such a very dark place i mean in a look the courts still has its processes chief justice roberts is going to move the courts the right when he is in a central position there's no question that elliot's right about that however he has not shown an appetite for huge enormous giant steps all at once and so i think there will be more incremental ism elliot's describing it may take longer for some of those things to come to pass and the reason is that roberts cares about the image of the court among the court gets completely out of sync with public opinion in american politics that's not good for the court and robert spoiled care about that to some degree so anyway i i think we're maybe having disagreement that has to do with pacing as opposed to the potential outcome what do you what do you mean emily by pacing well i mean that it just takes time for cases to come up and that you know so for example let's talk about abortion rights because that's going to be such a crucial issue one could imagine that the first thing that will happen is the court will take a case where there's a twenty week abortion ban and allow that band to stand that's a substantial change from the law we have now but is not the same thing as you know half the states declared abortion illegal full stop all at once i think there will be a more incremental shift and look that means that the voters will weigh in along the way as things change yeah e l a you tweeted that you think that half the states will outlaw abortion in the next twenty four months because kennedy's mere presence acts as a stop or an arresting development for some of the most draconian impulses in some of these state legislatures so now if you're if you're you wanted to ban abortion when kennedy was on the court why would you bother you knew that wasn't going to work now in my work why wouldn't you try especially if they hold onto the state legislature i would like to agree with emily overall about pacing that i have deep concerns especially about john roberts who and there's no other way to put this i think roberts is respect and care for.

writer staff writer emily basil lon the new york times twenty four months twenty week
"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Good chance we'll bring that up we talked about the trouble in the senate with your bill what about the president also i spoke to the white house about this and i didn't speak to the prisoners the white house about this and what the white house expressed us is that that the president was concerned that we're going to have such a heavy compromised bill actually does nothing and and he's saying and then that tweet he was saying why waste your time if we're if we're gonna have to negotiate everything away just wait until the red wave comes in november and we have a stronger senate and and we still control the house and then pass legislation that is more conservative i don't disagree with this thank you that and so if we can get a good deal moving forward that make sure that we're covering national security and we're we got a immigration bill that actually works than the president will sign it but he just doesn't want to shave the house away just to have an immigration bill that's mark wayne mullen republican congressman from oklahoma congressman thanks for joining us hey thank you for having me on appreciate you now to the supreme court decision today about what's been called racial gerrymandering that's assigning citizens to districts on the basis of race without good reason the case was over district maps in texas they were redrawn after the two thousand ten census and in a five to four ruling written by conservative justice samuel alito the court upheld all but one of those texas districts even though a lower court had said the district's discriminated against black and hispanic voters joining us with more is emily basil on staff writer at the new york times magazine she's also fellow at yale law school either emily hey how are you i'm doing well so first of all let's talk a little bit about the district's specifically so after said after the two thousand ten census texas redrew several of its district because population growth there but much of that growth was due to an increase in black and hispanic residents so how are these districts are initially drawn up well you're right so texas initially drew the districts in twenty eleven after the census then a court stepped in and said that they'd been drawn with discriminatory intent that they were either packing latino voters to diminish their influence or spreading them out too much the phrase of packing or cracking that comes up a lot of these gerrymandering cases so then the court offered an interim plan the legislature mostly adopted that plan and then the court came back in two thousand seventeen instead actually that plan doesn't cure the problem of discrimination we saw originally we want you to go back to the drawing board and so that's what we're arguing over here.

senate president white house congressman texas staff writer the new york times magazine yale law school mark wayne mullen oklahoma samuel alito emily basil
"emily basil" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Took a while for the wax to get up into stood icty wayne now yeah they lgbt's trying to escalate i'll bet ladder you know my way quality but their fringe on everybody else's liberty thank you very much let's get yo in here from hollywood florida hi geo what do you think on this hygiene i think it's really sad it's it's just the disheartening to see that we're taking such a big setback words it's a slippery slope i mean today's a cake tomorrow it's going to be a doctrine in an er using take care of analogy t person who could be dying gee i don't think that's what this case says emily basil on that would not be appropriate would it be no i hope not but i think the kind of pain in your caller's voice speaks to the sensitivity gay people have to how they've been treated in the past and sharon talked about this too and there's a lot of legitimate fear and concern that we could slip back into being a society in which gay couples do face a number of barriers that really deeply affect their lives go way beyond where you buy your wedding cake and the court didn't didn't clearly say no to that today so people who wanted to clean ruling that said gay people have the right to buy to get services for their weddings wherever they want that didn't happen and you know the gay rights come into that's a big disappointment sheeran mcgowan jump back in here what did you hear in our caller geos voice in his in his point there i think it was really important and i'm glad that she was able to get through today because the brief that lambda legal filed in this case a friend of a court brief in support of a couple really brings to the fore the fact that.

hollywood emily basil icty florida sharon
"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Blown up with the slate political gabfest per march fifteen twenty teen the rex rex addition i wished we had stormy daniels because i was like we have rex rex xx heck's but we're not gonna do it you saw best wrecks we ever know worst wreck wrecks i ever had the new york post headline that was a great headline that is ruth marcus of the washington post sitting in this week for emily basilan hello ruth i'm doing my emily basil i'm not imitation live low nicely i'm david lots of atlas obscure and ruth is with me in washington but john dickerson cbs is this morning or cbs this morning i still don't know if there's an apostrophe silent they've hostas island yes hello john hello david on this week's gaffe has this i would say i will i will appeal to both of you this was one of the news east weeks i can remember that didn't have something like absolutely catastrophic in it but just unbelievable amounts of news unbelievable variety of stories so we're not gonna be able to get to all the incredible things that are happening to theranos to toys r us toys r us as closing so the house russia investigation to north korea we're not gonna get to north korea there's all i'm sure john pick your favorite story we're not getting to it's incredible you know you did a pretty good job there between fairness and the toys r us i was i mean it was an iconic brand part of growing up who didn't love walking down the aisle and seeing all the things you couldn't get but i also felt like well yeah they've been in bankruptcy for awhile and the retailers are taking pounding from online sales and so all right.

daniels ruth marcus emily basil washington cbs david north korea new york post emily basilan john dickerson russia
"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Blown up with the slate political gabfest per march fifteen twenty teen the rex rex addition i wished we had stormy daniels because i was like we have rex rex xx heck's but we're not gonna do it you saw best wrecks we ever know worst wreck wrecks i ever had the new york post headline that was a great headline that is ruth marcus of the washington post sitting in this week for emily basilan hello ruth i'm doing my emily basil i'm not imitation live low nicely i'm david lots of atlas obscure and ruth is with me in washington but john dickerson cbs is this morning or cbs this morning i still don't know if there's an apostrophe silent they've hostas island yes hello john hello david on this week's gaffe has this i would say i will i will appeal to both of you this was one of the news east weeks i can remember that didn't have something like absolutely catastrophic in it but just unbelievable amounts of news unbelievable variety of stories so we're not gonna be able to get to all the incredible things that are happening to theranos to toys r us toys r us as closing so the house russia investigation to north korea we're not gonna get to north korea there's all i'm sure john pick your favorite story we're not getting to it's incredible you know you did a pretty good job there between fairness and the toys r us i was i mean it was an iconic brand part of growing up who didn't love walking down the aisle and seeing all the things you couldn't get but i also felt like well yeah they've been in bankruptcy for awhile and the retailers are taking pounding from online sales and so all right.

daniels ruth marcus emily basil washington cbs david north korea new york post emily basilan john dickerson russia
"emily basil" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Evidence of an attempt to usurp the sovereignty of the people i believe instead of just castigating this supreme court i believe we should start the articles impeachment with more of this case in what it means for gerrymandering in pennsylvania and nationwide is emily basil on staff writer for the new york times magazine emily welcome thanks so much for having me we will get to did pennsylvania supreme court's ruling in what gerrymandering looks like in pennsylvania emily but first a chris dutch is argument there that the justices of the pennsylvania supreme court should simply be impeached rather than republicans complying with this ruling is he and outlying or or a does this movement have any legs he is an outlying where i am i haven't seen any rushed to join him among pennsylvania republicans and obviously impeachment is a strong remedy for a judicial decision that you don't like it's also not entirely clear that representive dash understands how the law works here he suggested that the court was going to draw the new districting lines itself but in fact what the court ordered was for the legislature to take a crack at drawing the lines the governor would have to approve those lines and only if that effort fails does the court appoint a special master to draw the lines that's a pretty standard way for courts to handle redistricting cruise dosari be getting ahead of himself a little bit but why do the pennsylvania supreme court see that these eighteen congressional districts violate the state constitution what's wrong with them well the pennsylvania constitution so rate every state has its own constitution the pennsylvania constitution protects the right to vote and the pennsylvania supreme court said that it relied entirely on its own constitution in making this decision a little surprisingly the court hasn't issued a full opinion explaining its reasons so were a little in the dark about that and that's a little odd given that the initial ruling was a couple of weeks ago now one expects that opinion any day but it did make it clear that by february fifteen th.

pennsylvania staff writer the new york times magazine chris dutch pennsylvania supreme court emily basil
"emily basil" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thanks for coming back with us everybody on todd's will like a new term officially began at the supreme court yesterday on monday and justices are starting off big the port here's oral arguments today in gil verses wickford in this case could have a huge impact on how political parties answers size power all across the country the justices are going to have to decide here just how far parties can go when they draw congressional districts to their advantage including some voters in excluding others and the outcome could alter how districts were drawn in every state in 2018 and for elections into the future emily basil on is staff writer for the new york times magazine she's been following the case which started in wisconsin after the 2010 census the republicans control both state houses and the governor's office in wisconsin after that 2010 census which meant that they got to draw the new maps to be district and the state assembly in the state senate and for the congressional delegation for the state and they conducted a quite secretive process they had a few aides huddled together in a room at a law firm and they hired a political science professor to do and sophisticated computer modelling for them the computer modelling was allowing the matinee cars to lean further and further toward distributing republican voters in the way that would produce the most possible republicans seats and so what do you then see in the twenty elections is that the republicans win on the sixty of the ninety nine seats in the state assembly in wisconsin with less than half of the vote how common is that in his that type of secrecy likely to play a factor here well it demonstrates to the courts that there was an intent to gerrymander here right and what was happening was that none of the democratic lawmakers were invited into this process and so that suggests that the republicans knew they were doing something that the democrats were not going to go floor and also that the public might not like either have republicans ever acknowledged amongst themselves or in public hey we did a great job look at the results in the elections yes they did talk about that in internal emails before the.

todd emily basil staff writer the new york times magazine wisconsin senate law firm professor republicans gil
"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thanks for coming back with us everybody on todd's will like a new term officially began at the supreme court yesterday on monday and justices are starting off vic the four years oral arguments today in gil verses wickford this case could have a huge impact on how political parties exercise power all across the country the justices are going to have to decide here just how far parties can go when they draw congressional districts to their advantage including some voters and excluding others and the outcome could alter how districts redrawn in every state in 2018 and for elections into the future emily basil on a staff writer for the new york times magazine she's been following the case which started in wisconsin after the 2010 census the republicans control both state houses and the governor's office in wisconsin after that 2010 census which meant that they got to draw the new maps to be district in the state assembly in the state senate and for the congressional delegation for the state and they conducted a quite secretive process they had a few aides huddled together in a room at a law firm and they hired political science professor to distance sophisticated computer modelling for them the computer modelling was allowing the matinee cars to lean further and further eric toward distributing republican voters in the way that would produce the most possible republican seats and so what do you then see in the 2012 elections is that the republicans win on the sixty of the ninety nine seats in the state assembly in wisconsin with less than half of the vote how common is that in is that type of secrecy likely to play a factor here well it demonstrates to the courts that there was an intent to gerrymander here right and what was happening was that none of the democratic lawmakers were invited into this process and so that suggests that the republicans knew they were doing something that the democrats were not going to go for four and also that the public might not like either have republicans ever acknowledged amongst themselves or in public pay we did a great job look at the results in the elections yes they did talk about that in internal emails before the elections they also could argue at the.

todd emily basil staff writer the new york times magazine wisconsin senate law firm professor republicans gil four years
"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners his support this npr station from npr news this is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm ari shapiro we're gonna talk now about a phenomenon the writer emily basil on calls guilt by omission if a prosecutor has evidence that someone is innocent sharing that evidence could mean the prosecutor loses the case holding onto it could mean sending an innocent person to prison in the new york times sunday magazine basil on writes that what the prosecutor does often boils down to an honor system emily basilan welcome back to the program thanks so much for having me you specifically talk about the story of a woman named a jackson who was eighteen years old when her mother was murdered in memphis tennessee and two thousand five her trial was widely reported on at the time and we actually have a clip here from the judge's sentencing let's listen gencor to feel guilty that a food singed twenty years and nine months in tuesday department of correction as a one hundred percent vaughn finger without parole nor was convicted of second degree murder but the prosecutor in this case had evidence that did not make it into betray what was that of at the evidence was a handwritten note from a key witness a child his name is andrew that he was the only person who testified that nora was at the scene of the crime at the key period in which her mother was killed in a time when oral was unaccounted for honic told the jury that nora asked her to meet han at her house yes in these early morning hours on her mother was killed and that he thought that was not normal not not something she had asked him to do before it turned out that in this handwritten note he gave to the police he said that he was rolling on ecstasy that night any also said the he gave has fallen to a friend so the tennessee supreme court when it reversed nor conviction sal and that the defence could have used the snow to completely undermine andhra hynix testimony in really shred this account he gave up this night which implicated nora so even though the tennessee supreme court reversed this conviction a nor.

tennessee supreme court honic andrew memphis emily basilan sunday magazine emily basil npr sal audie cornish han nora second degree murder tennessee new york times prosecutor writer ari shapiro one hundred percent eighteen years twenty years nine months
"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"emily basil" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The times 536 from npr news this is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm ari shapiro we're gonna talk now about a phenomenon the writer emily basil on calls guilt by omission if a prosecutor has evidence that someone is innocent sharing that evidence could mean the prosecutor loses the case holding onto it could mean sending an innocent per listen to prison in the new york times sunday magazine battle on writes that what the prosecutor does often boils down to an honor system emily basilan welcome back to the program thanks so much for having all you specifically talk about the story of a woman named nora jackson who was eighteen years old when her mother was murdered in memphis tennessee in two thousand five her trial was widely reported on at the time and we actually have a clip here from the judge's sentencing let's lesson jedand court you found guilty that offence inched twenty years and nine months in to see department of correction as a one hundred percent value defender without parole nor was convicted of second degree murder but the prosecutor in this case had evidence that did not make it into the trial what was that evidence the evidence was a handwritten notes on a key witness a child his name is andrew homolka he was the only person who testified that nora was at the scene of the crime at the key period in which her mother was killed in a time when naral was unaccounted for honic told the jury about nora asked her to meet him at her house on in these early morning hours on her mother was killed and that he thought that was not normal not not something she had asked him to do before it turned out that in this handwritten note to the police he said that he was rolling on ecstasy that night any also said the he gave his falling to a friend so the tennessee supreme court when it reversed nor his conviction sound that the defence could have used the snow to completely undermine antibiotics testimony in really shred does the council gave up the night which implicated now so even though the tennessee supreme court reversed.

audie cornish ari shapiro writer prosecutor new york times nora jackson tennessee second degree murder andrew homolka tennessee supreme court npr emily basil emily basilan memphis honic one hundred percent eighteen years twenty years nine months