13 Burst results for "Emily Ackerman"

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

"Or very long story internet. True the watson you know ran against in coming on to be a gravestone. Maybe really burning the evening green savings lease lacquer and okay now i love it even more. Oh my gosh. Thank you so much for being on him so excited i now know what systems biology is and how cool take over the do This club in new york city hall regard so ask systems biological people simple questions and you'll get to know your world and the people making a better better and you can follow dr. Emily ackerman who is at emily. Ackerman a slacker man on twitter and her website is emily ackerman. And if you'd like to hear her on more podcast you can check out the disability visibility project hosted by alice. Wong and dr ackermann is on episode. Ninety one talking about disabled engineers and a link that on my website to as well as a link to heard where we send a donation today at emily's kind suggestion and we are at allergies on twitter and instagram. and i'm ali ward with one l. On both so do be our friends. Thank you erin campbell tower for admitting the algae's podcast facebook group full of very swell. Humans think spongy dutch and shannon feltus for managing merch. They're also sisters who host the podcast. You are that which is very funny. Thank you emily. White of the word dot com for making our transcripts. Those are up for.

Emily ackerman emily ackerman dr ackermann emily watson Ackerman ali ward new york city twitter erin campbell Wong alice instagram shannon feltus facebook
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

"Written piece that is written specifically by disabled person. I think just being cognizant that the opinions that really matter on this debate rich not being debate for most people or reverse score official. Yeah we are. The ones who matter in kind of having our voices heard as elaborate radicals in by people who have no connection beyond understanding crisper. Mandates it's very disappointing to see that platform be given to them when they this is of course a really important topic and this conversation with dr ackermann really opened up my own is the issue and she sent me an email after we recorded because she just wanted to expand on it and get her thoughts down and she wrote quote crisper and gene. Editing are absolutely incredible scientific technologies that have revolutionized the way we're able to address biological problems. She says i know that as a scientist there are a million ways to use it for good however in combination with the able ism ingrained in. Our societal teachings blatant or unrecognized it stands as a not so far fetched weapon against the identities in the lives of the disabled. The failure of the scientific community to widely condemned. The detrimental idea of editing are very disabled existence and the suggestion that represents an optimal future to do so combined with a very extensive history of eugenics leads me to actively fear my colleagues potential role in the downfall of the community. I love so much under the misguided. Ablest idea that all those with disabilities would be better off without them. She says the day the nobel prize was announced for genetic scissors. A tool for rewriting. The code of life. Dr ackermann continues. My twitter feed was fifty percent scientists who were elated and fifty percent disabled people who were saddened angry and scared. Science community needs to bridge this divide and seek out voices of disabled individuals themselves. Not their families who are proclaiming their joy and renouncing. The idea that there's something wrong to be fixed if we don't have this very personal conversation. Now she says it will soon be too late and she also sent a few great articles on identity. And i'll link them on my website at alleyway dot com slash allergies slash systems biology. Now we'll be linked to the show notes. Oh also includes hashtags and some articles that she recommends so yes gene editing on humans not as simple issue as just putting an instagram filter on your vacation photos in. It's very rooted in a it's a projection of of fear. That's how i see is people are worried about genetic what the defended tonight. Disease rambam a child today and how that would affect their lives. But it's really you know this. It's great. I love being disabled. And i i know that everyone does and then i suspect on anyone's night. They do adults but too often. We don't hear the voices of people who love Because we don't get to hear those voices. Can you tell people what you love about it. Love being. I love the view. But i have on life in how inherently different in this. I think that there are things lighting about are they every day as far as getting my basic needs met. And how. I'm going to plan my next career steps and right there. That's the gamut of like you know. Like how am i gonna tomorrow do. I have all medicines. I made and how am i gonna get them by. Can we buy a promise to. What am i gonna do next year. When i have to graduate the phone specimen awake my most disabled specific thoughts. Salena my most generalized every day. Earth appears now gods But i love that. My view on those like everyday christians but everybody has to answer in so tinted by my disability in good way unthinking about accessibility and i'm thinking about recliner climate on these kind of factors. But i think there's been a homemaker better to ice oats because they'll have to go. It sounds like a a richer experience because not only. Do you have to consider your needs. But it also must make you considerate of other people's needs across many different spectra. You know it's a lousy ex-rebel of disabled community is one of everyone and then some and on it's so easy to find someone who is the complete opposite view and someone who shares so much with you in a way that i don't find in in everyday spaces because it is just so much more to talk about have an experience about which is so exciting to me other disabled people and bring so much about excitable and what about systems biology. What are you love the moths thinking about the scale. And i've had the network project which is very jim guy. I look at the walker teens. The south at once and nyc very generalized. Yes or no do interact. Where can we live. And then i can legislate singular directions abasement path ray in the details. Object zoomed in view are just so there's so many details and you can is the smaller. And they're sewing your connected tissue level and a whole body level just very small changes that it's such as small wake micro level can cause huge differences in what he does and how we perceive ourselves. I just love thinking about you thinking that space but it makes me really. I think that's when i think by the saiga small group. That's funny. I found out the word for that called cosmic vertigo. When you have a big spaces and you're like but as you were as you were saying it was funny because i was picturing you in this tiny rocket ship and you're able to like government the outer edges of the universe to lick all the way zoomed into like molecules insistence allergies essentially like the spaceship. You can just like hyper speed. Is reeling all these different perspectives. Which is so cool looking to throw every wrong so definitely follow. Emily ackerman on twitter. Although her display name. I take issue with emily slack. Herman the only bone. I have to pick with you. Is that your handles like Emily emily a aggravated. It's emily slacker. Ackerman and i was like highly doubt the slamming.

dr ackermann Dr ackermann Salena jim guy twitter nyc Emily ackerman emily slack Emily emily Herman Ackerman
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

"Boxes and everything right inside the doors and just a quick side note on identity and disability so dr ackermann says she prefers identity first language. I e. She is a disabled person. Rather than saying a person with a disability and this discussion comes up in the disability community a lot many autistic folks prefer identity first autistic person rather than person with autism. So deaf person blind person are also common choices and dr ackermann pointed me to a really great article written by molly callahan for northwestern university which explains quote for people who prefer person first language the choice recognizes that a human is first and foremost a person they have a disorder that disorder doesn't define them and for people who prefer identity first language the choices about empowerment it says that autism or disability isn't something to be ashamed of so now you know what person first versus identity i means and went out. Just ask someone if they have a reference point being disabled is not a bad word and it's especially great to know this on the heels of july's disability pride month which celebrated the ada or americans with disabilities act which was example of person first language on that one but major point being disabled nothing to ever feel ashamed of as my good friend tv writer. David radcliffe says quote. Disability will be a part of everyone's life whether through age illness or accident so we are either disabled or we are temporarily non-disabled and i love that sentiment. It's really true for everyone and also david radcliffe. Is david ratcliffe on twitter by the way a link his twitter on my website. It's great and it's also always wonderful to read articles by or follow folks on social media. Who are passionate about communicating these issues. Honestly the best prevention for accidentally saying ignorant shit is just to learn and listen more in the first place. Boop or reason you can minimize the fact that you have on earn your surroundings. Because i think what people assume that when they see someone who is disabled. Say either disabled truth is you can't really see an impact. It's a one time it's difficult to see when people need detained the way that you come up free and so instead of waiting for someone to ask recommendation just providing is the best way to inch of actress. And that's what they need without putting the onus on them to ask for you to change the way that you operate from your position our that makes so much sense in in thinking about it ahead of time instead of waiting until you've put someone into crisis sort of an relying on that person to be able to convey to you broken needed. Change is an even bigger barrier view like twitter's popping up recently Kind community building for specific disabled in stem for in a degree. I love interacting with people listeners. Patrons have questions for you. Can i lob some you. Okay i note. Those twitter hashtags are disabled in stem. That is a great one and you can follow disabled stem not account to listen to that community and to get more resources and speaking of resources before we lob questions. Let's toss some money at a cause of the august choosing and dr. Emily ackerman asked that it go heard which she told me via. E mail is an abolitionist disability. Org that does a lot of work around the incarceration of deaf and disabled people. She says our current carceres system is built from and runs on able ism and disproportionately affects. The lives of by pock. Disabled people and heard does an incredible job of centering. Disability justice with abolitionist. Thinking and they have trainings called. A revolution must be accessible. That i would urge people to take a look at. She says especially those organizing and their own circles so that donation went to be heard. Dc dot org that is linked in the show notes and that donation from allergies in emily's name was made possible by patrons of the show and sponsors who you may hear about now being a human is heart these.

dr ackermann molly callahan autism David radcliffe david radcliffe david ratcliffe twitter northwestern university Emily ackerman emily
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

"Dang whoever thought not me We stay up in the charts. Thanks to every kind. Soul who leaves us ratings and reviews like this one from. We'll golly hugh on apple podcast wrote. This shows like a red carpet premiere was scientists and set of celebrities. And i just can't get enough. I'm glad you can't because we have more for you in this episode. We'll value okay so this all just and we met via twitter last year. She wrote some really thought. Provoking articles on the robotic. Seen in pittsburgh and how errant delivery rovers caused a lot of problems for wheelchair users like yourself and she has written extensively about accessibility in stem. She has a ph phd and chemical engineering where she used data and math and modeling to figure out what the fuck happens in the body when were infected with a virus like the flu and what drugs might work best for whom we recorded this while she was still in the throes of finishing her dissertation but now this dock is off to cambridge to start post doc work a little place called harvard medical school and it's the systems biology department there. She is smart kind funny. Brilliant not at all a slacker. More on that later so count your lucky stars. You're about to learn about mathematics. Computational science excel curses career pivots accessibility redundancy to nomex crisper soap-boxes science and more with advocate scholar and systems biologist. Dr emily ackerman lee ackerman. How pronounce she her coup. And now you are a systems biologist. Correct.

hugh apple pittsburgh twitter flu harvard medical school cambridge Dr emily ackerman lee ackerman
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"It was a wild time like academic way. I picked up three new projects. A lot of really good. Collaboration has come out of covid. If you can say something good has come out of coburg. Science community has really come together. So for example. I joined a group that There's one hundred twenty of us on the paper that basically said. Okay let's try to track every new paper that comes out and make a map of everything that we know that happens in a cell when covered starts so young people who were. I'm cardiologists in in italy. Like what can. I do where people who were like. I developed a way we can track all this data. I don't know anything but to help me. And so i had a very very small part. I should say of this large community. Ephron the outcome is a really valuable specific tool time. So it's really so fun to see what we can accomplish together in unfortunately a time of crisis. But it's really. I hope a model for us going forward as far as the way that we work with each other and we cross between all of the stem fields and we really can interact in the exciting way. There's something for everyone to do. A lot of people don't realize how hard it is to organize a ton of information. Yeah it's even getting like ten people to like one thing each and dropbox undoable. Good luck. no. I can barely get on a zoom call without some technical difficulty. Yeah i couldn't imagine being a word doc. With one hundred and twenty people my goodness cass. So i guess. Do you think that that was a big shift in your focus academia or was that something that is pretty normal for you. Now is pretty abnormal. The kind of academic mindset. Is that as shape this far into. Was you graduate school. He's sort of pick your same severe life and you pick up new skills us. I knew things you make collaborations. But it's often people pick their field then and that's it. It takes quite a why to learn a whole new field. I'd say it's spend the majority of my time in that covid. Sweat actually devoted to repurposing a project of nine that was very easy to throw in some new data and doing analysis to identify them drug candidates that we thought we could use to tweak over it quickly which was kind of is the big goal raised to nyc is a hydroxy cork as it reminds and like what can we already have and so like. That was my project. I developed before. That wasn't a jump as far as the actual tool the net but it was the knowledge cakes to understand. The results are to understand the system that you're working with them because it's actually very different and so it's about like a willingness to learn new things and how much you can take on especially in a time like that when the news covid everything was co and erin covid so it was a mental exercises. Well where. I needed to be careful of how much time i was spending curb spiraling about does pose and way that disabled people were being refused. Care and roy about my family balancing all that with thinking about covid in academic context. It's let a covid research project inside of the standard nightmare of being alive during a pandemic hasn't been the only tough thing emily's been dealing with recently a member of her academic fellowship program committed suicide at the end of twenty nine thousand nine hundred k. Consumption is a group of howard hughes medical institute gan fillers which i am one of so it's a fellowship of around forty people a year that receive funding for their. Phd's and to be a value have could be from an underrepresented group in science and one of our cohort took her life in december twenty nineteen and so we came together as a group to presence back and her family was very open about the fact that academia had largely contributed to her mental health struggles. And we came together and talk about out our own mental health and the way that we wanted to move forward and we decided that it was important to honor. Kennedy's taylor brown and to also try to better the environment for all graduate students and early career researchers but particularly underrepresented groups who really don't receive support golfing come Environments where mental health is not a subject they are family talk about so it's it's very tough underrepresented groups in particular who have these discriminations and strains it's something that we need to talk about. More has people academia adopted seen as a sign of weakness to discuss. You know i'm i'm juggling. Things are not going well for me or whatever but it's really important that people don't feel alone which is often kind of what happens when we feel like. Oh it's just mean. We're not being able to meet deadlines me. They can't do the work or not smart enough and so yeah personally. I see a therapist. And i have built support systems but then the community and that's made it much easier to have that kind of support that you need to get through back with academia. You can't just really switch your school. At least with freelancing. I can be like all right piece. Client or rock can move jobs but.

italy december twenty nineteen ten people coburg one hundred and twenty people each one one thing erin covid one hundred twenty nine howard hughes three new projects twenty nine thousand nine hund around forty people a year brown Kennedy nyc covid
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Then the people who hate them and basically kick them like that bird. Scooter exactly and one day. I was just walking around. I think or something. And i had stopped at a an intersection A very busy one. Four lane street and The works kind of pile up with people so standing behind a lot of people and it was in a wheelchair behind them. So i can't see beyond them. I'm looking at butts all day. And yeah it's it's not great and sometimes it is. Yes you can't the street. So the late turned and people started working. So i followed and when i got maybe halfway across the street i realized that one of the robots was sitting in the curb cut which is the little ramp that allows beta get on and off the street and so i thought okay well by the time i get to. You'll probably have moved. But when i got there it had so i was sitting on a four lane street where the light was about to turn back for the cars to go and i was trapped. And i really. We need to decide what to do. Because i knew it wasn't going to move and i knew that sitting in front of it wasn't going to make it move and so i kind of panicked and i hopped myself up over the curb into the part that's meant for me and kind of turned around and stare today. Almost like is this happening. Are we doing this. And i kept walking. I turned around a block away and it was still sitting in the same spot. And i i was just beside myself because that is a technology. A curb cut was made for me. It was made for disabled people to be able to access the community. And and it's hard fought. When i mean we've only had them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight paths and just knowing that there is this thing underdeveloped non human thing putting the endanger and taking up that space that we fought so hard to win. It just really was i. It was not acceptable to me. And and i knew that it was going to keep having. If i didn't say anything. And so i went and made some tweets hoping to make some change. And i i got some attention well. Do you ever get angry on twitter or was this something that you did for the first time. It's sad of the ordinary for me to be angry. Maybe not so much on twitter. I'm a firm believer. That being angry is okay and that being upset about things that affect your life are okay. It's okay to make some noise. Did you tweet to the company that owned these robots and what happened after that did they shut them down. Yes i tweeted at the company and the university and kind of explained cabin in light was a problem and i basically clause a bit of a frenzy internationally. I think it was the first time that the university at least. I'd really had to deal with this problem in a public way. Yeah i after that. It was not by any means aid. Unique experience and the robots were pulled from the street that day and reassessed and they were back on the street within four days. The frenzied like claws. I guess you could say. I'll that to some internal re looking at the map that the robot was lied to us. Some kind of discussions about what was spurs to happen versus. What happened with me. What happened for me. It was a whirlwind of of media. I guess the news picked up my story. I was on a bunch of different websites. I was asked to read an article to do interviews with the financial times in which a reporter. That's drain story For national geographic. And just kind of. It became clear to me that i was the first one to really bring this to the public. We really hadn't had a public discussion yet about technology in the way that it's becoming part of our lives whether or not ready for it and what are not. It's really beneficial for everybody. It's harmful to groups of people and so yeah. It just became this big discussion. Meyer people from all of our were emailing me about their experiences with similar robots. Because there's a bunch of companies doing a very similar kind of delivery services and lawyers talking about you know what rights the robots have versus me. What rights people have to damage robot split pedestrian rights while i was getting multiple emails a day just a from people all over. It was a lot like whoa now whenever you tweet are you like. Do i want to go down this rabbit hole. I taught me a lesson about viral internet content and about the ways that people feel entitled to technology in public spaces whether or not. It's good for other people. Just i really learned a lot from it. This episode is brought to you by tear story. I've been trying out stories new wash. it's a sulfate detergent. Shampoo free hair cleanser. Ereli like okay. Wait what is not apple. I dunno ever since. I turned thirty. My hair has become more dry. And i just i need it to be more hydrated so hears stories. New wash has all these natural ingredients. That don't strip away. Your hair's protective barrier in only removes access oil and dirt. Basically all the good stuff that keeps your hair hydrated that stain put now to stay now. I'm much stay on here. Held the other thing about it is. There's absolutely no sites and hair story says that suds are like the number one. Sign your shampoos bad. Essentially if it foams it strips what was really interesting. When i tried it is that it replaces your who and conditioner so many different bottles in my shower and this is just one all in one. I do have to say. Though that there is an extra product that i liked a lot and it was the hairball which was essentially this air drying cream that it just kind of gives it more of a polished finish and that worked so perfectly just put a little bit in my palm and then just put the put pat down on the on the frizz it was really great anyways. I really enjoyed my experience with it. So if you want to try it out checkout hair story at hairston dot com and you can use the promo code girl boss to get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That is h. a. i. r. s. t. o. r. y. dot com and use the code girl boss to get fifteen percent off..

fifteen percent twitter thirty today hairston dot com one thousand nine hundred eigh first time four days first purchase first one Meyer one four lane street one day Four lane street a day code girl
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Really. We need to decide what to do. Because i knew it wasn't going to move and i knew that sitting in front of it wasn't going to make it move and so i kind of panicked and i hopped myself up over the curb into the part that's meant for me and kind of turned around and stare today. Almost like is this happening. Are we doing this. And i kept walking. I turned around a block away and it was still sitting in the same spot. And i i was just beside myself because that is a technology. A curb cut was made for me. It was made for disabled people to be able to access the community. And and it's hard fought. When i mean we've only had them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight paths and just knowing that there is this thing underdeveloped non human thing putting the endanger and taking up that space that we fought so hard to win. It just really was i. It was not acceptable to me. And and i knew that it was going to keep having. If i didn't say anything. And so i went and made some tweets hoping to make some change. And i i got some attention well. Do you ever get angry on twitter or was this something that you did for the first time. It's sad of the ordinary for me to be angry. Maybe not so much on twitter. I'm a firm believer. That being angry is okay and that being upset about things that affect your life are okay. It's okay to make some noise. Did you tweet to the company that owned these robots and what happened after that did they shut them down. Yes i tweeted at the company and the university and kind of explained cabin in light was a problem and i basically clause a bit of a frenzy internationally. I think it was the first time that the university at least. I'd really had to deal with this problem in a public way. Yeah i after that. It was not by any means aid. Unique experience and the robots were pulled from the street that day and reassessed and they were back on the street within four days. The frenzied like claws. I guess you could say. I'll that to some internal re looking at the map that the robot was lied to us. Some kind of discussions about what was spurs to happen versus. What happened with me. What happened for me. It was a whirlwind of of media. I guess the news picked up my story. I was on a bunch of different websites. I was asked to read an article to do interviews with the financial times in which a reporter. That's drain story For national geographic. And just kind of. It became clear to me that i was the first one to really bring this to the public. We really hadn't had a public discussion yet about technology in the way that it's becoming part of our lives whether or not ready for it and what are not. It's really beneficial for everybody. It's harmful to groups of people and so yeah. It just became this big discussion. Meyer people from all of our were emailing me about their experiences with similar robots. Because there's a bunch of companies doing a very similar kind of delivery services and lawyers talking about you know what rights the robots have versus me. What rights people have to damage robot split pedestrian rights while i was getting multiple emails a day just a from people all over. It was a lot like whoa now whenever you tweet are you like. Do i want to go down this rabbit hole. I taught me a lesson about viral internet content and about the ways that people feel entitled to technology in public spaces whether or not. It's good for other people. Just i really learned a lot from it. This episode is brought to you by tear story. I've been trying out stories new wash. it's a sulfate detergent. Shampoo free hair cleanser. Ereli like okay. Wait what is not apple. I dunno ever since. I turned thirty. My hair has become more dry. And i just i need it to be more hydrated so hears stories. New wash has all these natural ingredients. That don't strip away. Your hair's protective barrier in only removes access oil and dirt. Basically all the good stuff that keeps your hair hydrated that stain put now to stay now. I'm much stay on here. Held the other thing about it is. There's absolutely no sites and hair story says that suds are like the number one. Sign your shampoos bad. Essentially if it foams it strips what was really interesting. When i tried it is that it replaces your who and conditioner so many different bottles in my shower and this is just one all in one. I do have to say. Though that there is an extra product that i liked a lot and it was the hairball which was essentially this air drying cream that it just kind of gives it more of a polished finish and that worked so perfectly just put a little bit in my palm and then just put the put pat down on the on the frizz it was really great anyways. I really enjoyed my experience with it. So if you want to try it out checkout hair story at hairston dot com and you can use the promo code girl boss to get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That is h. a. i. r. s. t. o. r. y. dot com and use the code girl boss to get fifteen percent off..

fifteen percent twitter thirty today first one hairston dot com first purchase first time one thousand nine hundred eigh four days Meyer one a day boss Ereli girl boss code
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Can't the street. So the late turned and people started working. So i followed and when i got maybe halfway across the street i realized that one of the robots was sitting in the curb cut which is the little ramp that allows beta get on and off the street and so i thought okay well by the time i get to. You'll probably have moved. But when i got there it had so i was sitting on a four lane street where the light was about to turn back for the cars to go and i was trapped. And i really. We need to decide what to do. Because i knew it wasn't going to move and i knew that sitting in front of it wasn't going to make it move and so i kind of panicked and i hopped myself up over the curb into the part that's meant for me and kind of turned around and stare today. Almost like is this happening. Are we doing this. And i kept walking. I turned around a block away and it was still sitting in the same spot. And i i was just beside myself because that is a technology. A curb cut was made for me. It was made for disabled people to be able to access the community. And and it's hard fought. When i mean we've only had them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight paths and just knowing that there is this thing underdeveloped non human thing putting the endanger and taking up that space that we fought so hard to win. It just really was i. It was not acceptable to me. And and i knew that it was going to keep having. If i didn't say anything. And so i went and made some tweets hoping to make some change. And i i got some attention well. Do you ever get angry on twitter or was this something that you did for the first time. It's sad of the ordinary for me to be angry. Maybe not so much on twitter. I'm a firm believer. That being angry is okay and that being upset about things that affect your life are okay. It's okay to make some noise. Did you tweet to the company that owned these robots and what happened after that did they shut them down. Yes i tweeted at the company and the university and kind of explained cabin in light was a problem and i basically clause a bit of a frenzy internationally. I think it was the first time that the university at least. I'd really had to deal with this problem in a public way. Yeah i after that. It was not by any means aid. Unique experience and the robots were pulled from the street that day and reassessed and they were back on the street within four days. The frenzied like claws. I guess you could say. I'll that to some internal re looking at the map that the robot was lied to us. Some kind of discussions about what was spurs to happen versus. What happened with me. What happened for me. It was a whirlwind of of media. I guess the news picked up my story. I was on a bunch of different websites. I was asked to read an article to do interviews with the financial times in which a reporter. That's drain story For national geographic. And just kind of. It became clear to me that i was the first one to really bring this to the public. We really hadn't had a public discussion yet about technology in the way that it's becoming part of our lives whether or not ready for it and what are not. It's really beneficial for everybody. It's harmful to groups of people and so yeah. It just became this big discussion. Meyer people from all of our were emailing me about their experiences with similar robots. Because there's a bunch of companies doing a very similar kind of delivery services and lawyers talking about you know what rights the robots have versus me. What rights people have to damage robot split pedestrian rights while i was getting multiple emails a day just a from people all over. It was a lot like whoa now whenever you tweet are you like. Do i want to go down this rabbit hole. I taught me a lesson about viral internet content and about the ways that people feel entitled to technology in public spaces whether or not. It's good for other people. Just i really learned a lot from it. This episode is brought to you by tear story. I've been trying out stories new wash. it's a sulfate detergent. Shampoo free hair cleanser. Ereli like okay. Wait what is not apple. I dunno ever since. I turned thirty. My hair has become more dry. And i just i need it to be more hydrated so hears stories. New wash has all these natural ingredients. That don't strip away. Your hair's protective barrier in only removes access oil and dirt. Basically all the good stuff that keeps your hair hydrated that stain put now to stay now. I'm much stay on here. Held the other thing about it is. There's absolutely no sites and hair story says that suds are like the number one. Sign your shampoos bad. Essentially if it foams it strips what was really interesting. When i tried it is that it replaces your who and conditioner so many different bottles in my shower and this is just one all in one. I do have to say. Though that there is an extra product that i liked a lot and it was the hairball which was essentially this air drying cream that it just kind of gives it more of a polished finish and that worked so perfectly just put a little bit in my palm and then just put the put pat down on the on the frizz it was really great anyways. I really enjoyed my experience with it. So if you want to try it out checkout hair story at hairston dot com and you can use the promo code girl boss to get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That is h. a. i. r. s. t. o. r. y. dot com and use the code girl boss to get fifteen percent off..

fifteen percent twitter thirty today first one first purchase one thousand nine hundred eigh Meyer first time one four days hairston dot com Ereli four lane a day apple code girl
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Sorta like a little cooler like a tiny spaceship or something and then one day the humans behind them just kind of disappeared. We wasn't a whole lot of info about what they were. They were doing Because whenever being trained they were unmarked and then once the school year started it became more clear that they were a delivery system for food from university owned dining halls and things like that and they were driving themselves autonomously and they are kind of a polarizing thing because some people love anything. They're very cute. And then the people who hate them and basically kick them like that bird. Scooter exactly and one day. I was just walking around. I think or something. And i had stopped at a an intersection A very busy one. Four lane street and The works kind of pile up with people so standing behind a lot of people and it was in a wheelchair behind them. So i can't see beyond them. I'm looking at butts all day. And yeah it's it's not great and sometimes it is. Yes you can't the street. So the late turned and people started working. So i followed and when i got maybe halfway across the street i realized that one of the robots was sitting in the curb cut which is the little ramp that allows beta get on and off the street and so i thought okay well by the time i get to. You'll probably have moved. But when i got there it had so i was sitting on a four lane street where the light was about to turn back for the cars to go and i was trapped. And i really. We need to decide what to do. Because i knew it wasn't going to move and i knew that sitting in front of it wasn't going to make it move and so i kind of panicked and i hopped myself up over the curb into the part that's meant for me and kind of turned around and stare today. Almost like is this happening. Are we doing this. And i kept walking. I turned around a block away and it was still sitting in the same spot. And i i was just beside myself because that is a technology. A curb cut was made for me. It was made for disabled people to be able to access the community. And and it's hard fought. When i mean we've only had them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight paths and just knowing that there is this thing underdeveloped non human thing putting the endanger and taking up that space that we fought so hard to win. It just really was i. It was not acceptable to me. And and i knew that it was going to keep having. If i didn't say anything. And so i went and made some tweets hoping to make some change. And i i got some attention well. Do you ever get angry on twitter or was this something that you did for the first time. It's sad of the ordinary for me to be angry. Maybe not so much on twitter. I'm a firm believer. That being angry is okay and that being upset about things that affect your life are okay. It's okay to make some noise. Did you tweet to the company that owned these robots and what happened after that did they shut them down. Yes i tweeted at the company and the university and kind of explained cabin in light was a problem and i basically clause a bit of a frenzy internationally. I think it was the first time that the university at least. I'd really had to deal with this problem in a public way. Yeah i after that. It was not by any means aid. Unique experience and the robots were pulled from the street that day and reassessed and they were back on the street within four days. The frenzied like claws. I guess you could say. I'll that to some internal re looking at the map that the robot was lied to us. Some kind of discussions about what was spurs to happen versus. What happened with me. What happened for me. It was a whirlwind of of media. I guess the news picked up my story. I was on a bunch of different websites. I was asked to read an article to do interviews with the financial times in which a reporter. That's drain story For national geographic. And just kind of. It became clear to me that i was the first one to really bring this to the public. We really hadn't had a public discussion yet about technology in the way that it's becoming part of our lives whether or not ready for it and what are not. It's really beneficial for everybody. It's harmful to groups of people and so yeah. It just became this big discussion. Meyer people from all of our were emailing me about their experiences with similar robots. Because there's a bunch of companies doing a very similar kind of delivery services and lawyers talking about you know what rights the robots have versus me. What rights people have to damage robot split pedestrian rights while i was getting multiple emails a day just a from people all over. It was a lot like whoa now whenever you tweet are you like. Do i want to go down this rabbit hole. I taught me a lesson about viral internet content and about the ways that people feel entitled to technology in public spaces whether or not. It's good for other people. Just i really learned a lot from it. This episode is brought to you by tear story. I've been trying out stories new wash. it's a sulfate detergent. Shampoo free hair cleanser. Ereli like okay. Wait what is not apple. I dunno ever since. I turned thirty. My hair has become more dry. And i just i need it to be more hydrated so hears stories. New wash has all these natural ingredients. That don't strip away. Your hair's protective barrier in only removes access oil and dirt. Basically all the good stuff that keeps your hair hydrated that stain put now to stay now. I'm much stay on here. Held the other thing about it is. There's absolutely no sites and hair story says that suds are like the number one. Sign your shampoos bad. Essentially if it foams it strips what was really interesting. When i tried it is that it replaces your who and conditioner so many different bottles in my shower and this is just one all in one. I do have to say. Though that there is an extra product that i liked a lot and it was the hairball which was essentially this air drying cream that it just kind of gives it more of a polished finish and that worked so perfectly just put a little bit in my palm and then just put the put pat down on the on the frizz it was really great anyways. I really enjoyed my experience with it. So if you want to try it out.

twitter thirty today first one four days one Four lane street one thousand nine hundred eigh first time four lane Ereli a day one day Meyer
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Gonna think to say she's randy and so two you actually thanks for that transition and we so i'd love to talk about something that got you into the press out of nowhere but the story of the delivery robot when you decided to do a viral tweet. Can you tell me what happened. Sure so. I am a graduate student at the university of pittsburgh and There is this kind of period of time over a somewhere where there is little robots that were traveling around and they had a person behind them and they sorta like a little cooler like a tiny spaceship or something and then one day the humans behind them just kind of disappeared. We wasn't a whole lot of info about what they were. They were doing Because whenever being trained they were unmarked and then once the school year started it became more clear that they were a delivery system for food from university owned dining halls and things like that and they were driving themselves autonomously and they are kind of a polarizing thing because some people love anything. They're very cute. And then the people who hate them and basically kick them like that bird. Scooter exactly and one day. I was just walking around. I think or something. And i had stopped at a an intersection A very busy one. Four lane street and The works kind of pile up with people so standing behind a lot of people and it was in a wheelchair behind them. So i can't see beyond them. I'm looking at butts all day. And yeah it's it's not great and sometimes it is. Yes you can't the street. So the late turned and people started working. So i followed and when i got maybe halfway across the street i realized that one of the robots was sitting in the curb cut which is the little ramp that allows beta get on and off the street and so i thought okay well by the time i get to. You'll probably have moved. But when i got there it had so i was sitting on a four lane street where the light was about to turn back for the cars to go and i was trapped. And i really. We need to decide what to do. Because i knew it wasn't going to move and i knew that sitting in front of it wasn't going to make it move and so i kind of panicked and i hopped myself up over the curb into the part that's meant for me and kind of turned around and stare today. Almost like is this happening. Are we doing this. And i kept walking. I turned around a block away and it was still sitting in the same spot. And i i was just beside myself because that is a technology. A curb cut was made for me. It was made for disabled people to be able to access the community. And and it's hard fought. When i mean we've only had them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight paths and just knowing that there is this thing underdeveloped non human thing putting the endanger and taking up that space that we fought so hard to win. It just really was i. It was not acceptable to me. And and i knew that it was going to keep having. If i didn't say anything. And so i went and made some tweets hoping to make some change. And i i got some attention well. Do you ever get angry on twitter or was this something that you did for the first time. It's sad of the ordinary for me to be angry. Maybe not so much on twitter. I'm a firm believer. That being angry is okay and that being upset about things that affect your life are okay. It's okay to make some noise. Did you tweet to the company that owned these robots and what happened after that did they shut them down. Yes i tweeted at the company and the university and kind of explained cabin in light was a problem and i basically clause a bit of a frenzy internationally. I think it was the first time that the university at least. I'd really had to deal with this problem in a public way. Yeah i after that. It was not by any means aid. Unique experience and the robots were pulled from the street that day and reassessed and they were back on the street within four days. The frenzied like claws. I guess you could say. I'll that to some internal re looking at the map that the robot was lied to us. Some kind of discussions about what was spurs to happen versus. What happened with me. What happened for me. It was a whirlwind of of media. I guess the news picked up my story. I was on a bunch of different websites. I was asked to read an article to do interviews with the financial times in which a reporter. That's drain story For national geographic. And just kind of. It became clear to me that i was the first one to really bring this to the public. We really hadn't had a public discussion yet about technology in the way that it's becoming part of our lives whether or not ready for it and what are not. It's really beneficial for everybody. It's harmful to groups of people and so yeah. It just became this big discussion. Meyer people from all of our were emailing me about their experiences with similar robots. Because there's a bunch of companies doing a very similar kind of delivery services and lawyers talking about you know what rights the robots have versus me. What rights people have to damage robot split pedestrian rights while i was getting multiple emails a day just a from people all over. It was a lot like whoa now whenever you tweet are you like. Do i want to go down this rabbit hole. I taught me a lesson about viral internet content and about the ways that people feel entitled to technology in public spaces whether or not. It's good for other.

twitter today two one thousand first one four lane first time one Meyer four days Four lane street nine hundred eighty eight path university of pittsburgh one day a day
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"I'm glad that we're both cat moms. Because i adopted y d- my cat six years ago and i went to a cat medium. Yeah so the you like hanging out with your cats thinking She's very adamant about making sure. She had permission to talk to because she like. I don't want to just like call her up and you don't know and then she told me that. My cat wanted to write a book about why it's called a self help guide for the poor unfortunate souls like me wow loaded. You're gonna think to say she's randy and so two you actually thanks for that transition and we so i'd love to talk about something that got you into the press out of nowhere but the story of the delivery robot when you decided to do a viral tweet. Can you tell me what happened. Sure so. I am a graduate student at the university of pittsburgh and There is this kind of period of time over a somewhere where there is little robots that were traveling around and they had a person behind them and they sorta like a little cooler like a tiny spaceship or something and then one day the humans behind them just kind of disappeared. We wasn't a whole lot of info about what they were. They were doing Because whenever being trained they were unmarked and then once the school year started it became more clear that they were a delivery system for food from university owned dining halls and things like that and they were driving themselves autonomously and they are kind of a polarizing thing because some people love anything. They're very cute. And then the people who hate them and basically kick them like that bird. Scooter exactly and one day. I was just walking around. I think or something. And i had stopped at a an intersection A very busy one. Four lane street and The works kind of pile up with people so standing behind a lot of people and it was in a wheelchair behind them. So i can't see beyond them. I'm looking at butts all day. And yeah it's it's not great and sometimes it is. Yes you can't the street. So the late turned and people started working. So i followed and when i got maybe halfway across the street i realized that one of the robots was sitting in the curb cut which is the little ramp that allows beta get on and off the street and so i thought okay well by the time i get to. You'll probably have moved. But when i got there it had so i was sitting on a four lane street where the light was about to turn back for the cars to go and i was trapped. And i really. We need to decide what to do. Because i knew it wasn't going to move and i knew that sitting in front of it wasn't going to make it move and so i kind of panicked and i hopped myself up over the curb into the part that's meant for me and kind of turned around and stare today. Almost like is this happening. Are we doing this. And i kept walking. I turned around a block away and it was still sitting in the same spot. And i i was just beside myself because that is a technology. A curb cut was made for me. It was made for disabled people to be able to access the community. And and it's hard fought. When i mean we've only had them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight paths and just knowing that there is this thing underdeveloped non human thing putting the endanger and taking up that space that we fought so hard to win. It just really was i. It was not acceptable to me. And and i knew that it was going to keep having. If i didn't say anything. And so i went and made some tweets hoping to make some change. And i i got some attention well. Do you ever get angry on twitter or was this something that you did for the first time. It's sad of the ordinary for me to be angry. Maybe not so much on twitter. I'm a firm believer. That being angry is okay and that being upset about things that affect your life are okay. It's okay to make some noise. Did you tweet to the company that owned these robots and what happened after that did they shut them down. Yes i tweeted at the company and the university and kind of explained cabin in light was a problem and i basically clause a bit of a frenzy internationally. I think it was the first time that the university at least. I'd really had to deal with this problem in a public way. Yeah i after that. It was not by any means aid. Unique experience and the robots were pulled from the street that day and reassessed and they were back on the street within four days. The frenzied like claws. I guess you could say. I'll that to some internal re looking at the map that the robot was lied to us. Some kind of discussions about what was spurs to happen versus. What happened with me. What happened for me. It was a whirlwind of of media. I guess the news picked up my story. I was on a bunch of different websites. I was asked to read an article to do interviews with the financial times in which a reporter. That's drain story For national geographic. And just kind of. It became clear to me that i was the first one to really bring this to the public. We really hadn't had a public discussion yet about technology in the way that it's becoming part of our lives whether or not ready for it and what are not. It's really beneficial for everybody. It's harmful.

twitter today two six years ago both first one one thousand nine hundred eigh first time four days Four lane four lane one day university of pittsburgh one
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso

"Have you ever been so frustrated with the world works year like you know what i wanted to change it. Today is the day. I want to change the world but then when you try to do something about it you realize how big the problem is. And it's it's overwhelming to say the least and then you're feeling like i don't know about changing the world it's too big. Sometimes well turns out. I am a mere mortal and emily ackerman is a god damn superhero out here fighting robots and changing the world. That's right straight up avenger. You heard me correctly. Robots air exactly as a grad student at the university of pittsburgh. Emily was running into problems with robots on our campus. I'm not kidding. that's right. Twenty twenty one. This is a future from get used to it here. we go. this is our life. Now you're going to hear more about it in the interview. Basically the college was using autonomous delivery. Robots and emily has a disability which requires her to be in a wheelchair so the curb cuts on the side of the road are very important for us and these stupid. Robots are just squatting here in the curb cuts and one day. Emily was heading towards the curb. Cut very busy streets and got stuck because the robot was blocking her way anyways. Emily has been a bad ass about bringing attention to this issue. And try to help solve the problem and while this was her first run in with robots. It was not the first time. Emily has had to deal with systemic and institutional barriers blocking access for her. Unfortunately it's something she's dealt with her whole life but despite the challenges she's been up against she's crushing it as an engineer. She's crushing it with her contributions to kovic research. Thank you and she's crushing it with her work. As a disability rights advocate she is just karachi all around crushing crushing everywhere he crush. What is that. i don't care crush it. I acute chick in a wheelchair in her best life and using her platform to stand up for community. I'm all about it. I love to hear it in this episode. Emily gave a lot of great pointers for how to approach design with less. Ablest thinking it was a great conversation. Made me think a lot about the ways. We often overlook disabled people and design and another parts of life. So hopefully this will inspire you to think of bit more inclusively in your everyday life. Okay.

emily ackerman Emily emily Today first time one day first run university of pittsburgh karachi Twenty twenty one
"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"emily ackerman" Discussed on Ologies

"Okay. Back to work fielding about fieldwork. First time question asker. Joanna mchugh good question. How many times have you gotten stuck in plus mud. And i don't know what plus mud is. But i want to ask you. Is that a term is it fluffy mud basically it's like very loose mud young That's a good question. I honestly don't know how many times because after a while it's like your brain is almost on autopilot and you don't even notice when you have fallen But like it's it's situation where you fall in right and i feel almost betrayed by the marshes out here sweating behind off right like and you gotta do this to me eventually. Don't even notice the army crawl out of it so you all in up to your waist and then basically lean over and pull yourself out using grass and other things around you. Yeah many many times it built characters would all say oh. Do you have to do specific exercises to like build up the muscles that pull you out of. Yes even just walk. Because the way that i describe walking in the marshes like walking upstairs for six hours And so i went out there without having trained at all. And i was out there for an hour and thirteen minutes alley. And i can't do this. I can't do it and so that was just like when i first got there and elizabeth was like you might have to do some training. That's what i do. So that's what i did. I literally started on the treadmill. It's not a thing that i tread mill. The stair stepper is all that My hip flexes right. Because you gotta you gotta work out and it was interesting because there was a period of time like after my last field season was over where i had to go out and just check on something. And they're probably been about three weeks to a month between then. And the last time i was in the marist when i tell you i was seeing stars within minutes of being out there. I was like oh see. Yeah like the mar- you cannot let the marsh leave your blood and if you're listening to this and thinking i love biology. I love wildlife but my body can't do that what about disability access for scientists so did some research and here that consulting firms need project managers to track and plan field work. There was also something called. Gs a geographic information system that acts as a framework for gathering and managing and analyzing data. And we have a really cool episode coming up with a scientist named emily ackerman who is a systems biologist. So stay tuned for that very soon. Naomi is a new question. Asker it was. What's the strangest thing that you found in the marsh. Have you ever found anyone's car keys or like a very treasure. I wish i found so. There are multiple highs. Where i was like. Is that a body. And then it wasn't just thing that are probably found not interesting stuff but just like large things like how did water carry this. Water can carry basically anything like huge cement blocks and pipes in this things that seemed like should've sank immediately upon entering the water. The water this brought right to the marsh. So that's why you want to take care of your water said a watershed is essentially the pathways leading to the ocean or big bodies of water. And i always get the word watershed mixed up with watership down which was a nineteen seventy two novel about some psychic rabbits which in writing this aside i learned was a worry that the author made up on long car rides until his daughters forced him to write it all up in an awful and it was rejected by seven publishers before going on to sell over fifty million copies. So this aside is your weird creepy. Signed just go work on that thing that you want to work on just creeping in your brain go to word to the wise for sure page. Mclaughlin wants to know what sets sparrow from other birds as in what makes spero spero and not a fincher swift or iran. In this case. Yeah so there are a lot of things physically morphological about a spare. That's different from any other songbird Some of the differences are in diet so sparrows are known for eating a lot of plant material. Bill both depending on the time of the year. But they do. They're really good eating a lot of plant material seeds things like that Suicides are different because they have a really heavily like invertebrate diet being in the marsh. Okay so remember. The salty flooding marsh is hard. Live in man in some cases. But there's less competition for bug lunches for these small will brown and cream colored seaside sparrows. They also physically look a little different. They have a big shape. It's a little different from say. Thin shorus a swift which is like a strictly insect eating bird and so a lot of the physical characteristics of a barrel versus any other bird. are about how it finds food a lot of the adaptations that birds have physically are about finding food. Yes will mike kamensky wants to ask why are they so dang and cute and also does the small strip of yellow near their beaks or evolutionary purpose so they they are definitely slept on. I think a lot of people think of seaside sparrows. It looks like every other what i would imagine to be. Small birds sparrow bird but that yellow band apps that little yellow block right above. Its i definitely pops. I don't know that it has any evolutionary purpose that we are aware of right. It's such a small feature. I imagine that there is some amount selection that that obviously made it stay males. I think have a more prominent yellow spot on their face and yeah outside of that. I am not aware of it serving any particular evolutionary purpose. Perhaps one day you'll be the first to publish a paper on it. And what is illustrative about so this yellow patch. If you're trying to imagine it looks like if a brownish bird to a fabulous mustard colored eyebrows just little pop of color. it's technically called a supercilious. Which is another word for eyebrow the origin of the word supercilious which means halt he. Also if anyone is professional eyebrow scientist or groomer. Please call yourself a supercilious and looked up on google scholar for minute trying to find the function of this mustard supercilious. When i learned that insights barrows is actually called a supra laurel. Because it doesn't extend past the i but honestly i'm still excited to talk to an eyebrow expert maybe just privately went on matt thompson had a great question. He is a student studying wildlife ecology and wanted to know if there are any interesting symbiotic relationships with sparrows and other birds in the marshlands any of them friends aleksei friendship. I don't like to say this is the first one i'm saying. Friendships don't really happen in. The mars like mutually assured destruction. Make friends i.

emily ackerman matt thompson Joanna six hours Mclaughlin mike kamensky an hour seven publishers first one elizabeth nineteen seventy two novel over fifty million copies first Naomi about three weeks First time google both thirteen minutes scholar