35 Burst results for "Emceeing"

Assessing Semiconductor Supply Issues, Giga Berlin Battery Update

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Assessing Semiconductor Supply Issues, Giga Berlin Battery Update

"Everybody robbing our here and today we're going to be talking about the semiconductor supplier issue that has been affecting the automotive industry as a whole and we do have a few other topics to go through as well. This is a live episode because after we go through this. I do have some thoughts to share. But i thought it'd be best shared live so we're gonna do the kind of normal episode structure But it will be live so bear with me as always but we'll get into it will start off just looking at the stock today so finish down five point three percent to eight hundred and four dollars eighty two sons. I compare to the nasdaq which is on the video. But down a quarter of a percent so it was a tough day for tesla today especially relative to the broader market other automakers. Did you know at least the ones. I looked at fare worse than the market today as well thing. Gm ford were right around down to percents neo. Probably in that ballpark as well So i don't know that this drop was entirely isolated to tesla but certainly tussle moved a little bit further perhaps related to the supply of semiconductor. So let's move into that topic For whatever reason. I've had i don't know fifty to one hundred people. Ask me about this over the last two days whether that's in the youtube comments or on twitter or on patriae on a lot of people for some reason seem to be incredibly interested in this in the last forty eight hours even though this has been something that's been discussed in the automotive industry since back in mid december And tesla has already talked about it a little too so we'll go through tussles comments. I'm here as well. So essentially what's going on. I'll go into some links here in a second. But what's going on here is that there is the semiconductor supply shortage which is a factor of multiple different things that factored into it so primarily what has been driving it is two things the pandemic and then the rise in some areas of consumer electronics. So the work from home movement during the pandemic has caused increase supply for things like laptops and stuff like that. That people are upgrading for working from home. The five g cycle with phones has caused an increase from what i gather in semiconductor needs and then the next generation consoles with the xbox one whatever it's called now and the bs five launching those things have worked together to create more more demand in the consumer electronics base and then in the automotive space because of the shutdowns that were experienced in the first half twenty twenty the a lot of automakers cut their orders or their contracts with semiconductor suppliers to help get through that period of time. So what that is caused. Is those autumn those suppliers to necessarily want to cut production. And things like that. They worked through Their safety stocks. So let's let's get into you some comments here from Chipmakers the first one. That i wanna look here. This is from microchip technology. So this is from a couple of weeks backer. Just not only one week back. But they kind of talk about how they got into the situation that they're in In terms of semiconductor in the automotive supply chain so they're talking about how their customers generally pulled back very hard. During the pandemic there was no backlog visibility in this environment. They had no choice to down inventories and safety stock to protect themselves from what looked like severe economic contraction and they saw similar similar actions from their suppliers that worked that they were together for Actually producing their semiconductors so they said during his time no one in the industry was adding capacity. Obviously given the uncertainty about win things would recover And that uncertainty extended significantly as the bottom of market as well so one of the things that they talk about here. That will come back. A little bit later is that they're offering this microchip. Preferred supply program called bs to offer the prioritized capacity to companies. That are willing to work with them. To order. twelve months of continuous non cancelable non reschedule will supply So they're not guaranteeing capacity for that but they're prioritizing people that are willing to make those longer term commitments and because if we rewind it back to the for salvatore nineteen because other because a lot of other because a lot of automakers were uncertain about their demand they were unwilling to give a lot of certainty to these two suppliers. So that's kind of brought the semiconductor situation into where it is today and they're trying to work through this now and that's impacting. A lot of different automakers couple other quotes here just from people in the industry so this one is from continental Major supplier in the space. They're talking about lead. Times for semiconductors saying what with lead times of six to nine months. The semiconductor industry has not been able to scale it fast enough to meet this unexpected growth. In automotive demand which really is a return to previous levels not necessarily new growth than they continue saying quote the bottlenecks from the semiconductor industry expected to continue well into twenty twenty one causing major disruptions and continentals production. So that gives us a bit of a timeline in terms of how this issue looks. We don't necessarily have a scale from that. Then let's move into one of their quote here. This is from Tmc one of the obviously major manufacturers. I think they do like seventy percent of some semiconductors or something like that so specific to their automotive customers They continued to decrease demand for cms t s emcees semiconductors in third quarter of two thousand nineteen. The chipmaker only began to see southern recovery automotive orders in the fourth quarter. Their ceo said earnings call earlier this month

Tesla GM Ford Youtube Twitter
Molecular Therapeutics Hopes to Reshape Gene Therapy

Breaking Biotech

05:15 min | Last month

Molecular Therapeutics Hopes to Reshape Gene Therapy

"So the first rail on a touch on today is from arena pharmaceuticals. The ticker symbol is a u. p. h. And they're sitting in a market cap. Now veron two two point one billion dollars and what we heard about a week ago is that they received fda approval for luke kindness for adult patients with active lupus nephritis and for those who haven't been following the company too long. They showed really really powerful phase three data. The stock shot up really well and then it's been kind of slowly selling off into you know around the thirteen fourteen dollar area and what we heard with this. Fda approval is the stock shot up to around twenty bucks and since then it's trading at around sixteen dollars now. I took a position around thirteen bucks and then sold most of it at around eighteen. And now i'm just sitting at around ten shares in anticipation of the future. And so we'll talk about that right now. But basically what the fda approval there are few details and one was that there was a black box warning but it was pretty much in line with cyclosporine. So it's not really anything to be concerned about. The other real benefit is that the patent protection is likely until the year twenty thirty seven so there were some concerns that the patent protection for arena in this drug was not gonna last that long and that could cut into the profits given the fact that they would lose exclusivity after a while so the other thing we heard is that arrhenius set the pricing and they said it at a price of three thousand nine hundred and fifty dollars for sixty capsules and then they estimate that the net revenue per patient per year is gonna sit at around sixty five thousand dollars so i did some quick math. Here to look at the prevalence of lupus and in general has around twenty to one hundred fifty cases per one hundred thousand people so in the united states that works out to around sixty six thousand two four hundred ninety thousand in the usa. And i know that's a pretty broad range but these are the These the publicly available stats. The corporate presentation of iranian says. That around forty percent of lupus patients have lupus nephritis so the actual problems in the kidneys that would benefit from this therapy so that brings us down to around twenty six thousand one hundred ninety eight thousand total addressable patients in the usa. So we have. Here's an estimated total potential revenue between one point seven billion to twelve point eight billion now again. That's a. It's a huge range. When there's an order of magnitude in there but at least there we get a sense of the kind of revenue. The company is going to be able to bring in sitting at around a two billion dollar market cap. It's definitely on the lower end. Even though this is the total addressable market and we know that arena isn't gonna be able to penetrate the whole thing. But i think the reason why the stock is of depressed is because of the bear narrative in regards to launch concerns so often with these smaller companies. Because they don't have an established salesforce they don't have necessarily those established relationships with either. Kol's or doctors space. It's difficult for companies that are small to really ramp up and deliver when it comes to the sales numbers so the bare narrative is saying that well they're going to really struggle with the launch therefore the company should only be expected to do the lower end of their expectation. Now on the both side. They're saying that well arena could be an emanate contender. And there's reasons to suggest that given that the risk is so low with this drug now. The data looks good and it's already fda approved so they could be being looked at by larger pharmaceutical companies. Who already have those established sales and marketing pipelines to just include this into their portfolio products. And start selling it so. I'm not sure what's going to happen. I'm going to relatively small position. I don't know how much i feel like diving in here. Given the the launch is going to be complicated. But i could miss out on a a merger acquisition deal. That could come as well. So that's really i think. Obviously it's very positive for the company and very positive for patients that are suffering with lupus nephritis but for me. I'm happy with my small position and just seeing what happens with the start with that. Let's move onto rhythm pharmaceuticals ticker symbol are ytm and they're sitting at a market cap of around one point three billion dollars and what they announced. It was positive data from semolina tied in additional emcee for our pathway deficient related. obesity 's so semolina tied was recently approved for hamas egas recessive mutant obese conditions related to pompey pcs k. One and leptin receptor so what that means. Is that patients that for this need to have a knockout in or a mutation in both copies of the gene whether it's policy pcs k. One or leptin receptor. Now what we weren't sure of is whether or not similan tide had an effect in hetero zayas patients and what this is is patients that have one functional copy of this gene so if their drugs sent. Milan could have an effect. In hetero zygote significantly expand the patient population that would qualify for treatment with this drug and with an expanded patient population. Obviously the revenues could be substantially higher than what we expect if it was only the home. Zygote

Lupus Nephritis Arena Pharmaceuticals FDA Veron United States Lupus KOL Hamas Obesity Milan
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | Last month

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
The Story of How TSMC Came To Dominate the World

Odd Lots

04:57 min | Last month

The Story of How TSMC Came To Dominate the World

"So obviously tracy. We've been talking a lot about chips lately. But for all the episodes we've done we haven't hit like what is sort of a. I guess i would say the elephant in the room or the gorilla in the room that keeps coming up over and over again. We've been going at a. I would say from a us perspective. Very focused on the trouble at intel. But we haven't really talked about the success story. That is taiwan. Semiconductor manufacturing company better known as t s emcee. Yeah exactly right so every episode that we do it sort of comes back to them. What a juggernaut. They've become and of course you know. The sort of basic story is that manufacturing chips is extremely hard It's extremely expensive. And it's very difficult to scale until Is one of the rare companies that designs and manufactures. Its own chips. But that for a lot of these companies that are sort of exploding ri- gaining market share there Having taiwan semi manufacture them and taiwan semi is getting extremely good or is extremely good at a manufacturing and maybe Pulling away from intel some extent in terms of its manufacturing capabilities. Right and i think they actually invented the foundry model which you know this idea of just manufacturing chips which keeps coming up over and over and over again in all of our conversations as one reason the entire semiconductor industry has changed and one reason why intel is struggling but the thing i find kind of amazing like in twenty twenty one. We all take it for granted. That tsmc is this massive player in the semiconductor industry in the world. Really but i find it really really noteworthy and you know somewhat surprising. In retrospect that what is a single company on an island has emerged to really dominate chips. That are now vital to all sorts of things so computers smartphones cars. Everything i think. Tsmc manufacturers little over half of the world's chips so it's not quite a monopoly but again like they are the juggernaut in the room as he put it absolutely. And it's such a. I mean it's such a pivotal company for a lot of reasons. I mean you mentioned cars. It was just a story this week recording this january twelfth by the way there was just a story this week about how car manufacturers around the world are actually running into supply constraints because they can't get chips because of the chip manufacturers decided to reduce their production of automotive chips during the crisis in the spring on the expectation that demand wasn't going to be there and now they haven't ramped up taiwan semi They're to actually reporting earnings. This week expected to be very strong. Earnings are soaring. stock is soaring. And then of course. Because it's in the strategic position end because taiwan itself is in this Uh strategic position obviously between the us and china and the roll over its status. It's just an incredibly central player and sort of necessary to understand the story right a big player in tech big player across multiple supply chains in a bunch of different industries. Uncertainly player geopolitics as well. So we really talk more time on semi and we have the perfect guest to do that. Someone who knows all about the company who's been covering them for a long time since long before they were the dominant player They are today. We're going to be speaking to copen. He is a tech columnist at bloomberg. Opinion has been with us a bloomberg for fifteen years and he's actually been covering The tech industry from taipei specifically for the last twenty one years Everything about Taiwan semiconductor where it came from this important player so tim thank you very much for joining us. Hey thanks time guys to talk to you tim. How would you describe the importance of taiwan semiconductor in the world right now well as you assess just saying they are so huge. Tracy pointed out the creates. Such a large share of the world saw chips. There's probably not a single device in the world that doesn't have. Tsmc somewhere but whether it's a car die. Fine of course famously. But even some really unimportant boring things like temperature sense. A hiya or some led lights array there. They do serve much of the waltz products. They're they're basically everywhere and so if that would've stopped production. Tomorrow i think the global technology industry would grind to a halt very very

Taiwan Intel Tsmc Tracy Copen United States TIM China Bloomberg Taipei
The weirdest stuff at CES

Talking Tech

07:10 min | Last month

The weirdest stuff at CES

"Joining us to talk about some of the most unusual stuff it's es this year is usa today tech columnist. Jennifer jolly a jennifer. Thanks for being here. Oh my gosh you guys. Thanks so much for having me. I love talking about weird tech. It's my favorite thing. All right so what was the weirdest thing you saw this slightly different. Cas where we all were covering it. Virtually yeah well we're just. It's it's going to be a tie between toews poop detective toilet. You heard that right and i mean please. Just start with the puns. Now i call it number two on my list healthier future based on what you leave behind get ready to be bulled over from the latest data dumb. I mean you can't you can't make this stuff up. What does it do. Tell me you you. You've you've peaked. You've peaked. My i can't think of a good pun around the top of my head so i'm going to give up. He's flushed with excitement about this. There you go there you go. Okay so todos newest ai. Smart commode is a sensor filled. Smart bowl aimed at detecting early signs of disease based on just imagine doing air quotes key outputs so it will analyze everything from how long you sit on the throne to The temperature of your skin as yours just sitting there to whether your stool contains enough fiber and then it will send you recommendations on how to improve your health via app on your smartphone showing gives you solid output. I caught up with you guys young so there we have it so that's got to be one of the weirdest last year. I talked about There was some gadget that analyzed your cats poop to let you know about your cats health so it was just a small leap to human health based on. You know looking into the future by what you leave behind. Yeah i'm gonna stop now it totally but you know it really it really make sense because you know how they've said. Some universities were analyzing waste on campus for covid spreading around so anyway so you mentioned it was a tie. So what's the other weird thing that you that at the top of your list. The bio breast milk. You guys remember last year when impossible pork basically got all the headlines plant based bacon that actually tasted really really good. Well this is again with the pun. The mother of all new high tech smart foods bio milk is a customized cultured breast milk. That is made from cells of a pregnant mother than cultivated in a lab to reproduce human milk. But it's personalized for that specific infant from that actual mother. So it's a way really. And i mean it sounds crazy but female Cell biologist female food scientists founded this company to create an alternative solution to formula to the packaged powdered formulas. We've been using forever because three out of four moms. Have some reason they have to stop breastfeeding before the recommended. Six months so it could be work. It could be health related. It's stressful any nursing. Mom knows it is one of the hardest jobs you will ever do. Toss in pandemic and working from home in teaching your kids. I mean it's really really hard in the best of times so that is just something i can't i couldn't believe it when i heard about it but i'm excited to see it. Come hopefully this year. So let's get to some of the really cool stuff that happened in the s one of the things that i've heard i'd heard about were these bionic contact lenses i think. Can you describe them. They sound really cool. Yeah it's called mojo vision. It's an a. Are embedded contact lens. That is as close to a bionic accessory as i could ever imagine. There's a teeny tiny display. It's half a millimeter in diameter. That's about the same size as a grain of sand that's actually embedded within the contact lends itself and then it projects images and information really subtly. You really take your attention away from what you're looking at but it projects that into your peripheral vision as you either. Walk down the street or cycle up a hill or even look up into the night sky. It's absolutely mind blowing at this. Was the winner of css last gadget standing. And that's an event that i have emceed for the past several years including this year i had not seen not mojo lens until video that the company played during the event and i had to pick my job up off the desk. I just cannot believe this kind of futuristic far out technology is actually here and the company told me they're going to launch this For people who are visually impaired. I and follow up with a consumer model. They have to go through all kinds of of fda and f. like all kinds of regulations because it is a contact lens. I e a medical device but they are looking at two three years out with these. Maybe less sounds like something. I am i on medically go to the goes. Terminator two were you. Were you got to see through the terminator's eyes and stuff was coming up on the side and you're like wow that if that could happen in the future yeah not only could is will. We've seen it. We also saw the music's glasses that do something very similar. But they're a pair of glasses so the difference is a contact lens and a pair of futuristic super cool smart glasses nice beyond products. Were there any trends or big takeaway. She took from the show this year. Jennifer there was a lot this year. You guys have already talked about this. A lotta pandemic tech germ killer. Everything's from target as new anti microbial backpack to special lights. I saw ub techs. Giant robot can rule through rooms shooting off giant rays of uvc. Light to sterilize a room so huge huge emphasis on clean tech mask tech. You guys wrote about the airpods mask. I have that with me where you know. There's a little disc on the front of it that connects with your smartphone and can give you all kinds of information about the air that you're breathing. How much your breathing. So that was a really really big trend and then also just comfort more comfort and this big buzzword this year delight at home figuring out ways to bring basically your whole entire world inside the walls of your home or even your backyard and have it be a lot better to hang out. There in the future will

Jennifer Jolly Toews Usa Today Jennifer FDA Giant
Marvel Studios’ ‘WandaVision’ Arrives on Disney+

Mo'Kelly

00:35 sec | Last month

Marvel Studios’ ‘WandaVision’ Arrives on Disney+

"Quick. I know that there is someone division news that's going to be coming down for next week. And we got to tell people about because this will be our only opportunity. Go ahead. Nex week Friday Wanda Vision debut. So so the emcee US setting off the new year, right? They want to wait till the stink of Wonder Woman had finally subsided and they could get back to some real superhero film and television business. Wanda Vision is not just debut ng next Friday It is debuting with a double episode two episodes next Friday. Star Wars.

Wanda Vision United States
An Indigenous Mixtape from Lima, Peru

TED Talks Daily

06:33 min | 2 months ago

An Indigenous Mixtape from Lima, Peru

"Basically this week's episode is a catch wa language mix tape and this mix tape starts with track. One introducing librado. Yeah that's clearly now my voice. I'm getting mixed eight hosting help from my friend. Dj just john. Okay here we go now. That's lebron connie emceeing at the national theatre here in lima. This past february he's rapping in a mix of spanish and catch wa if you haven't heard of catch wa that's kind of the point. It's the most widely spoken indigenous language and latin america about ten million people speak it and liberal bringing it to people in a whole new way. His mc name librado. Connie means i am a free man and a call and response you hear throughout his concerts is catch wa is resistance. I met librado while in lima peru. And i was in lima on this. Totally non far-flung gig filming young rappers and beat makers which have been doing on and off for the past seven years all over the world priscilla. Anyway i've always been interested in ways. Music leads to cultural mashups like catch one hip hop and how that intersects with identity and the way people feel about themselves and when it comes to documenting hip hop it's always a cool story when different languages and traditions get mixed into the music but it's kind of hard to tell what that mixing means. What does it mean. When someone is wrapping in their ancestral language does that relate to a language living or dying and house. All that culturally significant politically significant. When does it lead to change on. Its face it might seem like the fight for catch. Wise is about lima's pride in their past and that's true but there's another crucial thing at stake here. It's the ability for indian culture to survive and to evolve into the future so to get the significance of what liberals doing we need to start with some background on ketchaoua. But you don't hear much catch. What outside of the countryside in peru ever since colonisation spanish has been the dominant language of government. Business education. Really life in general. And there's of course all kinds of cultural implications with that as well in the broncos music though you don't hear any of that higher he swapping between languages constantly and letting catch while on hooks his call and responses. He's young but he's like a classic ninety s hip hop head and when we hung out. He seemed really comfortable in his skin and sincere about everything. Oh and heads up. We were talking spanish most of this interview. So you'll hear some overdub. English shorter track to deepen the andean bronx. This is teach them what either made from purple corn. It's very delicious from corn. You can even make teacher. They hold a credible. We're walking down along. Walk walking for a little bit. We are eating a kind of Proven popcorn and we're drinking a purple corn based drink. Ginger morava balmy out here. It's not that hot again. Noisy sirens is a cultural hub for peruvians. It's like they're la and new york matching into one about ten million people live here and the population's growing we're walking through downtown. Lima librado told me that when he went to new york to perform for the first time in two thousand eighteen a lot of what he saw reminded him of home unusual ways. You told the crowd that he realized he was like a rapper from the indian. Bronx they loved it. You know. he's a rapper. So he's good with metaphor and there's something very hip hop about his light experience. He grew up in a world that was hostile towards identity specifically his indian catch. Wasp became identity twenty mike cornell so librado wrapping and catch wa flowed great to my ear as someone who didn't have a lot of linguistic and cultural context. It's just good sound but sometimes locals were shocked to hear the language mixed into hip hop track three welcome to the donkey belly sky. And what are those. Locals is my friend oscar durand he's producing and basically co hosting this episode with me. Oscar grew up in lima in the eighties. And i left peru in two thousand two to study and live abroad as a photo journalist. The first time that occurred without those music. I was surprised you know he was not the first time i catch wa. I heard it when i was in crew. Obviously but it was the first time that i hear someone rapping ikeja and he was a new context for language at the energy. So i knew that. I had to meet this guy told me the story man. I wasn't there so you know. I already heard about him. So i was really curious about his because as a journalist i have my my antennas. You always scanning for interesting stories to last time when i was visiting peru i was there for work. I send a message of media and she told me. have this concert. why don't you come. I couldn't make it but him and his band were playing this rehearsal space so i just went and then we start chatting and it was just such great energy because i felt like i knew these guys forever and then they start playing and it was just the most amazing experiences having peru because he had this concert just for myself. But what was it about him that shocked locals. I mean there's great musicians in peru for sure. So what was it about librado. That made him stand out. Well its first surprising to catch on. Because when i was growing up catcher was really around me in school. Remember catcher being mentioned in our history class when we were talking about the inca empire our glory days but those days are long gone and many people would not associate catcher with innovation or success.

Librado Lima Lebron Connie Peru National Theatre Lima Librado Priscilla Connie Latin America Mike Cornell Oscar Durand Broncos John New York Bronx LA Oscar
AMC+ to air first-ever Walking Dead holiday special

Jason and Alexis

04:48 min | 3 months ago

AMC+ to air first-ever Walking Dead holiday special

"Oh, the holiday special. Um, I actually when I saw this headline and went Oh, God, no. The walking dead. We'll take a break from bad vibes to Eric's first ever holiday special. What? Yeah. Does that mean on December 13th? I will tell you what it means. Just in 10 days, okay? There is going to be a holiday special is going to be hosted by Chris Hardwick, and he's going to moderate a mass chat with cast members past and present. Here's the part that's gonna get real cringe. E for everybody. You know, there's also gonna be some caroling s O s O. The actress who played Maggie's Little sister, Emily Kenny, she played Beth Green. She's going to perform the Yuletide classic up on the Housetop. Oh, while let's see. I looked up all the actors. They just list the actor's name, so I looked up their characters while Ezekiel Jerry You, Mako and Lydia is going. They're going to do a parody of 12 days of Christmas, a song presumably with lyrics about flesh eating and society crumbling. Okay, so yeah. On the house top. And then you have the 12 days of Christmas about zombies by those fine folks. On then it's just It's all just so incredibly awkward. Then they're going to do actually the only cool thing If you're really into the show is that there's going to be a table reading from the forthcoming episode, which won't air until late March of next year, so they're going to do a table reading of this. Um okay. So you're gonna basically know what the episode is, If you watch this the next episode and other people, including this are Carol Eugene. Connie Judith. And he did favorite Yes. Oh, it's past and present some people that you thought you got rid of that already died like the girl. It's going to be singing. Um, Emily Kinney. Beth Green. I was glad when she died. I was like, Oh, see, That's what's great about this show. Is that you about Glenn? Oh, Glenn. I don't see Glenn on this list here. Oh, he'd bring us to the yard Exactly. But it's going to be, uh, airs December 13th on a emcees. Premium streaming bundle. We have to pay extra for this I get. I don't know the premium streaming bundle. Is that something I'm assuming it is? It's something that AMC has, like their own streaming service. Like CBS all access. Have to do some research on that, but that's when it airs. It's really great for people who are super into a walking dead, but the whole singing thing just makes me really nervous. That's why I want to see it to see them. Like do wedding. Oh, gods require the walking dead. You know that if they're changing the words to Zombie ish stuff. Yeah, I mean, they've done this several times in the show word. They'll have an actor who can sing and it's just so cringe. E, like, you know, like that one guy who was at the hilltop and he would like, sit by the campfire. Yeah, that dude, she couldn't be there. Yeah. You know what? He probably is begging to be there. He'll be there. Yeah, And so they'll take these people that are actors and singers. And somehow work in music to the show, which is always like no, not this. Bring back the flesh eating zombies. You know, we don't want to see singing by the campfire less obvious. They're gonna attack and interrupted. That's the only purpose. You know what I mean. 12 ripping heads on got suspending 10 rotting body. Nine. Next breaking glory gravestone. Seven shambling nightmares. Six bedded fingers, five appetites for future toes. Three teeth left two bloodshot eyes and a fresh, juicy brain in the hands their ago Now I like that real quick find that good things are out of your head. That was pretty good. Right? That real quick, Jason. Silent for a minute or two. You found it. Okay. Well, that's still excellent. All right, so I'll have to research What am sees premium streaming bundle is and see if we can Maybe just buy it for a night and then cancel. Yes, because I will. I'm curious just to see how this whole thing will go down. Let me just say there are certain shows that shouldn't do a Christmas special. Yeah, that is the first ever walking that there's a reason the walking dead one of those

Beth Green Emily Kenny Ezekiel Jerry Glenn Chris Hardwick Carol Eugene Connie Judith Emily Kinney Mako Lydia Maggie Eric UM AMC CBS Jason
Powerhouse Marketer Ana Valdz on Using Media to Create Change

Latina to Latina

03:20 min | 3 months ago

Powerhouse Marketer Ana Valdz on Using Media to Create Change

"I speak with a lot of latinos who emigrated to the united states as children are in their teens. You're thirty when you came to the us and you were single. It's a big leap. It is a huge leap. You know in a lot of different ways. Mexico became small in the sense that when we opened up i realized that there was so much more so my masters took me to spain. My phd took me to the united states. And it allowed me to myself. It allowed me to be exactly who. I wanted the way i wanted another thing. That was very crucial. And i didn't mention it. Before was the latino movement in mexico philanthropy and social movements are not easy to happen and over here. I just saw immediately. What was happening. I saw people at the white house at very high levels that in countries like my original country mexico could have never had that upward mobility. I saw literally the american dream and being here for the first six months. Change the perspective of my life. You worked at the white house. Office of presidential personnel received a presidential appointment from president clinton to act as a special assistant for latin america at the us department of energy. How do you go from that world to building your own production company so my husband comes in there. I need my husband at the hispanic heritage awards when vice president gore was a special guest. And that's you know in politics. I worked there. I'm latino letting van. You wanna come. So i actually went to the event and my husband right now was the emcee. Ob vent and so there was an after party. I met him. We started dating long distance. And we also realize that what i wanted to do politics. He wanted to do in media which is bringing all the latino amazing element into mainstream in mikey's mainstream politics and in his case mainstream media additionally he was exactly what i wanted to do which is used media to create change. At that point. I was using politics to create change but the truth is media was mice expertise so two years later we get married. I leave my job. It was really hard by the way but leave my job and moved to california and then we started working together with my concepts in washington. Dc and all his production company that already existed when i got married and do shows and other things what actually went in to building that production company walk us through it first of all the passion you know the passion of knowing that there was a treasure than was a blind spot for america. That was waiting to happen. And that could make so much money for all this corporations and studios and competent producers that were in the business to make money. We could make money by transforming the community and transforming the way the community looked in the united states.

Mexico America Office Of Presidential Personn Us Department Of Energy White House Hispanic Heritage Awards President Clinton Spain Latin America Gore Mikey VAN California Washington
Stop Being a Doormat!

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:55 min | 3 months ago

Stop Being a Doormat!

"It took me almost forty years to learn how to do this. And now i just do it all the time. I love doing it. I'm talking about learning to just say no which i have found in my travels around. The country is still one of the most difficult things in the world for women to do. Dr martha beck is here today. With the cure. Really if you will listen to her. If you pay attention and get it you can cure your disease to please or at least take big strides towards carrying it beginning today. Dr martha beck is a regular contributor to the magazine. Where i'm wearing the hat this month. In june and actually martha. I've never told you this but you are the first thing i go to an magazine you are. I love your column so much. I think you have such yours. You go to mind. Yeah what i know for sure way already know what i know for sure so i already wrote the so. I go to you every month. Because i think you have solid sounded by. She's in omega seen every month and she got her phd from harvard while raising three children. She works as a life coach and has really sound sensible advice that you can just in the instant that you read it. No that's the truth. I'm going to stop doing that. She says every woman in the country is socialized to act like a doormat. We all have been socialized that way and today you all agree right today. She is going to begin to teach us how to say no. Kelly desperately need. Martha's help kelly. Says she is so eager to please that. She spends thousands of dollars a year trying to buy people's love. Look at this. I'm a twenty nine year old single woman. I'm very very hard working in the real estate field. I own my own home. I drive a very nice car. And i make very good money and i feel like i have to buy other people's love. I am doormat when it comes to money. I just cannot say no to my friends family or any type of relationship. That i'm and i just broke up with my boyfriend of eleven years and basically i paid for everything to keep him in my life. I even found out that he was using my credit card to go to strip clubs and it was hard for me to even confront him about using my money to pay other girls to take their tops off. I finally got the courage to kick him out. But i am still paying for him to stay in a hotel till he gets some money to get. I'm a pushover with my friends. I typically pay for dinners. they don't ever asks me. I just feel like that's just my job that i need to pay to keep them in my line. I always buy the most expensive gifts from my friends. Baby showers wedding gifts birthdays. Three years ago. I loaned my friend about three thousand dollars And i i haven't even gotten five dollars back. I'm a very visual person around town. I get compliments all the time saying kelly. I've never seen upset. I always emceeing you smiling. But the fact is that when i get home is a very lonely time. I'm not happy. And i wish i could find somebody to give me something. I don't think i've ever had i don. I haven't even had a boyfriend that could afford to take me to mcdonald's. Well dr martha says that Kelly is just like a man who sleeps with prostitutes. Not exactly how it's it's more like. She's a man who has decided at the beginning that no woman can ever love him that he's not good enough and so he only plays prostitutes because he figures that way he can't lose. He pays people to pretend to love him because he does not believe that he can be left without that guys. Think prostitutes love them. No no that's the. They want the prostitute to pretend to love them. Okay but of course. They think she's doing it for the money right. And basically what kelly's doing is have you ever tried making a friendship or being in a relationship where you didn't money so what you're doing is you're starting with the theory. I'm not loveable. Therefore i will buy people's love but you're always conscious that it's bought and paid for so it doesn't feel like love to you now. What i suspect is that these people really do love you you know. I know that. I have several friends. Left you're keeping it away you see in the tape. I wish that i could find somebody that would value me. That would give things to me. Well guess what you're going to mirror you're the only one who doesn't value and you as the bad news. The good news is that as you have the power to become the someone in your life who loves and cares for you okay. So that's why we gotta work on here.

Dr Martha Beck Kelly Emceeing Martha Dr Martha Harvard Mcdonald 'S
Dallas Cowboys QB Garrett Gilbert 'excited' about game against Pittsburgh Steelers

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

01:10 min | 4 months ago

Dallas Cowboys QB Garrett Gilbert 'excited' about game against Pittsburgh Steelers

"About about it, it, you you know, know, And And I I think think Cooper's Cooper's in in the the same same boat boat who's who's ever ever name name is is called called on on Sunday. Sunday. We're We're both both very very excited excited about about this this opportunity, opportunity, and and we're we're you you know, know, we're we're getting getting ready ready to to win win a a game. game. So So the the two two of of us us are are are preparing, you know the best we can together to get ready, Tio go win a football game. Dallas Cowboys quarterback Garrett Gilbert, who might be your starter and Sunday against the Steelers. Good morning for Meyer. W B AP Sports Desk Emcee Lam like he said. He's excited for this opportunity to possibly play at a T and T stadium in while he might Knight start you might in the plain, depending on the game goes Not only like I said played, but start after Andy Dalton went down on the reserve covert 19 list this week, leaving Dallas having look for another quarterback. No, Dak Prescott know Dalton not going with rookie bendy Nucci again. So it's either Gilbert or Cooper rush. They prepare for the single. So you know your help each other out and you know, it's your job. Q B Matterwhat. We're on the same team and they're just trying to, you know, get yourself ready for game helps. Everyone helps the whole team. Not sure it matters. Who the quarterback is against that Steelers defense. They come to town. Ah, perfect record, the only team in the NFL that's undefeated. College

Cooper Garrett Gilbert Dak Prescott Dallas Cowboys Steelers Cooper Rush Andy Dalton Meyer Football Knight Dalton Dallas Gilbert NFL
Atlanta declares state of emergency after Hurricane Zeta

The Von Haessler Doctrine

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

Atlanta declares state of emergency after Hurricane Zeta

"Of of Hurricane Hurricane of of Hurricane Hurricane Zeta Zeta Zeta Zeta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Mayor Mayor Mayor Mayor Keisha Keisha Keisha Keisha Lands, Lands, Lands, Lands, Bottoms Bottoms Bottoms Bottoms declared declared declared declared a a state state a a state state of of emergency emergency of of emergency emergency yesterday yesterday yesterday yesterday that that that that clears clears clears clears the the way way the the for for way way for for more more more more city city resource resource is is And contract And contract and cruise and cruise to help to help with power with power restoration restoration Update Update from Georgia from Georgia power power in this in morning this morning power power has has been restored been restored to more to than more 95% than 95% of its of customers its customers that 25,000 that 25,000 customers customers are are still still without without power power this this morning morning total total statewide statewide outages outages including including all the all local the local emcees emcees about about 40,000. 40,000.

Hurricane Hurricane Georgia Hurricane Hurricane Zeta Zeta Atlanta Mayor Keisha Keisha Keisha Kei 40,000. 40,000
#Election2020: Obama to campaign for Biden in Atlanta Monday

The Von Haessler Doctrine

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

#Election2020: Obama to campaign for Biden in Atlanta Monday

"Of of Hurricane Hurricane Zeta Zeta Atlanta Atlanta Mayor Mayor Keisha Keisha Lands, Lands, Bottoms Bottoms declared declared a a state state of of emergency emergency yesterday yesterday that that clears clears the the way way for for more more city resource is And contract and cruise to help with power restoration Update from Georgia power in this morning power has been restored to more than 95% of its customers that 25,000 customers are still without power this morning total statewide outages including all the local emcees about 40,000.

Bottoms Bottoms Hurricane Hurricane Mayor Keisha Keisha Lands Georgia
"emceeing" Discussed on BaKChat

BaKChat

04:47 min | 4 months ago

"emceeing" Discussed on BaKChat

"Yeah which have been trying to do for my for my birthday this year for some ever I did a facebook fundraiser I know and it was very six. Honestly Blake brought to tears by how generous and supportive all of my friends you know not just friends and family there people I don't even know that. I had no idea who they were and we're donating money to the indigenous women's Fund of Canada. Dear Birthday. Yeah Yeah. It was great first of all I just think supporting. Women and the whole culture is so important on a day-to-day basis. But then when you take the increased risk factors and jazz women face and the unfair advantage, they have a system that set up for them to essentially all yeah It just meant a lot to me that people were able to open their hearts and their minds a little bit. Yeah and look into it and decide it was right or not for them to donate to yeah and I think the numbers spoke for themselves I raised three thousand, one hundred dollars. Didn't people donated three, thousand, one, hundred and incredible. Yeah. It was really great. I was like, wow, it's. So it's so cool. The power of like those fundraisers like how much money you can we can. We can really breathe when we come together. Like. I don't know sorry I have a little bit of brain fog all the time. All the time. Like, duck could be one of the mottoes could. Yeah I think twenty twenty s motto should still be didn't even kiss, US? After. This bad and didn't even kiss is totally there was not even a cuddle was like this the Bedia emceeing that didn't have any after caring. I that should be the motto. I. The worst. The best but the best at being the worst. You have been just. So everybody knows we're broadcasting live from Quinn's Claes in. Eastern Cougar I love this neighborhood so much you have a on the most beautiful tree on your corner that is the quintessential autumn orange color. Yes, and I actually I pulled up vote and I was that Weirdo on the street crouched in the middle of the intersection with my iphone held upside down because. Of, like a the pavement texture. Orange and it was actually quite comical. I was because I would tell my window it's like, oh You're like having trouble finding it, but you weren't..

Blake facebook US Fund of Canada Bedia emceeing Quinn
"emceeing" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:30 min | 6 months ago

"emceeing" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"I mean, big crowd like that man has got to be a guy must make you feel good when you run for Congress when you could. You know, you get a giant crowd like that shown up to an event like that out in quantity. Tucson, which is not close for a lot of people. It was an amazing event. I thank you tow to Natasha and Kyle over a taste for hosting and we know we put together an absolutely great event to honor those fallen from 9 11, and it was just like you said three or 400 people. I know that we stopped counting around 300. People just kept showing up. And we were all outside having a good time. That's the America that I grew up in the America that I remember and love. And it was just so great to see all those folks out there celebrating. You know the lives of those who died in that horrible terrorist attack, But, yeah, absolutely fantastic event. We had a great time. We had great speakers. Thank you. So much for emceeing the event. I hope everyone and I know they did because I've still got people contacting me saying, Brandon. We had an absolutely fantastic time. When can we do something else again? People are ready to get out there and be free again and just get the lights and we celebrated nine of those folks who died. We celebrated their lives and remembered them and it was an honor. So I just want to thank everybody involved for that. Everyone who came out And we shot those two beams of light up in the areas of gray memorial, and we just got to keep this going because this is this is what the Democrats don't want. They want to shut down the country. You know they weren't out there. They make there trolling us there, making sure that we don't win this election. Nestor Cole, We've got to make sure that we pro for the America that we want to see. That's right. Brandon Martin for Congress dot com is the website Branden Martin for congress dot com and the website If you'd like to, Ah, do what you can to help out. Brandon help get the his name out there even more go to his website, and you know, there's always the donate button is always other events. You go to a CZ well and Brandon as this continues. We will. We will talk more. I appreciate everything on good luck, man. Thanks. Thanks for having me on Thank you to your listeners will talk soon. You got it. Brandon, marking running for Congress, Brandon Brandon Martin for Congress dot com will continue much more to get to highlights of the Latinos for Trump event. Incredible stories from great great great Americans. Andi Trust me you want to, but I wouldn't waste your time You want to hear this, especially when we have Or he revives the owner. Sammy's what he did. I was just great. All coming up right here on canister, the morning ritual with Gary Lewis. All right. So listen, I amazingly enough, we're into fall. We're getting close to Thanksgiving to Christmas, Tanaka and you might have got to get the house in order right? Especially people in the house for way too long. Time to go Your tile cleaner Garrett. It's expensive to get tiled clean. I get it. Listen, zeros always has the best prices. But in September, their prices are insane. Like crazy, Eddie, right? They're insane. You, Khun! Get this month from zero as you can get tile clean for the same price is carpet $42 to get a room, a carpet clean and the same $42. To get a room of tile clean on Lee from zero rez, and they clean it like anybody else with that powered water in their great equipment, and they literally flush out the grout removing the chemicals left behind by mopping, So your tile and grout are clean residue free and you are going to see The original ground color. That's right. The original ground car, it's going to be back there. It's.

Brandon Brandon Martin Congress America Tucson Natasha gray memorial Nestor Cole Branden Martin Kyle Lee Gary Lewis Sammy Eddie Tanaka
Protests continue in Portland after more than 100 consecutive days

Pacifica Evening News

04:51 min | 6 months ago

Protests continue in Portland after more than 100 consecutive days

"Marked 100 Days and nights of Black Lives matter. Protests in Portland, Oregon. They began after the police killing of George Floyd on May 25th despite an uptick in police, violence and right wing militia groups confronting protesters in Portland. The demonstrators are determined to continue. Katya face Perrin Smith attended a solidarity building event in Portland this weekend. Any B way Got B. We got Jobe at Len's Park in southeast Portland on Saturday afternoon. Several 100 people showed up for community gathering with speeches, songs, inspiration and sharing resource is What's this? It's one of more than a dozen events across the city this weekend to mark 100 consecutive days and nights of protests for black lives matter. Regina rages, an organizer and emcee of the day's programme. And this right here. This isn't antiracist active, Resist states by being here today you are saying that you are anti racist I A is with P d X Black youth movement, which was formed in the aftermath of the police killing of George Floyd. And has led many of the Portland marches. It's coming out of a place of exhaustion. We're tired. Honestly tired. We've been fighting our whole lives and we have to continue to fight. I told you guys are stories. And it's hurting us. You know, it's Harding. Us. We just constantly have to relive it every single day. She asked the crowd to take a look at her attire. She's just come from basketball practice, wearing shorts and sandals and her hair pulled back. She's not just an angry black woman, she says. She's also a high school student and an athlete. But woman have always always been taught that we had the fight hard so hard we had to put in those countless hours. We have the practice harder than a white girl. We had to work so much harder. And why is that? It's because America has normalized normalized it. We've normalized little black girls being in these streets finding for their lives. But we haven't normalized black girls being doctors. Black girls being principles like girl be a teacher's why black women and especially protecting black trans women, was a major topic of discussion at the rally. Protesters say their demands haven't changed throughout the 100 days. They want to end anti black racism and police brutality and to defund police budgets to reinvest in community services. What's changed is the increased use of force by police against protesters. Did. Eisen, artist and organizer with black lives matter. He was one of many protesters arrested by federal agents last month process within an hour. I got tackled arrested. Realized they cut my finger over. Ask them why they arrested me. They would not answer. Why? Why just full ignore sitting in the back of the car, and I could feel my back of my shirt getting wet from blood. I can't look at this. Please, just fully ignore me. He said he was detained for about two hours, interrogated and photographed. Finally, they let him go. But he was given no documentation or court date, he said. It was only later speaking with a legal support team. He realized he was kidnapped. She realized Wow, you were actually Tell. I said that to say That is an important piece of this revolution. That's what we're dealing with right now. Making just rolled to the street, snatch people up and hold them hostage for however long that is very scary. Problem with doing the next day he quit his job at T Mobile to join the protest full time. On Friday night, Organ State troopers returned to the front lines of the Portland demonstrations, and, along with police arrested 27 protesters, according to the Oregonian. A viral photo from that night shows a woman beaten by police and blood dripping down her face as she's carried away by officers in riot gear. The Trump Administration has deputized the state troopers as federal agents, which means protesters could now face federal charges. The protesters charged that law enforcement has reacted disproportionately giving a pass to right wing militia while cracking down harshly against black lives matter. Demonstrators.

Portland George Floyd Oregon Jobe Len's Park Harding Basketball T Mobile Katya Trump Administration Regina Perrin Smith America Eisen Legal Support
Call of Duty's Gunsii Talks Change from 5v5 to 4v4 and RosterMania

Esportz Network Podcast

04:04 min | 6 months ago

Call of Duty's Gunsii Talks Change from 5v5 to 4v4 and RosterMania

"Less than twenty four hours after everyone Chaffetz activision blizzard announced the. Four for the next season, which changed from five five to forty four. Now, this is a bit of returned to its roots colored duties sports a four before was how everything used to run but what that change happening gear with no expansion beyond the twelve ts CDL suddenly, twelve spots for pros have disappeared at the highest level the change to forty four reserve the controversial. So players Ford Southern gutsy. Where do you say that change? honestly it's a, it's a very huge change I. Remember growing up being younger watching for before and then seeing the expansion five and an amateur scene that kind of got everyone's hopes up because they it being bobby five there's more spots there's more opportunities there's just there's just more to it. Now going back to forty four it's just a lot of competition. I thought I thought last year in the amateur scene. There was a lot of good talent out there and a lot of good anyone can be picked up this next upcoming year. But how it went back to forty four, it's going to be gladiator. Definitely, it seemed like a lot of teams defaulted to who some of the old guns veterans who've been call of duty for quite a long time this I hear the CDL but we also saw a lot of rookies. You saw the empire shots Utah Mac for the New York subletters really turnaround that team belt midseason, Y- There's value in having some of these young players you know people might recognize some of the big names but having young players having that young energy has shown to be really successful for a lot of teams. Yeah I agree one hundred percent I see a lot of the older people, all the people that commute competed saying how people always forget but I think there's just a lot of talent emceeing that you just have to take a chance like. There's just so much talent out there. There's so many people unknown people that don't get that chance. It don't have the connections to get to the next level, but they have that potential night just feel like if more professional teams take a chance on the obscene or brought more spotlight that it can just show like the potential we have in here. Absolutely you know previous success is not necessarily an indicator that you're going to continue being graded a game call of duty is just a game that changes each year at East sports in in all people just fall off at a certain point you gotta be make sure you're bringing in the young players, the people that could really source the seen few like the teams that are having the most success because if you could just grab a guy that was great on optic for years ago, dot com out any particular. Maybe. But that's not necessarily going to be great CDL. So you have to make sure that you're up-to-date with WHO IS THE BEST Of the youngest of the upcoming right now, I mean it has been a while since we've had new players like into the scene lake. I personally feel I. Don't personally feel but I, think it's time for like a new generation of that would make sense like I'm not calling them old but. I don't know I don't know where I'm going with this. No I. Think you're right. I talked about this a little bit with Mac on the show is that there's sort of a changing of guard first of all word the CD L. wherein entirely new eastward structure we've already seen. J.. Cap Who is one of those guys who's long time success retire we saw Karma retire we saw you know. Empire wins the championship at its. cloister that they drop waster. I can kramer clay for a second but yeah, they drop Claes who's now a three time world champion at keep the rookies keep some of the the other guys that. So it's feels like there is a bit of a changing of the guard. It's just up to some of those team managers to be like, okay we're gonNA take the chance on somebody who maybe doesn't have the pedigree but has the skill, and then they could start just you saw with Mac is hey, does it take long? If you start having success, you can start building your own brand. quickly.

MAC Bobby Claes Utah Karma New York East Sports
Top Voice AI Stories in the First Half of 2020

The Voicebot Podcast

05:52 min | 7 months ago

Top Voice AI Stories in the First Half of 2020

"I. I asked each of the panelists today what they thought was the top story in the first half of twenty twenty invoice in everyone seemed to agree that covid nineteen was to be Let's start with you John There are many stories about voice in Corona. what stood out to you what's your experience Ben and how that's impacted the voice industry. Generally whether it be Europe or US or globally whatever your perspective is on that. That's interesting questions. At the beginning I think we covered it. In like end of February or like mid. March. I was a little concerned the odds because various like building for assistance like Alexa Google Assistant. is still very often seen as to some like innovation. And so what I thought is that companies now that they're not sure where market is going in these uncertain times that they budgets for this and that's this all of these developments, wiggins slowdown but it feels like at least when we're like when I'm talking to other industry professionals, it feels like that. There is love optimism One might related might be related to. People being at home more using Alexa more I. think Catholic early say more about this. The other is that more and more people now see the value of vices not being just like saving time for example, but then also being germ-free technology that you're like there was this one them all by. Pico. Voice thing queered they have like the voice enabled elevator of, for example, all of these different applications these. Are. Pretty exciting I mean we're still in the early days regarding this, but I definitely emcee that more and more companies are thinking about voice experiences the go beyond building. Games Alexa. For example, on that go beyond marketing Alexa skills, and think about k. what's what could the health benefits of filling filling voice and Tad's Free Interactions Look like A great point eight is thinking about that when. When you look at voice, you mentioned this idea is works experiment for a lot of businesses and it might have been coming out of their innovation budget and you see some sort of really big disruption that's hitting revenues profits, and therefore discretionary spending. We would see we would normally expect these type of special projects beside line but in fact, what we're seeing is a lot of there being accelerated. This. Very interesting to see an I thought some of that is definitely kind of a self fulfilling prophecy of the industry that you're like, Oh yeah. Alexa has been slowing down a bit at least it felt like this in the scale store Kayla look into other ways that we can build exciting experiences but it also feels like that more and more companies that haven't been in the industry in the voice in the treaty are also looking for like how to deploy was experiences now. Whether it be touch free or it just be for a really convenient way to interact. Catherine Yon just mentioned you. You're sort of background and focus on the consumer. It will bring you in here a when you think about the voice view the voice brew lands and Cova Nineteen. How do you come out on that? Yes. So there are a couple of things I. Love. I love to talk about I. You know there have been lots of reports that have indicated that there's been an uptick in voice assistant usage and that's great for the industry but I think what's even more interesting is that the data showing that people are trying more things more things they haven't done before with their voice assistance and I am definitely seeing this. You know through the Lens of voice brew the engagement with forcetruth emails has been up significantly through You know since the start of the pandemic and March and also the volume of subscriber emails that I get has exploded in recent months. So people are at home they're trying things they're running into issues and they want help solving them or they're just excited that something new work. Then they wanna tell me and they get in touch. So it's you know it's kind of anecdotal but you know I'm I'm definitely seeing more people trying more new things with their voice assistance and I think that's that's really exciting. That's really interesting to me that that you know it it doesn't surprise me that. Because people are all they're using their devices more, they're looking for more ways to do it. They've discovered voice brewed so that it's just another signal that your subscriber base has gone up Frankly because of you know it coincides with all these other things that are happening simultaneously. Yeah no that that's been great and it's also just with the existing Subscriber Base I. can see that you know people again people are at home. You know they're reading their reading their emails. They're just they're they're engaging more and I, think. Part, what's you know from my perspective also really great about this. Is that I am hopeful that this will persist beyond Kobe. So once you kind of open the can of worms of trying a lots of new things with Alexa or with Google assistant that people will now be open to continuing to do these things but trying more new things So. You know all good

Alexa Europe United States Pico Corona. BEN Cova Catherine Yon Google Kayla
Malik B, founding member of The Roots, has died at 47

TIME's Top Stories

00:49 sec | 7 months ago

Malik B, founding member of The Roots, has died at 47

"Me Be a rapper and founding member of the roots has died. He was forty seven. The group announced the death of the Philadelphia born MC and a social media post Wednesday, the cause of death was not released. Maliki whose real name is Malik Abdul Pass. was a major contributor to the group which includes a mere quest, love Thompson and Tariq Black Thought Trotter. He appeared on four albums before departing the group in Nineteen. Ninety nine, the group won its first grammy the following year the roots paid homage to Maliki for his rap talents and faith. We regretfully inform you of the passing of our beloved brother and longtime roots. Member Malik Abdul Basset. The group said on twitter may he be remembered for his devotion to Islam and innovation as one of the most gifted emcees of all time?

Malik Abdul Basset Maliki Malik Abdul Pass. Trotter Founding Member Twitter Tariq Black Philadelphia Thompson
Malik B., founding member of The Roots, dies at 47

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 7 months ago

Malik B., founding member of The Roots, dies at 47

"And founding member of the Roots. Malik Abdul Basset has died at the age of 47. The group confirmed his death on its Twitter account. Fans knew him as Malik be joined the roots in the early nineties, He appeared on the group's 1st 4 albums, including 1990 five's breakthrough hit. Do you want more? He left the group in 1999. Fellow roots member Questlove calls Molly be one of the most gifted emcees of all time.

Malik Abdul Basset Founding Member Twitter Molly Questlove
"emceeing" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

10:39 min | 11 months ago

"emceeing" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Lebron has not had that there have been years where people are like. I I think I would steph. Curry in our is like oh well we got. You know it's like Jack Still Available. So does the difference. I mean like like Lebron I think that if if you can't you're measuring like their bodies in their skills and all these things in their longevity it really is hard to argue against Lebron now but he is closer to his peer groups in Jordan swell the longevity thing makes it so hard to figure out because you know even look at the stuff. I did a thing with Mikhail We watched game seven of the buck south extinct for MBA TV. And we're just shooting the shit they're in the game we're talking about just how different it was. Were there you know. He's playing with his broken foot that they're diagnosing correctly and then they just send them back out. There you know is wearing sneakers from the mid eighties. There's no there's no sort of Dieting like all the stuff we've talked about those advantages before that somebody like. Lebron has now I do wonder if you just take Jordan from the the eighty five to ninety eight Jordan and he just gave them all the advantages people had now how long he would've played like would have been twenty years instead of thirteen. I think it's pretty reasonable to thank. Yeah he would have played two decades. It's just easier to do that now. Lebron at age thirty five was arguably physically ninety five percent what he was at his absolute peak because of all the ways he can stay in shape. Easier might be the wrong word but definitely possible like you could definitely do it like it. Seems like guys now. If their if their whole life is making sure their bodies days together they can play a real long time Really is another one so it's Like coop somebody on the stock. I can't remember who it is. But like they just a great thing where they say sorta like she made. He's the only guy who can turn on and turn it off who just never turned it off. Yeah I think that's you know that that's a that's an interesting way of looking at because they're they're the assumption is your player. Who so great that you can turn it on. Turn it off. That's going to be part of your bench that you're going to be able to flip the switch down take plays off and then come back at you and he. I guess he did really you know it's like like even when you're watching that stupid game against like the French cheap. It's like played pretty hard to like. You know artery needs to. Yeah he was just a maniac. I mean Goldsboro had a piece last weekend about they have all the shot charts. Jordan's last two years so only two years. But it's the last two bowls years. How unbelievable his mid range shooting was like he basically mastered it. He was shooting fifty five percent on jump shots from twelve feet to nineteen feet and he he'd mastered it in a way like people thought Kobe was this awesome. Madrid shooter Jordan's at this whole other level and and then you look at the shot charts of all the guys league at the time. There's no comparison. He owes like three times better than everybody else. It was surprising though on that. Shot Chart how. He's shooting percentage in the paint was lower than you would have thought though with his legs his last year he was tired. I think and it may have been a difference in how the game was officiated. You know like the the degree of difficulty in a lay up. There used to be in some kind of that if you're at the rim there's probably going to be contacted doesn't not as true anymore. Yeah I just think it there were we. He wouldn't have shot three. He would have done whatever was going to win and if he was here in two thousand twenty he would just like oh so threes are important and he just would have become the best three point shooter. He was the best at everything. There was no no thing that he wasn't awesome Matt. If it was I go do this. He's giving the best at. What are you looking forward before we go? What are you looking forward to the most the next day parts? Well I mean I. I'm not I'm not sure I don't know. Is it going to be the are? They GONNA have ten kind of back stories. Like this is going to be Jordan. Pippen Rodman Phil Jackson. A Steve Kerr backstory at twenty twenty coolidge backstories. They're going to be a krause backstory. Like have you. I'm assuming you've seen it. I've seen the first nine. Yeah it definitely goes more into the footage from that season as the doc goes along because they have this motherlode of of great behind the scenes stuff so as once they set up everybody. It moves more into that. Yeah I I you know it's just it. It's it's a little audit because of the conditions of the world dowd's like there's so much interest in this. You know there so much interesting interesting like tie your Kanye notes like there's just these limits these things that are we have limited opportunities. Now is sort of experience. Anything new that like it I I was. It was weird to me that I was spending Sunday looking forward to watching something. That's a limited engagement ran unlimited case. Watch anytime I want you know but I was so I just I don't know I I guess I just to see what it is like. I just I'm also interested to see if there's anything in here that is going to dramatically change. The Way I think about any of the involve people because when Jordan Pippen Phil Jackson dropping all these guys it feels like I have of calcified view of how I think of those people. And I've had the opinion I've had about them for ten twenty years or whatever so I'm curious to see something actually shifts that yeah. I think that was what was so surprising to me. After the DOC came out with these people that were looking at Jordan just completely freshly like oh. I had no idea. I didn't know because I feel like you and I 'cause it probably anybody else. Who is there? We just Kinda knew this stuff but then you realize oh you know. We're getting older and every year you get older. There's another year of people that just tableau idea. You know it is a I mean like some people are just more fascinating than others. I gotTA check some a friend of mine. Said how many athletes who didn't murder anyone could you make a ten part documentary about? It's pretty small list. We started talking about is like Cabernet. You'd like us six episodes. You know it's like six hours of being up of like pejoratives like if this insisting was just about your I would be as interested as I am about the whole team. I do it. Ask One quick thing before you leave. I was listening to one of your other podcast. Hello and you had mentioned that you secretly signed your wife up for survive. Yeah okay. Here's my question. Did you tell you get it then or would it be like honey? Got Some News. You could be on survivor if you watch. I told her I did it after you get. What was your reaction? She was like what did you do that and I said I don't know I've always wanted to be on and she's like I would get voted out in three days. You know. I'd go nuts if I couldn't eat I was sick. It'd be great. That's exactly why you should go out. The fact that bends reaction makes me think she will go on selected like the the normal. But it's something that would be like. I'm not doing that. I don't care how much money you are automate. But when she's like I think I'd lose. It means part of her things she'd win. Well we've always joked about it because she'd be amazing in the challenges and I I do think I think she could navigate a lot of it. I think she'd be really interesting contestant. I know she won't get picked but it's just been ever since they created the show we've always joked about. I'd have ill and then why. Why won't you could pick? I think that that you know maybe Jeff crouse would go. I would love to have beloved one. Be You come out of that situation. Happening we were joking about when the loved that loved on episode that it would just be our dogs because she likes the dogs more than mere the kids right now because we're all trapped together so despite here's here's your dog. Willie like she'd be the happiest to see. Willie I did fail. We watch the loved one episode. Last week I always. I don't understand the family's fly out there in some weird location right there. I don't know where they'd Fiji. Or wherever the hell they are always eating g not right. That's yeah they kinda because there's less about sort of the mystery of the area now it's like here. We are so flying cross country C can be tried it out for the loved ones episode. Mike at the spend an hour maybe two. Maybe maybe if you win a challenge you get to stick around for like five hours. And then that's it like back to the Fiji ritz-carlton Wherever they put you up the flying back. I don't know if it's worth it. It wouldn't be a long slight. It would be tough like not to do it like if your wife got selected for this and like like. I'm just going to send you Kobe or something like that. Going to be real shock. You know it's like us. They've had years where you know. It's like somebody's friend the kids it's clear either. They didn't have a great issue with their parents are not married or execute Eat when someone gets on survivor do they. Do they ask like who? Would you like your loved? One should be the Hafner. Yeah so for me. I'm not going. I don't have time to fly across country. Just see my wife for an hour like I I would just send like one of our kids are no good. They could so she'll be happy to see you anyway. I got work to do. I can't find cross cross country. Do the slow boat should jog for an hour of time. I'm not doing that. Although look was one of the situations where the the love one compete in the challenge. That that'd be good for my family will but wouldn't you feel some desire to be involved with that? No because I would have my daughter do it. That'd be amazing now. If it was my my daughter would kill. It should be great. That'd be a big win. I hope I hope she makes it. It'll be the funniest thing I although do. They have survivor anymore. Survivor canceled out of. How did they do it? The next two seasons I.

Jordan Pippen Lebron Mikhail We Kobe Fiji Phil Jackson Goldsboro Steve Kerr Willie I Jeff crouse Pippen Rodman murder Kanye krause Matt dowd twenty twenty Mike
"emceeing" Discussed on PodKats! Las Vegas Entertainment

PodKats! Las Vegas Entertainment

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"emceeing" Discussed on PodKats! Las Vegas Entertainment

"Oh yeah. That's right. There was so many of them that have been pushing me. Mama to run into pack but would fight was that Apac y'all versus. Oh my fellow no blanking on. May whether it was there. I just remember that there were there. Were more people. I've ever seen in a ring before in anthem in. You're in the middle of all that I was in the middle as I just said. Screw it the fist-bump before why not sorry. Martin sang that anthem. I don't know if you know the story he is. He's from the Philippines and he did something different. I don't know if you change tempo or alternate lyrics. When he went back you got in trouble in society. That's why getting Zaidi I mean. It's not about the Filipino. You people give pressure. Don't mess up the words right as you're going out really Mental I was talking to my friend Frank Marino saying not long ago at the at the Madison Square Garden texting. Says I'M GONNA be on the anthem. I think they're televising nights at all record it and then. I sent him the all the lyrics. I texted him all here and he goes wait. A second we're like like he's looking. Okay okay I got it. I can have a feeling that he might have screwed up in his head. The Oh you know you're looking out for him okay. But don't do it T. mobile is they have they have. I don't think not all the time the first time I did. They didn't have it now they do. I don't know they should do that. Give you know it's scary? Because I called you after the Agra Lara one of the Super Bowl and she even jumbled lyrics. It's a lot of pressure a- singer chance to get it right when I saw those lyrics anxiety just went away. I was so nice. You know that's what we're doing phonetically. You don't really know what the words that's you know if if singers now and I see this all the time they have their their phones out in a reading lyric sadly I see this. In ticketed shows I've seen as a cabaret jazz for the singers will be looking down at their phones. During shows I used to be really frowned upon not happening a lot more. Says he will do the. What a little note thing who those tuning human nature does they do. Get ONE OF THOSE. Kinda sing about during the during the show just before you look all about the notes. Anita to we need tuning Harvard's at some point in the show are in apparel of phase. You John and Las Vegas Nevada. It's always a pleasure to talk to you. Thanks for your time with us. Great to see you and Ray John so happy here in Las Vegas absolutely love it and I'll be back here five or six times this month. Okay promise thank you for having me. Thanks once more Lorraine Apparel for joining us this week on podcasts as always. We'll be back next Monday and every Monday so be sure to subscribe to the show where you're listening. What is happening in the column? You might be asking yourselves. Well run is closing at Luxor. Effective March eight. We found this out on Friday. The show failed at the box office and was beaten up by fans and reviews online run with Cirque du Soleil first attempt at a scripted. Show graphic novel if you will in Las Vegas but there are no plans yet as to what to do about replacing the production at its own theatre. Share is sick. She called out of her shows of Park theatre on Friday and Saturday because of an upper respiratory infection. She has no shows scheduled this here in Las Vegas but we expect an announcement of new dates within a couple of weeks. John Fogerty is closing his fifty year trip production at encore theatre at Wynn Las Vegas with nine shows in November. That's kind of sad thing. That's one of my favorite chosen town. Lady Gaga has released her new single stupid love and is set to return to park theatre. From April thirtieth through may sixteenth. We expect an announcement will carry her through the end of this year and even into next year soon house blues headliner Carlos Santana and earth wind and fire are touring the US this summer. Santana performs again at House of losing May as Earth wind and fire place five shows also in May at Pearl Concert Theater then they tour and Santana is back in September. Her what else. We'd my interview with Teller Penn and teller who is back in action after three back surgeries over the past eighteen months penn and teller are filming the upcoming season of fool us at the Rio this week for all that and more read. Cats closes out another episode of PODCAST. Thank you Frankie Marino for our theme song the biggest cat in town. Keep up with me or try to under review journal website or at Johnny cats on twitter at Johnny cats one on instagram and tune in next Monday to the next installment podcast.

Las Vegas Carlos Santana Teller Penn Ray John Philippines Martin Lady Gaga Las Vegas Nevada Wynn Las Vegas Frank Marino Johnny Mama Frankie Marino Cirque du Soleil Zaidi Luxor Agra Lara US Lorraine Apparel Madison Square Garden
"emceeing" Discussed on PodKats! Las Vegas Entertainment

PodKats! Las Vegas Entertainment

09:20 min | 1 year ago

"emceeing" Discussed on PodKats! Las Vegas Entertainment

"Every day an online all the time our guest this week is lorraine a- Perreault who is the star of and singer in fantasy at the Luxor peril has been in the show for about seven years off and on she has worked in LAS VEGAS CYNTHIA. Early two thousands including stints at the Lounge at planet Hollywood shimmer cabaret at the Las Vegas Hilton and American superstars at the STRAT. She's also a singer for Terry Bradshaw's show at the Luxor. Peril talks of growing up in San Francisco her time on the cruise ships and how she became a star on the Strip. Hello everybody John. Cats lameda cats in the Las Vegas Review Journal three a everyday online all the time with lorraina peril the Great Marina Pearl of fantasy. How's it going you good? How are you? I'm great? We should start with the national anthem. This can say anything about the lead Fan. We are forgotten the words. They'll do that that's it. You're known to be than let's get to the stick here for many years who've Sung national anthem for your the anthem girl. One and then. It was the first anthem big anthem Gig. You had a big one you can tell me donny. Better at me than me. It was the rumor that Rocky Balboa that Rocky Balboa Sylvester stallone thing he had a planet Hollywood for it when it was going through that transition from Aladdin. Yes I did a reality show. I did an anthem for that. What was the stage for? That was he was a fight. There was seen in. That was a fight and I was so nervous so I barely remember. It wasn't my first big one a newer performing planet Hollywood. It's time right sunset strip my first band so we're talking about. Oh Five L. Five to sixty five K. And from there you just took off and it just was the word of mouth and I've been very blessed. I got about a say a tour. I'm doing an anthem tour. Starting Saturday what. What have you performed in as an anthem singer? Sung at staples for the Kings what other ones and T. mobile arena. Mgm Grand You'd NBA at PAC. Ten coming up I've done. The big fights Wardha versus Russian night. Cola Coke Kobouloff cover and I've done that too patio fights a- yeah it's fifteen thousand fourteen fifteen thousand people for two minutes. Is that feeling you get? Please rise and listen to this woman. She gets it right during my favorite anthem story about us. How you did the forty niners home opener in two thousand twelve twelve. Yeah let's Tell. Latte story that was that was. La's ING emotional moment. Well I've been going to the forty nine. Five with my. My Dad had season tickets originally born and raised San Francisco and we still go with my family and we always sat in the nose bleed seats way in the back. Never imagined I would sing the anthem Candlestick Park. Until Twenty twelve and my dad was right on the sidelines. I mean you should've seen his face. He got so choked. W was an emotional most amazing experience. I can't even explain it. Seventy thousand people in my hometown home opener and the roar. Yeah of played the bears at night right. Detroit wasn't it was cavernous first home game as a starter. I think maybe not. I think it was Alex. We're thinking of different. Did you do to out just one? But I've done other. Is this the one where you want a right to sing? Yes it was not an addition idle setting. Yes and when I won I was this little girl she took of Iran. You're going like this. And she's in years to come credible about that is they. Didn't just come into Las Vegas and find a Fantasy Square. A whole hundreds of people hundreds of people singers but I got the home opener which is amazing and got to watch the game up in the box seats and we won. That Bergman here had a big party at the end. My step brothers and sisters. Everybody was there it was. I wish I could go back and do it all over again. That was my all time favorite in them. You're from San Francisco. And how did you get to Las Vegas in the first place? Tell us that Odyssey man who was like a movie Selena it's more like maid in Manhattan but graduate from High School. My mother comes from Mexico. You know that. And that's why we make jokes papers papers. I graduated from high school following my mother's footsteps. She's always been a housekeeper she worked but off taking good care of us and so did my dad and I thought I would do what she did and made more money than working in a mall. Honestly I'd work nine to five or does your mother work well. When I was a baby she worked in a factory right cleaning kind of bullying road all sheets in hot atmosphere sweating. Busting her butt off. Yeah she my dad my Stepdad. Who's my father amazing he? They both worked their butts just to support us. But we're not out of high school. I decided to join her. In the workforce at the nursing home. She was cleaning at so. Okay a convalescent home. That's where I started singing on the site upstairs for the elderly and it was the first audience. How much is that Doggie in the window? When the lady it was. Just that's all I knew. I never thought I'd be whole different. Rooms did seven. Am to three thirty. Now it's the opposite. Did it for about five years. And then after that I became I worked in the financial district. I had the whole business. I know right crazy answer. Phone Calls Leah Turns News Married Man. Yeah I did that and I was content. My I was happy. I didn't know any difference until I went on vacation. Which most people know? The story went on vacation on a cruise ship When my parents and entered a talent show yes next thing. You know. It's history. I get a tap on my shoulder. Cruise director offered me a job pretty much six months later get crews on that cruise. I didn't do that ship. But what did you sing talent? Contests remember the song of songs. I did crazy love and Patrick Lane. Crazy natural woman. Okay Wow yeah got me. The big one was fine until I. You know I was over right when you say it went right when you started singing in front of people do have the people shy. Don't swear I just had a couple of glasses of wine in but go so you know. I wasn't shy at the time and then next dino I was ready to go back come to my office job until very happy at I was good at it. Filing you need one was like office. This assistant yeah did a lot of fun. So you're GONNA TRANSAMERICA building was wrong. It was actually I used to drop off packages messenger on the site of a thing. You know my briefcase just totally out. It was financial one. Oh One California street yeah in the Middle Right there but when I did the crucial thing I knew that's what I wanted to do. I wanted to be out at sea and travel because traveling and singing was my thing so I got a job offer. I got a call at my desk. Carnival cruise lines calling Sunday like NPR. And six months later I they throw me a going away party at the office. All tropical theme Hawaiian Leis and it was so sweet and thought I'd do it for six months. I said mom I'll be back. Don't worry it's just one contract okay. She missed me and NOPE did it. For three hundred. You have an idea that you'd be that would be part of your life and still stay in San Francisco and I'd go out once in a while. Fear part of it was well I succeed his never had any experience. Just did bans on the side and we know a lot of people out and it never worked on the ships. Still you know just for whatever reason so I'll never worked. Hasn't you know they they go out. And it's like whatever that didn't fit in others. I got paid to be on vacation and sing a couple of shows a week. I mean it did help that. I had my own cabin a lot of them. Don't get that but had no porthole. I mean I was okay.

San Francisco Las Vegas High School Las Vegas Review Journal Las Vegas Hilton Luxor Hollywood lorraine a- Perreault Terry Bradshaw Candlestick Park Kings Strip Carnival cruise Mgm Detroit donny Doggie Rocky Balboa Patrick Lane Sylvester stallone
"emceeing" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"emceeing" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"In partnership with local business owners. Result of. Unintended property that occurs it coffee shops. Restaurants, gyms any tables, or counter tops, it different. Businesses remain Lucas tells can't actually businesses. They're partnering with we'll put up posters reminding customers of the risks of leaving items unattended so far this year eleven percent of overall theft involved unintended property and some weeks it's been as high as twenty six percent coming up at the bottom of the hour. Just five minutes from now, more on the situation with medical for illegal immigrants that coming up to twenty-five traffic and weather together, every ten minutes on the five his loose downs. We're going to start this off in San Gabriel on the ten west between dillmore new avenue. Cespedes running a traffic break. Right now in this is for a car that crashed into the center divider and is blocking the carpool age, actually, the express lanes and emceeing a backup now because of that to dillmore avenue. Your stop right now at dillmore Pravo hopefully to get all of the emergency crews onto the scene. There. And you can problem they have you stuck right between del mar and new avenue. So if you're coming up on del mar just take that and go down to Hellman and then back down to either new avenue or Garfield than get back up to the ten that way that it shouldn't be that long. If you're stuck after Delmore, then we'll go to south LA on the one ten north of slauson avenue off ramp. A homeless man is planning that he had his foot run over by by vehicle. So CHP an emergency crews are on the way there to see what's going on. And then on the five north at San Fernando road, and this is in more. We have a situation going on there as well. This is a ladder in the number one lane. The car allegedly hit the ladder and got a flat tire. So now it's limped over to the right shoulder. Next reports coming up at two two thirty five hours more traffic reports, more often can't extend seventy NewsRadio. Hi, today should be in the sixties and seventies after overnight lows in the. Fifties. Sixties light winds at about fifteen miles per hour..

dillmore Pravo San Fernando road San Gabriel theft Delmore Lucas Hellman Garfield LA two two thirty five hours twenty six percent eleven percent five minutes ten minutes
"emceeing" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Liars. What emceeing that's all? I'm trying to say here. All right. And we're working on. Look, I'm here. Aren't you a liar? Would you say that your daughter is some kind of rowing person? Rowing. That's not. No, no. Let me say this because the president there. He's out doing whatever he does. And then it gets. So digamma expense autumn said here, let's say your kid gets in where maybe more deserving kid from a a poorer background, and again, oh Trump's are racist, and he doesn't and he's all about white privilege. And what the hell is this? Most of the outrage should be based on the fact that again, these people who tried to tell the mid west to live our themselves hypocrites. Although that's nothing new. We already know it if that's where I get worked up, but the idea of. I'm not gonna credible on the kids who didn't get in because one. I mean, if you knew how much funny business there is in college, admissions all the way around this. This should be like, oh, yeah. Right. They did things wrong. They need to pay the price, but a million dollars. That's a lot. Again. I said it yesterday a couple of times the FBI is acting like they broke up a human trafficking rings. Oh, we're also much safer today morons since you guys. That's the word of the day apparently moron since you guys touched on Lori Laughlin situation paying the million. Oh, I'm sorry. She paid a million dollars failed to get out this broker earlier this price, she has a million dollars. What's that from the full house thing? Yeah. Wow. Pit put down what ten percent? So like a hundred thousand okay. But still I didn't know cast you have there. Well, you know when your house, he means you're on the von Hessler, Dr. Maybe a hundred dollars. But this broke this morning. Lori law daughter, the YouTube star Olivia Jade, okay, Jay, this is the YouTube influencers audio because she did she has her own YouTube channel. And then we have our talking about how she hates school New Yorker bunch.

YouTube Olivia Jade Rowing Lori Laughlin FBI Trump president Pit Jay million dollars hundred dollars ten percent
"emceeing" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"I will be at the Arctic tailgate tomorrow night's emceeing some of the festivities raffles got some great brewers alumni, we're gonna we're going to interview. And there's a cornhole tournament going gonna be inside this year, which I'm a big fan of having froze my butt off last year. So join us I'll be there. I think from about five to ten tomorrow night at Miller parks living guessing the enthusiasm for the brewers. This year is going to be significant so come on out similar park and join us that will be a blast. Hey, real quick little bit of housekeeping. I gave the address for the memorial fund for Brian Rodriguez. The DPW worker who was killed in a hit and run accident. The address in the story that I was reading from his actually incorrect. He cracked address for the Brian Rodriguez memorial fund is nine five one five west national avenue, west Alice, Wisconsin, five three two two seven the address in the story that I was reading is actually incorrect. So it's five three two two seven these code for west Alice. And again, it's nine five one five what's national avenue. He can also drop them off at all landmark credit union location. So if you can do that, please do and to honor the other person who was killed in the line of duty last week in Milwaukee before the break, I kind of set this one up with with this. Question if you can decide what you pay for your food at a restaurant. As little as you want as much as you want. How do you think that would work out for restaurants, too, long term viability of a restaurant? But if you don't know Panera bread experimented with that as part of their. They actually have a couple of different names of their franchises want to Saint Louis bread company when his Panera and as part of their Panera cares program. And the idea is is that people are coming to their restaurant. And there's about a dozen of these things all across the country. And you can pay as much or as little as you wanted for your meal. And one by one these restaurants closed and tomorrow. The final one Panera cares. Located in Boston closes. Now, the idea was to you know, obviously help people. It was a they called it their social experiments or tests of humanity their their founder set in a Ted talk. What would people pay for it? When people come in and value it, and it appears to answer is a resounding. No. And if you think about this, it's kind of a noble idea. But I don't know what base my company's reputation on something that really is unsustainable. Think about it. You got really really love a restaurant to say I'm going to go into a restaurant. No prices. And I'm going to pick a number, and it's going to be more than whatever. Expect to pay in most cases, people aren't going to do that. It's not the model that guarantees success. And now we find out years later the last one's closing tomorrow. Know suffers from stuff like this all those employees that work at those restaurants. They're no longer employed. They don't get paychecks. They need money to get money for food. The jobs is there route to do that. Maybe I should have thought about that. And I'm a fan of I liked their food been in their restaurants. Many many times I wrote my book sitting in a Pinera every Monday morning about six thirty AM for about a year. Big fan. But this idea is is rather silly now. I am fan of of restaurants, generally who saved for maybe. They save a table for people that maybe can do that's a homeless person I've seen that before I've seen that work. They designate a day where people can do something like this. And I have no problem with that. But if you're in the business of selling food to make money as a company, you better think through these things a little more carefully. I got nothing against Pinera. Love the company love their food. But when you do stuff like this, you got to think about the longterm implications to your employees. I. It's kind of this rush to wanna do something seems like a good idea. It's in their name. Panera cares. Of course, they care, but people don't care as much as they do. And in the case of these restaurants now the last one closing in Boston. Awesome. Italy they failed because people aren't going to overpay. They're not in some cases, either gonna pay what their food is worth. What do I know about people from sixty sixty years on this planet? They look for bargains. They tried to get on the cheap side of things, and you show me a restaurant. That's gonna let you what you want. I'll show you a restaurant is probably not going to be in business that long and clearly that's the case with Pinero great company. Great food dumb idea. More next WTMJ attorney, Tom Nichols,.

brewers Panera bread Brian Rodriguez Boston Pinera DPW Miller parks Milwaukee Wisconsin Italy Pinero founder Saint Louis Tom Nichols attorney Ted sixty sixty years
"emceeing" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm Linda Holmes. There's more stuff to watch these days than you can ever get too. That's why we make pop culture, happy hour twice a week. We give you the lowdown on what's worth your time and what's not find pop culture, happy hour on the NPR one app or wherever you get your podcasts. This is on point Meghna trucker. Bharti. We are trying to step out of the Washington vortex for just a minute and talk about the world news. Maybe we haven't been paying as close enough attention to as we should, but also the same time seeking those patterns, those trends in those global news stories that could wash back here on the United States. I'm joined today by Kathy Gilson and she's with us from Washington. She senior editor covering foreign affairs at the Atlantic. David Rennie is with us from Beijing. He's Beijing bureau chief for the economist, and Matthew carnage. Nick joins us from Berlin. He's chief Europe correspondent for politico Europe, and I want to talk with all three of you about the, there's a bunch of major human rights stories around the world. And to that point Riyan tham has sent us a tweet. This is a question for you. David. She looks like Riyan didn't love the fact that you looked at u. s. China trade as a major story. She says, you're breaking my heart hundreds of thousands of minorities in extrajudicial internment camps more to come question Mark. She s I think Riyan is asking about a China interning Wieger emceeing the a million of a of Chinese leaguers or are potentially held in political camps, or at least that's what's been told to the United Nations. What's going on there David. So you'll listen to exit good point about it's hard to know sometimes how to cover very low running stories as opposed to break news to his. But the economist, my own magazine, we put this on the cover a couple of months ago. There is a absolutely appalling human rights crisis onto way in the fall, west and region of sin Jang which is basically. Home to a large number of millions of weakest, who essentially took people look like Chinese people didn't have the same language, the mostly Muslims, and because of phase Chinese phase of separatism and Chinese probably exaggerated phase of terrorism, but they built these labor camps in reeducation camps. And the numbers are very, very hard to assess because. Reporting incredibly haunted to Incheon Jiang without getting people looked up, not just giving it into foreign jealous, but certainly credible reports self in a potentially hundreds of thousands of people logged in reeducation camps without trial for crimes, like crimes komo's, like having phone, some of the broiled having visited someone abroad having an Islamic app on your smartphone when the police put your smartphone into digital Rita. So you're listeners? Absolutely, right. This is a chronic lung running, very, very grave. Human rights crisis. It's hard to know how to weigh those against. Some of them will break news. I guess that's a judgment. All of us have to make it on business all the time. Well, I suppose if you're a weaker, it is very urgent. I mean, if you're if the Chinese are using the the justification of protecting against religious extremism to imprison, perhaps starved and tortured people simply for happy having Muslim apps on their smartphones. I mean. Isn't, isn't this something that the global community should be paying more attention to. It absolutely should I, you can see a difference in seven countries approaches. So we have seen, for example, the German government being fairly vocal about this. They go policy now that they will deport people back to China who we is when the Chinese requested. It's a big issue in Turkey which has very close ties of religion language with the with the weakest. The tragic truth is that I suspect that if this were brought to the attention of the Trump administration, the idea of weighing in on behalf of Muslims, accused of extremism by the Chinese government probably isn't top of the the American mind. In fact, in recent years, the Americans have tried to win Chinese support the stuff that America chasm by saying to the American sank. The Chinese we could help you with tracking. For example, Weigo's he go to fight with the Taliban in Afghanistan, treating it as a kind of Pacino for cooperation on counterterrorism..

Riyan tham China David Rennie Washington Chinese government Linda Holmes Beijing NPR Nick Meghna Kathy Gilson United States Bharti politico Turkey Incheon Jiang Atlantic senior editor United Nations
"emceeing" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Point, for our customers that was huge we felt like that give and take you know was in the benefit of the customer and ultimately you know the the right choice may through it appreciate at the end. Of. The day will you kind of have the best of both worlds because, obviously packaging is very very important, which you get satisfaction for the first one right with the burlap bag but? Then, after that you get to have the price point and sustainability at the The forefront of dined moving forward so you got kind of two birds one stone And then when. It came to that indie gogo campaign when you knew let me say that over and then circling back to when? You, actually started the, indeed go go campaign any. Advice to having a successful campaign yeah I think I it's a lot more challenging I know, we initially, planned in terms of like all the ducks to have, in a row I think is watching one of your episodes on launching, an indigo, go about how you really have to have the branding had the product the pricing if you want the whole campaign to. Be successful as opposed to just really having the whole thing be a science experiment think that's probably the biggest thing that we learned is the more preparation you have going into the indie gogo the more you're going to get out of it and the more successful it'll be as a. Whole, as opposed to thinking you can just kind of discover things along the past. Yeah which doesn't really work out as well because As you know The consumers are looking for something specific they need, to be captivated and that's only gonna happen If that preparation and planning is happening on? The, front side of did you. Have the products. Already or was he had the idea of okay because sometimes companies do many do, we had we. Had some great mentors. That have given us advice as well along the way but we. Did we had the product we've had people behind friends and family that had tested the product so we felt good. About the products even though we weren't sending it out yet at that stage for indie gogo we could at. Least show pictures and really be confident of the product because it, was in a good place Wanted, that you've mentioned that the mission is, so important to tampon tribe and emceeing a. Really really, big push especially in our generation of entrepreneurs who are wanting to have purposeful companies, and consumers and customers who really want to invest and purchase from purposeful company as so tell me a little bit about that social impact component of tampon tribe and and why it's just extra meaningful and really at the end of the day helps your business as well yeah definitely I, think that is you know where you can combine you know what you're? Passionate, for passionate about what you're. Good at where. Your strengths lie and then being able to help others whether that's in the products, that we provide. I mean I think. At the most simple level to be able to provide affordable organic. Products I feel we feel like we are doing something good just in in the business where running and to be. Able to take that many many steps further and give back in a way where we're helping knows that are Less fortunate. Than us that really don't have any of the resources and and all the gifts, in education that, we've been given that's huge and that's a whole nother layer that's so meaningful that's extremely important for us so being able to work with whether it's working with. Women's shelters to give back and donate feminine hygiene products that's really important for us I know that you're starting an ambassador program tell me about that and maybe some of the other. Key, ways. That you're really getting the word out yes so we're, very excited this fall for the, fall twenty, seventeen semester we're going, to be watching our, university embassador program so that's really mean, there's a lot that goes into that all. These same, themes that you're that you're hearing here today but we want to engage with women, at all the universities and colleges that they can really help us build the brand about tampon tribe and really spread the mission that we add as it shared awesome well I love your mission love what tampon try all About thank. You. So, much for stopping by. And sharing all of your Really appreciate it yeah of course we're still happy to. Be here so glad we..

one stone
"emceeing" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Eighty two Green Bay eighty-five Waukesha eighty four in Milwaukee eighty five. Degrees the great Bob euchre has the call as the. Brewers. Welcome the nationals to Miller park are brewers game day coverage starts today at twelve thirty. Five I'm Mike. Spaulding NewsRadio WTMJ Bogo nine WTMJ so Mike I've got some. News and announcement that affect you potential I'm on. The edge of my seat you are on the agency absolutes today at my my goal in life is to avoid meetings because generally speaking I. Don't stuff at meetings involves things that I told that. They. They want me to do that I don't necessarily want to do well this is going. To be fun. Starting tomorrow We are, going to, go live on Facebook live for the first. Couple segments of the program I think the the plan, is to try, to do it in almost. Every day, basis so when you are here during the news you will at. Least partly potentially be on on Facebook live. So people can see your smiling face, your starch freshly starched shirt tie and all those things I've always been, told David face for radio four to I don't believe so that that's exactly it so you to spread the word around the. News department but you know on an almost daily basis and. Again this is our plan when you do this kind of. Trial run. We have gone Facebook live on different. Segments we, used to pop culture corner stuff but we're going to. Try it out first segment or to. Generally speaking probably between twelve o eight when the, program starts to twelve thirty or so we're going to be, on Facebook live every day and of course check and read and, respond your Facebook comments just another. Way to make it easier to take, in WTMJ all right if you follow me Me. On Twitter it is at Jeff Wecker six, twenty you've, got an indication of where I was last. Night and I I admit I geeked out as a, general rule I, don't I don't if I'm. Emceeing an, event or an ad an event I don't get my picture taken. With the person who's there is a general. Rule just because it's not supposed to, be cool that you do that now I've made exceptions to that when, Jim Lovell who was the Milwaukee guy who was in charge of Apollo thirteen when he was here a couple years ago I. Was MCI this event you bet I stood in line to. Get my picture taken Jim level but in general I will. Do it. So let last night My very dear friend Devon and, I we're going to go to canton Ohio next week to see Jerry Kramer admitted into the hall of fame. But there was this special event in, downtown, Appleton, I was. Talking about this with Jerry baiter it was, a, fundraiser, for, this museum. That they. Have in downtown Appleton and soon as I got done with work ran out picked up Evan whipped by my house took the dog. Out and then we got on the. Road got to apple about five thirty the event was from like, six until, seven thirty or so in this wonderful. Museum downtown. Appleton got. It was very intimate probably only I'd say eighty to. One hundred people there and Jerry Kramer did this very intimate conversation talking about the Packers glory years and afterwards there was an opportunity to have your. Picture taken and meet Kramer and I took advantage of that so if you follow me at Twitter Jeff Wagner six. Twenty you get to see me and my, buddy Evan Jerry Craig just, great I. Am I'm looking forward to seeing him go into canton Brett, farve admission at, the hall of fame. Couple years back and This is got great stories about Vince Lombardi and stuff if you. Are a Packers fan this is just an absolutely great opportunity and I loved loved, loved loved, downtown Appleton is saying to Jerry baiter it's been years since I have been there and it's not going. To be years before I go back I was. Just amazed at all the stuff they have. Going on down there all right we have an abbreviated show oh this. Was the other kind of cool thing so, we're driving back we. Leave about eight o'clock from, Appleton's who were driving, back so I'm listening to the ball game all night and of course. You've got the brewers they fall behind Ford and nothing after three run home run in the second inning and you're sitting, there going oh gosh, this is going to be another one that kind of breaks and the brewers comeback with a big win got, back in time to see it to the game most of the way back and just what a great win. Resilient team and get the third game, in, the, series against. The Washington nationals is this afternoon it would, be, great, if, they could. Pick up. This game their game and a half behind the Chicago Cubs it'd be great if they could pick this one up Because they've got a. Tough road trip coming up they go to San Francisco and then to Los Angeles as I said coming. Out of the all star break I think the the two weeks if the. Dodgers series. The national series at home. And, then the long road trip to California it's. Kind of a make. Or break time of the season I don't think the brewers. Can can win the central division or necessarily guarantee. A wire wildcard space over these next. Couple of weeks but I think they could certainly make their life more difficult if, they didn't play well and, that's why, today would be a great game you can hear the coverage here WTMJ all right before that though this, is a story that started breaking yesterday and it's kinda Coleman nation of of where we have been going over the last several weeks President Trump following through on I guess campaign promises in an effort to try. To I guess protect the American steel and aluminum industry announced number of weeks ago that he was going to. Start putting tariffs on imported steel and aluminum now part The problem with this is we can't make enough steel and aluminum, in this country we don't have the facilities to meet all. The demands so as a result we have to import stuff but he indicated he was going to start putting tap tariffs on steel. And aluminum as a result cost of stuff for are going to go up in response. Europe China South America has started pudding retaliatory tariffs. On things that we export and it's. Been particularly hard in, Wisconsin, they've gone after motorcycles we've talked about that a couple times essentially if you import a bike a Harley Davidson motorcycle made in America you send it to Europe now, as a, result of these retaliatory tariffs you're going to, have to, the consumer would have to pay about two thousand dollars more that's crippling the market you've also had agriculture hit especially hard I was mentioning. This yesterday We have incredible surplus of meat right now that we're houses containing frozen. Meat are packed to the gills because what's happened is. You have all these, farmers they produce the meat, and it's ready to be shipped overseas well because of the tariffs retaliatory tariffs people aren't buying as much of it overseas they're finding other markets and so we've got, a, surplus of of this what, do you do with it in Wisconsin. The tariffs are hurting us we make. Ginseng we export cranberries. It's hurting us up and down the line, it's something that Scott Walker, talks about something that Ron Johnson talks. About so recognizing that in. Particular, American farmers are getting hurt what President Trump announced yesterday is as a result of this trade war which he previously said was. Easy to win I. Understand that farmers are getting hurt so. What I'm going to do I wanna take twelve billion dollars in tax payer money and. I want. To direct it, to farmers who've harvests. Have been hurt by the tariffs all right all right the terrorists are hurting you I want to give you a bailout I'm gonna take twelve billion dollars. To do this well on the one hand I guess it. Has, this appeal you know, you you don't what the farmers suffer but the question. Becomes why are the, farmers suffering well they're suffering because of this trade. War that we launched in my? Opinion stupidly, in the last two months. Ron Johnson who, is a supporter. Of President Trump Ron Johnson is out there. In the most specific terms saying that this is this is crazy he. Says this is becoming more, and more like a Soviet. Type of economy here commissars deciding who's going to be granted waivers commissars, in the administration figuring out how they're going. To sprinkle around benefits all right and. Other words we've created this problem And now we're going to give people. Money, we're going to pick, winners and.

Facebook Brewers Jerry Kramer Evan Jerry Craig Appleton Jerry baiter Twitter President Trump Ron Johnson Milwaukee Packers Mike Miller park Bob euchre Green Bay Wisconsin Jim Lovell Vince Lombardi Waukesha
"emceeing" Discussed on  News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Native people of the area had a a number of legends and myths of their own about sort of crazy creatures that live in the in the woods and emceeing was one of the more potent and well known of these creatures and so one of the things that we kind of argued was that there you with mythology of any kind it's never one thing you can never say oh well we the people come up with the idea for this mantra because of this one thing over here it's a it was a complex interplay of native american legends of european legends and other elements like political and religious infighting but yeah the the native people did have prior to europeans coming over here had their own on so pantheon of of foresty dragging creatures yeah i never had given any thought to considering how long perhaps the people's or even whoever their predecessors were that may forever go on name but whoever was still in that area whether at any point you know even though we don't have a record of it whether at any point any of those traditions might have gotten may have found its origin from from some fossil from something that was being passed down from generations that started this description which later on gets co opted by by europeans when they move into the area i just i just thought it was a very interesting idea i just never thought about that because that's why we talk about the the they ended up having a kind of a role to play in the creation of the story of the jersey devil it just they didn't do it intentionally it just may have been something that sort of cross pollinated over into the into the the the white settlers right well that's the make you make good point there because that's really what's going on here for most of the history of this legend is that nobody is sitting there saying y'all i'm gonna do today i am going to create a myth about a crazy looking thing that flies around in the woods it doesn't happen early on that sort of thing does happen in the early twentieth century but up until then there really isn't a kind of concerted effort by anybody to create this idea it kinda comes together very slowly over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we're at develops eventually by the early twentieth century into the legend of of the jersey devil at people know and love today right right but that's where that idea of collective memory and it's passed down by generations and a description that i if one were to look at and i was kind of going back and forth between some of the drawings that exist of the jersey devil descriptions that were made by people who claim to have seen it and whatever to to actually to pterodactyls and i thought that's a it's it's not that close but it's not it's not especially the flying part which i thought was really because you know people don't always think of the you know that that piece about them having like a jersey devil having giant leathery flapping wings i don't know i just i thought that was interesting so so what you have though though is this this legend that seems to be floating out there from the la about this this emceeing creature and then slowly colonists are moving into this area in and this is where a lot of the cross pollenisation occurs all over the country when you have these different cultures that starting in the same space and that that brings us to the very early years of of of the story so talk about the the leads family because the the name mother leads is the one that's most usually associated with the one that gave birth to the jersey devil but there really was a leads family it's just not what people would have thought right now i'm assuming you want the actual eads family rather than the mythical weeds let's go with the actual the actual leads family comes to north america what at the time is known as british north america to a region called west jersey in the sixteen seventy s and they are quakers who are refugees who are basically chased out of england by the anglicans and especially the puritans the quakers sort of draw the wrath of the mainstream because first of all they didn't call themselves quakers they call themselves society of friends and they're still around there's there's still quite a few people who are members.

emceeing
"emceeing" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on WLAC

"Native people of the area had a a number of legends and myths of their own about sort of crazy creatures that live in the in the woods and emceeing was one of the more potent and well known of these creatures and so one of the things that we kind of argued was that there you see with with mythology of any kind it's never one thing you can ever say oh well we the people come up with the idea for this monster because of this one thing over here it's a it was a complex interplay of native american legends of european legends and other elements like political and religious infighting but yeah the the native people did have prior to europeans coming over here had their own on pantheon of of foresty dragging creatures yeah i guess i'd never had given any thought to considering how long perhaps the people's or even whoever their predecessors were that may forever go name but whoever was still in that area whether at any point you know even though we don't have a record of it whether at any point any of those traditions might have gotten may have found its origin from from some fossil from something that was being passed down from generations that started this description which later on gets co opted by by europeans when they move into the area i just i just thought it was a very interesting idea i just never thought about that because that's why when we talk about the lobby the they end up having a kind of a role to play in the creation of the story of the jersey devil it's just they didn't do it intentionally it just may have been something that sort of cross pollinated over into the into the with the white settlers right well that's the you make a good point there because that's really what's going on here for most of the history of this legend is that nobody is sitting there saying you know what i'm gonna do today i am going to create a myth about a crazy looking saying that flies around in the woods it doesn't happen early on that sort of thing does happen in the early twentieth century but up until then there really isn't a kind of concerted effort by anybody to create this idea it kinda comes together very slowly over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we're at develops eventually by the early twentieth century into the legend of of the jersey devil at people know and love day right but that's where that idea of collective memory and it's passed down by generations and a description that i you know if one were to look at and i i was kind of going back and forth between some of the drawings that exist of the jersey devil descriptions that were made by people who claim to have seen it in whatever to to actually to pterodactyls and i thought that's a it's it's not that close but it's not it's not especially the flying part which i thought was really because you know people don't always think of the is that that piece about them having like a jersey devil having giant leathery flapping wings i don't know i just i thought that was interesting so so what you have though though is this this legend that seems to be floating out there from the lunardi about this this emceeing creature and then slowly colonists are moving into this area in and this is where a lot of the cross pollination occurs all over the country when you have these different cultures that start existing in the same space and that brings us to the very early years of of of the story so talk about the the leads family because the the name mother leads is the one that's most usually associated with the one that gave birth to the jersey devil but there really was a leads family it's just not what people would have thought right now i'm assuming you want the actual eve's family rather than the mythical weeds let's go with the actual the actual lead family comes to north america what at the time is known as british north america to a region called west jersey in the sixteen seventy s and they are quakers who are refugees who are basically chased out of england by the anglicans and especially the puritans the quakers sort of draw the wrath of the mainstream because first of all they didn't call themselves quakers they call them so society of.

emceeing
"emceeing" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on KGO 810

"Of the area had a a number of legends and myths of their own about sort of crazy creatures that live in the in the woods and emceeing was one of the more potent and well known of these creatures and so one of the things that we kind of argued was that there you see with with mythology of any kind it's never one thing you can never say oh well we the people come up with the idea for this monster because of this one thing over here it was a complex interplay of native american legends of european legends and other elements like political religious infighting but yeah the the native people did have prior to europeans coming over here had their own so pantheon of of foresty dragging the creatures yeah i never had given any thought to considering how long perhaps the people's or even whoever their predecessors were that may forever go unnamed but whoever was still in that area whether at any point you know even though we don't have a record of it whether at any point any of those traditions might have gotten may have found its origin from from some fossil from something that was being passed down from generations that started this description which later on gets co opted by by europeans when they move into the area right i just i just thought it was a very interesting idea i just never thought about that because that's why when we talk about the lobby they end up having a kind of a role to play in the creation of the story of the jersey devil it just they didn't do it intentionally it just may have been something to sort of cross pollinated over into the into the the white settlers right well that's the you make a good point there because that's really what's going on here for most of the history of this legend is that nobody is sitting there saying you know what i'm gonna do today i am going to create a myth about a crazy looking thing that flies around in the woods it doesn't happen early on that sort of thing does happen in the early twentieth century but up until then there really isn't a kind of concerted effort by anybody to create this idea it kinda comes together very slowly over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries where it develops eventually by the early twentieth century into the legend of of the jersey devil at people know and love today right but that's where that idea of collective memory and it's passed down by generations and a description that i you know if one were to look at and i was kind of going back and forth between some of the drawings that exist of the jersey devil descriptions that were made by people who claim to have seen it and whatever to to actually to attack does and i thought that's a it's it's not that close but it's not it's not especially the flying part which i thought was really because you know people don't always think of the is that that piece about them having like a jersey devil having giant leathery flapping wings i just i thought that was interesting so so what you have though though is this this legend that seems to be floating out there from the lobby about this this emceeing creature and then slowly colonists are moving into this area in and this is where a lot of the cross pollination occurs all over the country when you have these different cultures that start existing in the same space and that that brings us to the very early years of of of the story so talk about the the leads family because the name mother leads is the one that's most usually associated with the one that gave birth to the jersey devil but there really was a leeds family it's just not what people would have thought right now i'm assuming you want the actual eads family rather than the mythical weeds let's go with the actual the actual leads family comes to north america what at the time is known as british north america to a region called west jersey in the sixteen seventy s and they are quakers who are refugees who are basically chased out of england by the anglicans and especially the puritans the quakers sort of draw the wrath of the mainstream because first of all they didn't call themselves quakers they call them so society of friends right and they're still around there's there's still quite a few people who are members.

emceeing
"emceeing" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Of the area had a a number of legends and myths of their own about sort of crazy creatures that live in the in the woods and emceeing was one of the more potent and well known of these creatures and so one of the things that we kind of argued was that there you see with with mythology of any kind it's never one thing you can never say oh well we the people come up with the idea for this monster because of this one thing over here it's a it was a complex interplay of native american legends of european legends and other elements like political and religious infighting but yeah the the native people did have prior to europeans coming over here had their own on so pantheon of of foresty dragging creatures yeah i guess i'd never had given any thought to considering how long perhaps the people's or even whoever their predecessors were that may forever go unnamed but whoever was still in that area whether at any point you know even though we don't have a record of it whether at any point any of those traditions might have gotten may have found its origin from from some fossil from something that was being passed down from generations that started this description which later on gets co opted by by europeans when they move into the area i just i just thought it was a very interesting idea i just never thought about that because that's why when we talk about the the they end up having a kind of a role to play in the creation of the story of the jersey devil it just didn't do it intentionally it just may have been something that sort of cross pollinated over into the into the with the white settlers right well that's the way you make a good point there because that's really what's going on here for most of the history of this legend is that nobody is sitting there saying you know what i'm gonna do today i am going to create a myth about a crazy looking saying that flies around in the woods it doesn't happen early on that sort of thing does happen in the early twentieth century but up until then there really isn't a kind of concerted effort by anybody to create this idea it kinda comes together very slowly over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries we're at the phillips eventually by the early twentieth century into the legend of of the jersey devil at people know and love today right but that's where that idea of collective memory and it's passed down by generations and a description that i if one were to look at i i was kind of going back and forth between some of the drawings that exist of the jersey devil descriptions that were made by people who claim to have seen it in whatever to to actually to pterodactyls and i thought that's a it's it's not that close but it's not it's not especially the flying part which i thought was really because you know people don't always think of the is that that piece about them having like a jersey devil having giant leathery flapping wings i don't know i just i thought that was interesting so so what you have though though is this this legend that seems to be floating out there from the lobby about this this emceeing creature and then slowly colonists are moving into this area in and this is where a lot of the cross pollination occurs all over the country when you have these different cultures that start existing in the same space and that that brings us to the very early years of of of the story so talk about the the leads family because the the name mother leads is the one that's most usually associated with the one that gave birth to the jersey devil but there really was a leads family it's just not what people would have thought right now i'm assuming you want the actual each family rather than the mythical weeds let's go with the actual house k the actual leads family comes to north america what at the time is known as british north america to region called west jersey in the sixteen seventy s and they are quakers who are refugees who are basically chased out of england by the anglicans and especially the puritans the quakers sort of draw the wrath of the mainstream because first of all they didn't call themselves quakers they call themselves with society of.

emceeing
"emceeing" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on KSRO

"Native people of the area had a number of legends and myths of their own about sort of crazy creatures that live in the in the woods and emceeing was one of the more potent and well known of these creatures and so one of the things that we kind of argued was that there you see with with mythology of any kind it's never one thing you can never say oh well we the people come up with the idea for this monster because of this one thing over here it's it was a complex interplay of native american legends of european legends and other elements like political and religious infighting but yeah the the native people did have prior to europeans coming over here had their own on so pantheon of of foresty dragon creatures yeah and i guess i'd never had given any thought to considering how long perhaps the people's or even whoever their predecessors were that may forever go named but whoever was still in that area whether at any point you know even though we don't have a record of it whether at any point any of those traditions might have gotten may have found its origin from from some fossil from something that was being passed down from generations that started this description which later on gets co opted by by europeans when they move into the area i just thought it was a very interesting idea i just never thought about that because that's why when we talk about the they end up having a kind of a role to play in the creation of the story of the jersey devil it just they didn't do it intentionally it just may have been something that sort of cross pollinated over into the into the with the white settlers right well that's the you make you make a good point there because that's really what's going on here for most of the history of this legend is that nobody is sitting there saying you know what i'm gonna do today i am going to create a myth about a crazy looking saying that flies around in the woods it doesn't happen early on that sort of thing does happen in the early twentieth century up until then there really isn't a kind of concerted effort by anybody to create this idea it kinda comes together very slowly over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries where it develops eventually by the early twentieth century into the legend of of the jersey devil at people know and love today right but that's where that idea of collective memory and it's passed down by generations and a description that i if one were to look at in i was kind of going back and forth between some of the drawings that exist of the jersey devil descriptions that were made by people who claim to have seen it in whatever to to actually to attack does and i thought that's a it's it's not that close but it's not it's not especially the flying part which i thought was really because you know people don't always think of is that that piece about them having like a jersey devil having giant leathery flapping wings i don't know i just i thought that was interesting so so what you have though though is this this legend that seems to be floating out there from the la nabi about this this seeing creature and then slowly colonists are moving into this area in and this is where a lot of the cross pollination occurs all over the country when you have these different cultures that start existing in the same space and that that brings us to the very early years of of of the story so talk about the leads family because the the name mother leads is the one that's most usually associated with the one that gave birth to the jersey devil but there really was a leads family it's just not what people would have thought right now i'm assuming you want the actual eads family rather than the mythical weeds let's go with the actual the actual leads family comes to north america what at the time is known as british north america to a region called west jersey in the sixteen seventy s and they are quakers who are refugees who are basically chased out of england by the anglicans and especially the puritans the quakers sort of draw the wrath of the mainstream because first of all they didn't call themselves quakers they call themselves the society of friends and they're still around there's there's still quite a few people who are members.

emceeing
"emceeing" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"emceeing" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Welcome to episode three eighty four with my guests todd g paul gilmartin this is the mental illness happy hour place for honesty about all the battles in our heads from medically diagnosed conditions past traumas and sexual dysfunction to everyday compulsive negative thinking this shows not meant to be a substitute for professional metal counselling i'm not a therapist it's not a doctor's office it's more like a waiting room that doesn't suck the website for this show is a mental pod his mental pod dot com i'm sorry i have slept about a half hour and the last twenty four hours i was doing a mental health emceeing mental health event up in sacramento california and flew back today and last night i didn't sleep at all before before the event so my brain isn't isn't functioning my brain isn't functioning as shitty isn't normally does but the website is mental pod dot com on metal pound is also the twitter handle that you can follow me at the the something that i always forget to ask you guys to do that can really help the show is instead of just downloading an episode here or there if you could subscribe and always download episodes that's that's good because that helps our numbers and maybe you will listen to an episode that you might not have picked otherwise so that's the way that doesn't cost you anything other than maybe a little room on your phone and as i've mentioned i'm going to europe in july two record nonamericans and i'm so excited about the trip to ireland and some of the people i'm going to be recording in dublin and especially in northern ireland got some interesting guests who have.

dublin ireland sacramento california twitter europe twenty four hours