19 Burst results for "Emancipation Park"

"emancipation park" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:53 min | 2 months ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on WTOP

"All the boxes and make sure within reason. Of course, there's not something glaring at Miami Dade County Courthouse will begin undergoing repairs immediately after a review found safety concerns there. The U. S. Is sending FBI agents to Haiti to help in the investigation of the assassination of its president. Haiti has also requested military assistance. The Biden administration says there are no plans to provide that at this time. This is CBS News. Upgrade your business during Dell Technologies. Black Friday in July event gets savings up to 50% off and take your office with you with Windows 10 Pro Call 877 Ask. Tell 603 on Saturday, July 10th 2021 71 degrees now in the nation's capital, going up to 86 Good morning. I'm Christopher Cruz. The top local stories. We're following the shower to Confederate statues in Charlottesville, including one of Robert E. Lee are coming down today. The push to remove the Lee statue was the animating force behind the deadly white nationalists unite the right rally in 2017, but the battle actually began before that, with a petition in 2016 from a local high school student and then early 2017, the city council said. And we're renaming the park, changing it from Lee Park to Emancipation Park, and we want to remove the statue. And that actually sparked a lawsuit by some of those figures from the unite the right rally challenging the city's ability to remove it. So it's been tied up in courts for the last over four years, which is why it hasn't been removed via IR TV reporter Max Marcia's in Charlottesville, W. T. O P S Dick Uliano will be in the city today covering the removal of the statues Stay with w T o P and w.

2016 Christopher Cruz Max Marcia 2017 FBI Lee Park Robert E. Lee Emancipation Park Charlottesville Saturday, July 10th 2021 CBS News Black Friday 71 degrees 877 early 2017 Lee Dick Uliano today 603 Haiti
"emancipation park" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

08:08 min | 3 months ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Emancipation Park Conservancy's holding its Juneteenth celebration virtually but is partnering with the restaurant Lucille's 1913 to distribute meals at a mansion Patient Park tomorrow There are some in person Juneteenth concerts in Baytown, Missouri City, a third ward event, Miller outdoor theaters, Juneteenth Blues and Creole Festival and a couple others were going to discuss now. The Juneteenth black market Tomorrow afternoon. The Buffalo soldiers National Museum features more than 70 black owned vendors, along with food trucks and live performances. And the Rutherford B H. Yates Museums. Juneteenth Celebration includes arts activities, the Juneteenth Freedom, Bike ride and Museum tours. To tell us more about those two events. We're joined now by J. O. Malone, the CEO of Black Market, Houston. And Dr Theophilus Harrington, president of the Rutherford BHH Museum. Welcome both of you. Houston matters. Good morning. Good morning, Craig. How're you doing? That? I gave the short short version their jail. What more can you share about black markets event at the Buffalo Soldiers? National Museum? Yes, sir. We are. I'm happy to be here, Craig, first and foremost, man, um Will be at the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum from 1 to 5. Like you said. We have more than 70 vendors to shop from and enjoy. We have live music, six food trucks. And you know, we at the black market. We do this every first Friday, every second Saturday. And so Juneteenth is just a celebration of what we do all year long. And so we want people to come out, enjoy themselves being a safe place for black Americans, and, uh, support and group economics. Why is it important in your mind to celebrate black owned businesses in this particular way? Well, I would say that opportunity. Um, what we always say, and you'll hear it over and over again from me. We have to create safe places for black Americans to Grow in scale, right? We have to create safe places for education, say places for for business growth. We what we say is take your six ft table to a storefront and that's what we really believe in and you don't have the opportunity to see what products work. What products don't work to see. Hey, what is my Way of taking payments. What is my way? How do I pay taxes We need to. We don't have a ground to learn these things. They're not teaching in the classrooms. They're not teaching and in college you have to. As an entrepreneur. You have to figure these things out in the black market is the perfect Breeding ground for this model small black businesses to flourish. Dr Harrington. What more details can you share about what's happening at the Rutherford BHH Museum tomorrow? Well, the revenue would be 88 museum will be offering several events were Houston to enjoy and protecting education and entertainment and celebrating Juneteenth. We'll be having a cultures on the Children's Museum. Houston will be, uh, the air with Children activities. The museum sign on Houston wield up Leader community base. Uh, collage projects based on architecture and freedom sound area. Uh, we'll have Giunti in kind of face being in that will be offered. There will be, uh, opportunities to do some tourists, particularly of the referee. BH Yates Printing Museum. Um, we have to explore the homestead built by Russia. Yates, Uh, Union whose design object Yates. The home was built in 1912. And it was guilt by you know, the first black own printing company in Houston ruffled me. Yates Jr was the first, um black owner Printing company in Houston. Will be an opportunity to physically is resident and bring it to life for history. Real have an active dig. Taking place. Uh, visited Supreme Sound will be able to Zuri Blunt Lone Star College are ecological research did It will be in progress, and they'll be able to see artifacts that will be exhibit from the early 19th century in the 20th century. And she Yeah, some Activities or with hopes, you know, related to Jones Jones doing some geographic mapping for us. There will be, uh, Juneteenth freedom, right? Also of these Juneteenth freedom right that will cover 20 Miles. Everything going up with some of the oldest African community communities, Uh, Freeman sound with includes. Of course, the reward and independent sites will be included. The two will drugs begin to, uh, South Street and will be a $10 registration fee for it. And, uh, we also offer um Front ports memory. It's quite cast a project that we are very excited about. That will be the inaugural podcast focuses on the J. Vance Louis. Uh, And and they will not a series of what were you expecting to be engaged in cultural and historical conversations that will celebrate the lives and the homes of Leaders of Houston Dreams town, particularly in the mid 19th and early, uh Central J. Vance Lewis was one of those people who was a prominent African American lawyer. Whichever country fighting for US civil rights, and then there will be opportunities to engage with our partners. Freeman sound, uh, farmers market being active in the area will be a juneteenth of adjustable family funding people activities. Presented by the Freeman Sound Association Coalition, the past or leaders and fourth ward health and education. Uh, Senate So let's see what's going on there. Sounds like you've got a big full event their geo. I wanted to turn to you on this. How significant is it to you? That Juneteenth is as of yesterday, a federal holiday? I think if I'm being honest, I think there's mixed reviews out there. Right, Uh, being from Texas and my mother being from Tulsa, Oklahoma, Um, we celebrate Juneteenth weather. We're in Houston or were in Tulsa visiting family and we've been doing for doing it for a while, so I think it's a great Everything when when it comes to the awareness that's brought on Juneteenth, and the awareness has brought on 1921. The Tulsa massacre is great. Because these stories were untold right and it's great for the rest of the nation to understand. Okay. These are when Let the last slaves were free. This is what happened 100 years ago, 100 years ago when we had black owned businesses, lawyers, doctors, offices, industries theaters. 100 years ago. Black people were doing this. So you can't tell black people that were lazy because we was burnt down when we built it, and it wasn't rebuilt, and so We? It's important to tell these stories. Um, for people in Texas, Of course, it's going to be a thing like, you know. Hey, we were first We were. We've been celebrating this. It's like, you know, it's that thing in music. When you find an artist early on, and you don't want nobody else to know about it and you're cool, and now everybody knows, And now it's un cool, But it's important that we put that to the side. We welcome. The federal holiday, and we have to make sure that we do our best to put our best foot forward to really tell the real stories and what it means and teach this and pass it down so we can have.

Tulsa Texas Craig $10 J. O. Malone Theophilus Harrington 20 Miles 1912 Emancipation Park Conservancy J. Vance Lewis Jones Jones Tomorrow afternoon yesterday Harrington J. Vance Louis tomorrow early 19th century Supreme Sound Freeman Sound Association Coal South Street
Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

The Ten News

02:51 min | 3 months ago

Juneteenth: A Celebration of Freedom

"Many people think slavery ended on the day. Abraham lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation in january eighteen. Sixty three but it actually took more than two and a half years for it to become official throughout all of the confederate states. Our correspondent pamela. Kirkland calls up. He's a museum specialists in oral history at the national museum of african american history and culture in washington. Dc to explain a bit more about the history of the holiday. We'll just start with what is juneteenth. June taint juneteenth this great day that is celebrated because on june nineteen eighteen. Sixty five general. Gordon granger arrived in galveston texas with order numbers sri announcing that the enslaved were now free this is important because although the emancipation proclamation had been signed in eighteen sixty three it had a little to no impact almost of the enslaved throughout the south. Because if there weren't union soldiers there to enforce it it literally. Nothing in did not change of your life if you were enslaved human being in texas. Which was the westernmost state. There was very little union presence throughout the war so it was as if nothing had happened in fact there were slave owners. He moved west to continue. The practice of slavery moved to texas for that purpose so this day this was a big day. He arrived with almost two thousand troops. Some of whom were united states colored troops and they enforced this order. What what kind of the history. Of june teeth in the legacy. It's only recently really bad. It's become more widely known. Yes i well. It started in texas so immediately a year. After this announcement they have the first juneteenth In texas in houston. The african americans their a saved up. Money and bought land is specifically for this purpose that became emancipation park and it was practiced throughout texas In also places like oklahoma is started to slowly spread with the great migration in which you see different ways so it was celebrated through the turn of the century than it waned a little. Then you see it's coming back after the after world war two then. There was another big boost after the civil rights era after the sixties. What are some of the exhibits that highlight juneteenth And demands pation. We have an entire gallery devoted to slavery and freedom so there you will find of of many artifacts relating to we have the actual copy of Mation for example we have of many artifacts related to the underground railroad movement. Things that belong to harriet tubman such as show in our

Texas National Museum Of African Ame Gordon Granger Abraham Lincoln Kirkland Pamela Galveston SRI Emancipation Park Washington United States Houston Oklahoma Harriet Tubman
"emancipation park" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:11 min | 3 months ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Prize winning historian and Harvard professor to underscore for our viewers exactly. Which from the Texas Constitutional Republic of Texas, Congress shall pass no laws to prohibit immigrants from bringing their slaves into the republic with them and later on, no free person of African descent, in whole or part shall be permitted to reside permanently in the Republic without the consent of Congress. Just two of the provisions That highlight the sentiment that you talked about. So if we get go back to the Juneteenth proclamation, why did it take Texas so long to acknowledge the end of the Civil war? Well, because the Confederate army kept fighting. Um, they didn't give up just collegiately. Surrendered, but they kept fighting. And in fact they won the last battle. The last skirmish or whatever of the civil war, Uh, was one near Brownsville, The Confederates one, but they surveyed the situation and realized that overall there was nothing more to be done, And that's when they decided to surrender. So the military effort kept going on and The effects of the emancipation Proclamation could not go into could not could not go into effect until the union Army had taken control of the area and That didn't happen until the Army of the Trans Mississippi surrendered in this particular in this particular area, so it it was a delayed response fighting on and I talk a little bit in the book about you know how you know, so speculated, in a way, and other people have said this as well, that The fact that they held out for so long, the fact that they won the last battle, the fact that there had been a republic made white Texans even more hostile in some ways more recalcitrant once the war effort was over and wants emancipation. Came to to to to the state of Texas. Well in 18 65. Not only did this general order number three happened, but it was also the year of the 13th amendment to the Constitution was passed and ratified. So became the law of the land that slavery was outlawed. How did Texans respond to all of this? Well, I mean white, I mean, Black Texans celebrated and I talking a little bit of the book about how this again started from the very beginning. They actually knew before Granger made this pronouncement, what was going to happen? There were rumors about it from in Galveston and other places, port cities or places where lots of information is is a passed back and forth through people who are traveling. From one point to another black Texans celebrated, Uh many white Texans responded to those celebrations with violence on their stories about people who were whipped because they celebrated, uh, the end of slavery. There are accounts of just Unleashing a torrent of violence on the Friedman. Someone talks about a person recounted coming to to an area and finding almost 30 bodies of black people, men, women and Children hanging from trees. Uh, talks of bodies in the river once black ceased to be property, and once whites lost their control over them. A number of whites responded with extreme hostility, so they and they tried as much as they could to put keep things as they were, and in fact, a number of people through force were kept, uh, were threatened and were kept working because the union Army couldn't be everywhere. He didn't Granger and grandeur was only there for a few months and then in the Freedom and bureau Opens and there were other troops, but they Texas is huge. So they couldn't go all over even East Texas to, um, to enforce these order this order, But the Friedman bureau was designed to make sure that contracts were fair and that people were treated fairly. But they had They didn't have the reach that was needed. They didn't have the resources that were needed to do it so You can sort of imagine this somewhat abrupt in a way, even though people have been anticipating that this would happen, But this change of circumstances where you first had legal control over people. To a situation where you didn't and you know, with the predictable results that there was recalcitrance and efforts to try to keep things as near to slavery as they could. How soon after 18 65 to June teeth become a commemorative date. Well, you know, it's As I said, the people started right away. Celebrated in church is sort of an annual celebration and in the 18 seventies for African American men in Houston bought property and created something that was called Emancipation Park that became for the specific purpose of celebrating Emancipation Day. And blacks from within Houston and other places as well would come to emancipation Park. You know, most people celebrated as as I did growing up as a child, um, at at home. You know, there were barbecues getting together with family. It was sort of a family day of family and friends. They so the CA memories or as far as we can tell the commemoration started immediately and kept on and eventually, in some places, larger cities moved to parks so that people can get together on a larger scale and keep in mind. This is happening. I mean, this emancipation Park is, uh, put in place in the 18 seventies, so it's still very early on. Hostility around. But people nevertheless made the effort to, uh, to commemorate this day over the next decades. You write about how Juneteenth waxed and waned, but over time it began being picked up by more and more states. And now I think the total is 48 states. Plus the District of Columbia recognized officially Juneteenth. What is that all about? Do you think? Well, I think it started out. I wondered about this. I talk a little bit about my feelings. Well, I first found this out. Going to college that there were other people who were celebrating this and I thought this was a holiday that was about black Texans in particular. And and then when they made it a state holiday in Texas in 1980, it became about Texas in general, but I think what happened? What gets going is that there's a Texas diaspora blacks who left Texas And went mainly west, Um, began to sort of took the holiday with them and wherever they went, they took the holiday with him. And that's how it became known to other people. And then I think there was a yearning or evidently there was a yearning to have some day to settle upon to commemorate the end of slavery because we really don't have one. I mean, there are a number of candidates. You mentioned the end of the red Application of the 13th amendment. That would have been the end of December 18 65, But not many people know that And that's the official the legal end of slavery. What happens in Juneteenth is that it's the end it's the result of the end of the armed conflict. Uh, about slavery. The Confederate Army surrenders. Um so people say, maybe, you know, December 31st or some people say January 1st Emancipation Proclamation. People want some day to commemorate it, So this one is It's a fun day. Uh, it's summer..

Houston Galveston Brownsville Congress 1980 December 31st Emancipation Day 48 states District of Columbia East Texas 18 65 Emancipation Park Harvard June 18 seventies CA black Confederate Army Civil war emancipation Park
"emancipation park" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:41 min | 3 months ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"To the kaleidoscope where every week we discussed issues, including gender and race this week, we look ahead to Juneteenth. That's June 19th, which commemorates the day in 18 65 that enslaved people in Texas, finally learned that slavery had been abolished. That's two years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Howard University chair of the Department of Afro American Studies, Greg Kerr joins us to explain Juneteenth now being celebrated around the country. Some want to make it a federal holiday. If I had to say it in a phrase, I would say Juneteenth is the best known even though still not as long as it should be the best known of African American. Emancipation Day or Freedom day traditions. Um, it the the the the Celebration of Juneteenth, which, of course, goes back to, uh, the end of the Civil War. June 19th 18 65 when General Warden Granger Read the proper read the immensity patient proclamation from veranda, Um, at a house in Galveston Bay, Texas, thereby, um, making Enslaved Africans and making everyone including enslaved Africans in in in that part of Texas, aware that the they had been freed by the time you get to that date, which is why we call it June 19th 18 65 the anchor day for Juneteenth, but by the time you get to that date There has been an echo of the news of the Emancipation Proclamation that really begins in terms of African American communities. Uh, a couple of years earlier January 1st 18 63, as you say when The Emancipation Proclamation went into effect. The Emancipation Proclamation, which of course was a presidential executive order by then President Abraham Lincoln declared that as of January 1st 18 63. All enslaved people who were in states that were in rebellion to the United States within fourth and forever free. It did have some car about exceptions, but you know, without getting to put into fine a point on it. That was the Emancipation Proclamation. The preliminary emancipation had been signed several months earlier September 18 62, and basically it was a war measure that was attempting its primary objective was not to free anyway, in fact, but to get the rebellious states to rejoin the union. It's a very important point to be made because I think that speaks to the the central tension at the heart of the Juneteenth holiday, which is the black freedom struggle against far too often. The American project. These are two very distinct things. How do you think the legacy of June teams that delay the spreading of freedom relates to modern day racism at a time where it's now been a year since George Floyd was died and there have been Global demonstrations against racism and police brutality. I think the simple fact of the matter is and it's not an easy thing for folk to here, but the truth when it comes to, uh, white supremacy is very difficult for folk to hear, and understandably so. The simple fact of the matter is that Um Juneteenth has nothing to do with The idea of American independence or really, the formation of the American set the state except as uh, kind of counter pose to the American settler project. It's very difficult to hear, but the simple fact of matter is the United States of America, like every other colony of Europe. In the Western Hemisphere. As a settler colonial State turned into a state and so there is no one set of memories. Everything is contested when it comes to memory, and so in some ways the project of Juneteenth, which means the project of Black Liberation, meaning the long black freedom struggle. Continues. So what happened to George Fluid is directly connected to Juneteenth? Not even in the broad. You're not just in the broad sense of the black freedom, struggle and state violence and resistance to state violence. In the case of the murder of George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and I'm at Aubrey and so many others. The response being black folk are joining the street, my white folk and others. Um, but in George Floyd's case, George Floyd was raised. The one of the places he was raised was Houston and the school. He attended the high school he attended in Houston. Jackie. It's high school, his named for formerly enslaved Africans, who had moved from the east to the west to Texas and was one of several formerly enslaved people who put money together immediately after emancipation. And purchased what became known as Emancipation Park. Emancipation part is where they had and continue to have Juneteenth celebrations. It was the first place in Houston where they had Juneteenth celebration. So George Floyd was a graduate of Jack Yates High School. One of the early Africans who school were the first settlements of June team. So we think this is even in an abstract thing, you direct light. From jackets, the Big George fluid, and so you know, it really is something. And so when you think about it that way, you understand that, As we all too often say the struggle continues. Juneteenth is really about black resistance to oppression. And that's what makes it very different than July 4th, which is about the colonies, resistance to America. And, of course, that just gets complicated, too complicated. In fact, is Juneteenth a concept That all races can coalesce around and this and this striving for unity in this striving to kill the schism among racist Yes, absolutely. But That's what has to happen. So Juneteenth isn't about Diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. That's important work. But that's not fundamental structural, wholesale structural change work and we understand that when, um, when you're talking about changing a society When you're talking about committing to the principle that we all have equal human value. And that we must all see ourselves as member of the human family that Gets a lot of pushback. So one of the ironies in fact, But what has happened since the death of of George Floyd may 25th 2020 and the aftermath in terms of the protests out there and ST and everything is that The thing that it has fed the most in many ways is renewed reflection in black communities on the nature and process of black self determination. And that's what Juneteenth was really designed has been celebrated for. You have black folks on black on land. They would you know, slaughtered the animals and have big barbecues and run races. They get speeches from the black churches, which they control the black high schools and they have competitions and All these things, reinforcing the idea of black self determination, black freedom that's very different. Than a collective determination to restructure. This project called America. So the answer is, yes, Everyone can celebrate Juneteenth, if in celebrating Juneteenth. They are also saying, we are committing to creating a different country. But that's a very different project than just saying, Oh, this is a black version of July 4th. No, because, uh, As Dr King said in 8 1963 on the steps of the Washington Monument, The Negro.

George Floyd Brianna Taylor Texas January 1st 18 63 Jack Yates High School Greg Kerr Washington Monument Howard University June 19th June 19th 18 65 George Fluid Jackie United States of America 18 65 Europe may 25th 2020 Civil War Emancipation Park July 4th Houston
"emancipation park" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on KTRH

"Richmond and 59. Southwest Freeway generals in the windows dot com 24 hour traffic center. Hot human again Today cloudy this morning. We'll see some sunshine mixing is we had through the day today. Scattered afternoon evening showers and storms. Temperatures climb back up through the mid nineties. This afternoon made 70 tonight study hot and humid for Labor Day, slight chance for a late day storm mid nineties. Meteorologist Ken Boon from the weather Channel. We got 81 a Galveston this morning in spring, you're waking up. 72 Katie, you have 74 75 at the K T. R. H top tax defenders 24 Hour Weather Center. It's six. So one our top story. It now appears vow. Four boats sunk in a massive trump Boat parade on Lee Travis yesterday there were so many boats participating that once they got all the motors crank. The bigger boats create some rough waters that sank a few of the smaller boats. In downtown Houston. There were calls for change. There were several rallies around town that collectively we're called black lives, Mohr than matter. The organizer of one at Emancipation Park, Dav Lewis, saying that so far there has been only talk. We have yet to see any to actionable items around police way. Haven't seen any, You know people talk about do fund and the police way. Want to reimagine police? What is policing look like on reality. Resource is two things such as having maybe a mental health. Organizer's air planning a march to City Hall in the days ahead, Texas and Louisiana lawmakers air teaming up to push for hurricane relief Texas Senators John Cornyn and Ted Cruz joined Louisiana Senators Bill Cassidy and John Kennedy, asking Senate leadership to take up an emergency funding bill for victims of Hurricane Laura in the letter to majority leader Mitch McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer. Senators note that initial damage reports put Laura's price tag in the tens of billions of dollars, adding the pandemic and other disasters have.

Hurricane Laura Texas Louisiana Hour Weather Center Ken Boon John Cornyn Galveston Richmond Bill Cassidy Mitch McConnell Lee Travis Chuck Schumer Emancipation Park City Hall Houston Dav Lewis Mohr Senate
"emancipation park" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

The United States of Anxiety

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

"One hundred and three is is a wonderful age. To live. It that as a celebration, can you know he? Can I say something he. He really great point I appreciate Steve's story about his grandmother. Because that's what early June team celebrations were out, there were about. Telling the stories of slavery, and telling the history of their people in their family to the generation that came behind them, and the fact that Steve Here's twenty five years old, and today can talk about his connections to slavery. Is also she represented? The strength that his family lineage so I just think that's a powerful story, and it's very reflective of how and why we celebrate Dune team today so I. I really appreciate his remarks. Does the historical record. Tell us much about how people in in Galveston Texas received. The information of emancipation in. On June one, thousand, nine, hundred and sixty five. Do we have a sense of not just literally how they received how they felt how they reacted where they were at emotionally. Absolutely yeah, we have we have this through slave narratives that were collected in the nineteen thirties to the workers progress administration very very interesting source that's highly contested, but still one of the only few sources of firsthand accounts of of formerly enslaved people and in those narratives particularly wants from Texas Oklahoma Arkansas because. Because many of them had been enslaved in. Texas talked about the moment they found out they were free. Some of them said a union soldier came to our farm and told us we were free. We packed our bags and left so some of them left right away. Others would say you know we. We celebrated week dance. We Sung stayed right there and work the land and we got paid for what we did. You know there's there's that there's others that said we we left. Left the next day we went into collected relatives. We look for family members that had been sold to Alabama Mississippi Louisiana and they tried to go, and one of the main things they wanted to do. Was One solidified their unions through marriage license to receive an education and three often leave the site of lead the fight of enslavement, and find work work for themselves and to work in occupations. That was their choice, not the occupations that they were forced into working. How did the? The idea of June eighteenth and the celebration that began there in Texas. Begin to spread around the country is is due to migration to tell us about that. Yeah, absolutely as I mentioned when we looked at some of the experiences of formerly incite people, as they left the sites of enslavement, move to parts of the north in the West and the Midwest and northeast those formerly enslaved people in Texas brought experience of Dune teamed with them. That's one way proliferated to other communities. Then, but I think there was a moment of turning point in the nineteen sixties of really large Tony in the nineteen sixties, where the poor people's campaign led by Sterling Tucker in Washington DC in Dr Whitney Young which is the National League they held a a June team solidarity day. And this was at the site of March on Washington. This was a place where a few years before a king had spoken right, and they were about seventy five thousand people in attendance, and at that Moment Scott King spoke and Sung Sung. The song come by here. My Lord come by here. And she talked about the connection between the history of slavery, and the Struggle Against Racism, poverty, and war at that time, and I think at that moment seventy five thousand people learned about the significance of June eighteenth if they hadn't known about it before, and those people took it back to their communities as well. That's quite striking and and then so. In that period thinking about I mean you're talking about the poor people's campaign in that era of Jim Crow and and the fight against segregation. How Up until that point? How was this holiday preserved in black communities? It particularly in the south, where where people were under such in many cases living under such violence. That's why the striking factors of this holiday to me that there's a there's great joy, and also great pain and to me joy and pain are one of the underbellies of African American history. You know you see. You see gangs using dignity than you see you see moments of African Americans. Experiencing great tragedies like some of the experiences. We are dealing with right now. in many cities formerly play people purchase parks like in Houston. Eighteen seventy two reverend Jack dates into other congregations purchased some land in Houston and they labelled emancipation park. There is a match patient park in Austin Texas where I currently live and June tenth celebrations occurred every single year in those parks now during segregation when there were restrictions on. On where at public parks African Americans could be in these celebrations were often taken to people's homes or in their churches, so during the early periods of the twenties and thirties, when segregation lynching and Lynch law sort of ruled our land African Americans still celebrated. They still share this history in this experience, but they did it in spaces where they could maintain their safety and becomes much more public. I'm hoping that as you mentioned at the outset of the show that it becomes a national holiday. Well on that note I should point out that One of my producers points out that the Mayor Mayor de Blasio here in New York. has tweeted that that these quote proud to announce the beginning beginning next year. June eighteenth will be official city and school holiday facing. That is great news. That's to celebrate today. Here we go there we go. We can add that to the celebration I know several other companies are talking about this about you know about taking the day off to celebrate I think twitter ninety, the NFL notably given it's. It's difficult history with the black lives matter. there's a federal bill in the works there's. New York State. There's a bill in the works. As a historian looking at the sweep of it, how how much of a turning moment is this for this holiday in particular and definitely optimistic so for me? It's a turning point, but I don't want this to fall on deaf ears. I don't want after we move forward and people are buried in the protests. You know I'm hoping. The protests will continue given everything we're dealing with. Things Wayne Down I. Hope that we still have conversations. I hope that we still have celebrations. I hope that maybe New York will have a large parade sometime. They'll have speeches and people like Steve will tell their stories about their family and their ancestors, and the ancestors I'm hoping that this is not just our response to the current climate, but that this is a movement of change change to see different textbooks changed to see the ways in which reteach history teams to see to make sure that this was conclusive way of understanding arm. Eric passed both the pain and the pleasure of our experience here. Let's hear from Erica in Brooklyn, Eric, welcome to WNYC. Hi there. Thank you for doing what you're doing. It's really important information that needs to be shared with the world be silent history so I said to be cleaner that I am a descendant of Nicodemus Kansas and It's an all black settlement that still exist in northwest Kansas established in eighteen, seventy seven. And my descendants left Missouri across the river into territory, and what I said to the spring or also, this idea of we have to also remember I'm I'm a biracial woman that this. Nation was built upon land that was taken. By force and that the indigenous. Were helpful. To blocks. At one point, but indigenist enslaved blacks license like blacks, so the idea of all of the painting, and all of us aware that we are part of a nation that was built on the backs of others and this idea of also empowerment.

Texas Steve Here Houston Eric New York. Kansas Washington Austin Texas Midwest twitter Sterling Tucker Alabama Mississippi Louisiana emancipation park Dr Whitney Young Scott King Mayor de Blasio Jim Crow Missouri Erica
"emancipation park" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"We're bringing in a guest. Mr Griffin Holland who just completed a really cool out school class. If you don't know about out school dot Com put GonNa Shuts by Dr. Sheri, a Meta called June eighteenth and exploration of the celebration of freedom, so he's gonNA share. Some additional information about June eighteenth specifically, he is GonNa. Tell us about emancipation park in area in Houston closely tied to the history of June. It was purchased to celebrate the end of slavery, but was too costly to for the entire year, though in became a holiday. The owner is a man named Allan and for other people. decided to open it for one day of the year, June teens, where lots of people could gather around four acres that they bought to celebrate June teens, they celebrate it mainly by eating foods that are generally read. This is a different topic, but it in my notes. So the emancipation park began as a place to celebrate June teeth. It didn't stay in the owners hands. kind of got neglected. In the seventies. Revive it in then recently, they spent the city of Houston Ismay millions of dollars, and now it's on the UNESCO slave route heritage site so. Emancipation Park and Houston is a really important part of June teeth history, and so we talked about. Often at June TNT celebration. There's Red Food and what did we learn about why red food? is believed that the REDFORD's is carried over from. Mainly drinks that were may in west Africa. Yeah, so they think that a lot of the West Africans in Texas at the time. Used high biscuits, not as a form of celebration in that traditional red drink carried over in NASA at June celebrations you see Red Velvet, cake and red punches, and want writing clothing and watermelon juice, and you see lots of red foods as part of the celebration. Okay, thanks for sharing what you learned Griffin, the third thing that we wanNA. Share is that June. Teens gained national attention in spread, more widely, following the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen sixty eight Kereta. Scott King and Ralph Abernathy cut short. The poor people's march on June nineteenth to commemorate. And! This is what really started to spread June teen outside of Texas, so you see a more modern adoption of June eighteenth in spread in the late nineteen hundreds and then. More recently, you've probably seen a lot of discussion over social media with companies like twitter, saying they're going to begin to give June nineteenth off to all employees and sort of reviving the conversation about June teeth as a national holiday. It is not yet a national holiday, and that's the fourth thing we want you to know. The Senate has passed a resolution last year, recognizing June eighteenth, Independence Day, but the House hasn't yet approved it. It is recognized by forty six dates in the. The District of Columbia only Hawaii North Dakota and south. Dakota don't officially recognize June eighteen. The NFL Twitter Square have now recognized it as a day offer, celebration, education, and connection, and the New York Times gave employees an additional day off and encourage them to use it on June nineteen I really appreciated this description from van newkirk reading in the Atlantic he said in it's spread across the country and gradual supplanting of other emancipation celebrations. June teen has always retained that sense of relatedness. Observance of victory delayed a foot-dragging and desperate resistance by white supremacy against the tide of human rights and of illegal freedom, trampled by the might of state violence, as the belated emancipation embedded in the holiday for generations of black codes, forced labor, racial terror, police, brutality, and a century, long regime of Jim, crow it also imbued the holiday with a sense of Sisyphean prospect of an abridged liberty with full citizenship, always taunting and tantalizing, but just one more protests down the road. And I think what you see because it was this gradual process, and it was the the celebration of the last place to to find out about the emancipation. It's really interesting. Many communities across the country you see different dates for celebration, so for example I don't know if you'll knew this I live in Paducah Kentucky. And in Paducah that the teeth conversation kind of left me bewildered in the beginning because in Paducah. Eighth of August and it's a very big deal because that's the day that African Americans in Paducah, learned of emancipation. This is from explorer. Kentucky History Dot Com these yearly occasions fell on different days of the calendar for several reasons, most often emancipation day celebrations fell in January first this day was popular because Lincoln's. Proclamation went into effect on that day eighteen, sixty three, some communities instead chose to celebrate on September twenty second the day, when the preliminary emancipation proclamation was issued in eighteen, sixty, two other communities chose to honor April ninth the day in eighteen, sixty five, when General Robert e Lee surrender to general, ulysses s grant at Matic's still other selected a day in December. When the Thirteenth Amendment took effect or the various days, when the Union army occupied their town or county in Texas, the most popular day was June nineteenth also known as June eighteenth. Eighteenth on that day in eighteen sixty five sleighs Texas heard that the war was over, and they were free Paducah chosen emancipation day somewhat unique, according to August eighth nineteen o five edition of the Paducah Daily News Democrat that day was chosen, because it was when slaves in Santo, Domingo Haiti or their freedom. Haiti was the first Black Republic established in the Western Hemisphere, a slave uprising that began in seventeen, ninety. One and I think that's so interesting I. Think it speaks to exactly that quote from Van newkirk that. This was so slow and Disjointed in a way, and even if it was announced just what we saw from the history and Texas, it's not like it was immediate. An everybody.

emancipation park Texas Red Food Paducah Mr Griffin Holland Van newkirk Houston Paducah Kentucky Dr. Sheri Haiti Houston Ismay Dakota Union army NASA twitter Dr Martin Luther Senate Scott King Allan
"emancipation park" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The day was June nineteenth. Eighteen sixty five union soldiers were in Galveston, Texas State, where the presence of union troops was low and thousands of people remained in slaved, the emancipation, proclamation went into effect two years prior outlawing slavery in the confederate states, but Texas was isolated and the proclamation with not enforced in a state when it was not outright challenged. So on this day, Major General, Gordon Granger announced to the people of Texas to emancipate of enslaved, people June nineteenth is now recognized as an independence day in marked by celebration honor black Americans freedom from slavery. On September twenty second eighteen sixty two a year after the start of the US civil war and centuries after the first Africans were enslaved in the modern United States. President ABRAHAM LINCOLN issued the emancipation proclamation the proclamation fit that all enslaved people in the rebellious confederate states were declared free and it took effect on January first eighteen sixty three the proclamation also announced that black man would be able to enlist in the union army, and navy and hundreds of thousands of flack men did fight for the union during the war, but it only applied to state, that had defeated from the US flavor remained legal in the border state or slave owning states that did not join the confederacy as well as union controlled rebel areas. So the proclamation did not outright inflationary in America. News of the proclamation took a while to spread in Texas, the most western state in the confederacy was removed from a lot of the civil war action slaveholders, had migrated in large numbers from eastern states to Texas to get out of war-torn areas, and shirt, emancipation enforcement by eighteen sixty five around two hundred and fifty thousand people were enslaved in Texas confederate general Robert E Lee, and the army of northern Virginia surrendered to union general. Ulysses s grant on April ninth eighteen sixty five, but the army of the trans Mississippi and other rebels kept fighting for months after Galveston Texas was a major confederate port since tech v the feed it from the United States. The city had been blockaded by the union occupied by the US navy and recaptured by the confederacy, but on June second general Edmund curb. Smith signed surrender terms for the confederate trans Mississippi department aboard the u s s fort Jackson in Galveston harbor. It was the last major confederate command to surrender. On june. Eighteenth Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, with two thousand federal troops? The next day, Grainger read, general orders, number three at the headquarters district of Texas in Galveston. He said the following the people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a proclamation from the executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and flavors and the connection here to four existing between them become that between employer and hired labor. The Friedman are advised to remain quietly at their present homes, and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts, and that they will not be supported in idleness, either there or elsewhere. But as the emancipation, proclamation change was not immediate in all encompassing. Many slave owners did not relate news of announcement and free enslaved people until after the harvest some forced free people to work anyway. Though, the order encouraged black people to stay with their former owners, many left to find family or to move north in a process that was dubbed the scatter. Some, formerly inflamed people were beaten or murdered after they attempted to fulfill their freedom in December eighteen sixty five the thirteenth amendment to the US constitution of polishing. Slavery in the United States was ratified the next year. The freed black people of Texas celebrated June nineteenth in recognition of grainger's. Eighteen sixty five announcement June team as June nineteenth came to be known became a day that marked freedom, and progress honored the reading of the emancipation proclamation games, food and religious, Thurman, the Freemen's bureau was established in eighteen sixty five to deal with the social reconstruction necessary in the aftermath of the civil war. But even then records exist, if like people who were still illegally inflated in Texas and other. Eight. And the black folks who were emancipated still face the problems of lack of shelter food and resources on top of the codify discrimination, and racist violence that proliferated at the time. Since the eighteen hundred the celebration of June team has spread from Texas and throughout the United States. I'm eve Jeffcoat in hopefully, you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. Just an additional note that after June teeth black people need it places to gather to celebrate as white people have Barth them from using their public spaces. They began raising money to buy their own spots to celebrate June teeth emancipation park in Houston, Texas, which opened in eighteen seventy two was one such space. We'd love it. If.

Texas US Galveston June teeth emancipation park Gordon Granger Texas State union army Mississippi US navy President ABRAHAM LINCOLN Galveston harbor grainger eve Jeffcoat America Grainger Robert E Lee Barth fort Jackson Houston
"emancipation park" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"I do not think that tros will wasn't one on. I think it's one in a long, long history of very dangerous, racial relations. And it's just the the most recent manifestation of that. And I think at its crocs what the Charlottesville protests symbolized was the fact that we, as a nation have done, absolutely nothing to aknowledge the brutality, the torture, the kind of terrorism that assistant based on a racially stratified society has led to. We have failed to really acknowledge that as a society. And as a result of that, you still have these episodes that. That pop up every so often that seem so surprising. This is the Brookings cafeteria podcast. I'm Fred dues, August, eleven, twelve, twenty seventeen white nationalists Neo confederates in Neo Nazis marched Charlottesville Virginia. With the stated intention of opposing the removal of a statue confederate general Robert early in the city's emancipation park. During those two days we witnessed these members of the so-called alt-right carrying torches chanting, Nazi slogans like blood and soil in clashing with counter protesters. Many people who turned out to oppose them are injured and a woman named Heather higher. It was there to stand up for diversity was killed by a man linked to white supremacist groups. After he rammed his car into the crowd. In the special edition of the Brookings cafeteria, four Brookings experts share their views on the events of that weekend. How history and public memory inform where we are today address. The question of white supremacy is domestic terrorism and look ahead to how we can do better. You heard from one of them at the start of this episode, Camille be set who was Brookings senior fellow and directs the race prosperity inclusion initiative. And you'll also hear from Christmas role, Andrea Perry, and Vanessa, Williamson, and the next episode of the Brookings cafeteria by colleague, Bill fine and director of the Brookings Institution press speaks with author and Peru, college professor, Thomas main on his new book, the rise of the alt-right visit our website.

Brookings cafeteria Brookings Institution Charlottesville tros Heather higher Camille senior fellow emancipation park Virginia Fred Bill fine Andrea Perry Robert professor director Thomas Williamson Vanessa two days
Court Square Park, Jerome Powell and Donald Trump discussed on Michael Medved

Michael Medved

02:01 min | 3 years ago

Court Square Park, Jerome Powell and Donald Trump discussed on Michael Medved

"Over how to handle confederate symbols the Charlottesville city council has voted for one to. Change the, names of two parks yet again the formerly park renamed emancipation park is now market street park and the former Jackson park. Whose name was changed to Justice, park is now court square park rich Thomasson, reporting tour boat operators in Hawaii promising to stay, farther away from an erupting volcano but they'll still take tourists to see at twenty three people hurt yesterday when an explosion sent molten rock barreling, through the roof of a vessel the coastguard prohibits vessels from getting closer than nine hundred eighty four feet from where Kellaway. Owes lava oozes into the sea the agency had been allowing experienced operators to go up, to one hundred sixty four feet. But it has stopped. Those exceptions this is townhall news The chairman of the Federal Reserve is pressed to comment on the effect trade tariffs have on the economy Linda. Kenyon has more from, Capitol Hill South Carolina Republican Senator Tim Scott post the question what's generally happened in the past economic growth when. We've raised tariffs Jerome Powell stressed he was not commenting on president Donald Trump's trade. Policy and, tariffs in particular but he did talk about trade tariffs in general countries that have remained open to trade that having a. Record barriers including tariffs have grown, faster they've had higher incomes higher productivity in, his semiannual testimony to congress Powell also said the, fed expects the job markets remain strong and inflation to stay near two percent over the next several years Linda Kenyon Capitol Hill and while we're, distracted by the US and Russia getting along the European Union and Japan teaming up signing a comprehensive trade deal that will. Eliminate nearly all tariffs between them the deal covers the third of the global economy more, than six hundred million people more. A townhall dot com Have you racked up more than ten thousand dollars in credit. Card debt are you barely getting by making minimum payments you, should, know the. Credit card companies are tricking you into thinking.

Court Square Park Jerome Powell Donald Trump Linda Kenyon Capitol Hill Emancipation Park Market Street Park Charlottesville City Council Capitol Hill South Carolina Kenyon Tricking Rich Thomasson Senator Tim Scott Kellaway Hawaii FED Chairman Of The Federal Reserv European Union President Trump
"emancipation park" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"Like you i was saying a lot of my own friends and stuff who are liberal and progressive and i usually with gree with most of the time they're posting tweets like chris clue he tweeted about how the aclu like they're blaming the charlottesville death sin and just everything on the aclu because the aclu protects nazis so i spent an entire hour on my show talking about how that is not what the aclu is doing let's start off with the basics did they have any direct involvement with the charlottesville events the you know of or is this more of a okay so what did they do they helped represent one of the principal organizers of the right yeah it was the unite the right was he the one who got kinda chased out of town on that after during his press get might be but he was the one who went to apply further permit though can have the demonstration at wiz this the roberty lee park the lee park the yes which was renamed two emancipation park which is one of the things that they were protesting they were protesting that it was renamed to emancipation part and that the statute of lee was going to be taking down so the he tried to your permit in would sorry uh this would suggest than than someone tried to deny him more is that where the deal you had to step in well what actually happened was he went there in march well ahead of time and he got the permit.

aclu charlottesville roberty lee park two emancipation park lee the deal principal
"emancipation park" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"Nasreen's can get and nobody really makes nectarine jam or you know during cobbler a you don't see that so nectarines are kinda like on the sideline which are kinda like i like the become rich in sugar is like a two bit sluggish type of dictator which is hilarious to me so it deals perfect to me nectarine noriega it feels like the right speed for trump is i think it's these some of these leaders who are a little too famous i think their place in history is a little too infamous i guess for where i think trump should be i think he is more been nectarine noriega guys i really do i mean mango mussolini is my personal favorite you know that i made up of course orange julius caesar just makes me laugh to but neck during noriega i may have to put up there that's pretty good so mike with your permission i'll be adding that to the rotation him okay so so this week in we have this horrible situation in charlottesville is that north carolina though charlottesville shows roosenburg junior i always think anything that charlotte is in one of the carolinas united's from my mind goes shows you in virginia i apologise virginia virginia's for lubbers dokic man but in charlottesville virginia were there is uh supposedly a protest of the taking down av property leak statue that was previously i think in what was caught roberty leap park and i could be getting some this wrong so i apologize and i believe it was changed emancipation park and it's it's kind of this the trend right now with the movement of having confederate imagery in statues taken down and there was a group of white nationalist neonazis and ultraright whatever you want to call it or is hillary clinton reversal demands the deplorables who wanted to protest this in them had some things to say about it and they are met with resistance as they should be.

Nasreen trump charlottesville north carolina charlotte virginia virginia roberty leap park nectarine noriega mike lubbers dokic hillary clinton two bit
"emancipation park" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

#WeThePeople LIVE

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on #WeThePeople LIVE

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred bigotry and violence on many sides on many sides so let's try to be as generous as possible here a k the rally on saturday was nominally organized in opposition to a plan by local officials to remove the statue of the confederacy is top general robert e lee from a pack emancipation park in charlottesville this has there been lots of conflagrations about this sort of stuff right about the removal of confederate flags and the removal of symbols lionising confederate generals in the south this same plan had led to had prompted another protest back in may which was led by richard spencer who who was a white nationalist as well as it could cox klan rally in july charlottesville should have known that this had the potential to turn violent the night before the rally it which had been planned well in advance hundreds of what nationalists marched this was on friday night and they were chanting racist slogans they were chanting antisemitic slogans they were carrying flaming torches for the president to come out and say that there was misbehavior on both sides even if they were all right let's suppose for the sake of argument that one side was just chanting peaceful rice racist antisemitic neonazis slogans and the other side showed up i can for a fight i don't think moral equivalence would be the correct posture to take i mean you might want to if you were if you are smart about it and you really wanted to try to be fair to both sides you would condemn the noxious ideas on one side and the noxious behavior on the other side for example.

robert e lee charlottesville richard spencer president klan
"emancipation park" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"There were also state and local police on foot patrols and at road closures at various locations throughout the parks so we could respond to emergencies occur and beyond the immediate area of emancipation park law enforcement were stage at mcintosh carcass wale you can see we had a very large footprint during this entire endeavour around 10 o'clock to unite the right a days began arriving and entering emancipation park we had a plan to bring the man at the rear of the park they had agreed to cooperate with the plan unfortunately data not follow the plan they began entering at different locations in and around the park and we have to quickly alter our plans to help facilitate that process other groups also began amassing along the street and in the park gradually the crowd sizes increased along with aggressiveness and hostility of attendees towards one another shortly before eleven a m individuals and a crowd began throwing objects and spraying chemical agents and to the crowd the city and county de made a declaration of local emergency the crowd size became increasingly violent with mutually engage combatants with one on one attacks following and unlawful assembly was declared and the state police troopers began to safely move individuals out of the park and through the streets scholes will police officers were originally onsite in there every day uniform we were again hoping that the members of the all right rally would cooperate with our safety plan of ingress in egress wants to violence began to a row we transition our officers enter their protective equipment we proceed with an organ asked response to ensure that we could safely restore order annan and around the park.

law enforcement chemical agents emancipation park
"emancipation park" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"We are working with the higher family to ensure that the safety of vigils and other memorials are that a planned for this week are safe we plan to keep the four street crossover closed until further notice as there are thousands of flowers lining the straight and that is the location of the crash site we are also establishing a hotline for any victims or witnesses to contact local authorities and provide information that may not have been reported during the weekend we understand it was a traumatic weekend for everyone we are still receiving reports of assaults and additional crimes and we're working with our state and local partners to investigate thoroughly any criminal or civil rights violations that may have occurred this past weekend that have not yet been reported throughout the throughout the entire weekend virginia state police charlottesville police department intervened to break up fights in altercations among those in attendance at the rally site the began on friday night and continued through sunday the city trucked approximately two hundred fifty calls for service on saturday alone and many of the conflicts individuals which strike and then disappear back in a crowd site police medics render day to approximately thirty six and and injured individuals on saturday including several of the traffic crash victims award a straight the early morning hours on saturday virginia state police in shoals will police war position and around and across the street from emancipation park in order to readily observe and monitor the actions of the crowds and respond as quickly as possible when emergency arose.

crash site charlottesville police departm shoals emancipation park civil rights virginia break up
"emancipation park" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"You know if if in some moment of anger if in some moment of personal a you know problems or something it's something they've said has a meet sense to you or you've gone online and said something that sort of links you to them that was yesterday today walkaway walk away this these guys are not the good guys they are the bad guys and they're in our house we have to reject so what happened i you know let's just go quickly over this thing they have us a park in charlottesville this is not the charlotte north carolina charlottesville virginia which has that beautiful words were uv a isn't and it's beautiful city i've been there and which jefferson designed and all the soft anyway they have is a park with a statute has roberty lease statue they had a vote to get rid of the roberty lee statue in renamed the sparked when we park to emancipation park celebrating obviously the emancipation personally i'm always against removing this kind of soviet idea that you remove the pats if you don't like it but it's their town it's not our town you know that if if were conservatives we believe in federalism we believe all the power should be concentrated on the individual and then locally in the state and only at the last in the last necessity should go up to the to washington it's their town if they wanna to do this that's up to them these guys came in from outta town to star trouble they showed up loaded for bear they showed up armed they showed up with helmets they showed up with weapons and and the the left came out to protest them now the left.

charlottesville virginia jefferson pats charlotte north carolina charl emancipation park washington
"emancipation park" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Who throughout the summer have been strolling around the mall in drawing hostile responses from local so that's been going on for a while and then of course a few weeks ago we had the klu klux klan a um a group from north carolina who came up and uh they also met in leap park or the two formerly park now called emancipation park around the statue of liberty lee and what was so interesting was again i don't see a lot of activism here in charlottesville but a thousand people turned out to surround that park and to shout the clansman down they had to be protected by police so um you know th sentiment in charlottesville is is clearly against this kind of seeing it says this i say quite a a blue spot in uh what some would consider a red region as soon as you know we saw the rebel flags you saw the kicking to let the hood stuff but but other symbols we saw the nazi symbols is that a new element era insulted drills experience oh must definitely i i've never seen anything like it that gap there were definitely some neonazis who were part of the group they reportedly stopped on the way to town at a walmart to buy weapons and uh the police were called it with his quite alarming to the local folk and um to yes this is another disturbing element in what has happened here but on the came cindy housing reporting on all this for wbt fm radio iq public radio.

klu klux klan north carolina charlottesville walmart fm radio
"emancipation park" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"emancipation park" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well the rally weather start till noon by people turned up very early in what used to be called lee park and has now been renamed emancipation park that's the location of the roberty lee statue robert lee on top of his horse um so those individuals the white whitesupremicist were in the park uh with their confederate flags and banners and sticks that they would later use for some street fighting out on the streets around the park were the uh counterprotesters and that was a very mixed bag you had some extremists there some left wing folks who call themselves and p foss had short for antifascists and you also had you know middle aged moms who were shouting scolding the the white supremacists a one lady walking around handing out flowers and other guy going around giving hugs but generally there was a great deal hostilities you heard net that tape the shouting back and forth and you'd have people coming out of the park in these little sort of antagonizing forays they would they would march around as if to provoke people and there were in fact some fights in police to kind of a hands off approach according to some witnesses there have been complaints about the police not doing their job um that i assume will be investigated down the pike but the police did used teargas to break up those fights and then at eleven thirty even of the rally was supposed to begin at noon the governor declared a state of emergency and the city ordered the uh rallied to move to a larger park where the chief of police had said it would be easier to maintain security um the demonstrators were giving a choice either move or be arrested and so they on massed.

lee park emancipation park robert lee p foss break up