38 Burst results for "Elving"

Fresh update on "elving" discussed on Aaron Byrd

Aaron Byrd

02:00 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "elving" discussed on Aaron Byrd

"Angeles at the intersections. March 5th, Dr Jennifer Mullen and Evelyn Escobar discuss how humans and animals alike are adapting to their changing environments. Musical performances by Neil Francis and DJ Anthony Valadez. First Fridays connected at N H M. R S V p Today at N. H m dot org Tune into some of KCRW's best work on life examined. One size does not fit all in relationships that for some people, polyamory is going to be a hot mess could be the kiss of death for other people. It will be the perfect relationship form life examined Saturday mornings at nine right here on KCRW. Life from NPR News. I'm Barbara Klein. President Biden says his administration will make an announcement Monday on Saudi Arabia after yesterday's release of the U. S Intelligence report. Concluded. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman approved the killing of journalist Jamal Kashiwagi and 2018. NPR's Ron Elving says while the findings aren't new, the release Could mark a shift in US policy. The Trump Administration was pursuing an ever closer relationship with the Saudis and especially in particularly and Bs. And that had a lot to do with arms sales and Israel. So the report was not released. And there was a general refusal to acknowledge the known facts. Now, the new administration is making more of the reports public but still not doing much about it. At least. Not yet The White House says We should stay tuned. The FDA is expected to clear Johnson and Johnson's covert vaccine for emergency use. This weekend. An advisory panel unanimously approved it yesterday, NPR's Amy held reports it would inject millions of doses into the nation's supply as soon as next week. Johnson and Johnson has committed to 100 million doses under its contract with the federal government. But won't deliver until the end of June. The company says it has just four million doses ready to go scaling up to 20 million by the end of March. The single dose shot doesn't require extra cold storage and has been found to be 85% effective against the most severe covert 19. 66% effective Overall. Those were the findings of a study conducted here and in South America and South Africa, where new, more contagious variants were first seen. Experts say it's race now between the virus and getting vaccinated one year into the pandemic that has already claimed more than a half million lives in the US Amy held NPR news. Several states are struggling to monitor vaccine spoilage as the number of locations handling the supply increases. Tennessee is having a particularly bad week. Nearly 5000 doses have gone to waste. Blake, Farmer of member station WPL in reports it's being attributed to a freezer snafu. A school district in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, received 1000 doses for a teacher vaccination event this weekend. They were probably put in a freezer, then moved to a refrigerator. But then an error code appeared on the temperature sensor. Turns out it was the wrong kind of freezer. Dr. Lisa Pearcey is Tennessee's health commissioner. Obviously we have to make some systemic changes to prevent those types of errors from happening, But I know the people on the ground or is just as devastated as I am. The city of Memphis is also piling up. Reports of wasted with nearly 2500 doses, pitched some for weather, others for poor management. Knoxville also had 1000 doses ditched earlier this month in a shipping error for NPR news..

Neil Francis Evelyn Escobar Jamal Kashiwagi Barbara Klein South America 85% Ron Elving 19. 66% Monday March 5Th 2018 South Africa AMY Yesterday FDA Today 1000 Doses Jennifer Mullen Next Week Lisa Pearcey
Fresh update on "elving" discussed on Snap Judgment

Snap Judgment

01:53 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "elving" discussed on Snap Judgment

"Life from NPR News. I'm Barbara Klein. President Biden says his administration will make an announcement Monday on Saudi Arabia after yesterday's release of the U. S Intelligence report. Concluded. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Somen approved the killing of journalist Jamal Kashiwagi and 2018. NPR's Ron Elving says while the findings aren't new, the release Could mark a shift in US policy. The Trump Administration was pursuing an ever closer relationship with the Saudis and especially in particularly and Bs. And that had a lot to do with arms sales and Israel. So the report was not released. And there was a general refusal to acknowledge the known facts. Now, the new administration is making more of the reports public but still not doing much about it. At least. Not yet The White House says We should stay tuned. The FDA is expected to clear Johnson and Johnson's covert vaccine for emergency use. This weekend and advisory panel unanimously approved it. Yesterday, NPR's Amy held reports it would inject millions of doses into the nation's supply as soon as next week. Johnson and Johnson has committed to 100 million doses under its contract with the federal government. It won't deliver until the end of June. The company says it has just four million doses ready to go scaling up to 20 million by the end of March. The single dose shot doesn't require extra cold storage and has been found to be 85% effective against the most severe covert 1966% effective overall. Those were the findings of a study conducted here and in South America and South Africa, where new, more contagious variants were first seen, Experts say it's race now between the virus and getting vaccinated. One year into the pandemic that has already claimed more than half million lives in the US, Amy held NPR News. Several states are struggling to monitor vaccine spoilage as the number of locations handling the supply increases. Tennessee is having a particularly bad week. Nearly 5000 doses have gone to waste. Blake, Farmer of member station WPL in reports it's being attributed to a freezer snafu. A school district in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, received 1000 doses for a teacher vaccination event this weekend. They were promptly put in the freezer, then moved to a refrigerator. But then an error code appeared on the temperature sensor. Turns out it was the wrong kind of freezer. Dr. Lisa Pearcey is Tennessee's health commissioner. Obviously, we have to make some systemic changes to prevent those types of errors from happening, But I know the people on the ground or is just as devastated as I am. The city of Memphis is also piling up. Reports of wasted with nearly 2500 doses, pitched some for whether others for poor management Knoxville also had 1000 doses ditched earlier this month in a shipping error for NPR news. I'm Blake Farmer in Nashville. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Kate Wolf. A proposal to build a new ballpark for the Oakland A's is inching forward after the release of a new environmental report. Cake. Rudy's Holly J. McTeague reports the Oakland A's want to build the New Ballpark on Howard Terminal at the Port of Oakland. The proposal would also include up to 3000 residential goods as well. It's office and retail space. A's president of environmental report doesn't include any show stoppers. The report says the development would lead to more traffic and could create safety risks for people crossing over railroad tracks to get into the ball park area. These Oakland Stadium Alliance, a coalition of labor, community and industry groups, opposes the plan. They say that is current Coliseum site should be revamped. Instead, the public has until mid April to comment on the report. I'm hard to indeed KQED news. California Democrat Alex Padilla unveiled a bill yesterday that would create a path to citizenship for undocumented essential workers. Cuties immigration editor Tiki Hendricks reports They work in food and farming, health care, transportation and construction. Idea, and others estimate that more than five million people doing critical work in the pandemic are immigrants who lack secure legal status. Padilla called the workers American heroes. If they pay a fee and pass a background check. The bill would let them become permanent residents and eventually U. S. Citizens. The bill will need support from at least 10 Republicans to pass the Senate..

Barbara Klein South America Jamal Kashiwagi Kate Wolf 1000 Doses Nashville 2018 Padilla Tiki Hendricks Ron Elving 85% NPR South Africa Alex Padilla Monday Yesterday Blake Senate FDA Next Week
Fresh update on "elving" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:27 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "elving" discussed on Weekend Edition Saturday

"Flat. NBS cpac. SCOTUS O M. B If we have the time joining us now to spell it all out, NPR's senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving, Ron Thanks so much for being with us. Good morning. Hope things are okay with what? I walked into that, didn't I? Um course MBS is what they call Mohammed bin some on the Saudi Crown Prince. U. S officials say that he approved the grisly murder of Jamal Kashiwagi and 2018. Proved it light about it afterwards. Not clear of President Biden will do anything in response to this find, you know, the rule of NBS in this murder has been widely known both inside and outside the intel community for roughly two years. That the Trump Administration was pursuing an ever closer relationship with the Saudis and especially in particularly and Bs. And that had a lot to do with arms sales and Israel. So the report was not released. And there was a general refusal to acknowledge the known facts. Now, the new administration is making more of the reports public but still not doing much about it. At least. Not yet The White House says We should stay tuned. Suggesting only that the Saudis are on some sort of probation now, and that seems to be the best judgment within Biden security team. It's not good enough for a lot of Biden's own voters who were expecting much more severe consequences for MBS and for the Saudi regime. It's irresistible to point out First military action of the Biden administration launched this week an air strike against Syria because Iranian back Miller militias there had attacked American assets in the region. That gets an air strike. Saudi Arabia gets summary Yes, President. Biden said That strike was a message to Iran to quote. Be careful. You can't act with impunity, Unquote. Hand in substance. It was a far more consequential response than Biden made to the Saudis, a contrast that as you suggest made the slap on the wrist for MBS all the more troubling Conservative political action Conference CPAC this weekend in Orlando, the largest gathering of conservative activists. Uh, apparently, and includes inflatable golden bust of Donald Donald Trump. Any room for Republicans like Liz Cheney of Wyoming or Adam Kinzinger of Illinois. Well, what's the opposite of a welcome mat Scott, maybe skull and crossbones on the door. The obvious question is how big 1/10 the Republicans want. Will it be Reagan's or bushes or Trump's tent? And will those people who were not welcome at CPAC be part of the party's campaigns in 2022 2024. We'll stay tuned. How big a deal. Do you think it is that Donald Trump's financial records? Uh, will end up being after the Supreme Court has love the Manhattan district Attorney office to get hold of him. There's a theory that these records will prove less damning than advertised that perhaps there are no bombshells or revelations left. But we've seen state officials in New York and elsewhere pursuing these records doggedly over years, and their air may well be a reason. Trump himself has fought so hard against release for so long and that such great expense $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package is making its way through Congress but apparently won't contain a hike in the minimum wage. No is in the House bill that passed late last night. But they were always real questions about meeting the Senate's rules, which are much tougher. The good news for the White House is that the rest of this relief bill seems remarkably popular, even with some trump voters. So, with the minimum wages you set aside to be dealt with separately later this year, possibly the overall bill seems increasingly likely to be law. Finally, Neera Tanden is President Biden's pick, Toledo embody the Office of Management and Budget is a partisan political figure. She made some colorful observations about some U. S. Senators whose votes You may not get One lesson here is that a 50 50 Senate truly empowers the individual senator. So losing one or two can cost you your power to act And that's a lesson we're likely to learn over and over. And another lesson is that even in the age of Trump Twitter What others say on social media can still come back to haunt them. NPR's senior Washington editor Ron Elving, thanks so much. Thank you, Scott. Millions of Americans are desperate to get vaccinated. But right now there simply aren't enough vaccines to go around. But there's some good news yesterday, an independent advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration endorsed Johnson and Johnson. Vaccine Doctor Montel Yes. Other Chatterjee? Yes. Dr. Fuller Committee voted 22 to 0 in favor, and that opens the way for the FDA to authorize its emergency use. NPR's Joe Palco was listening to the committee deliberations, Joe, Thanks so much for being with us. You're very welcome. And what of the committee based its decision on Well, the committee heard from scientists, both at the company and the FDA, and they were both looking at the data that came from several studies, the most important of which was a large 40,000 person Efficacy study that was carried out in the United States, South Africa and six Latin American countries. I guess. The good news is that the company and the FDA by and large, agreed with their analysis. The key findings were that the vaccine had 66% efficacy against moderate to severe disease overall. 72% If you just look at the data coming from the United States and 85% efficacy against more serious disease, and this was basically keeping people out of the hospital on that number held up across all countries, which sounds encouraging, but But don't the vaccines from Fizer and Moderna have better numbers? Yeah, Those numbers were closer to 95% efficacy, but you have to keep in mind a few things. First of all those studies were done before these new variants started popping up and it's possible in laboratory results suggest that it is possible that they won't work quite as well against the new variants. The other thing is that this vaccine did work in South Africa, where there is a variant that people are very worried about circulating and that's good news and the Other really important thing is that this is a vaccine that can been given in one dose. So from a logistical standpoint, you come in. You get the thing you're done, and public health officials would be very happy to have that as a tool in their arsenal when they're trying to control a pandemic. So what happens next? Well. What happens next is that the Food and Drug Administration decides whether to grant this emergency use authorization and that will allow the vaccine to be distributed. Then the question is how much vaccine is there and that's been a bit of an issue. The company said in testimony earlier this week that they had four million doses ready to go out the door. They have 20 million doses. They think they'll be able to provide by the end of March and 100 million by the end of June and keep in mind that each dose is one person vaccinated. So you know it's a wonder one thing, Joe. We've been hearing some of the vaccines out there right now might have to be modified because of the new Corona virus variants that are spreading. Does that mean the companies will have to do another study of 40,000 people if they modify the vaccines? No. That's something the FDA has thought about. They issued guidance earlier this week. They have said that they will be satisfied with much smaller. Studies just to make sure that the vaccines are safe. They'll be particularly eager to see that the same techniques were used to create the vaccines, and they'll be looking at laboratory data that will help convince them that the modified vaccine will work as well as the original vaccine. NPR's Joe Palka. Thanks so much, you bet..

Joe Palka Neera Tanden Adam Kinzinger Joe Palco Liz Cheney JOE New York United States Donald Trump 66% 2022 Food And Drug Administration Donald Donald Trump Ron Elving Orlando $1.9 Trillion 85% Congress NPR
"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is available to you. It's 8667336786. The number again for your calls 8667336786. You can. Also, of course, get in touch on Twitter and Facebook. Where at KQED Forum or email Any questions you may have to form at kqed dot org's Let me go back to you, Ron Elving. What about Didn't we talk about this? But I think it's important part of the whole picture of national politics veto of the unrelated defense bill, which essentially has a lot of bipartisan concern. There are few, if any bills that are more bipartisan in Congress every year than the National Defense Authorization Act, and this is a staple. It's a standby it is. It is absolutely something that the Military Council on it's the authorization of every program. That our armed forces are carrying out everything The Department of Defense does is not the only bill that affects them because there's also a funding bill for them. But this is their authorization to operate, and it's been passed every year for 59 years in a row. And this is about his bipartisan is it gets as I say it was run out of the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Armed Services Committee by a Democrat in the House and a Republican in the Senate, Jim Inhofe tells Oklahoma who is very conservative Republican senator. Was the father of the bill on the Senate side. The president vetoed it, and he vetoed it, saying that what he was really upset about here. What's the section 2 30 of the Communications Act of 1996, which we all know of? As basically social media Facebook, Twitter all of those platforms that we all use rely on this section because it gives them liability protection against things that may be said on the platform that they can't stand behind improve the way publishers who required to do So this is a big deal to the president because he feels he's been treated unfairly by social media, Facebook, Twitter and he is at war with them, and he thinks that this would be a way to Bring bring them down if you will rein them in. And by the way, there are quite a few people who feel that this section gives those platforms way too much protection and and allows people to do things on those platforms that are really inimical to society. A lot of misinformation, a lot of disinformation, a lot of conspiracy theories and even the organizing of violence. So There are reasons to talk about section 2 30, but they're not necessarily the reasons that President Trump is relying upon in calling for it to be abolished to be removed from the law, so that doesn't have anything to do with the National Defense Authorization Act. But the president has veto this bill to get some attention to his 2 30 campaign. We assume it will be either overwritten or re passed in the new Congress, but they could get it overridden even this week, perhaps assumed in the Senate as tomorrow, but It's also possible that will be kicked over until the new Congress convenes early in January. We're also talking about salaries of those in the military, which the president least says that he is All in favor of and a zoo champion of well what the military needs and particularly the those who serve in the armed services. I'm wondering if I go back to you. Kimberly Atkins on this hey also was objecting to removal of Confederate base names. Yes, again. This is another play to the president's base. He has claimed that Thebes protests that we have seen this year after the death of George Floyd, the killing of George of Floyd. Which has have included calling for Confederate monuments to come down in the capital itself. Just last week, I believe the statute of Robert E. Lee that represented Virginia was taken down and we've seen that happening across the country. Well, the president has really rallied against this, saying that it's an attempt to remove history. He cast these people as heroes, even though they were literally fighting against the United States. On. So he consistent with that He opposes efforts to rename bases that were named after Confederate heroes again a play to his base, but something that even folks like his former U. N. Ambassador, Nikki Haley, led the removal and called for the removal statutes in In South Carolina, where she was a former governor. So it's not completely in line with all Republicans, but it is keeping with Donald Trump's messaging. And and as you turn if I go back to you, a lot of this omnibus bill includes $1.4 Trillion to fund the government through September, But I'd like listeners to know actually. Have sort of been cursory about what's in the bill, and there's a lot in this bill, and maybe we could flush it out of it with you. We're talking about $300 a week and jobless benefits and those who makes $75,000 a year. Or less getting a $600 stimulus check, which is we've said At least the Democrats are trying to up to Ah, 1,002,000 years. Me, but what else is in the bill? Can you break it down for a Santa Yeah, And that's one reason why it was so important to sign this bill into law this week is because there's Kind of a web of deadlines coming up with some expiring hands make relief from the previous bill. Those passed in March and we talked about the eviction moratorium. The federal election Natori, um, that would have run out on December 31st. There's $15 billion in aid for airlines. That, of course, have been greatly impacted by the pandemic. There's I believe $285 billion for the Paycheck Protection program, which is a program that gives forgivable loans to small businesses with less.

president Facebook Senate Twitter Congress Donald Trump Senate Armed Services Committe House Armed Services Committee George Floyd KQED Forum Department of Defense Military Council National Defense United States Jim Inhofe Robert E. Lee Ron Elving Kimberly Atkins Oklahoma
COVID-19 stimulus deal remains elusive as Trump signs 2-day spending bill to avoid shutdown

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:06 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 stimulus deal remains elusive as Trump signs 2-day spending bill to avoid shutdown

"Congressional lawmakers avoided a government shutdown by giving themselves two more days to agree on a $900 billion covert relief bill. Or not, it's financial relief. The American people have been waiting on for months and months. Joined now as we are most Saturdays by NPR's senior Washington editor Ron Elving. Ron, thanks so much for being with us good to be with you. Scott. Negotiators said They had a framework for this package a few days ago. What's in it? About a trillion dollars scot a little less so, so it looks a little less expensive. That keeps some of the senators on board who said they would never vote for another trillion dollar bill, and it is a lot smaller than the Leave package we saw last spring. This one has about 300 billion for businesses. Another 300 billion for unemployment benefits. We expect there to be stimulus checks again. For individuals. They'll only be about $600 this time, about half assed much his last spring. But aid to states and localities has been dropped for now, as well as liability protection for employers, and it's all attached to a stop. Gap funding bill passed just last night, And when we say stopgap, we mean Just a little bit of stopgap. It only lasts until tomorrow night, which is kind of a nice metaphor for how our federal budget has been working in recent years. Democrats won't get all aren't getting all of what they want Republicans already there. I'm not sure where they couldn't have just recognized the obvious six months ago and passed a bill. But is this exhausted? Kind of compromise? A preview of how the incoming congressman work? Oh, you have to hope not. But on the other hand, why expect better? Unless the Democrats can win both those runoff elections in Georgia in January, there will be divided government and if the Democrats are nominally in charge, their margin in the House is only going to be a handful of seats. And in the Senate, there would be no margin at all. They would be 50 50 with the vice president would be Kamila Harris by then, breaking the tie. So everything will be a negotiation with Republican leader Mitch McConnell, much as it is now

Ron Elving NPR RON Scott Washington Georgia Kamila Harris Senate House Mitch Mcconnell
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 3 months ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
Michigan officials call for audit after state certifies election results

Snap Judgment

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Michigan officials call for audit after state certifies election results

"The chairs of the Republican National Committee and Michigan's Republican Party are calling on Michigan's boards of state canvassers. Delay certifying results of the presidential campaign for two weeks to allow for a full audit of votes in Wayne County, the state's largest. They cite unsubstantiated claims of irregularities alleged by losing Republican Senate candidate NPR's Ron Elving says other legal efforts by President Trump and his supporters to de Legitimize election results have not been successful. In Pennsylvania, you got a blizzard of court filings of the state and federal levels that have produced basically nothing. One after another has been withdrawn or dismissed with no change. Georgia certified its results on Friday, so another one in the barn, the Trump campaign could still seek another machine recount there after the hand recount that's already been done. But all the relevant statewide officials have already signed off, including the governor, who is a major

Michigan's Republican Party Ron Elving President Trump Republican National Committee Wayne County Michigan NPR Senate Pennsylvania Georgia
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 7 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
State Department inspector general is latest watchdog fired

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:21 min | 10 months ago

State Department inspector general is latest watchdog fired

"Of new and stunning move overnight by president trump he announced there would be a new inspector general at the state department he gave no calls for the removal of the veteran who was in that job this would be notable under any circumstance but it is just the latest in a series of watch dogs and other government officials have been forced out in the trump administration and Pierre senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving joins us Ron thanks for being with us good to be with you Scott I don't know how to begin except to say what what's going on here so the president is asserting control exercising the full extent of his powers over the executive branch including people whose job is to keep an eye on other officials one of whom was Steve clinic the inspector general it's day two was fired late last night members of Congress are telling us this morning that clinic had opened an investigation of secretary Mike Pompeo close ally of the president over the alleged use of the department staff but we have seen the president fired the watchdog in other departments as well as you say last month it was Michalak consent the intelligence community I G. who process the whistleblower complaint last year became an issue in the president's impeachment Christy Graham at health and Human Services who would criticize the corona virus response and the president also removed Glenn Fein who was supposed to oversee some of that two trillion dollars that Congress approved a spending dealing with the corona virus

Senior Editor Scott President Trump Steve Clinic Congress Christy Graham Glenn Fein Pierre Ron Elving Executive Secretary Mike Pompeo Michalak
Trump says the coronavirus is Democrats' new 'hoax'

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Trump says the coronavirus is Democrats' new 'hoax'

"The stock market plunge this week is the corona virus spread rapidly across Europe and the Middle East and of the Americans last night president trump referred to the virus as the Democrats knew hoax even as he appointed by president Mike pence to oversee America's preparedness voters head to polls in South Carolina today for the state's primary in Pierre senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving is in Colombia at one of the many voter events taking place today run thanks so much for being with us good to be with you from chilly south Carroll a chill oh I'm sorry you mean it's cold in South Carolina and I mean Ising early surprisingly brisk Columbia South Carolina Scott and president trump is also there he held a campaign rally and he tried to frame the corona viruses a democratic conspiracy that's right just down the road from where I'm standing the president told Israeli crowd it was quote the latest hoax although it is now in fifty six countries and new cases have been reported overnight in San Antonio and there are cases reported in California with no known links to foreign travel in the hole well the World Health Organization is saying the novel coronavirus poses a very high global risk a rather colossal hoax to be sure but in the past the president has labeled climate change a hoax as well Scott so he may be using that word as a synonym for inconvenient

San Antonio Donald Trump Ising Ron Elving Pierre World Health Organization California Europe Carolina Scott Colombia Senior Editor South Carolina America Mike Pence President Trump Middle East
Trump declares victory following acquittal in impeachment trial

Political Breakdown

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Trump declares victory following acquittal in impeachment trial

"We begin tonight with the conclusion of president trump's impeachment trial in the Senate on Wednesday the Senate voted to acquit president trump of obstruction of Congress and abuse of power met rami was the lone GOP lawmaker to join Democrats in finding him guilty of abuse of power the next day president trump appeared at the White House to celebrate his acquittal and denounced Democrats and the investigations that have dogged his presidency president trump also deliver his third state of the union address on Tuesday night he claimed credit for the stronger economy and vowed to quote never let socialism destroyed American health care the issue has taken center stage in the twenty twenty presidential race here to discuss this politico senior writer Carl Ameren Nucci and NPR senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving he joins us by Skype from the nation's capital welcome to you both Ron let's start with you we are hearing today that lieutenant colonel Alexander vin men who and his twin brother are being fired and removed from the White House he was one of the witnesses called during the impeachment investigation he provided very damaging testimony against the president what is this firing tell us about how trump gonna act moving forward and could there be any repercussions for the president or his administration you know there were two theories on the part of the senators who were voting on impeachment one was that the president was going to have learned his lesson and that he was going to moderate his behavior that does that does not seem to have been borne out by his behavior thus far at the prayer breakfast on Thursday or at his victory lap speech in the east room or now today as he has begun and we don't think he's finished cleaning out some of the people that he thinks betrayed him and the impeachment proceedings including a lieutenant colonel Benjamin and his brother who was actually on staff over in the Senate for some other people but seems to have lost his job in the same hour I mean it's not just the president that could potentially suffer repercussions we have senators like Susan Collins from Maine who it said she hoped the president would learn lessons she is one of a handful of senators that Democrats hope to defeat in November what do you think this means for them look I think it's gonna fire of the Democrats they are already donating in record amounts to the on the opposition in all of those cases when you talk about college attack on more than like Sally this is this is but it's going to keep the Republicans fired up as well this whole week is an example of of the kind of I mean a rancor and hostility we seen between the parties it is not going away anytime soon it is going to extend probably on the next election I think we've we've gone the other residents a suite yeah it definitely feels like we are already in the selection run I wanna bring you back in here the impeachment vote was on Wednesday the only person who you could say maybe didn't act in a partisan manner was Utah senator Mitt Romney he was the sole Republican vote on that first article of impeachment on abuse of power do you think that in anyway rob's trump of this talking point that this is a purely partisan witch hunt it doesn't seem to have deterred him from using exactly that language what it does add a note an asterisk if you will Mitt Romney was the first person to vote to remove from office a president of his own party we've had party lines stepped over in the past in previous impeachments but always to defend someone not to remove them so he does become a unique voice in all the history of impeachment that's not something we're going to hear from the White House White House is in some sense is trying to ignore him but is also made some rather direct shots at him hiding behind his religion or using religion as a crutch because he mentioned his Mormon faith when he gave the speech on the floor and was quite an emotional speech about why he felt he had to follow the facts that had been presented to the Senate and vote for the president's removal from office Carlos you think there could be any political repercussions for Ronnie I mean obviously he has a target on his back when it comes to the White House look his own newspapers in Utah have stood up for him but there's no question about it there's going to be political repercussions for him and for his state and that's I think going to be of concern to hand the president has already mentioned is such an antibody I think that he's getting support from Democrats it's interesting to watch but it was also interesting to watch the silence the came out of the Senate people that have known him for years people have respected him for years have not come forward to to to the firm for him in any way so I think we're going to see how this plays out he but he's willing to take the heat he made

Donald Trump Senate President Trump
An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

Q

12:10 min | 1 year ago

An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

"I'm Audie Cornish in Washington earlier we heard from president Donald Trump and we just heard the voice of Michigan governor Gretchen Wimmer who presented the democratic response to president trump stated the union speech we have several folks here tonight to do some analysis about all that we heard we're gonna start within the within eighteen L. Shammi who was the chief of staff to speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi and Brendan Buck who was a spokesman for the former house speaker Paul Ryan bring you guys both in for your expertise how what we heard tonight now if you're on Twitter there were a lot of conservatives you you're you're using a lot of exclamation points and saying this is the best thing that they've ever heard Democrats not saying the same I want to start with you Brendan what did you make of the president's focus tonight how we deliver that yeah and this is certainly a confident president in a way that you know you might expect a president who's at his all time high in in the latest Gallup poll who is just really defeated impeachment and have the Democrats sort of in disarray he started off with all of those economic status just making the case that things are going well in this country talk about how we're we're not gonna turn back and really was just riding high right some of his quotes it insane three years of my administration three and a half million working age people of join the work force in leaning really hard into that at the top in it and it was a lot of job well done on my part and very little agenda going forward I counted this is not an official count but I counted only ten things in which he is calling on Congress to do anything in a lot of those were relatively small ball usually a president comes in with a big agenda here's all the things I want to do and you really have to dig in there to find them some of it is funding neo natal research funding a child tax credit sanctuary cities sending Americans to Mars things like that that don't really come together in a real way but another take way as as sue was talking about from the room if I've seen a lot of state of the union this was as divided and cold as I've ever seen you could almost hear brewing from some of the Democrats and that is just really stark and the Nancy Pelosi interactions yeah she she tried to shake his hand and he did do it she actually tore up his speech at the end that that's remarkable I've never seen anything like that the team let's have you jump in on your former boss there people were watching her and her behavior very closely but first your reaction to some of the things you heard tonight shoring it was a fascinating speech the king can I give you a look into president trump's mine and that we were hoping that he would meet the commander in chief test but then said that I believe he produced a speech that was made for TV made for TV moments and Brandon is exactly right some of the big issues bi partisan issues that he could work with Democrats on infrastructure he had two lines and infrastructure of prescription drugs he really did not go into specifics as to get me a bell and I will sign it these are opportunities lost a lucky get a showing at age she has to do is to tell Democrats thank you for working with me on U. S. M. C. A. and he didn't right you mentioned that it was signed by it was that yeah and and I and also in terms of I've I've seen many states to the union I've been there and I think this is stands up to when president Obama was to during the ACA negotiations and trying to get the bill passed it was it was that same feeling that you had in those to complete the process I want to take a moment now to fact check some of what we heard both the president's speech in the democratic response NPR's Scott Horsley is here to help us do that welcome Scott they do with it this speech was kind of the theme of it was the great American come back the president spent considerable time talking about the economy both his and the prior administration's but here's a sample of that in just three short years we have shattered the mentality of American decline and we have rejected the downsizing of Americans destiny we have totally rejected the downsizing we're moving forward at a pace that was unimaginable just a short time ago and we are never ever going back Scott who was Anderson economy were looking at the one the president's describing characteristically here Donald Trump exaggerates how strong the economy is now and how weak it was when he came into office the fact is the economy was pretty good in twenty seventeen and it's still pretty good now the economy last year grew two point three percent that is exactly the average for the last decade the U. S. added six point seven million jobs in the first thirty five months after trump took office pretty impressive but not unprecedented in the previous thirty five months the U. S. added nearly eight million jobs so really less of a comeback than a more less straight line continuation a lot of people also measure the economy by the size of their own paychecks right in this president described this as a blue collar boom after decades of flat and falling incomes wages are rising fast and wonderfully they are rising fastest for low income workers who have seen a sixteen percent pay increase since my election Scott Horsley is our chief economics correspondent and of course was a long time White House correspondents so to help us understand how he's trying to frame these specific numbers wage wages have been rising faster than inflation that's good for workers there read real purchasing power's been going up but wage gains of actually moderated in recent months in the twelve months ending in December average wages rose just two point nine percent compared to three point four percent earlier in the year and that deceleration in pay hikes is a little surprising given the very low unemployment rate we have now is encouraging as the president says that wages for people at the bottom of the income ladder have been rising faster than those the top that's partly because a lot of states have raised their minimum wages the present also talked about the very large stock market gains that we've seen since the election of twenty sixteen it is way up not seventy percent as he said but the Dow's up fifty seven percent stock ownership are is heavily concentrated among the rich eighty four percent of those gains have gone to just the top ten percent of earners and forty five percent of Americans don't own any stock at all I want to pause for a second and go to Ron Elving because when you think about the last impeach president he was giving a seat at the union is also the person we attribute this it's the economy stupid kind of sloganeering and so is this something that the president should lean hard into especially given what his democratic rivals are talking about why would he not why would he not take credit for where the car a condom use today presidents have suffered when the economy was poor even if it wasn't their fault and even when it wasn't really that bad and even when it was recovering I'm thinking here by George HW bush in nineteen ninety two very short very shallow recession and yet he was pummeled with it and that has happened in other occasions and we've also seen presidents come and office riding on a long recovery such as the one from say about two thousand nine two thousand ten forward into two thousand seventeen and tack on a few more years with policies and there's no question that this president has cut regulations and cut taxes what particularly for a corporations and to some to be wealthy individuals which has juice the economy if you're further but he did come in riding on a long recovery which may be slowing down a little bit now but he basically takes credit for all of it and says that when he came into office it was a situation of American carnage I want to come back to Scott Horsley here because another issue one of factcheck health care promises the president spoke about also Michigan governor Gretchen Widmer who delivered the democratic response here's an example of something the president spoke about one hundred and thirty two lawmakers in this room have endorsed legislation to impose a socialist takeover of our healthcare system wiping out the private health insurance plans of one hundred and eighty million very happy Americans to those watching at home tonight I want you to know we will never let socialism destroy American health care members we talk about the language is using their this is obviously divisive issue even within the Democratic Party some of the presidential candidates on the democratic side Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren have favored a single payer plan that would eliminate private insurance in warrants case over a period of time other Democrats though want to preserve a role for private insurance for those people who want it we should also point out the president did make what he called an iron clad pledged to protect patients with pre existing condition did he explain how we do that he he did not in this this is surely the biggest Whopper in tonight's speech the president knows a protection for patients with pre existing conditions as popular so he pays lip service to it but if anything his administration has has whittled away at those protections and of course they're they're fighting to overturn the affordable Care Act which is where those protections come from I want to talk about another big issue border security the president talked about this one even before he you know what it was the nominee and hit that thing again tonight my administration has undertaken an unprecedented effort to secure the southern border of the United States this statement seems vague but it's got I believe you've kind of dug into it what do you know the administration has made a series of sweeping changes to limit access to asylum seekers at the border I'd sent tens of thousands of migrants back to Mexico to wait for their day in immigration courts and administration credits those policies for a very sharp drop in the number of migrants who are being taken into custody the border in a last may we saw that number peek at a recent high about a hundred forty thousand last month the number was down to around twenty nine thousand so a drop of about eighty percent our allies in this gets at some of what we would call kind of red meat or culture were issues that we heard the president talking about he said he was calling upon members of Congress to pass legislation banning late term abortion of babies he talked about the idea of a sanctuary cities and kind of going after sanctuary states how did he balance this part of the speech with what we heard about the economy well I think those are the two parts of the president's campaign message one is to say you're better off now than you were four years ago the economy is great he said it's greater than ever before in American history but also the president is at heart a culture warrior and he believes that cultural issues are more powerful than economic ones and there is some evidence that might suggest he's right for instance the parts of the country that are reaping the most benefits from the trump economy are the ones where his approval ratings are the worst and the parts of the country that are not reaping the benefits that are doing badly record farm bankruptcy is a manufacturing recession those are the parts of the country where his numbers are the highest why I think because of the cultural issues he's pretty face the voters in those places think he's protecting them against criminal immigrants he talked about those he highlighted once again this is a staple for him a family whose family member has been killed by an undocumented immigrant so these are the two parts of his message one is you never had it so good and the other is you know the Democrats want to ruin your your way of life and that's the message to the public we want to talk about what it was like inside the capitol congressional correspondent kills the smell is there tonight moments ago she spoke with the second highest ranking Republican representative in the house that Steve Scalise we did see a pretty tepid response from Democrats on most things including things other were bye bye things that should have been bipartisan that always have been bipartisan it almost is is like they have this personal hatred against the president and they're letting it see through where they're opposing good policies and you should always put your personal differences on the

Audie Cornish Washington President Trump Donald Trump Michigan Gretchen Wimmer
Impeachment trial: House managers push for witnesses

The Takeaway

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Impeachment trial: House managers push for witnesses

"Right now lawmakers are taking a break Senate stands in recess they spent much of the morning hearing from house impeachment managers of people like house intelligence house intelligence committee chairman Adam Schiff also congressman chasing crow of Colorado and Akeem Jeffries Democrat from New York they talked about the two articles of impeachment they're winding down on the first which is abuse of power to Davis can you talk a little bit about one or two of the points they made a little along those lines in in terms of the abuse of power charge in the piece of power well I think what she was trying to do today I mean the first two days of this of these arguments Democrats laid out a very meticulous timeline of what happened to the key players were and what and what was wrong about it today was really I think that it time to hit the sort of constitutional high notes what are the bigger constitutional progress here what are the bigger at national security questions and I think Adam Schiff in his closing arguments sort of pulled no punches this was his last best case to make and it was really striking to hear him not just talk about the articles of impeachment and what's outlined in the July twenty fifth phone call but to go back to things like president trump's comments standing next to Vladimir Putin in Helsinki when he questioned intelligence US intelligence about Russian influence in trying to hack the twenty sixteen election I think we have that moment hold on one second he's promoting this cookie crazy server theory cooked up by the Kremlin right next to the guy the cooked up it's a breathtaking success of Russian intelligence I don't know if there's ever been a greater success of Russian intelligence whatever profile Russia did of our president boy did they have him spot on the kind of evokes the days of the Miller report what what do you think she was trying to do here is focusing so intently on trump's relationship with Russia I think he was trying to make a broader case that the president is a threat to the country and that his argument here is that if you have a president that welcomes foreign interference and then also has a president that seeks it out to benefit himself over the national interest which is the case the Democrats have been trying to make then that is the most impeachable offense because once a day elections in a democracy are in question that's sort of the whole ballgame right so I thought his rhetoric was at least I think he took some risks here I think it is the kind of rhetoric that could alienate some of the senators he's trying to appeal to although I also think that shift knows what we all know is that there are not sixty seven votes to remove this president from office I wanted before we get too far down that road I do I want to bring in the east Orozco because this gets at what the White House has to accomplish in the next few days from its legal team are they going to for instance defend against those kinds of moments right moments that are on tape our that our public it's not a denial of things the president has done what I I think what they will do and especially with the you know him with shift bringing up Putin is they will argue that this is just an extension of of the the mylar at the mall or special counsel investigation that Democrats weren't able to get the president with that so now they're trying to get it with to get him will on Ukraine this idea that Democrats really overstepped a when they were talking about the Russian investigation that the the president of the Russian asset is is that what you're saying I think you'll hear a lot of that sort of thing and I think when it comes to these ideas of like the tape that they were playing you already see some Republicans pushing back not necessarily on what the president was saying but pushing back on like some of the the the the witnesses that testified like you ambassador Gordon sorry because we should say throughout this opening statement period we have been seeing clips from the house intelligence committee and the Judiciary Committee hearings and they've been playing almost like a highlight reel from that period yes and so what they're going to point to is silence saying that he was never told directly that aid was linked to up the aid was linked to the opening of these investigations or to the White House visit that this was his presumption so you're going to hear a lot of people saying that they didn't know directly that there was bribery or that there was anything like that going on and that some they're going to argue that these were assumptions being made to Matt can I bring you in on this because the other defense kind of force they are if the president's proxies that people in the gallery right senators who were coming out in between breaks and let X. essentially defending him right well that there are a number of different groups among Republicans some who say they're concerned with the president's conduct but this is not something that that we should remove the president from office over and then there are other Republicans who say well you know there's that the president did nothing wrong from beginning to end in a big a big line that's being used right now is on the issue witnesses and on the issue of the subpoena documents is look if we do go forward on this issue we had we pretty much know the president isn't going to be removed from office and subpoenas for documents and witnesses we'll just read this process out even when we know what the conclusion is going to be that it's going to take weeks and weeks and weeks to get additional evidence and come to the same conclusion this is something that congressman Adam Schiff tried to head off a little bit this morning said he said that that line of argument was nonsense that this is quote not a trial over a speeding ticket or shoplifting that an impeachment trial was very serious and it takes more time essentially it should take more time I want to play one more clips from the leading peach men manager Adam Schiff here's what he said in his final remarks the president trump used Ukraine's leader for political favor and with held critical military aid to an ally in exchange for that favor he did exactly what our framers feared most invited foreign interference in our elections and sold out our country's security for his personal benefit and betrayed the nation's trusts to a foreign power Ron Elving this essentially sums up the week so what should what are you going to be looking for listening for next today was the day that the issue moved on from Ukraine to really being focused on Russia and suse already mentioned the really moving tape that we saw from John McCain and this is ultimately why this all matters a great deal more than it might if it were strictly a technicality the Russia issue the Russia relationship the Russian confrontation and the suspicion that works around this president that he is not sufficiently confrontational with Vladimir Putin and that he's done many things that have helped Putin's world planning so this is a critical moment really if if that issue can break through if that can be the salient that senators take home with them then this will be a very different three days then it would have been without that particular connection so we'll see now in the remaining hours whether or not the obstruction of Congress evidence the extraction of Congress descriptions that we'll hear from the Democrats will be equally effective were equally powerful as what we just heard from Adam shin right although that charge is essentially saying to the White House the White House did not cooperate with the investigation into itself that is correct little different from

Senate Adam Schiff Chairman Congressman
Second full day of Trump impeachment trial under way in Senate

Reveal

06:48 min | 1 year ago

Second full day of Trump impeachment trial under way in Senate

"We've been listening to house impeachment managers present their case to the Senate should convict president trump on two articles of impeachment they are now we believe adjourning for the day the president is charged with abusing the power of his office and with obstructing Congress democratic house impeachment managers spent the day laying out the case for the removal of the president from office house lead impeachment manager Adam Schiff open the day's arguments and made this case against the president president trump has acted in a manner grossly incompatible with self governance his conduct has violated his oath of office and his constitutional duty to faithfully execute the law he has shown no willingness to be constrained by the rule of law and has demonstrated that he will continue to abuse this power and obstruct investigations into himself causing further damage to the pillars of our democracy if he is not held accountable I'm joined now by senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving and NPR congressional correspondent because he's now hello do both hi there good to be with you all right let's start with what appears to have been the overall strategy here we're gonna listen again to Adam Schiff the house impeachment manager here at the end of today and he kept on repeating this let's assume you want to know exactly what happened in that conversation when it was fresh in someone's mind and he told Taylor about it and Taylor road in its notes you're going to want Taylor's notes in any court room in America holding a fair trial you would want to see contemporaneously notes this Senate should be no different demand those notes demand to see the truth we're not afraid of those notes we haven't seen them we haven't seen them maybe those notes say something completely different maybe those notes say no quid pro quo maybe does not say it's a perfect call I'd like to see them I'm willing to trust the master sword Taylor's testimony and his recollection I'd like to see them I like to show them to you they're yours for the asking all right Ron what is the strategy here what is Adam Schiff asking for we have waited and been commenting throughout the last of several shift performances of through the day to comment on this particular tactic that he's using which is wouldn't you like to know we've brought shop here is we've brought up that we've brought up this witness this potential document wouldn't you like to know wouldn't we all like to know the answer to what went on at this point and you can do it all you have to do is vote to subpoena these documents and these ones it's been a systematic narrowing of the scope of what documents and witnesses meet because it started out that that's what all we heard we heard that phrase repeated over and over and over by Democrats in the house and the Senate they want documents and witnesses what shift did throughout the course of today was to say this is the document we need and this is why we need it I think was really well system summed up by the what point when he said do you want to know the full truth now do you want to know just who was in the loop and that is the case that ship was making it's interesting that we are not at this particular point the managers are not so much arguing for the removal of the president from office what they're arguing for is to get the full record to hear from the witnesses to get the documents now course last night there were a series of votes on subpoenaing a number of these documents right and the Republicans voted them all down fifty three to forty seven every single time eleven times over but there's going to be another vote next week about having witnesses about going back over these documents and that's really what the managers were driving that is the crucial moment and they know that a lot of polls are out with something like sixty to seventy percent of the people in the country saying yeah let's have the witnesses let's have the documents let's see the evidence why not how effective has the argument then in your view it it's no mistake that he was making the most pointed argument interim prime time when people are watching and he's hoping that the people watching are people who live in say main where Susan Collins a Republican is up for reelection or Colorado where Cory Gardner another Republican is up for reelection he wants there to be a public pressure campaign on these vulnerable senators so that they come back next week and have to really seriously think about how they're going to cast their vote when a quiet question a witness comes up I mean you mention prime time obviously we know that about seven and a half million people tuned in during prime time yesterday that's a modest number but I mean it still is significant when you think about all the people that this will touch and and you know for the first time people really maybe tuning into this and might not know all the specifics and even people who do not tune in for the moment to moment gavel to gavel kind of coverage that you hear on NPR people who just get it later on before they go to bed in little snippets in a little bit of a news package just the last thing of the day even those people are going to hear the prime time stuff that is emphasized by whoever has the podium on a given day and this day it was a democratic managers tomorrow what will be the next day it will be then we get three days of the Republicans and they will do the same a democratic strategist said to me about a month ago that people largely didn't feel that they needed to tune into impeachment Intel it was actually happening until the present was actually being impeached and we have past that date with past the date when the those votes were cast and people are starting to pay attention in a way that they maybe didn't when it was just theoretical hearing we heard from different people throughout the day but Adam Schiff you know was sort of front and center I think it's three times four times he came to the podium and you know basically laid out the case over and over again he opened he closed he dominated throughout the day this is clearly a case of one impeachment manager being the lead horse now everybody else got a chance we we heard from so Lofgren was the last of the seven to actually get her chance and she's a person who's been around for the Clinton impeachment the Nixon impeachment as a staffer and she was making her side of the case talking about some of the legal of Judiciary Committee kinds of issues that came up a little later Adam ships main purchase here is he's the chairman of the intelligence community a committee rather in the house and so he is really been the driving force in the investigation in the house in two of what exactly went on with respect to Ukraine and the state department and all of these ambassadors and so forth you'll see what they're able to lay out the case in a way that people understood it I mean they were

Senate President Trump
This week's new developments in the Trump impeachment inquiry

Political Breakdown

08:48 min | 1 year ago

This week's new developments in the Trump impeachment inquiry

"Earlier today the three house committees leading the impeachment investigation demanded documents from vice president Mike pence about the white house's dealings with you crying and yesterday the committee's interview Kurt Volcker former special envoy to Ukraine among their findings Texan documents suggesting that top state department officials worked on getting a statement of support from Ukraine's president to investigate democratic presidential rival Joe Biden and his son hunter also this week president trump told reporters that China should open an investigation into bite and then his son I mean our KQED politics and government correspondent resa Lagos and joining us via Skype from Washington DC as NPR senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving welcome to both of you things happening pleased to have you both here well I don't think let me begin with you let's begin by talking about the newest the revelation with respect of ice president pence what we know and we're just going the house leaders have sent notice to the vice president saying they want to see every document that might exist that might pertain to meetings that Mike pence might have had with Ukrainian president perhaps with others in Ukraine they want to know everything that he knows about the interchanges between our government at the highest levels that is to say president trump and the Ukrainian president with respect to investigations all the buttons and also with respect to what the president has been saying and we saw this in those envoy messages that you referred to a moment ago the quid pro quo which seems to be quite explicit at least in the minds of those envoys those people in our state department a delegation there in Kiev that the president was saying if you want this aid that Congress has appropriated that everyone seems to be for you've got to give me something on this investigation these are not perfect tax then I take it as a present rises phone call well he called it a perfect phone call some people are calling these smoking texts and a reference obviously to a smoking gun and what do you suspect will go on with Michael I consider who's the I. G. for the intelligence committees can be testifying on Friday this is this is the idea that you have of it is that he's going to defend his handling of the whistle blowers complaint now that complaint came to him directly and he checked it out to his own satisfaction to be able to say he found it credible and urgent and serious and then passed it on to the director of national intelligence his superior for further action a we know that because that individual does requires appeared before the house intelligence committee last week so this is further checking of the legitimacy of the whistle blowers complaint that is driving this whole process Marie said Joseph Maguire didn't find it necessarily all that credible though did he no and I think that this speaks of a different sort of way is that you know different members of the administration are trying to spin this verses the way the Democrats view it but what I would say is that every single piece of evidence that has come out since Adam Schiff first up and sort of made that cryptic announcement about this whistleblower complaint has really played into democratic hands not Republicans I mean these text messages that Ron was just talking about a really very explicit in terms of the concern that was being raised within the administration and their sense that maybe the words quid pro quo quid pro quo was not used but the doubt there was basically a sense that it was that and so I think that whatever the inspector general says it is it has to be taken in the context of everything else as well as the other state department officials including Mike Pompeii who is obviously hit back almost as hard as his boss president trump this is somewhat of a sense the legal your news from helping that maybe China's of being offered a kind of quid pro quo here that is president trump like you did with Hillary Clinton on east said Russia if you're listening where those emails you sort of saying China if you got something on my political opponent here let me know about and which was we going trade war with China well we're supposed to be hearing from some people from China coming to the United States and next week and the context of that request to China came in the same drive way conversation between the president and some of the people covering him in which he said I have tremendous power over these trade negotiations the Chinese really need a deal they need to make a deal I think they ought to make a deal but maybe we will and maybe we won't we don't really have to and then on to talking about China investigating the vines for you were hearing from Adam Schiff and Nancy Pelosi about the president violating his oath of office just keeps coming up came up from both of them what are you making that I mean I think that this is really the crux of why Democrats are moving now with this latest scandal why they did not you know go as far as they have especially pelo see with the Russian investigation with the emoluments questions all these other things they feel like this is a clear cut case that they can make to the American public that essentially by you know making this demand of Ukraine that that is a violation of the oath of office and I think it's really in a lot of ways a strategic talking point from a public relations standpoint as much as a legal argument because they think they can make both and that is something that people understand very clearly and another California the politician Kevin McCarthy the minority leader said that this pope should be dropped is not enough evidence is not enough transparency all things along those lines seems like now is not suppose he dug in but she pretty much said nonsense yeah I mean you know Kevin McCarthy is very close to the president has called him might have been at one point I think that he it you know is doing what the White House with like in sending this letter but maybe bad timing on his part the letter was being transmitted right as the president was making those comments in the White House at outside the White House about China I'm digging on the Ukrainian stuff and I think it gave policy a very clear sort of opening to say look we're not going to drop this it's true you know to to come across these point that in the last two impeachment investigations there was a vote taken to launch those investigations but what clothes he says I don't need to I don't have to and I'm in control which you know we often hear from Mitch McConnell too so that's a that's not unique to one party will these parties are about is antithetical and as far as soon as they can possibly be what does that mean in terms of the fact that we're seeing whistleblower having been identified as a Democrat yeah I mean I think that that is something that the the trump administration and there always are going to keep trying to hammer on I think it will be increasingly hard to make that point when we see mounting I've events like this text messages were that those concerns are actually being called out by the administration officials themselves behind closed doors but certainly you know this is what we saw it during the Hillary Clinton election and and the accusations with the state department and and the various sort of accusations the president made and so I think that that is their political play if we can make this appear partisan then we can sort of take the heat off ourselves and pointed back at the Democrats victory until they run on the let's talk about the role of Rudy guiliani the president's personal lawyer and all those who really kind of got things started with respect to Ukraine any to some degree although it was also started to some degree by some people in the conservative media who had been riding that Joe Biden had some exposure for some of the things that he said while he was vice president with regard to a corruption investigation in Ukraine now what he was trying to do was get the corruption investigation to go forward and get rid of a prosecutor who was blocking it but that was turned around to suggest that somehow he was trying to end the corruption probe that was started some time ago Rudy Giuliani has been part of spreading that particular interpretation he has done it through the media he's done it through and visits with a number of our allies in different countries always appearing only as the president's personal art now it's interesting that he is not part of the government he does not have a role in the government but he is conducting what appears very much to be our foreign policy business as though he had the authority to do so just as the president's personal lawyer and there's also in the background of this some effort that's been made in the past by the Russians to say that the Ukrainians first responsible for the twenty sixteen election interference which all of our intelligence community has agreed was done by the Russians the Russians say no that was the Ukrainians doing that and they were framing us in trying to make it look like we did it and at this point it appears that guiliani and to some degree the president have been playing into that particular interpretation where thousands of thinking of buying campaign I mean it looks bad that he had a son who had no experience got inspirational board in Ukraine getting fifty thousand dollars a month and also the tie to China and investment firm I mean I think that's the problem for by then is not that obviously there's been any fun but you know rendition of wrongdoing but just the appearance of it and I think that every time his name gets brought up in the same sentence as trump and corruption in Ukraine it's sort of yokes them in a way that is not helpful for the

Vice President Mike Pence White House Kurt Volcker Fifty Thousand Dollars
Why Hong Kong's protesting youth are so angry

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Why Hong Kong's protesting youth are so angry

"Hundreds of protesters are staging a sit in outside. The school of a teenager who was shot by police during violent clashes on Tuesday. The student was the first demonstrator in Hong Kong to be shot with a live round in almost four months of protests he said to be in stable condition today the resentment though among young people is partly fuelled by growing economic comic inequality as the BBC's charisma twenty reports in a night market on the streets of Kowloon. I need a group of young students. I had about their phys for the future. CIA Won't be changed my family's life because in Hong Kong. They have to work hard to pay the hydrates of full ties. Now I cannot do it. Even when I graduated from the university I will live with these issues aren't why young people are taking to the streets but it has fueled their resentment kind of a system. Bayfield has neglected them. John Waco is a lecturer at Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He's published a report on job. Prospects and wages ages for young people in Hong Kong over the last thirty years in that period of time starting salaries for fresh graduates have largely stayed the same while property prices prices have gone up tenfold. Our economy is dominated by a handful of powerful families. We looked to IM- wes gene high tech industry. Young people want to get into the high tech industry. They're not a lot of good chances for them. There's perhaps no better illustration of Hong Kong's housing crisis than if you wander through a public housing estate. This is one of the most expensive cities in the world. Take on a flat more than half of Hong. Kong's households can't afford to do that. These public housing estates were meant to be the solution but there's simply simply not enough of them. Stanley one has joined me here to tell me why that's the case as the former chairman of Hong Kong's Task Force on land supply. He was tasked with solving elving the housing crisis. He says there's more than enough land in Hong Kong. Developers hold most of it but have no incentives to build public housing. If they develop into residential housing on a private basis they fared ten times as much for public rental housing they would and lower the prophet roughly about five times mm smoking all of this has contributed to the highest inequality rate in Hong Kong in forty five years. The government now recognizes it needs to fix things but it may be too little too late

Hong Kong Hong Kong Polytechnic Universi Hong John Waco BBC Kowloon Bayfield CIA Lecturer Stanley Chairman Forty Five Years Thirty Years Four Months
Trump whistleblower's lawyers have 'serious concerns' for client's personal safety

Here & Now

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Trump whistleblower's lawyers have 'serious concerns' for client's personal safety

"As house Democrats launch their impeachment inquiry this week president trump is attacking the whistleblower whose complaint that trouble leisurely pressure the head of Ukraine into investigating a political rival started it all and here is Ron Elving reports on efforts under way to protect the whistle blowers identity under federal law at this point a legal agreement is in negotiation between the lawyers for the whistleblower the whistle blowers lawyers and these are the people who were involved in writing the complaint as the complaint is very lawyerly and they say that they want to be careful about exposing the identity of the whistle blower which is protected under the law of the whistleblower law and of course you saw how careful Joseph inquire was on Thursday and Michael Atkinson the inspector general of the intelligence community has been quite careful about protecting this identity and at least so far we don't know who this was a blower is and one suspects on the president doesn't either or perhaps we'd already be hearing more specific things about the

Donald Trump Ukraine Ron Elving Michael Atkinson President Trump Joseph
House committees threaten Trump administration subpoenas over documents

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:11 min | 1 year ago

House committees threaten Trump administration subpoenas over documents

"Congressional Democrats are calling on secretary of state Mike Pompeii to turn over all documents related to a whistle blower case involving the president as required by law there are reports the government whistle blowers accusing trump of attempting to pressure Ukraine to investigate the son of a political rival ever growing attention to the case it's having an impact on impeachment talk and P. R.'s Ron Elving explains the big question is Nancy Pelosi's view she's been trying to protect some of her incumbents who were elected in swing districts last year going to have a tough race in twenty twenty many of the people in those districts don't understand what this impeachment talk is about so the Democrats are wary they know what happened with the impeachment of Bill Clinton it was never popular and in the end it blew up in the face of the Republicans for going after him so the Democrats don't want to repeat that history and yet one thing after another yet another law that the president seems to be floating in this case the intelligence community is a whistleblower protection act. and what are they going to do they don't have any other tools in the shed they don't have any other weapons in the arsenal impeachment is all they've got NPR's Ron

Mike Pompeii President Trump Donald Trump Ukraine P. R. Ron Elving Nancy Pelosi Bill Clinton NPR
The DNC again raises the requirements needed to qualify for the Democratic debates

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

The DNC again raises the requirements needed to qualify for the Democratic debates

"Elving requirements are getting tighter for inclusion in November's democratic presidential primary debate details from NPR's a small college as in previous debates there will be both a polling and a grassroots fundraising threshold for candidates to meet but this time the DNC is giving candidates two ways to reach that pulling requirement one option is to receive three percent or more in at least four poles that's up from two percent that candidates needed to qualify for the October debate the other option is limited to pulling in early states candidates would need five percent or more into single state polls separately they will also need to meet a higher fundraising threshold receiving donations from at least a hundred and sixty five thousand unique donors that's up from a hundred and thirty thousand in the

NPR DNC Three Percent Five Percent Two Percent Four Poles
"elving" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"It is eleven beautiful degrees in Wisconsin. And we are celebrating the end of the polar vortex by camping this podcast was recorded at twelve. Oh, two AM on Wednesday. The sixth of February things may have changed by the time. You hear it? All right. Here's the show. Wow. I think after Patrick bedtime, folks. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast. President Trump delivered his second state of the union address. The state of our union is strong will break down the speech and discuss the democratic response, which was delivered by Stacey Abrams. I'm tamer Keith. I cover the White House. I also covered the White House. I'm Susan Davis. I cover congress. I'm Ron Elving correspondent, so President Trump's state of the union address. It was his second though, his third address to a joint session of congress. It came between one government shutdown, and what could be the next government shutdown or an government emergency. Exactly. And it is also the first speech that the president gave in divided government where Democrats control the house of representatives. Sue, you were there in the chamber. What stood out to you from the speech? I think the. Image of the state of the union will linger in that. There was a call among health democratic women led by Lois Frankel, who's a democrat from Florida, although she did put out the call to the entire house not just to women encouraging them to wear suffragette white to the state of the union. It was meant in part to send a message to the president and the image of the chamber. You know, it's already kind of striking because on the one, and you have the Republican party, which is predominantly white men and on the democratic side, you had this c- of white women standing up and a much more diverse crowd. And I think that visual representation was not just about historic levels of women that helped Democrats win the majority of this year. But also, the kind of candidates that will help them win the majority, and I'd say a very muscular Democratic Party coming into power saying you now have a check on your power, and we plan to use it and also pretty good sign of democratic unity. They they can follow marching orders. Wardrobe orders, I should note that men in in the room also were wearing white ribbons as. As a sign of solidarity. There was at least one man in a white suit run. What to you was the take home from this address like all state of the union addresses by all presidents. This one was devoted to having it both ways it wanted to reach out to people who are not supporters of the president, but might become so persuadable as the campaign consultant, sometimes call them, but hold close those people who are the president's actual supporters and make sure that those people do not wander off or find themselves disappointed by the speech. And in this particular case, there was a virtual catalog of things that were clearly outrage issues talking about defeating HIV within ten years having paid family and medical leave. That is a proposal the president is made before, but he brought it up again infrastructure, drug prices, kids cancer, something everybody, obviously could really get behind addressing as an issue and veterans and the first step act, which is a criminal Justice reform. All these things were outreach. These recuperation issues between the parties in the last congress or prospectively in the next congress that to me there is one clip of tape that sums up this thing that you're talking about. And I wanna play this moment where President Trump is seemingly making a pitch for unity. We must choose between greatness or gridlock results or resistance vision or vengeance. Incredible progress or pointless.

president President Trump White House congress Democratic Party Wisconsin NPR Lois Frankel Stacey Abrams Patrick bedtime Republican party Susan Davis Keith Ron Elving Sue Florida consultant ten years
"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"We're back. You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR the show where we catch up on the week. That was I'm Sam Sanders here with two great guests today. Camilla NAS car breaking news reporter for NPR. Also here with Ron Elving senior political editor and correspondent for NPR, you covered the politics stuff and have and for a very long time and can't seem to stop. There are worst addictions. Yes. Maybe better ones too. That's true. True. True. Anyways time for my favorite game. Who said that? Basically, I share three quote from the week. You gotta tell me who said it or get a keyword from the story. Then you get a point the winner gets as, you know, absolutely, nothing bragging, right bragging rights, all the bragging rights this one. Okay. You both are gonna know this one. So it's all about who says it, I all right ready. The quote is it goes to show you you get into a tinkle contest with the skunk. Yes. Right. We just spoke about earlier this show. I hope everyone was equally embarrassed at here. They used the word tinkle. I wanna say it again because I just love saying it it goes to show you you get into a tinkle contest with a skunk. Did get tickle all over you. One called the president a skunk. Do you use the word tinkle twice while we know how she felt when she left the White House Nancy Pelosi after she left a contentious meeting with President Trump and Chuck Schumer from the Senate and in the aftermath. Call the president. It's just anyway, Ron you got that one. I got I got that one point Ron next quote. There's been times someone wants a picture and while I'm doing a selfie. They're like, you're not dancing. Of course. I'm not dancing. I'm walking down the street who said that. Who dances a lot that is in the culture in his I guest. Someone who dances on this show? Yes. Okay. Camilo barely got it. So that was from Ellen Degeneres. She had a New York Times profile run this week and over the course of the profile. She basically says that she's kind of tired of being nice on her show. It does seem exhausting and it's been like sixteen years. I the smiling alone would be exhausting, and you add the dancing, and it's so actually fun. Fact, she stopped dancing on the show two years ago, but people still expect it from her. But her big thing now is that she's thinking about leaving the show and she's also out with a neck special next week. And apparently in this Netflix special it's like Ellen with an edge. Will you know, she made Obama dance with her when she was first. That was a bad. You can't see that. It's really his his elbows are so high. This is just not nice set. It injuries may though seem. See? Theresa May dance politician in no confidence vote. No dancing. All right for the final quote at wanted. Just play the tape. We've been to the moon. No good is. You don't think? So who said that Ron close? I see you you get you somebody wasn't. Yes. So I went to Davidson college Steph curry also into Davidson college overlap. Yeah. Yeah. He's he said hi to me like at least once really nice, very polite says, hi, everybody. Yeah. It was nice. This is Steph curry the NBA championship winner plays for the Golden State Warriors in a podcast interview this week. He apparently seems to say that he doesn't believe that we actually had a moon landing. A lot of people. There are a lot of NASA was like come on come on over dude. We'll like show you a NASA spokesperson claps back and said feel free to come. Visit the space enter and we'll show you what we did. He came back and said, actually, I was joking. Sure. Fine. Why would you make that joke? Is it funny? We're laughing at it. And believe me, I have all respect for David. But it is a slightly odd thing to say, what did they Davidson college? Yeah. It does. Arts college. It wasn't necessarily quite that's right. Blame it on the liberal arts community you want. Indeed, that's all you're going to react with. Stance. She's banking fake fine to the moon is what you could do. All right now. I'm in the show as we do every week. We ask our listeners to share with us. The best thing that happened to them all week..

Ron Elving Ellen Degeneres Golden State Warriors Camilo NPR Steph curry Davidson college Sam Sanders president NASA reporter political editor Nancy Pelosi New York Times Netflix Senate White House President Trump Chuck Schumer Theresa
"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"I'm having a okay we had to bring that up. Hi, I'm gonna give myself the pep talk. Like, there's a whole like two more weekends. It's going to be okay. Yeah. No. I'm not on top of it. Well, I plan to get started this weekend. We haven't started yet. When is Christmas list? It's on the twenty fifth. I think okay that wouldn't leave a whole lot of time with a lot of time. Anyway, now signed for segment that we call long distance where we call up listener from somewhere out in the country or the world and see what's going on where they live this week. We're calling somebody back. Kate mile shared a best thing with this late last year. She is from Portland, Maine. And when she called us last year she and her husband had just taken in a family of asylum seekers from Burundi five people two adults in three teenagers Kate and her husband already had three children of their own. But they welcomed these five people in and checks. She told us about it last year. It has been such an awesome week went from having no kids in the local public school to three tenth graders. Learned all about that those two families are still living together. So we wanted to see how that last year has gone for Kate and all of them. So we called her up. So yeah, we are. We are very much. A big old household of ten people. Oh, eleven to fourteen depending on who knows? Okay. We got people coming through there. People coming through could I come. Visit come on down. Yes. Yes. So there's a backstory for all of this. Kate actually heard a radio news report over a year ago about refugees in Europe, the crisis in the story, moved her Kate networked asked around and she ended up finding an older couple from Burundi that have been granted asylum. They were trying to find a bigger place to live and help just kind of fit into America with them came three kids who are guardians for a brother sister and a cousin who at the time. We're fifteen sixteen and seventeen and our notion was that. Oh, yeah. You know, you guys and your three kids are are welcome to live with us for a bit while you transition kind of to our town. But I think it's a remarkable undertaking to immigrate to new country and the amount of work. It took to get them enrolled in high school, which seemed to take like a week or two that made me. Really holy cow. Like, this is a big undertaking. And then once we had high school in place. There was medical things we had to get into place getting primary care physicians getting vaccinations sorted out. And as I was kind of facilitating these things on a very logistical gear critical level. I was falling in love with everyone. Yeah. And so we should point out here. You know, you you and your husband took in five people. But you and your husband already have three kids of your own. I guess my question is how do all fit? We've got a big house. Okay. How big? It's it's actually probably the size of plenty of people's houses. I just had this moment. Like well. How do you use the formal dining room and dining room got turned into a bedroom? But I also did have to get a new hot water heater a new toilet. And. Okay. But you know, I think that's kind of what I want to think about is the reason I'm doing this, which seems kind of crazy was I'm at capacity like I work a fulltime job and my husband works full time job. And I'm spending all of my money on take care, and I do not have hours in the day to give back to the community in a more traditional sense. So I kind of looked around and try to figure out what resources I did have. Wow. So then you and your family are white in a very white state superlight. Yeah. This family living with you is back. Has that been hard to navigate or easier than you thought? It would be how is that working out? Yeah..

Kate mile Burundi Maine Portland America Europe twenty fifth
"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"They would like to do infrastructure. They would like to do a number of things with respect to health care. There are many things they could even conceivably do with Republicans and with President Trump, including those two items where things could be done to make the situation better. There could also be compromises with respect to immigration and border control. But impeachment is out there as something people talked about in getting elected during the two thousand eighteen campaign. It's something that's going to be demanded by activists in the Democratic Party and on the left, and that is going to be sorely tempting to respond to. For Democrats in the house and also for all those Democrats in the Senate who are running for president. Exactly already already this story. The store is the investigations there so complex, and they seem to be ever evolving for those listening to wanna follow these storylines better. What should we watch the legal maneuverings that are going on in New York are probably the biggest most immediate imminent threat to the president's legal status than Muller more than Muller because we don't yet know what Muller is going to say about the central issue. He was assigned to investigate which is Russian collusion, but up in New York, there are already establishing crimes. Michael Cohen is plead guilty been been sentenced for making payments at the direction of individual one. There is no one else that that could be but Donald Trump. Yeah. So that means that the president is essentially being named as a person guilty of criminal acts sufficient to have already sent one person to prison. Yeah. Yeah. And and could involve others as well. And we're only beginning to unravel that particular case, and it's also important to watch the president's Twitter feed. I think people watching that will get a sort of temperature check. You're listening to it's been a minute from NPR the show where we catch up on the week that was coming up. I catch up with the listener that I chatted with about a year ago. She and her family opened their doors to another family of five refugees. They are still there in the same house. And she tells now it's going right now, we'll be right back. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from CO, lar-, mold and mildew stain remover while you were going about your day to day life, making dinner or getting the kids to school something's happening in the dark recesses of your.

president President Trump Muller New York Democratic Party Senate Michael Cohen NPR Twitter
"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"I think that was all a little overdone. And I think one of the reasons it was overdone was because there is no style Joe for that style of doing politics that had to do with Donald Trump. My question for you, Ron I mean, one of many questions is the too big I guess allegations against Trump are that one. He improperly used campaign funds to silence women that said that they were his mistress and to he and his campaign had contact with Russians throughout the course of the campaign. And if you talk to Republicans, many of them will say, well, even if both of those things happened, they're not that big of a deal campaign. Finance is very complex and stuff happens all the time. And, you know, people talk to people all the time. Campaigns because campaigns are big how do we know how seriously to even take the two big allegations of what Trump and his campaign did wrong because a good chunk of the country says it's not a big deal. That's right and a big chunk of the country felt the same way with the last two presidential impeachments that we've had not to make light of what's going on right now at all. But people thought at the time of Watergate that it was just all about a burglary. Third rate bungled burger. Yeah. The White House fact formally dismissed it as a third rate burglary at the time, and of course, in the case of Bill Clinton, the general sense of the country at the time was oh come on. Of course. He lied would. He expect him to say, well, I'll when you're talking to a grand jury or you're talking to a judge. That's perjury. And that is a crime, and it's a serious federal felony. We've been talking about elections and investigations and the turmoil at the White House, and I was wondering if you could talk about what all of this. Means on a policy front what's next for the Trump agenda? Given this moment, it's a distraction, obviously as it has been for every president who's head scandal. It takes them away from focusing on the policies before the men in the most immediate thing for this president. And this moment is that the federal government has six of its appropriations Bill seven of its appropriations bills that have not yet been done. And as a result of big chunks of the federal government have to shutdown on December the twenty first of that would be Christmas weekend. And and whatever else you may want for Christmas. No one wants a government shutdown from Christmas that President Trump. You'll be happy seem to have said that he would own the shutdown f it happened. There was this moment this week where he's in the Oval Office with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer heads of his opposition party and in front of cameras. He said if shutdown happens, and I don't get my wall funding shut it down lay me. I'll take. Okay, good. You know, what I'll say? Yes. If we don't get what we want one. Way or the other whether it's through you through a military through anything you want to call. I will shut down that guy. Okay. And I and I'll just three I am proud to shut down the government for border security because the people. Yes security, he said, meaning his full funding for the wall and the distractions of dealing with all these scandals are making it much more difficult for him to reach some kind of an agreement with Democrats in with his own party and keep the government open and resolve the border crisis. Speaking of Democrats, they are in a very interesting position. They did well in the midterms, but they've also been exceedingly cautious about what they will. Or won't say around the I word around impeachment. How aggressively will they pursue that? And when will we know if they will or not and also what policy can they hope to pursue in the midst of all of this as well. You know, they are also hampered by the other party still control in the other chamber. Yes. And they are also hampered by the lack of total consensus on their own side with what exactly they do want to pursue his policy..

President Trump federal government Bill Clinton burglary Chuck Schumer president White House Ron Joe perjury Nancy Pelosi Oval Office
"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"The donkey save Christmas visits his pythons with Don when they kill the because the rain can climb the hills of it the lead. Hey. It makes no sense the ringer fly. Dr. Camillo reindeer cannot fly. I've never heard that song in my life. But now it's going to be in my life forever. You're welcome. Thank you. So usually this is a part of the show where we each describe. How are we of news felt in only three words, but because we have a very special guest this week Ron Elving himself. And because it seems that there's one story line second up more and more of every new cycle. I wanted to use this time for new segment that I'm going to call ask Ron, okay? Well, I do have three words though, actually. Oh, exactly. What what I think we want to talk about? And okay three words are this feels different? I think that the entire experience about we have had up to now with Donald Trump is president has been unique and special and and not like anything quite we've ever experienced before. But it has certainly taken a turn and not just this week the real change. I think came on November six with the biggest win for Democrats in the house of representatives since the Watergate election, just my chance the Watergate election, and if you put that in presidential terms. It would be well compared to the last several decades of our presidential elections with something of a landslide. So it does feel different. And I wanna use this ask Ron segment to dig down on. Why we saw the president's former lawyer Michael Cohen sentenced to three years in prison this past week for some time. Now, Trump has been having to deal with multiple investigations in the last few weeks, we have seen more big revelations from two of those the special counsel investigation by Robert Muller and an investigation led by federal prosecutors in New York, Ron you mentioned the election. Why do these investigations in these storylines now feel different? Well, first off it takes time for these two ripen. Watergate started June of nineteen seventy-two Richard Nixon didn't resign until August of nineteen seventy four the investigation that led to the impeachment of Bill Clinton in the nineteen ninety s started years earlier in Arkansas, we've never had a president actually removed from office because no president impeached has been removed from office by vote of the Senate that takes two-thirds and no president has ever been impeached by a house majority of his own party, which why November six matters so much because the dams are in power now in the house, and they could probably do it. Can you have any questions for right? I have a question that sort of also connects to the big picture things feeling different moment, and that is is this normal. And how do we tell this is something that was really, you know, eating away at me bugging me. It's old news now. But when John Kelly was departure was formally announced from the White House. There was this. Really disorienting moment of like, wait is this crazy chaos from this White House, or is this like a normal routine thing that would happen with any presidency? And I feel like there's been so much wild news out of the White House that it's kind of hard to tell when things are actually normal. It's not unusual for a president to have more than one chief of staff in the course of a term, but it doesn't feel normal because they are going in such rapid fire fashion because they're being fired in a manner that seems to defy all decorum. But of course, in the end that doesn't really matter. It's just a stylistic thing. And it has worked for President Trump to defy a lot of those conventions of how things are supposed to be done hard to tell sometimes the difference between what's the difference in style. And what's actually a difference in substance? I mean me following along my head just spends time with all the political news. Yes. And I believe it is extremely difficult to always know the clear line between what is style, and what is substance. One of the reasons that the George H W Bush funeral was so heavily covered. And so, hey geographic. You know? I mean, people were worshipping at the man's feet..

president Donald Trump Ron Elving White House Dr. Camillo Watergate George H W Bush Don Robert Muller Bill Clinton Richard Nixon Senate special counsel Michael Cohen John Kelly New York
"elving" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to election Night Live from NPR news. I'm Sam Sanders. Joined now by NPR's, Ron Elving, Ron how are you? Good to be with you say my big question for you. Why does tonight seemed like such a mixed bag? You know, Democrats took the house, but they still had some really big symbolic losses. I'm talking about Gillam Abrahams and Beto it doesn't feel like a big win for them tonight. It doesn't because they put into place some states that not too long ago would not have been considered even remotely competitive, for example. Rick Scott was looking very strong as a Senate candidate against Bill Nelson. But what was really presumed was that, whomever? The Republicans nominated for governor would probably be very strong and the Democrats surprised everybody. By nominating Andrew killing the mayor of Tallahassee. There's an African American very charismatic and highly charismatic and surprisingly popular among Democrats. But of course, was going to face the usual presumption that it's going to be hard for an African American to be elected governor of Florida or for that matter for Stacey Abrams in Georgia as an African American woman to be elected, governor of Georgia. And then, of course, by a rock in Texas taking on Ted Cruz, always a long shot not long ago, considered to be very close to being the Republican nominee for president certainly the runner up to Donald Trump in the Republican party and somebody with national ambitions from the get-go and here he was suddenly on the ropes running against a guy. Nobody had ever heard of before this year. So all of those. If you will we're hell Mary passes to some degree for the Democrats. You can look at the demographics of those states and say eventually they're going to have so much Hispanic vote to go with our African American vote and their Democratic White vote that they will be much more competitive for the Democrats, but a hail Mary passing twenty eighteen but Gillam it's at some points was ahead by many points in what happened. Well, among other things polls aren't votes when you look at a midterm in particular, you have to assume that the presumption is anybody you talk to is not a voter because even if they say, they're voter, you know, that overwhelmingly most people aren't going to vote so polls in mid terms can be deceptive. And we also know that in the closing days in all of those states. There were a number of events. There were a number of tactics used there were advertisements of a highly misleading nature that were passed around very present there, and let's also give credit to the president. For having gone into all three of those states campaigned hard and also on a number of others. We might add Montana several times North Dakota. Indiana, all of which seemed to be going Republican right now for the Senate. Although Jon tester in Montana is still in the fight. We should we should we should make clear that the president went to Ohio as well. And in Ohio, the Republicans did surprisingly, well, although they did not win the Senate seat there. Thanks NPR's. Ron elving?.

Senate Ron Elving president Gillam Abrahams NPR Mary Sam Sanders Donald Trump Ohio Republican party Montana Georgia Rick Scott Bill Nelson Tallahassee Ted Cruz Stacey Abrams Florida
"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Much attention this week, and to do that we always have NPR's Ron Elving Ron good to be with you. So everything else that happened this week. President Trump signed sweeping legislation on Wednesday to address the opioid crisis. What was in that Bill? A rare moment of bipartisanship actually piece of legislation aimed at helping people prevent an overcome addictions in what has become the worst health crisis in this country in many years, and you know, it's hard to think of another domestic issue where President Obama pushed for legislation and provided funding and President Trump has followed up doing more of same reminder on the figures last year more than seventy thousand Americans died from a drug overdose. Opioids were responsible for about two thirds of those deaths. That's more than one hundred and fifteen Americans a day who die from opioids. So the house and Senate passed an opioid Bill with near-unanimous approval several weeks ago, but it was not actually signed into law until this week signed at the White House together we are going to end the score of drug addiction in America. We are going to end it or we are going to at least make an extremely big dent in this terrible terrible problem. So what are some specific things that this law does one of the factors cited in recent successes with controlling this scourge has been access to Medicaid coverage, which was expanded under the Affordable Care Act states. Taking advantage of that have seen some progress in reaching difficult cases among the poor. So one of the things this Bill does is to lift certain restrictions on the use of Medicaid and Medicare coverage to deal with opioid addictions at backs the creation of comprehensive opioid recovery centers tries to address the over prescription of opioids and many doctors appear to be getting the message on this. The new law also backs government research into non addictive drugs that could be used as alternatives for pain management alternative therapies additional measures, including new enforcement strength for the United States postal service. So that they can. Try to curtail some of these foreign shipments of illegal drugs into the United States. You mentioned some of the overwhelming statistics of how many people are dying from overdoses feel like almost every person in the country knows someone in one way or another who struggled with opioids. This Bill is signed into law at a time where we're seeing some signs that this crisis may have least be leveling off. Yes. That came from Alex czar, the secretary of the department of health and human services data for the first months of two thousand eighteen indicate that the number of opioid deaths is not increasing nearly as fast as in recent years, he used the word plateau, and that's certainly hopeful term. Maybe a few percentage points increase this year rather than say ten percent as we saw in the previous year in two thousand seventeen the number of Americans dying from opioids rose to seventy two thousand from sixty four thousand the previous year new data from the centers for disease control show. The numbers are not rising. As fast in the last month of seventeen and the first few months twenty eighteen. So if anything that the government has been doing can further that trend both parties seem to think that's worth doing. And that's at least one hopeful story this week. We're talking about how this is the rare period where we're both parties are on the same page. But that doesn't mean there hasn't been any criticism, right? That's right. And there was a lot of disagreement in the process of putting this together. People saying look what we need here is a tobacco up and take a much more holistic approach to the entire question. But just stitching together all these different programs that kind of pastiche of good intentions of. That's not going to be good enough. And that that may well be true. Some people say there needs to be a great deal. More money put into all of these programs that it's really just a drop in the bucket against the size of the problem as we've seen, but here again, the consensus in the end was let's pass what we can. Let's put as many dollars in as we can if we can only agree on that stitch together patchwork of programs. Let's at.

America President Trump Bill United States Ron Elving Ron drug overdose NPR President Obama White House department of health Medicaid secretary Senate Medicare ten percent
Pepsi’s outgoing CEO Indra Nooyi deserves credit for the company’s big push into snacks

The Takeaway

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Pepsi’s outgoing CEO Indra Nooyi deserves credit for the company’s big push into snacks

"Many ways save the takeaway we'll be, right back after these headlines Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor, Johnston testimony has resumed in the trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort NPR's Ron Elving reports the, jury could hear from, manafort's longtime business partner Rick gates as early as today. Rick h is the key point he's the pivotal point the Lynch pin of this trial the prosecution has already put out a lot of evidence that Manafort made millions move them around to fool people about their source defrauding banks hiding them from taxation and what we're expecting from gates that he'll give us a great deal more detail. And he'll tell us perhaps a little. Bit more about the cast of characters the sources of that income and the defense is going to try to paint gates. As the bad guy who did all the bad stuff and hid the money even from. Paul Manafort whom they, will claim was not guilty of knowing, about any of this NPR's Ron Elving reporting. Metaphor does facing eighteen counts of tax. And Bank fraud. The trial is expected to last about three weeks several tech companies have started blocking content from controversial media personality alex jones from their media platforms joseph lahey from member station k. u. t. reports facebook says it's taken down four pages administered by jones for repeated violations of the company's community standards those included language glorifying violence and dehumanizing people who are transgender muslim or immigrants also today apple confirmed its i tunes platform will no longer offer five podcast series hosted by jones because they violated the company's hate speech guidelines spotify and youtube have also taken similar actions to block his content jones is facing multiple defamation lawsuits in texas district court for making false claims regarding the school massacre in newtown connecticut and parkland florida for n._p._r. news i'm joseph lahey in austin pepsi's long-serving chief injure a new ye is stepping down new He is a rare minority female CEO whose tenure lasted a. Dozen years NPR's, Yuki Noguchi reports she'll be succeeded by another Pepsi veteran Raymond LaGuardia, the sixty two year. Old new year stepping, down as. CEO in October and will remain as chairman into the early, part of next year during her. Tenure new you push the company to expand at. Snack and soft drink empire to include healthier foods as consumer tastes were shifting in that direction she. Helped add products, such as, HAMAs and coconut water to Pepsi's line and its. Stock rose, eighty percent. During her tenure the Indian-born new Ye grew up during food shortages and in a statement called leading Pepsi the honor of. Her lifetime low quarter who replaces her is president of. The company and has been there for twenty two years you can Gucci NPR news stocks are trading higher on Wall Street, at, this hour the Dow is up. Thirty four points the NASDAQ, up thirty, eight the. SNP up nine this is NPR news And this is WNYC, in New York good. Afternoon I'm Sean Carlson New York governor Andrew Cuomo is robust ping the National Rifle rifle association's claim that he tried to put the organization out. Of business by banning sales of an insurance product called carry guard the NRA, says it lost tens of millions, of dollars after New York regulators curb the sale of carry guard which is meant to. Cover the legal fees, for people, who fire weapon in self defense but on MSNBC's morning Joe today Cuomo said the NRA had. Been providing insurance of gun owners who had knowingly broke the law I believe this insurance product is going to be. Illegal from a public policy point, of view and most most states and, now that the NRA said this is. A major. Source of revenue I'm going to pursue it nationwide Cuomo says he's reaching out to other governors. And attorneys general to also ban the. Product city and state officials took a bus ride from Williamsburg to Manhattan this morning. To get a taste of what a commute during the l.. Train shutdown will look like, state Senator Brad Holman said after the ride that he's. Concerned about the pollution. From all the buses, that'll be traveling, up and down fourteenth street. In the morning making up for the loss of the subway we.

Paul Manafort Paul Manafort Npr Andrew Cuomo NPR NRA Austin Pepsi Yuki Noguchi CEO Pepsi Manhattan Alex Jones Ron Elving Chairman Rick Gates Senator Brad Holman President Trump Gucci Npr Washington Rick H Joseph Lahey
Lawyers welcome U.S. court order to slow deportations of separated families

Fresh Air

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Lawyers welcome U.S. court order to slow deportations of separated families

"Vivid Albertine guitarist and lyricist for one of the first all women, punk bands the British band, the slits. Now she's a writer and has just published her second memoir the slits worked hard, not to copy popular male bands and dressed in ways that defied ideas of what is feminine and sexy on the street band members were literally attacked. I'll singer who was fourteen fifteen when we first got together with stop twice in front of me by men, starved for looking like she looked Albertine is in her sixties now has been married, divorced, survived cancer, raised her daughter and stayed best friends with her mother who died for years ago. We'll talk about her life today and what her punk aesthetic and anger mean to her now and David in Cooley reviews a new HBO documentary about Robin Williams. That's on fresh air. First news Live from NPR news. In Washington I'm. Lakshmi. Singh President Donald Trump is drawing bipartisan criticism after he appeared to cast doubt on Russia's interference in the two thousand sixteen. Presidential election NPR's Scott Horsely has more on what Trump said and didn't say during today's joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin after their one on one in Helsinki lawmakers from both parties are lining up to say what the. President did not that they believe the assessment of US intelligence that Russia interfered in the two thousand, sixteen election, Tennessee Republican Bob corker who heads the Senate Foreign Relations committee said Trump's equivocation on that point makes the US look like a pushover and. Democratic leader Chuck Schumer suggested darkly Putin may hold damaging information on Trump the president insists that, isn't so and I have to say if they had it would've been out. Long ago Russia's president was asked directly if he has compromising material on. Trump Putin sidestepped. The question Scott Horsely NPR news Washington in his first remarks since departing Helsinki Trump tweets that he has. Quote great confidence, in. His intelligence people however he goes on to tweet we cannot exclusively focused on the past as the world's two large nuclear, powers we must get along a tweet from President Trump a short time ago as Air Force One makes its way back to joint base Andrews NPR's Ron Elving reports Trump's to meet around Putin appeared friendlier than when he met with. NATO members last week those are our allies twenty eight other countries with whom we are allied largely, against the, threat posed I by the Soviet Union now by the Russian federation under Vladamir Putin and we did not seem to have anything like the. Same kind of chummy relationship with many of those leaders and the staging of much of it brought that out that's NPR's Ron Elving a federal judge in California has temporarily. Halted the deportation of immigrant families that have been reunited after being separated. By the Trump administration NPR's Joel rose reports that decision came from, the same judge who ordered the government to reunite the, families the government is working to reunite roughly two thousand. Five, hundred and fifty immigrant children. With their parents by court order deadline of July twenty sixth what will happen. To those families after reunification is unclear lawyers for the American Civil Liberties union which brought. The lawsuits say they're concerned about rumors of mass deportations, of families that have just been reunited in response judge Dana Subroto said he would order a temporary halt. To deportations for a, week until lawyers for the government can respond to the ACLU's motion the Trump administration says it has reunified all eligible children under the age of five. And it submitted a plan to reunify older children ahead of next week steady line Joel rose NPR news before the close the Dow was up forty five points at. Twenty five thousand. Sixty four the NASDAQ was down twenty points at seventy eight oh five SNP was off two points this is NPR from geeky weedy news Amina Kim San Francisco transportation officials are expected to. Vote tomorrow on a ban on tour buses in. Front of. One of the city's famous. Homes key cuties Michelle Wiley has more The house featured on the ninety s sitcom full house and recent Netflix reboot fuller, house is a major tourist attraction Neighbors say the crowds are relentless visiting day and. Night now the San Francisco MTA, is set to vote on. Whether or not they'll band tour buses on the street. But resident Carla has Hagen says buses aren't the real problem we have people standing. On the street to take pictures we have people double parking..

Singh President Donald Trump Vladimir Putin Andrews Npr President Trump Russia NPR American Civil Liberties Union Joel Rose Helsinki Washington Scott Horsely Writer Ron Elving HBO San Francisco Albertine Chuck Schumer Bob Corker United States
U.S. government says it will detain migrant children with parents

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:10 min | 2 years ago

U.S. government says it will detain migrant children with parents

"Try to do that later npr's ron elving thanks so much thank you scott government says it wants to hold migrant families in detention until their immigration cases complete now that's according to court papers filed late last night should be a big change from past practice because a longstanding court agreement limited the detention of children twenty days the latest move by the trump administration to try to curtail the flow of migrants arriving at the us border in the southern border and it's likely spark a fresh round of legal challenges and barriers joel rose joins us now joe thanks for being with us sure scott the trump administration has backed down from the practice of separating families at the border but they're still about two thousand migrant children in the government's care they have been separated from apparent what is this what does this mean for them well we've been waiting to understand how the government plans to reunify those families that were separated as a result of the administration's zero tolerance policy at the southwest border a federal judge this week gave the administration a very tight deadline told them to reunite those families within thirty days and if the children are younger than five within fifteen days and now we know how the government wants to do that they could the administration has the option of releasing these parents from immigration detention letting them live in the us pending their dates in immigration court but that is not what the in ministration says it wants and these court filings the government makes clear it wants to detain these children along with their parents instead of releasing them wherever these families be detained well the government is running out of space in detention centers for migrant families there are two facilities in texas to detain migrant families but they're at about eighty percent capacity so the government is moving ahead with another option the department of defense announced this week that it plans to start building to tent encampments in texas one at fort bliss in el paso specifically for migrant families so these families may be headed to that post in el paso but the courts have said children could only be held for twenty days right what what what happens thereafter well the government is trying to reconcile instructions from two different courts here one of them is the federal court ruling out this week ordering them to reunify these families and the other is what is known as the florez settlement which limits how long children can be held in jail like settings to about three weeks so in order to comply with the first ruling the government says it needs to hold families longer as long as it takes her their immigration court proceedings to play out and that can sometimes take months even years now i should say it is not at all clear if the judge overseeing the florist settlement will sign off on any of this she could approve longterm detention but she could also order that the parents be released with their children that they'd be monitored with gps ankle bracelets to ensure that they show up in court immigrant rights advocates are already urging the judge to reject the government's plan and their filing last night they say there's no reason to lift the limits and florez just to remedy the chaos as they put it that was caused by the administration's decision to separate these families in the first place and rights advocates also note that the same judge rejected a similar request from the obama administration just a few years ago and they say nothing on the ground has really changed since then joel the the reality not just the idea of separating and detaining families has sparked an outpouring of outrage across the country going to be a number of protests today aren't there yeah immigrant rights advocates are horrified they say detaining these children even with their parents is profoundly harmful they point out that these are mostly asylum seekers largely women and children from central america who are fleeing from violence in their home countries and immigrant rights advocates say we can do better that these migrants should be allowed to stay in the us to ask for asylum and they should be allowed to be free until those claims are heard protests are planned today in washington dc on the brooklyn bridge in new york and in dozens of towns and other cities all across the country npr's joel rose thanks so much you're welcome in annapolis maryland last night where students held a candlelight vigil to remember five employees of the capital gazette.

NPR Ron Elving Twenty Days Eighty Percent Fifteen Days Thirty Days Three Weeks
"elving" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Harming hillary clinton's presidential campaign in two thousand sixteen with cooperation with what he calls the subcontractors at wikileaks he refers to russian trolls and he speaks again and again about what he sees as the destruction of american political values by such things as conservative talk radio and people on the internet that he says ought to seek psychiatric help so no he's not apologizing bruni of the things that they didn't like does he right as a person who sounds as though he is at home in his political party at this moment he writes as a person who is at home in his chosen state arizona at home with his family at home and at peace with himself but sadly not comfortable with where his party has gone on a range of issues from immigration to human rights to america's role in the world that's npr's ron elving ron thank you thank you you're listening to wnyc liz fair burst onto the indie rock scene back in one thousand nine hundred eighty three rattling the music industry with her graphic and feminist lyrics fair was a bit of an outsider and she didn't conform to what a cool underground woman was supposed to be like twenty five years later a closer look at liz fares classic debut album is coming up next it's still sunny and hot out there tonight a low around seventy degrees currently ninety one degrees in central park at four thirty at wnyc we rely on the listener support but what exactly does that mean hi i'm jacqueline cincotta the program director wnyc to me listener support means you're a partner with us the news the information the types of conversations you hear on wnyc without your contribution it doesn't happen and you know i like it that way we.

hillary clinton bruni arizona partner america npr ron elving liz fair jacqueline cincotta program director ninety one degrees twenty five years seventy degrees
"elving" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Mister elving gets a whole big thing they get a parade in their honor in in in disneyland disneyland disneyland again in a rival party or watch you get a whole bunch of stuff but this year's mr relevant was a guy named trey quinn who was a wide receiver at smu so he was the second smu wide receiver drafted obviously portland sutton right the bigger wide receiver went to denver in the second round but trey quinn is very interesting guy besides having an awesome first name he started out at lsu where he didn't really fit in but then he had one season at smu in his one season smu is worked out he might as well ahead four seasons sub morales hundred fourteen catches for over twelve hundred yards and thirteen touchdowns so that right alone makes him not really irrelevant he was very relevant with the smu offense but he did stuff way before this it also made him interest let's go back to two thousand eight let's go to the little league world series he threw a no hitter yeah in the opening round of that little league world series in williamsport in two thousand eight so this guy can do a little bit he loves and he went to washington with that final pick so look trey quit i i'm i'm not going to back poop on it drake wind is making washington ross when when the draft was when i was playing in the draft was twelve rounds of you're low round pick the odds were they weren't gonna to keep your house a tenth rounder and the odds are against you there are seven rounds now so the odds are better that the drafted players you know obviously the early ones but even the later ones you know fifth sixth seventh round still have a pretty good shot to make the team because it down to seven rounds and then we see undrafted free agents make it all the time.

disneyland trey quinn lsu smu williamsport Mister elving portland denver washington twelve hundred yards
"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Strikes meanwhile npr's ron elving says president trump is being criticized by some of his own supporters who camp as trump campaigned on a motto of quote america first and decried usa involvement in overseas conflicts the president has indeed been attacked on just those grounds this morning by number of bloggers and talk show hosts on the right they were calling him donald bush and asking if hillary clinton had secretly taken over and it doesn't help that the president himself this morning used the phrase mission accomplished a phrase made famous for its premature use by george w bush and the iraq war that's npr's ron elving gun rights advocates are holding rallies in several state capitals this weekend to push back against von gun violence protesters organizers want participants to bring unloaded rifles this is npr from cake amedee news i'm tiffany cam high as we've been hearing all morning the united states along with france in the uk attacked what are said to be chemical weapons related facilities in syria in a press conference last night president donald trump said the strikes were in response to a deadly chemical attack last weekend by the assad government against innocent civilians on the line with us now is peninsula congresswoman jackie speier who sits on the house armed services committee congresswoman a bipartisan group of your colleagues in congress in a letter last night president trump urging him to receive authorization from congress before ordering additional use of force in syria do you think president trump should have gotten that authorization before last night strike without question somewhat argue that what happened last night was an illegal strike because he did not coordinate with congress in the authorisation of use of military force now secretary mattis argued that under article two he has that authority but he only has that authority when americans are in imminent danger and i don't think you can make that argument here in your opinion was this strike necessary first of all i will say this about the president's actions last night for once he did it in conjunction with our other allies which i think is very important to it was strategic third it appears that.

congress mattis assad donald trump iraq george w bush donald bush ron elving npr secretary america jackie speier syria uk france united states hillary clinton president
"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is a way for the holiday he regularly blasted as the failing new york times that president trump could not resistant impromptu sitdown interview with one of its reporters nbr senior washington editor and correspondent ron elving joins me now to offer some insight under what that interview revealed and what battles the president will be fighting in the new year however on always good to your bores linda thank you the president constantly lumps the times in with other media outlets he perceives to be critical of him as fake news so why does times reporter michael schmidt get so much of his time this was something of an accidental interview it wasn't on anybody's schedule but it just happened because it had been invited down there a bio trump confidante who set it up uh the president after all of its remember is a born new yorker he's a longtime manhattan night so his personality kind of needs the oxygen of the new yorker sms every day he does read a lot of other things for affirmation or to gauge public sentiment and information but he still looks to the times to gauge his own stature it's important to be in the paper to be on page one and when he is he is affirmed he is the most important person in the world well what was the take away for you from that interview you know it was full of tential quotations and news bits this is what the president does as a media star he dominates the daily news cycle but you had to be struck by his repeated self exoneration in a probe of russian election interference about every other minute in this interview literally sixteen times by several people's count in a 30minute interview he said there was quote no collusion unquote the same words over and over no collusion between his campaign and the interfering russians justin assertion he just repeated at he'd never gave in the evidence to that effect this is a kind of ad technique repeating a phrase like lowest prices of free shipping and there's also that line from shakespeare if i may paraphrase dot the gentleman protest too much now we're had.

trump editor president other media outlets times michael schmidt new yorker shakespeare new york ron elving reporter manhattan justin 30minute
"elving" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The out thanks for hanging on what can i do for elving that are lower oh my gosh i'm so sorry you've very patient thank you anyway what i wanted to ask you are not wife about they're getting burn between uh eat echo and the gugel home i have an amdro hey and i would also dinovite for my kids and may have i uh so that doesn't matter although though because you have android you might know a little bit more about what the echoed uh the go home does cause essentially the google home is the same thing as the ghul assistant in your android found you ever talked to your android phone uh i'm budo yeah yeah you say you know you say okay go rule and ask a question that's basically the exactly the same as the google home so anything you it's a good way to practice z if it's useful there is a significant difference and capabilities uh amazon's eco came out two years before goodwill home did the idea is basically the same of their little little device with a speaker and a and a with the con a ray microphone six or seven or sometimes even more microphones that are designed for picking up your voice even at a distance so you can talk across the room to it and they're very accurate uh they both have trigger words uh hey google or okay google for the goodwill home for the amazon echo there's a variety of them including alexa echoed oh amazon and computer you get to choose that you so you say the trigger word and then uh depending on how you said it sometimes they go boop sometimes they don't you can have it either way and then you speak usually i just will say onesentence i will say hey echo what time is it in a and botswana and then shall respond both they're pretty good at basic things like that the goal is better for facts so for instance last night we we were wondering when's the last time the dodgers won the world series and.

amazon google dodgers world series android alexa botswana two years
"elving" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Elving hand the reward will be all yours chefs are coming up soon eighteen forty five the first baseball team the new york knickerbockers organise young at his final career victory number five hundred eleven this week nights sweden 1928 chicago grand jury convened to investigate charges that he played such players conspired to fix the 1919 world series teeing bvb race in a battle of the sexes tennis match also this media 1973 he 1980 richard of the jets set event nfl record of forty two complete passes and in news time four l eight here's tracy john honky add bloomberg mary wall street opened two down and sp records and closes there the dow up sixty three points at its fifth straight high twenty two thousand three thirty one the sp up three at 25 four the nasdaq spent most of the day in record territory bad to ended a few points short of making a new high though was up six points for the day the dow's record is thanks to record highs for caterpillar and boeing analysts are predicting a u s construction boom and a global comeback in mining and they are also expecting greater demand for caterpillars big trucks and earthmovers chipmaker irs drove the nasdaq and sp gains nvidia chips are seen at the center of some of the hottest areas in tech including artificial intelligence and video games and that stock climbed to a record business reports dayton 38 past the hour i'm tracy junkie bloomberg business on wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time four ten it is his second court appearance in four days for the fire chief in ipswich wbz's bernice corpus says the latest charge involves an alleged domestic incident last year gregory gagged then didn't say anything as he left the courthouse but he pleaded not guilty to a charge of strangulation authorities say he choked a woman in 2016 but the allegations sir fist only recently after he was accused of assaulting the same woman last thursday in court gag been waived his right to a dangerous this hearing he was ordered to be released to a mental health facility in battled are over mahd but there was no mention about his mental condition in lull bernice corp who's wbz newsradio 1030 more boston college students prayed with acid over the weekend in france are said to be doing fine after being treated at a local hospital wbz's ben parker has more on the students and.

france ipswich artificial intelligence nvidia irs tracy john honky chicago sweden new york baseball ben parker world series bernice corp gregory bernice corpus fire chief dayton sp boeing nasdaq dow nfl four days four l
"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sugar and we all know we should walk more patty name and got the latest research on just how bad sitting is for you today is monday september forth on this day and nineteen seventy two mark spitz won his seven swimming gold in munich and in his next live from npr news in washington on norodom president trump is expected to announce tomorrow his decision on daca the deferred action for childhood arrivals the obama program allows immigrants brought into this country illegally as children to stay and work by receiving two year renewable work permits npr's ron elving reports the president is expected to end the program but not right away is latest friday we were being told the president had not finally made up his mind with respect to what to do in the immediate future several news outlets though are saying that he has decided to end the program that is too to remove the current protection for the dreamers people who came here before they were sixteen often with their parents but there will be exceptions for certain countries and there will be a phase president will give congress six months to pass legislation if congress really wants to save daca or replace it npr's ron elving members of congress returned work tomorrow after their summer recess lawmakers must pass a comprehensive spending bill to keep the government in business after the fiscal year ends september 30th they must also raise the debt limit to keep the us from defaulting on its debts congress is also expected to approve spending seven point nine billion dollars to help texas recover from hurricane harvey texas governor greg abbott says parts of his state are open for business again but npr's brian man reports many companies are still struggling to get back on line amid ryan guests the computer repairman as he was racing off to try to help another hotel get back up and running and over to a super eight hotel there are no down us army just contacted them to go stay there but they need someone out there fixed their internet before that can happen that stories playing out over and over with companies.

mark spitz washington trump npr ron elving president congress fiscal year texas greg abbott munich obama brian man nine billion dollars six months two year
"elving" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"elving" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm janine herbs former homeland security secretary general john kelly takes on the job of white house chief of staff next week he's taking the place of rights priebus whom president trump fired friday previous was the chair of the republican national committee before trump tapped him for the job in many say the two just never gelled there were also complaints that too many people had access to the president the chief of staff usually puts controls on who gets to see him and fears ron elving says general kelly could bring more order we would expect the general to impose some discipline blew the whistle on the crowd gene as you describe it sort of sorting out the various cats in the bag in restoring some kind of since hierarchy of chain of command borrow military term and beers ron elving and president trump is once again threatening to end required payments to insurance companies if congress does not repeal and replace the affordable care act trump tweeting today if a new healthcare bill is not approve quickly bailouts for insurance companies will end soon he estimated seven billion dollar a year subsidies help reduce costs including deductibles for people with low incomes republicans are challenging the payments in cordoned trump has only guaranteed them through the month julie rob nur from cow kaiser health news has more the administration is literally deciding every month whether or not it's going to provide those funds and what insurers have said is that because of the uncertainty of that alone that they're asking for a increases of twenty percent for next year right now there are about forty counties where there is no ensured i think over a thousand counties where there's only one insurer.

washington trump president insurance companies congress npr secretary general john kelly white house chief of staff ron elving seven billion dollar twenty percent