6 Burst results for "Elvin Howard"

"elvin howard" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"elvin howard" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"In their. Finish Youtuber to each other. Nonsense I'm in the trenches the point I want to make to you gentlemen. Is I walk. Seventeen miles of the snow I seen the ending. Wow Elvin Howard five million Ryan Times. Yeah I've seen the last two minutes of that film more than any other movie at every staff and it took me until maybe three years ago to actually watch them. Yeah Yeah See I. My father loved this movie and my father in upcoming guests on the show we have the banks. It's quite a barn burner if if you like monologues by Jewish men is we just got great one right it is generally ask hour and a half long monologue by my father. Talking about spalding gray. It also will explain a lot of my brain. Yes and also why we're friends which all sort of rakes. Yeah you see the similarities between my father and my ever Lucien of new line that Ben wanted to blow and then calls US Beta Cox. Yeah but they're my father talks about in the episode that he was not a big movie guy. Despite working they are tame ministry which was sort of something he fell into did not I want to do. After many other careers had failed him at that point So I would always ask. My Dad was his favorite movies. Where because I only care about movies. There were the only thing I wanted to talk about. I'm like my dad. Works in the movie business. He must love them and he'd be like not really but the movies he would tell me he loved were. I mean this is kind of my dad's favorite type of movie sure. which is this very very sort of Seemingly slight small well observed human story with just a little bit of an odd bent and he would describe movies to me as a child where I'd go. What's that about? I think. Melvin Howard Hollywood movies. What's that about? And the way he would describe it to me would Seem so odd that it would stick in my mind for years and years and years before I ever saw them. We Brewster mccloud was another one like this where I'd go. What's the movie about? And he would say it's it's about this guy who's just kind of loser and he picks up an old man on the side of the road and it turns out to be Howard Hughes and he leaves him one hundred and sixty million dollars so he goes to the movies about him getting really rich at a nowhere and he was like no that happens at the very end the movie is just kind of the guy living his life and I would think I don't understand how that's a movie so it must be good? That would be my take away when I was. That's what made it seem magical to me. I was like whatever happens. Pins in the middle stretch of that movie. See Right incredible setup an amazing ending. There must be something so well executed. Because I don't understand how that can sustain ninety minutes you know and so would hold the sort of mythical place in my brain of what is this movie and it just sort of felt like I have in my head this sort flake. The folklore version of a laugh. A minute you know thrills and chills and you see it's kind of a shaggy dog must have been somewhat Shaggy Jaggi because you know the the inciting incident then takes an hour and a half to play out where I was like. There aren't hijinks tied to the Big Hook of the movie in order for that movie to be that good. Something has to be done so well in area that you're not even describing to me. That's what was Kinda magical talk about. I guess was that he couldn't describe what happened. In the whole Middle Chunk of the movie it would be hard to describe. I mean how would you describe it. It's like just kind of life. He's got the one wife and kids. ALZA party gets another wife actually kind of tries to make big a couple of times like brushes up against so you know tiny bits of man for a little while right good milkman. A bit like it's just been Yeti and sort of this and that the other movie that's sort of like this for me is terms of endearment. Why feel like everyone remembers the beginning? The humongous watches that movie. And it's like isn't this movie about someone getting cancer and dying and it's like no only right at the end. She gets cancer in the last ten minutes. Mostly it's just about her life mostly it's just about her life and different relationship. She has all these different things right. And it's like well that's the real meat of the thing but that's the hard thing to explain so everyone reduces it to right. What's the setup overbearing mother? What's the end cancer weepy? What's the setup this beautiful sort of meeting between You know nothing man and billionaire right. And what's the end he gets the will you know for like a second but knowing never but it's it's the same thing and that's like you talk about. What makes a good director what makes a good screenplay? What makes a good performance? It's all this stuff in the middle and the middle is ninety five percent of the movie is so gripping and so engaging and so emotional and there's there's no way to explain why it is because it's all just done well it's well observed you know it's done with like an incredible amount of intelligence and craft aft and also has like weird twists that you go with like yeah. They're watching a game show and he's like we should go on the game and then they go on the game show which is which is based in fact right. That's in the wikipedia page but it is. I mean it's a stranger than than truth story of what all the weird things this guy went through that he got married twice on the second time time was in Vegas to his wife who had left him got pregnant by another man. You know good that I relate to this character. Oh totally yeah I mean I think that's what I guess. The ultimate cash in on this movie is this is sort of the Goldman blank check. Because he had done Cuckoo's nest won the Oscar screenwriters and I do think this was his big pet project project he wins another Oscar for the screenplay but I think much like Ebert guess this was such a big news story that probably everyone was. How do you make a movie movie out of the lawsuit? How do you make a movie out of the trial right? He ignored that title card at the end. It's still under content which it was until two thousand six. It was still being contested. Ask someone wrote a book in the nineties. He sued again in the two. Thousands died just a year ago. A whole problem was that was never a real so it could they could just kind of drag drag it out forever right. This is the only thing the reason purporting was even purporting to be a very compelling narrative on both sides which were Hughes's people were saying then why would he leave it to this guy. This thing is riddled with spelling errors. It has a bunch of things that don't line up with his life. Why would he leave money to this guy this stuff that anyone could have researched in a book his wife? I've had access to all these documents. She could have copied his signature all this stuff and on Melvin side. It's like these guys wanted that money for themselves right right. They didn't WANNA give it up to some fucking guy. They never heard of me to stop funding the wonderful reality of this movie but he definitely made the wheel. It's like the evidence it gets if it's completely damning and there's no evidence that he that he would you read about this book though. That book is ludicrous. It has the most insane circumstantial like yeah. Well this one Guy Kinda saw him go to the sand one time like it's not very good. Also that Hughes had told other people about yeah. Yeah sure maybe he met Howard News. Yeah right whilst you have the idea of four refuses. Howard Hughes's will look? I think he probably made the will. But that is the beauty of this movie movie which is why not make a story about that being real. That's that's what I love about this. Moving right yeah. You don't really have to think about the real guys real this movies about the guy who actually got this you know they just said well yeah right. I'm doing a little research. I think Melvin himself MM self was on. Let's make it. They change it for the movie. It's not. Let's make a deal. It's the pathway to riches or something What's it called? Not a road to riches easy streets easy street with the dollar sign instead of that's what it is but I think he was on. He was literally on. Let's let's make. Yeah yeah something like that but I think he was on more than once or he was a multiple a great. It's a great scheme game shows. There was a little stretch of my life when I saw game shows. It was my my my window into Fortune really yeah. I was on a game show which game show I will offer so I was almost on jeopardy. Okay and I would've would've guessed you seem like you'd kill had a disaster of time when I made it past one does not simply walk into jeopardy mm-hmm but I screwed up. I could not remember John Grisham. 's name John. Grisham is not exactly Esoteric Fella quite famous especially and I could see his dumb books in my head. I could see you can feel the Lamar by half the pages. Sean Chris I saw you know frigging crews in the firm coaster greatest film of all. This is not that good to firm interesting opinion out and then I just and then I was done knocked me out because he went to get past that sort of the final audition fast. What game show where I was born a show very relevant I was on a show called the What was the exact title? The all the were were. What was it called? The Great American film fanatic or something like that. The world's biggest film fanatic or it wasn't it was at the. IFC Chris Gore. I know I watched every episode of that. Then you saw me. I definitely did. I was first season and I won my semi final one five grand and that's when I decided ride. It was that night in Los Angeles and it was funny because I was I. I'm from New York. I'm from New York to Los Angeles Aj Berry cold at New York. And I was in an outdoor swimming pool in February during a saying to.

Howard Hughes cancer John Grisham New York Melvin Howard Hollywood Elvin Howard US Oscar Ben Chris Gore Shaggy Jaggi Melvin side Brewster mccloud Los Angeles Sean Chris I Howard News Goldman Ryan Times Melvin
"elvin howard" Discussed on Dateline NBC

Dateline NBC

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"elvin howard" Discussed on Dateline NBC

"As the sun was coming up over the Mississippi that Cole February morning the family and friends of Chiquita Tate were converging on the street his legal assistant lessee huck Finn was stopped on the street outside by an officer and he saw me coming so he came toward me and grab the mean pretty much to hold me up because I was going down and that's when he told me she was dead Chiquita's loved ones were huddled together when veteran homicide detectives Chris Johnson and Elvin Howard rolled up to the scene so there's responding officers told you that's the husband over there but he's in ethics for you you have been approached him yet that's correct he was upset to the point where uniformed patrol had to put him in the back of of the unit could you go up at that point no time we try to get as much information as possible the police wanted to create a time line of Chiquita's last day at one that's where workers were refinishing a bookcase lessee left at her regular time about five thirty and she remembers being concerned about the smell of varnish I said Kita don't stay in here too late because the smell was just overpowering she says I'm not going to stay in here late I'm just GonNa read this but she did stay late Chiquita's husband Greg told police his wife called him around seven or so and asked him to please bring her something to eat so we set out from their home and Baker about twenty five minutes away then he said he went to the downloads and Baker and got some hamburgers and fries and brought it to Shaquille and our office Greg told the cops he encountered a number of tenants in the building working late that he remembered running downstairs on a small Erin for his wife I had a client that was coming over to pick up some money so he went downstairs to to pay declined and pick up some paperwork from his person force Akita Greg said Chiquita had more work to do and yet another client AC- so he said he took off for home was some time around eight thirty and what happened next was applauding mystery it would be up to the detectives and also Prime Burns to figure out the attorney hearing the awful news on her Iheartradio that morning the one got such a kick out of Chiquita in court was in fact a legendary Baton Rouge prosecutor my boss the district attorney was out there there were so many police officers there the crime scene Van was there and so I went into that and immediately said to my boss I want this I want to ski ice premise insistent as she always does on viewing the crime scene as she entered the office she noticed Chiquita had been fixing things up but then when you proceed into the next room where her body was I was like Oh my lord she was butchered she was butchered she was laying on the floor she had little slipper socks on her feet the way all of us would be if we stay after work we're not gonNA keep our heels on basically had a law book that I think she had been reading that was in her hands at the time the attack began Chiquita had been stabbed forty three times the attack was brutal and messy the bloodstained wall suggesting a fight to the death did you have a murder weapon no the killer had him probably vanished without leaving a trail and at first glance hadn't taken anything either she had expensive jurors still on on didn't look like a robbery however as crime scene techs processed the scene the investigators realized Chiquita's wallet was missing from her purse and they're in the uh-huh hand what looked like a major clue and her left hand was opened there was a piece of hair in it now actually ninety one strands of hair in it and her right arm was over her head and she just she just died like that had she pulled it from her killer Dan the hair was long had the killer been a woman what we're theories what do you think happened I actually did not come to any conclusions I can think of who would have wanted her dead Chiquita's father-in-law Suva Ray Harris admired her courage but wondered about the kind of clients who came with her line says he can't understand how anyone could do such a thing heartless completely to do her that away when I get on my knees at night I pray he'll get justice police were confident they would get their man or woman suitable for framing sees the wild on the side of the road the missing wallet and that mystery clump of hair what might it reveal if you're in a fight and pull someone's hair out you're gonna find root hairs so the scenario that occurs to me that this the woman that's in this society exactly.

Mississippi Chiquita Tate twenty five minutes
"elvin howard" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 3 years ago

"elvin howard" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Sir. This is democracy. Now democracy now or the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman with one gun solace with part two of today's edition of fifty years ago that right fifty years ago this week, the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention in Chicago became a national spectacle as a major political event turned into chaos that culminated with a police riot, much of it unfolding on live national television. While Hubert Humphrey was nominated as the democratic candidate in nineteen sixty eight inside despite the fact he didn't run in any primaries outside was where the news was where police were clubbing teargassing thousands of protesters. For more. We continue our interviews with Bobby Seale founding chairman, Black Panther party was in the protests at the beginning in Chicago. Bill Ayers was arrested on August twenty seven fifty years ago and Bernardine Dohrn both Bernardine and Bill longtime activists for peace and racial Justice, former SDS that students for a democratic society and whether underground members. I mean, he Goodman with Juan Gonzalez one? Yes. Yes. With Bobby Seale again to follow up a Bobby on the conversation. We were having that the end of our previous segment when you were talking about how once Richard Nixon was elected president, he ordered. His aides to begin immediate eradication of the Black Panther party. One of the interesting things that most people are not aware of is that years later report came out in the New York Times that the f. b. i. had conducted a CPR secret poll among black Americans and found that more than twenty five percent of African Americans were supporters of the Black Panther party felt that the Black Panther party was fighting. Their interest is significant portion of the America of the African American population of this country was supportive of of your revolutionary organization. And yet as you were saying Nixon immediately ordered that you be crushed, could you talk about what happened in that first few years of the Nixon administration to the panther party. Exactly the year of nineteen sixty nine is the year. Now, remember I said he had a meeting with j. Edgar Hoover and Jade ago who were in the December the first week of December stated nationally on television that we were threat to the internal, the blackout, the party is a threat to the internal security of America. Come come. What was February seventeenth seventeenth. John a buddy Carter and John Huggins will murdered at UCLA. They were the leaders of the black path to party and loss Angeles California now. But she Carter really had gotten out of his gang group. 'cause he, he ran a three thousand member gang and he created a political organization call wretched of the earth delay to become and he later became rub. They headed up to southern California chapter the black part in the Los Angeles community. Eric, the what I'm trying to say here is that. That was the first attack on the part of the power structure using the us organization, etcetera. In a conflict situation to kill and murder. The leaders of the Los Angeles chapter, the blackout, the party do that process in the next three or four months. They attack more than twenty two offices I'm talking about in Indiana. I'm talking about the, they blew up the office and demands. I will literally got the crew Clinton of blew up that blow up that building. And I'm telling you. In San Diego brother. Bell was opening up to San Diego office at eight AM in the morning, and the police and FBI came jumped out of cars and came into place and shot him dead killing murdering. So I'm just says that period of tacking by the end of that year with the murder of Fred Hampton and then the shootout in Los Angeles, four days later after that cetera I have in my organization, I had twenty eight dead blackout to party members sixty nine wounded and defending ourselves. We defended ourselves and many of these attacks. By the end of that year, fourteen police were kill because we shot back when they came in shooting in us. We did not play. We shot back

Bobby Seale Black Panther party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John McCain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama national association of black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill bill
"elvin howard" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 3 years ago

"elvin howard" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So there you have a wreath of Franklin singing inside criticized by the white establishment for jazzing up the song, but two years later in nineteen seventy Retha Franklin offered to post bail for Angela Davis who is jailed on trumped up charges. I want to turn to an article in jet magazine from December third nineteen seventy headline to read the special, go Angeles bond if permitted in which Retha. Franklin's quoted as saying, my daddy says, I don't know what I'm doing. Well, I respect him of course, but I'm sticking to my beliefs. Angela Davis, Musco free black people will be free. I've been locked up for disturbing the peace in Detroit, and I know you got to disturb the peace when you can't get no peace. Jail is hell to be in and going to see your free. If there's any Justice in our courts. Not because I believe in communism, but because she's a black woman and. She wants freedom for black people. I have the money. I got it from black people. They made me financially able to have it, and I want to use it in ways that will help our people. Bobby Seale. Do you remember when Retha Franklin to say the least world renown the woman who sang the star spangled banner inside the DNC is offering bail money for Angela Davis. We just had Angela on after after a wreath died talking about what this meant to her. Yes, yes, yes. I remember all of that. Sammy Davis junior also. I mean, there was so many. I had Marlon Brando. He was there. I'm trying to tell you we volved organization so much support in the community monetarily and socially and politically. It was all the way up to the point. I finally come out of jail. We won the cases in New Haven and everything, and I ran for mayor of Oakland are never forget, and then we was talking. What happened is election day that was getting ready to come down was on April fifteenth off year. Election run for mayor of Oakland. I was and we've looked up and the sports arena that whole sick that hosts sixteen thousand people to reach. The Franklin was scheduled to speak that day, April fifteenth election day. And so two months before that, I finally got a chance to get people to get in touch with the Susan. I begged us sister reason rankled please tell you producers to postpone your your, your, your, your, your appearance here in Oakland, California to sports because the April fifteenth also. Welfare check as these sisters are going to have be be out. They're going to get that welfare check getting buy a dress and they're gonna forget about coming to the polls. And we've organized and she says, yes, brother, Bobby, I will definitely do that. And she did pokes phone it for him and had really hug her through the phone and say, thank you, you know? So it was a great supporter and many ways of I got others who there. I mean, everybody came out on our side really all those shootouts I'm telling you the NAACP everybody ROY will help us put together, but I'm telling you, I had coalitions the and this is what the power structure was really scared of the unity across that, and this is what I do now. I'm going to colleges and stuff. I, in fact, I'm going to, we're going to be the national association of black party or going to be. N. Chicago come November second, third, four, fifth and six. And I'm trying to get one of the colleges there to to to to pay me to come and speak on the second of November this. This'll be a reunion session of the founding of the Chicago chapter Chicago, Illinois chapter the black pound to party coming in within the next two months or so. So. Is just a of this history is human involvement, history, protest movement that we love us all. I mean, sister, Angela Davis, all the party members. I know I can mention party members like archery Jones. She used to run the Boston Massachusetts state. Chapter two poxy covers a mother. She used to run the Harlem office in New York and cetera. I'm trying to tell you. I'm trying to get these young folks understand what the resistance was in the sixties, and it's broad relationship to stop in the war and standing up for constitutional democratic civil human rights and that people talk talk. But even my kin, our ten, four platform and program, I put the first two paragraphs of the declaration of independence of the United States America detailing in my Tim point platform and program. When we found that the Black Panther in October nineteen sixty six at Oakland, California, and the last reliant. And that thing says, when a long train of abuses and usurp patience, pursues an invariably events a designed to reduce a people under absolute despotic. Then it is the right of the people to alter or change that system and provide new guards with a future security and happens. And that's exactly what I was trying to do. With the Black Panther party. It was a political party. When at the time I created the blackout, the party I had done, I was working for the city government of Oakland, California, really, actually most people don't even know that at the department of human resources, but I did a demographic search across the United States of America to see how many black politicians existed in nineteen sixty five. I found only fifty two and a few other people have people colored Asians and others. That's all there was all across the United States of America from local city to to the federal is only fifty two people. That's the real reason. I created a black after Bharti as a political party in Oakland, California. How can we take over some of these many of these local scenes? Young brothers was running around Holland, black problem, black clubs. You're not gonna get any black power until you take over somebody's political policies. What you talking about political policies. CD city council sees these counties. The county sheriff seeds says with him, the white man sees you'd better making some colored people seats because you ain't go get. And later there at founded the Black Panther point with that ten point that him for me and he, we knew them in my war on poverty office. Why work for the city government of Oakland. That's what we wrote it where I turn out all the copies. I compass that ten point program. It cetera may big men l. but how it. Huey Luton. And then other people join the party elders, Cleveland, Kathleen cleaver cetera, broaden my central committee cetera, and so on and evolved, and we will part and parcel of that our whole nineteen sixties protest movement read on up through the democratic convention and past democratic convention trying to get more and more political power seats. But anyway. Of that Bobby. Kim seventy. There was seven thousand black people do elected office by the end of the eighties. It was fifteen thousand duly elected office and ten years after that we're twenty thousand plus. And today the two people were close who United States. Congressman congressman Bobby rush, Illinois state chapter, the blackout departments, congressman, what twenty five thirty years. And the other sister. She was a just a community worker primarily, but his congresswoman, Barbara Lee and across my cross through my shoulder here is the federal building with Bob release offices, Reggie in Oakland, California, and destroy go continues, the human liberation struggle continues Bobby, Alexa, go back to Bernardine and Bill on this whole issue of coalition building. Bobby Seale talks about that the Panthers practice, if you could take it up to today to the politics of today and. The difficulty that many progressives and radicals have in building coalitions to affect substantive political change. And I'm wondering if you not that you are join lessons for a young generation, but the lessons you learned about the failings of building coalitions back in in the seventies. Well, I think in know that our sense of young people in gauged in struggled today of younger people is that they, as you said, don't really need lessons from us. They have learned the lessons. They actually study history quite carefully and they have analyzed their own concrete conditions. I'm fascinated that by clubs matter, for example, has a strong position about the about Palestine in the necessity for the liberation of Palestine and the end, if you support for Israel domination of Gaza and and in Palestine, and the West Bank that that to me is an amazing and interesting form of internationalism. The black lives matters also very educated about the struggles in South Africa today and what's going on. On, and you know, is in solidarity with struggles to maintain their independence in there and take take her to like Yuba. I think this is a very internationalism for anybody in the United States is very important, radical edge of political organizing in the Panthers, get a great job through the ten point program, but then through their political education of bringing people who were already quite conscious really from the civil rights movement into a global understanding of who we are, what we're responsible for. So, and I think the young lords were also part of that strategy by definition being having one foot in Puerto Rico and one foot in the United States in the Puerto Rican struggle here in Chicago, here's a live and well. And Bill Ayers. I would just ahead that I think that what we what we've learned this, that coalition building is hard work, but it's necessary work. And what we have in Chicago today is thirty six organizations that have been meeting since Trump was elected, hammering out a common Ingende and that means they have to meet and talk and learn. They have to speak to each other with the possibility of being heard. They have to listen to one another with the possibility of being changed. And from our perspective is critically important from the beginning in coalition building to understand the deep history of white supremacy, racism and empire building in this country, which means you can't build a coalition that doesn't recognize the special of national oppression of African Americans in this country of native peoples of Puerto Ricans and people's color. And I think now dependency to that. Lives matters very strong about recognizing the history of male supremacy and the need for. Queer black, revolutionary consciousness coalition doesn't just happen automatically. It takes work. It takes consciousness. And so people have to go into it with the idea that I'll be challenged and it'll be changed. And I think the rainbow coalition that Bobby referred to was an excellent example. The art three coalition in Chicago today, which stands for resist reimagined. Rebuild is an excellent example from today. And I wanted to ask you about the remembrances of Senator John McCain. We took a look at it yesterday on the broadcast. But he proudly campaign for every war from Iraq to Afghanistan. He ran for the surge in Iraq against Brock Obama in two thousand eight. And during that time, one of the campaign ads he used was one against you. Bill Ayers, linking you to Barack Obama saying Barack Obama launched his campaign in your living room. And I was wondering if you could comment on John McCain and the history that's being written this week leading up to his funeral with both presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama speaking. His funeral, this weekend President Trump not invited to be there. If you could talk about what John McCain did in your case in two thousand eight when he ran for president, I mean the most. Portly. I think it's, it's, we're watching the revision, the rewriting history kind of the idea of lionising John McCain, who was a work criminal and drop bombs on the Vietnamese people in a period when six thousand people a week were being murdered much of it from the air. John McCain participators exacting people week in Vietnam, Vietnam and Cambodia, Vietnam. And what's important is that to now turn around and pretend that none of that happened. What happened in two thousand eight, very briefly is that they couldn't figure out I Hillary Clinton and then McCain Palin couldn't figure out how to oppose this young charismatic, obviously brilliant politician from Chicago. And so instead of concentrating on Barack Obama, they concentrated on his friends and it was classic guilt by association. So it was Reverend Wright. It was us. It was father Pfleger. It was Rashid Khalidi. Anyone they could say was a friend of Obama's, and then they would say. Say what we don't know much about him, but look at who hangs out with. And the reality is that Obama was a rising politician, Chicago, we knew him as he referred to me, I would prefer to him as a guy around the neighborhood. We knew each other, but we weren't intimates and we certainly weren't political cream int- so I think that that that distortion was a crude attempt at an old American tradition, which is if you can't figure out how to oppose the politics and the policy, you try to smear somebody through guilt by association, and it was a failure. Both times it failed for Clinton and then failed for for McCain. Get a great job on Amy yesterday about McCain. I thought it was terrific. It's hard to do at the moment when somebody dies, but the lies that come rolling off about who he was and what he stood for permanent, Noah tours ation escalation of war everywhere. You great. Well, finally, the prison strike that's happening around the country. Now that's getting almost no attention launched in prisons around the country to protest what prisoners are calling modern day slavery, and they're also demanding better food, fair pay for work. Wondering, Bobby Seale. We just have like thirty seconds. If you can just say what this means back to Black Panthers time, focusing on conditions in prisons. We still us black passes. We still have some fourteen people who are still political prisoners Black Panther party member, political prisoners from the sixties protest movement, era, and conditions in prisons absurd, always have been absurd. We just lost Bobby on satellite as he talked about prison conditions today being absurd. Why don't we end with you both talking about this this protests that's happening around the country. Very few people are hearing about the media hardly covering people, risking a lot inside even their freedom. If they're near the day that they will be released to say to let people know on the outside what's happening on the inside. Great consciousness among young people today about about the prison industrial complex, about the way in which law and order and police are the frontlines and incarceration and deprivation of civil rights. Human rights are the middle ground for for creating a separate group of people for taking away democratic rights as you say, voting rights among other things, but other rights housing until this is an outrage. We live in city of Chicago right here within a mile of the studio. There's six thousand primarily African American, Latino young men locked up in Cook County jail, pretrial pre-conviction. It's an outrage. It's an incredible system and destroys lives at destroys communities. It makes it very hard for people to get jobs coming out. There's a wide awake nece I. Think among young activists about the relationship to this prison gulag and the need for abolition really abolition of prisons and and a campaign to downsize the incarceration of people and people of color and one the coming together of the immigrant rights movement and. Critical mass movement around detention and prison weight and one that the combination of the movements of immigrant rights, the separation of families detention around the country. Among those joining this prison protests is the northwest attention center in Washington state where many immigrants are held. In fact, there were immigrants there that were separated from their children at the border. Well, the the, the immigration detention industry has become sort of a subset of the overall prison industrial complex clearly in many cases, civil sub subset because most of the people are not facing criminal charges, and but I wanted to get a Bill bill's perspective as well on this whole issue of the the movements within prisons these days, and also the the attempts now serious attempts for change. Obviously, York City council voted about a year ago that they're going to close Rikers island, the main city jail, although the exact timing of that is not been determined yet, but there's definitely been dwindling of that population. What the what the prison reform movement looks like from your perspective? I think that what we're seeing is the resistance in prisons and it's happening in so many fronts, partly there. The hunger strikes happened a Urasoe ago. They're the, they're the fightback in in North Dakota, South Dakota. There's the immigrant rights, and I think what we're seeing is something that's growing and you're right, certainly that it's not getting the kind of attention or coverage that should get it. Snuck into the New York Times yesterday it's being talked about across networks. It's on social media. I think we're at the mid point. I don't know. We're in a point where the kind of gathering massive opposition to mass incarceration is spreading. And I think it's going to be a major part of the kind of movement and coalition of resistance that's being built up. I see it and I think that the courage of people who have very little resources very little to hold onto to withdraw their labour to demand Justice, and to ask the rest of us to step up is absolutely horrific and and inspiring. We're gonna. I just gonna say that was the buck panther party program to to end prison labor, slave, labor, and that's where we're going to end because Bobby, she'll just pop back on the satellite on with this mass protest movement in the prisons that's taking place from the aniversary of the killing of George Jackson to the anniversary of the uprising on September ninth. This is the period of this national prison strike on Saturday, protesters gathered outside Lee Correctional Institution and South Carolina to demand better living conditions for prison for prisoners, inside seven prisoners died during a riot at that prison in April. Meanwhile, Lee, six people are continuing hunger strike inside the northwest attention center in Tacoma, Washington, I wanna turn to human rights activists educator and founding member of the Black Panther party overt, big men. Howard who died last month at the age of eighty born in Tennessee. In nineteen thirty eight. Howard was also the first editor of the Black Panther party's newspaper. This is Howard speaking about visiting with prisoners during the nineteen seventy-one Attica rebellion. Panthers. Accompanied by resealed and several other Panthers, and we went and we listen to the grievances of the inmates and. Very little. We could do on the spot other than. We got party outdoors ation to offer the inmates assistance if they wanted to leave the country. Because at that time we had some friends, revolutionary friend who would give them sanctuary if we. Could encourage them to come out and about all that we could often and day after we were there. He issued to order to take the prison back at all calls. So that was Elbert. Howard. I enter of the Black Panther party newspaper. He died. Bobby Seale if you can take it from there end our show with that the significance of the rebellions back from Attica in nineteen seventy one to what we're seeing today in the person's across the country. Yeah, I was. I was pulled in as one of the main as one last negotiators at Attica prison. Me and big man Elvin Howard and a couple of other people was my onto Raj. And we, in fact, did get to go inside the prison through section call. No-man's banana was a long haul. We would go out to the right to yard and go to another yard. Well, the other prisoners was negotiating tables, word cetera. One of the prisoners saying because we had a United Airlines pilot who was a who was also a member of our organization, the Black Panther party. They had heard about this and they will want to know if I could get a helicopter and to come over to bits Fizeau. You kidding doubt that's going to happen at any rate. I did. Visit to all the things we went back out. Of course, I flew to Oakland California's and set up a meeting with me Huey the lawyers in another committee as to what else we could possibly do. And then of course, we decided that was gonna wholesome, kind of protest rally something. But by the time I got back to you. You know, and we came from the airport and we went to the motels with the lawyers and other people were, and then we were headed to Attica prison and as who headed to Attica prison. That was that Monday morning of our live on radio bumble boom, the attack went down with that attack. We stopped. We didn't go any farther at any rate following that they released in that Bobby Seale had went in and toll the toll the prisoners to stab and cut the throats of. Of the guards who were being held hostage, there cetera. And that's what they put out. So the think Rockefeller, whoever was governor cetera they were ready to put me back in prison, it cetera, et cetera. But the honesty of the coroner's report came out and says. No, no. Presents throats were cut every every guard who was a prisoner in a hostage would shut by the weapons and the guns of the guards who went into attack and stuff. There, Chris resistance, we're going to have to leave it there, but very critical point that that apprising from September ninth to September. Thirteenth, when governor Rockefeller cold out the national guard, they opened fire and killed thirty nine men in the prison, both prisoners and guards critically wounding scores of others and injuring hundreds more. That's going to wrap up this show. But of course we'll continue to cover the person strike and so much more Bobby Seale, founding chairman, Black Panther party. Thanks so much for being with us from Oakland, Bill Ayers and Bernardine. Dohrn. Thanks for joining us from Chicago, longtime activists for peace and racial Justice. Former STS members students for a democratic society as well as in the weather underground Bernardine Dohrn was professor a law professor at northwestern law school and Bill Ayers, retired educator. Professor and author of many books, education professor at the university of Illinois, both speaking to us from Chicago and Bobby Seale an early happy birthday when you turn eighty two in October. Thanks so much for joining us. I made me Goodman with one gun solace. This is democracy now to see part one of our discussion go to democracy now dot org. Thanks so much.

Bobby Seale Black Panther party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John McCain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama national association of black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill bill
"elvin howard" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 3 years ago

"elvin howard" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"So there you have a wreath of Franklin singing inside criticized by the white establishment for jazzing up the song, but two years later in nineteen seventy Retha Franklin offered to post bail for Angela Davis who is jailed on trumped up charges. I want to turn to an article in jet magazine from December third nineteen seventy headline to read the special, go Angeles bond if permitted in which Retha. Franklin's quoted as saying, my daddy says, I don't know what I'm doing. Well, I respect him of course, but I'm sticking to my beliefs. Angela Davis, Musco free black people will be free. I've been locked up for disturbing the peace in Detroit, and I know you got to disturb the peace when you can't get no peace. Jail is hell to be in and going to see your free. If there's any Justice in our courts. Not because I believe in communism, but because she's a black woman and. She wants freedom for black people. I have the money. I got it from black people. They made me financially able to have it, and I want to use it in ways that will help our people. Bobby Seale. Do you remember when Retha Franklin to say the least world renown the woman who sang the star spangled banner inside the DNC is offering bail money for Angela Davis. We just had Angela on after after a wreath died talking about what this meant to her. Yes, yes, yes. I remember all of that. Sammy Davis junior also. I mean, there was so many. I had Marlon Brando. He was there. I'm trying to tell you we volved organization so much support in the community monetarily and socially and politically. It was all the way up to the point. I finally come out of jail. We won the cases in New Haven and everything, and I ran for mayor of Oakland are never forget, and then we was talking. What happened is election day that was getting ready to come down was on April fifteenth off year. Election run for mayor of Oakland. I was and we've looked up and the sports arena that whole sick that hosts sixteen thousand people to reach. The Franklin was scheduled to speak that day, April fifteenth election day. And so two months before that, I finally got a chance to get people to get in touch with the Susan. I begged us sister reason rankled please tell you producers to postpone your your, your, your, your, your appearance here in Oakland, California to sports because the April fifteenth also. Welfare check as these sisters are going to have be be out. They're going to get that welfare check getting buy a dress and they're gonna forget about coming to the polls. And we've organized and she says, yes, brother, Bobby, I will definitely do that. And she did pokes phone it for him and had really hug her through the phone and say, thank you, you know? So it was a great supporter and many ways of I got others who there. I mean, everybody came out on our side really all those shootouts I'm telling you the NAACP everybody ROY will help us put together, but I'm telling you, I had coalitions the and this is what the power structure was really scared of the unity across that, and this is what I do now. I'm going to colleges and stuff. I, in fact, I'm going to, we're going to be the national association of black party or going to be. N. Chicago come November second, third, four, fifth and six. And I'm trying to get one of the colleges there to to to to pay me to come and speak on the second of November this. This'll be a reunion session of the founding of the Chicago chapter Chicago, Illinois chapter the black pound to party coming in within the next two months or so. So. Is just a of this history is human involvement, history, protest movement that we love us all. I mean, sister, Angela Davis, all the party members. I know I can mention party members like archery Jones. She used to run the Boston Massachusetts state. Chapter two poxy covers a mother. She used to run the Harlem office in New York and cetera. I'm trying to tell you. I'm trying to get these young folks understand what the resistance was in the sixties, and it's broad relationship to stop in the war and standing up for constitutional democratic civil human rights and that people talk talk. But even my kin, our ten, four platform and program, I put the first two paragraphs of the declaration of independence of the United States America detailing in my Tim point platform and program. When we found that the Black Panther in October nineteen sixty six at Oakland, California, and the last reliant. And that thing says, when a long train of abuses and usurp patience, pursues an invariably events a designed to reduce a people under absolute despotic. Then it is the right of the people to alter or change that system and provide new guards with a future security and happens. And that's exactly what I was trying to do. With the Black Panther party. It was a political party. When at the time I created the blackout, the party I had done, I was working for the city government of Oakland, California, really, actually most people don't even know that at the department of human resources, but I did a demographic search across the United States of America to see how many black politicians existed in nineteen sixty five. I found only fifty two and a few other people have people colored Asians and others. That's all there was all across the United States of America from local city to to the federal is only fifty two people. That's the real reason. I created a black after Bharti as a political party in Oakland, California. How can we take over some of these many of these local scenes? Young brothers was running around Holland, black problem, black clubs. You're not gonna get any black power until you take over somebody's political policies. What you talking about political policies. CD city council sees these counties. The county sheriff seeds says with him, the white man sees you'd better making some colored people seats because you ain't go get. And later there at founded the Black Panther point with that ten point that him for me and he, we knew them in my war on poverty office. Why work for the city government of Oakland. That's what we wrote it where I turn out all the copies. I compass that ten point program. It cetera may big men l. but how it. Huey Luton. And then other people join the party elders, Cleveland, Kathleen cleaver cetera, broaden my central committee cetera, and so on and evolved, and we will part and parcel of that our whole nineteen sixties protest movement read on up through the democratic convention and past democratic convention trying to get more and more political power seats. But anyway. Of that Bobby. Kim seventy. There was seven thousand black people do elected office by the end of the eighties. It was fifteen thousand duly elected office and ten years after that we're twenty thousand plus. And today the two people were close who United States. Congressman congressman Bobby rush, Illinois state chapter, the blackout departments, congressman, what twenty five thirty years. And the other sister. She was a just a community worker primarily, but his congresswoman, Barbara Lee and across my cross through my shoulder here is the federal building with Bob release offices, Reggie in Oakland, California, and destroy go continues, the human liberation struggle continues Bobby, Alexa, go back to Bernardine and Bill on this whole issue of coalition building. Bobby Seale talks about that the Panthers practice, if you could take it up to today to the politics of today and. The difficulty that many progressives and radicals have in building coalitions to affect substantive political change. And I'm wondering if you not that you are join lessons for a young generation, but the lessons you learned about the failings of building coalitions back in in the seventies. Well, I think in know that our sense of young people in gauged in struggled today of younger people is that they, as you said, don't really need lessons from us. They have learned the lessons. They actually study history quite carefully and they have analyzed their own concrete conditions. I'm fascinated that by clubs matter, for example, has a strong position about the about Palestine in the necessity for the liberation of Palestine and the end, if you support for Israel domination of Gaza and and in Palestine, and the West Bank that that to me is an amazing and interesting form of internationalism. The black lives matters also very educated about the struggles in South Africa today and what's going on. On, and you know, is in solidarity with struggles to maintain their independence in there and take take her to like Yuba. I think this is a very internationalism for anybody in the United States is very important, radical edge of political organizing in the Panthers, get a great job through the ten point program, but then through their political education of bringing people who were already quite conscious really from the civil rights movement into a global understanding of who we are, what we're responsible for. So, and I think the young lords were also part of that strategy by definition being having one foot in Puerto Rico and one foot in the United States in the Puerto Rican struggle here in Chicago, here's a live and well. And Bill Ayers. I would just ahead that I think that what we what we've learned this, that coalition building is hard work, but it's necessary work. And what we have in Chicago today is thirty six organizations that have been meeting since Trump was elected, hammering out a common Ingende and that means they have to meet and talk and learn. They have to speak to each other with the possibility of being heard. They have to listen to one another with the possibility of being changed. And from our perspective is critically important from the beginning in coalition building to understand the deep history of white supremacy, racism and empire building in this country, which means you can't build a coalition that doesn't recognize the special of national oppression of African Americans in this country of native peoples of Puerto Ricans and people's color. And I think now dependency to that. Lives matters very strong about recognizing the history of male supremacy and the need for. Queer black, revolutionary consciousness coalition doesn't just happen automatically. It takes work. It takes consciousness. And so people have to go into it with the idea that I'll be challenged and it'll be changed. And I think the rainbow coalition that Bobby referred to was an excellent example. The art three coalition in Chicago today, which stands for resist reimagined. Rebuild is an excellent example from today. And I wanted to ask you about the remembrances of Senator John McCain. We took a look at it yesterday on the broadcast. But he proudly campaign for every war from Iraq to Afghanistan. He ran for the surge in Iraq against Brock Obama in two thousand eight. And during that time, one of the campaign ads he used was one against you. Bill Ayers, linking you to Barack Obama saying Barack Obama launched his campaign in your living room. And I was wondering if you could comment on John McCain and the history that's being written this week leading up to his funeral with both presidents George W Bush and Barack Obama speaking. His funeral, this weekend President Trump not invited to be there. If you could talk about what John McCain did in your case in two thousand eight when he ran for president, I mean the most. Portly. I think it's, it's, we're watching the revision, the rewriting history kind of the idea of lionising John McCain, who was a work criminal and drop bombs on the Vietnamese people in a period when six thousand people a week were being murdered much of it from the air. John McCain participators exacting people week in Vietnam, Vietnam and Cambodia, Vietnam. And what's important is that to now turn around and pretend that none of that happened. What happened in two thousand eight, very briefly is that they couldn't figure out I Hillary Clinton and then McCain Palin couldn't figure out how to oppose this young charismatic, obviously brilliant politician from Chicago. And so instead of concentrating on Barack Obama, they concentrated on his friends and it was classic guilt by association. So it was Reverend Wright. It was us. It was father Pfleger. It was Rashid Khalidi. Anyone they could say was a friend of Obama's, and then they would say. Say what we don't know much about him, but look at who hangs out with. And the reality is that Obama was a rising politician, Chicago, we knew him as he referred to me, I would prefer to him as a guy around the neighborhood. We knew each other, but we weren't intimates and we certainly weren't political cream int- so I think that that that distortion was a crude attempt at an old American tradition, which is if you can't figure out how to oppose the politics and the policy, you try to smear somebody through guilt by association, and it was a failure. Both times it failed for Clinton and then failed for for McCain. Get a great job on Amy yesterday about McCain. I thought it was terrific. It's hard to do at the moment when somebody dies, but the lies that come rolling off about who he was and what he stood for permanent, Noah tours ation escalation of war everywhere. You great. Well, finally, the prison strike that's happening around the country. Now that's getting almost no attention launched in prisons around the country to protest what prisoners are calling modern day slavery, and they're also demanding better food, fair pay for work. Wondering, Bobby Seale. We just have like thirty seconds. If you can just say what this means back to Black Panthers time, focusing on conditions in prisons. We still us black passes. We still have some fourteen people who are still political prisoners Black Panther party member, political prisoners from the sixties protest movement, era, and conditions in prisons absurd, always have been absurd. We just lost Bobby on satellite as he talked about prison conditions today being absurd. Why don't we end with you both talking about this this protests that's happening around the country. Very few people are hearing about the media hardly covering people, risking a lot inside even their freedom. If they're near the day that they will be released to say to let people know on the outside what's happening on the inside. Great consciousness among young people today about about the prison industrial complex, about the way in which law and order and police are the frontlines and incarceration and deprivation of civil rights. Human rights are the middle ground for for creating a separate group of people for taking away democratic rights as you say, voting rights among other things, but other rights housing until this is an outrage. We live in city of Chicago right here within a mile of the studio. There's six thousand primarily African American, Latino young men locked up in Cook County jail, pretrial pre-conviction. It's an outrage. It's an incredible system and destroys lives at destroys communities. It makes it very hard for people to get jobs coming out. There's a wide awake nece I. Think among young activists about the relationship to this prison gulag and the need for abolition really abolition of prisons and and a campaign to downsize the incarceration of people and people of color and one the coming together of the immigrant rights movement and. Critical mass movement around detention and prison weight and one that the combination of the movements of immigrant rights, the separation of families detention around the country. Among those joining this prison protests is the northwest attention center in Washington state where many immigrants are held. In fact, there were immigrants there that were separated from their children at the border. Well, the the, the immigration detention industry has become sort of a subset of the overall prison industrial complex clearly in many cases, civil sub subset because most of the people are not facing criminal charges, and but I wanted to get a Bill bill's perspective as well on this whole issue of the the movements within prisons these days, and also the the attempts now serious attempts for change. Obviously, York City council voted about a year ago that they're going to close Rikers island, the main city jail, although the exact timing of that is not been determined yet, but there's definitely been dwindling of that population. What the what the prison reform movement looks like from your perspective? I think that what we're seeing is the resistance in prisons and it's happening in so many fronts, partly there. The hunger strikes happened a Urasoe ago. They're the, they're the fightback in in North Dakota, South Dakota. There's the immigrant rights, and I think what we're seeing is something that's growing and you're right, certainly that it's not getting the kind of attention or coverage that should get it. Snuck into the New York Times yesterday it's being talked about across networks. It's on social media. I think we're at the mid point. I don't know. We're in a point where the kind of gathering massive opposition to mass incarceration is spreading. And I think it's going to be a major part of the kind of movement and coalition of resistance that's being built up. I see it and I think that the courage of people who have very little resources very little to hold onto to withdraw their labour to demand Justice, and to ask the rest of us to step up is absolutely horrific and and inspiring. We're gonna. I just gonna say that was the buck panther party program to to end prison labor, slave, labor, and that's where we're going to end because Bobby, she'll just pop back on the satellite on with this mass protest movement in the prisons that's taking place from the aniversary of the killing of George Jackson to the anniversary of the uprising on September ninth. This is the period of this national prison strike on Saturday, protesters gathered outside Lee Correctional Institution and South Carolina to demand better living conditions for prison for prisoners, inside seven prisoners died during a riot at that prison in April. Meanwhile, Lee, six people are continuing hunger strike inside the northwest attention center in Tacoma, Washington, I wanna turn to human rights activists educator and founding member of the Black Panther party overt, big men. Howard who died last month at the age of eighty born in Tennessee. In nineteen thirty eight. Howard was also the first editor of the Black Panther party's newspaper. This is Howard speaking about visiting with prisoners during the nineteen seventy-one Attica rebellion. Panthers. Accompanied by resealed and several other Panthers, and we went and we listen to the grievances of the inmates and. Very little. We could do on the spot other than. We got party outdoors ation to offer the inmates assistance if they wanted to leave the country. Because at that time we had some friends, revolutionary friend who would give them sanctuary if we. Could encourage them to come out and about all that we could often and day after we were there. He issued to order to take the prison back at all calls. So that was Elbert. Howard. I enter of the Black Panther party newspaper. He died. Bobby Seale if you can take it from there end our show with that the significance of the rebellions back from Attica in nineteen seventy one to what we're seeing today in the person's across the country. Yeah, I was. I was pulled in as one of the main as one last negotiators at Attica prison. Me and big man Elvin Howard and a couple of other people was my onto Raj. And we, in fact, did get to go inside the prison through section call. No-man's banana was a long haul. We would go out to the right to yard and go to another yard. Well, the other prisoners was negotiating tables, word cetera. One of the prisoners saying because we had a United Airlines pilot who was a who was also a member of our organization, the Black Panther party. They had heard about this and they will want to know if I could get a helicopter and to come over to bits Fizeau. You kidding doubt that's going to happen at any rate. I did. Visit to all the things we went back out. Of course, I flew to Oakland California's and set up a meeting with me Huey the lawyers in another committee as to what else we could possibly do. And then of course, we decided that was gonna wholesome, kind of protest rally something. But by the time I got back to you. You know, and we came from the airport and we went to the motels with the lawyers and other people were, and then we were headed to Attica prison and as who headed to Attica prison. That was that Monday morning of our live on radio bumble boom, the attack went down with that attack. We stopped. We didn't go any farther at any rate following that they released in that Bobby Seale had went in and toll the toll the prisoners to stab and cut the throats of. Of the guards who were being held hostage, there cetera. And that's what they put out. So the think Rockefeller, whoever was governor cetera they were ready to put me back in prison, it cetera, et cetera. But the honesty of the coroner's report came out and says. No, no. Presents throats were cut every every guard who was a prisoner in a hostage would shut by the weapons and the guns of the guards who went into attack and stuff. There, Chris resistance, we're going to have to leave it there, but very critical point that that apprising from September ninth to September. Thirteenth, when governor Rockefeller cold out the national guard, they opened fire and killed thirty nine men in the prison, both prisoners and guards critically wounding scores of others and injuring hundreds more. That's going to wrap up this show. But of course we'll continue to cover the person strike and so much more Bobby Seale, founding chairman, Black Panther party. Thanks so much for being with us from Oakland, Bill Ayers and Bernardine. Dohrn. Thanks for joining us from Chicago, longtime activists for peace and racial Justice. Former STS members students for a democratic society as well as in the weather underground Bernardine Dohrn was professor a law professor at northwestern law school and Bill Ayers, retired educator. Professor and author of many books, education professor at the university of Illinois, both speaking to us from Chicago and Bobby Seale an early happy birthday when you turn eighty two in October. Thanks so much for joining us. I made me Goodman with one gun solace. This is democracy now to see part one of our discussion go to democracy now dot org. Thanks so much.

Bobby Seale Black Panther party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John McCain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama national association of black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill bill
Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 3 years ago

Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

"Sir. This is democracy. Now democracy now or the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman with one gun solace with part two of today's edition of fifty years ago that right fifty years ago this week, the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention in Chicago became a national spectacle as a major political event turned into chaos that culminated with a police riot, much of it unfolding on live national television. While Hubert Humphrey was nominated as the democratic candidate in nineteen sixty eight inside despite the fact he didn't run in any primaries outside was where the news was where police were clubbing teargassing thousands of protesters. For more. We continue our interviews with Bobby Seale founding chairman, Black Panther party was in the protests at the beginning in Chicago. Bill Ayers was arrested on August twenty seven fifty years ago and Bernardine Dohrn both Bernardine and Bill longtime activists for peace and racial Justice, former SDS that students for a democratic society and whether underground members. I mean, he Goodman with Juan Gonzalez one? Yes. Yes. With Bobby Seale again to follow up a Bobby on the conversation. We were having that the end of our previous segment when you were talking about how once Richard Nixon was elected president, he ordered. His aides to begin immediate eradication of the Black Panther party. One of the interesting things that most people are not aware of is that years later report came out in the New York Times that the f. b. i. had conducted a CPR secret poll among black Americans and found that more than twenty five percent of African Americans were supporters of the Black Panther party felt that the Black Panther party was fighting. Their interest is significant portion of the America of the African American population of this country was supportive of of your revolutionary organization. And yet as you were saying Nixon immediately ordered that you be crushed, could you talk about what happened in that first few years of the Nixon administration to the panther party. Exactly the year of nineteen sixty nine is the year. Now, remember I said he had a meeting with j. Edgar Hoover and Jade ago who were in the December the first week of December stated nationally on television that we were threat to the internal, the blackout, the party is a threat to the internal security of America. Come come. What was February seventeenth seventeenth. John a buddy Carter and John Huggins will murdered at UCLA. They were the leaders of the black path to party and loss Angeles California now. But she Carter really had gotten out of his gang group. 'cause he, he ran a three thousand member gang and he created a political organization call wretched of the earth delay to become and he later became rub. They headed up to southern California chapter the black part in the Los Angeles community. Eric, the what I'm trying to say here is that. That was the first attack on the part of the power structure using the us organization, etcetera. In a conflict situation to kill and murder. The leaders of the Los Angeles chapter, the blackout, the party do that process in the next three or four months. They attack more than twenty two offices I'm talking about in Indiana. I'm talking about the, they blew up the office and demands. I will literally got the crew Clinton of blew up that blow up that building. And I'm telling you. In San Diego brother. Bell was opening up to San Diego office at eight AM in the morning, and the police and FBI came jumped out of cars and came into place and shot him dead killing murdering. So I'm just says that period of tacking by the end of that year with the murder of Fred Hampton and then the shootout in Los Angeles, four days later after that cetera I have in my organization, I had twenty eight dead blackout to party members sixty nine wounded and defending ourselves. We defended ourselves and many of these attacks. By the end of that year, fourteen police were kill because we shot back when they came in shooting in us. We did not play. We shot back

Bobby Seale Black Panther Party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John Mccain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica Prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama National Association Of Black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill Bill