17 Burst results for "Elsbeth"

"elsbeth" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"And for one final time, that we have shoutouts. Now, just U.S. open 2022. We do. We have Alex king in Apple Valley Minnesota. Wow. Apple Valley. All right, Alex. And Alex also comes with bonus rescue dog dotty who would love a shout out as well. So there we go. Hello dotty. Amazing. Like hello Dolly, but a little bit different. Do you have a picture of dossi? No. No, okay. I'm sure Alex can sort you out. What else have we got? We've also got elspeth Dao in Leeds. I like the name Elsbeth. Yeah. Very nice name. Is it Scottish or Elizabeth? Oh. Is that what it is? I don't know. I've said that. And I'm not sure. I mean, it's a lot like Elizabeth, for sure. And I do know. This isn't from Scotland. Currently in Leeds. But I'm right that weird. We like weird here. We've also got trip Johnson, who is in Tennessee's American tennesse trip is one of those names. That can only be American. Certainly couldn't be British. And that's to our detriment. You might be Canadian. All right, Tripp. I like it. I like it a lot. Tennessee, home of the Titan. Yes. I'm seeing the title. What's trip surname? Johnson is in three. He could be a character in an American teen drama. I think you're right. Maybe he is. Well, I don't know. But Tripp has got a little story about how his tennis fandom started. It was saying it was all by chance. I was flipping, flipping through the channels and stumbled across Serena versus kvitova in their 2012 Wimbledon quarterfinal match. Ever since then, I've kept up with every tournament from two 50s right to this trip. It's great. Love it. Well, thank you so much for coming in as Friends of the tennis podcast at the shoutout level. If you'd like a shout out and to support the show generally as well as getting access to our bonus podcast for Friends, you can do that. The link to sign up is in our channels and there is a shout out section of it along with the intros, so just choose whatever suits you and that's available to you. And finally, we'd just like to wish a very happy birthday to Debbie Goldstein, who is a very loyal fan of the pods and she's turned 50, so a huge, happy birthday to deadly. Debbie, 50 Debbie, I don't know if you wanted a niche and a partridge gag for your birthday, but that is what you've got. Happy happy birthday. Two niche from me. Really ill know. Tough crowd. Happy birthday to you. Happy birthday. And well, look, that's it. That's it for the U.S. open. We'll be back with my diary tomorrow for Friends. We've got our review show to record. We've got our Q&A. And then we're going to go to the rest. But it's been an absolute pleasure, a treat, a privilege to record these editions of the tennis podcast for you throughout the U.S. open. We hope you've enjoyed them. Thanks so much for listening for getting in touch if you have been we really enjoyed it and Catherine, thank you to you and to Matt for keeping me company. It's been lovely. Likewise, I feel like you two have kept me company, but I suppose we all feel the

Alex dossi elspeth Dao Elsbeth Leeds Tripp Alex king Apple Elizabeth hello Dolly kvitova Tennessee Johnson tennis U.S. Minnesota Debbie Goldstein Scotland Serena Debbie
"elsbeth" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

08:05 min | 3 weeks ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"The only reason why the A380 has the ability to dump fuel is to meet the one engine out go around requirement of 2.5%. And he says, and you guys thought Miami Rick was the only one who liked the books. However, we may make use of the fuel jettison to avoid overheating brakes and melted fuse plugs after landing, even then we can not dump from the four feed tanks, which can hold at least 27 tons each. Meaning we are likely significantly above the maximum landing weight. Regulations only state that we can not plan to land overweight. As you know, after an overweight landing engineers will do a set of checks to ensure no issues arise from the landing and back service the aircraft will go. Oh, back in service, the aircraft will go. Love the podcast and keep them coming. Your fan in the great sand pit. Yeah, I remember, I don't know how many, what do you say? What episode was that we were talking about that? 5 28. So that was a few ago. Not quite ten, but it was a little while back, but I do remember we were looking at that hole in that fairing. And as he said, you know, we suspected correctly that that area was not pressurized. Or visible. Or visible. Yeah, I think we were debating the decision. Right. I'm wondering how much the crew knew about it and obviously were unable to find out a lot about the amount of damage. So yeah, I think the decision was very good now, looking back at the full facts. I thanks very much, indeed. Thanks for taking the time to go back and wander into the cabin and have a peer down to see if you could see that bit of the airframe. That was interesting. Yeah. And checking out that camera and the whole bit. Yeah. That's the cool thing about doing the show is that we have so many listeners from so many different backgrounds and they fly so many different types of airplanes out there that they don't hesitate to chime in and let us know. Yeah, keep us on our toes. The next one's really for Nick if you want to get him to do it. Okay. Yeah, well, Nick. Liz is telling me that this next one is for you number 14, right? That we were talking about Liz? Yes, sir. Okay, again, is this from Elsbeth? Else Plato, again, yeah, okay. So hello, Jeff and APG crew, and then Nick, take over. Yeah, this is where we fall out. Oh, wait a minute. Wait, wait, wait, okay. Maybe we shouldn't read this one. I think it's fair to remind everyone that I'm no longer current. And I have to rely on my memory to work all this stuff out. So it was regarding a very serious Q&A incident as Alder meter pressure setting incident of an aircraft into Charles De Gaulle in Paris, 5 two 9. Sorry, I'm going to have to Sunday quarter about your comments and Nick in this me. No, the other neck. Regarding VOR DME approaches versus RNP approaches. What I said was because we did a lot of alumina checks in the old days every mile on the DME. It would have been less likely to happen, but he quite correctly points out that the Alameda difference would have resulted in an erroneous descent path regardless of whether you doing an RNP approach or a VOR DME approach, which is actually what I thought about it afterwards is absolutely correct. So it feel me would not have been any safer in this situation and this is mister sandpit speaking again. As the era was altitude not position. He would have given the same readiness to sent path like the RMP DME hike checks would also have appeared correct and that was my error. This is because the altitude error was constant. Throughout the descent, the glide path is a pseudo one created supposedly using a correct Alameda setting, and we know in this case the element of setting was out by ten millibars, something like that. I don't remember exactly. It was a couple hundred feet, 300 feet, something. A little bit, right? And they got down very low. Before they realized there was a problem. Not even the ground base augmentation G bas on a GLS approach would have helped, as the SMC, the flight management computer, computer glide bath in relation to the Q&A channel meter setting would have been in error. If anything, R and ps are safer than VOR DME, I'm old school, so I don't know about that. They're probably because they use a cross check of GPS and IRS with then the FMC produces as an estimated position of uncertainty. You know, we used to fly those RMP approaches overlaid over an NDB or reviewer, which is even better in my mind because then you've got all the information. But don't let me confuse the situation. This is monitored by the aircraft and guarantees position within three nautical miles or one nautical mile. Does it mean yeah? 3.1. Yeah, I think you've put the decimal place in the wrong position, mister sandpit. You've made a critical error, which is completely ruined your argument. The regular GPS approach is .3. Yeah, and he's written, and he's written three point three just doesn't see this. He just put the decimal in the wrong place. In the right place, a critical other wage might have killed him. To the crew during an RNP. I have to trust the VOR and D mail fully serviceable, yes. In fact, on the 30th 1st of March, 2003, a British Mediterranean a three 20 nearly impacted terrain at its Ababa twice during due to a faulty VOR damaged by rainwater. I do remember we actually covered that instant. Yeah, nasty, nasty. The only way a hike check would have raised suspicions is by using a glide path a radiated by an iOS. Keep the ILS. Yes. For sure. We like Kyle has then there could have been a chance to pick up the error. But in my experience, most crews are pretty poor at performing hike checks on iOS's. Well, they obviously don't have good trainers. I've flown into cities where the temperature is pushing a plus 30° centigrade and this creates about 20% underneath it. Yes, you're quite right. So a 1500 foot high check in ISO temperatures would read about 1250 feet on the IMS in these hot conditions. I've yet to fly with someone who's picked up the era and mentioned it all planned for it. Interesting. Personally, I'm really surprised that crew did not react to the quickly reducing height on the RA call outs, and like Nick I found it very odd the autopilot was disconnected for the go around. Maybe the captain had just come off the 7 37. Doesn't the 7 37 do automatic go. Only if you have a cup of dual autopilot approach, right? When you hit toga disconnects. Okay. And you need to put a dollar in the slot as well, don't you? Yes. For each go around. Yeah. Excellent.

Nick Elsbeth Liz Alameda Rick Charles De Gaulle Miami Plato Jeff British Mediterranean Paris FMC IRS
"elsbeth" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:19 min | 4 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"They were, in fact, the injured party, but the world looks at them as damaged goods. I mean, that just seems like now even now I think it's a pretty good idea. Because it just seems like so much about me too, but before me too. So anyway, that scene, I would say that was it. Wasn't it? Yeah. And in terms of your own lives at the time when you embarked on this, I guess 7 year or 8 years, 7 season journey, your first of all, you have one child, right? And she was quite young. She was at that point about 9, and I'd heard a funny story that you guys kind of deferred to her as far as naming the characters. It was funny to go back and realize everybody in their third grade class were names of characters and good ones. And Elsbeth Tascioni was a combination of two days, one is their teacher. And one was a fellow student. So it was all letting her choose because why not make it a family affair? Right, right. And another key ingredient, of course, is the amazing ensemble that you guys put together for this. And first and foremost, Julianna Margulies, as Alicia, I want to just clarify something that I read, which is now in hindsight, impossible to believe. But she was almost not interested in doing a show about legal subject matter. Is that right? I don't know if that's the case. I think we were concerned that that would be the case. We were worried that because she had just done Canterbury's law that perhaps she wouldn't want to do a law show, but very fortunate for us, she didn't hold the genre against us or the show. She, she saw it as the good wife and not the good lawyer and was very, she understood the character right away and immediately..

Elsbeth Tascioni Julianna Margulies Alicia Canterbury
"elsbeth" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

03:46 min | 5 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"Like in the description, ostensibly, it was to stop people spending beyond their means. So if you're spending a huge amount on kind of like clothing, then maybe there's not enough left to pay taxes or something. But also there was another reason as well that there was a political thing to it apparently that they didn't want a lot of the wealth going out of the country. So they didn't want you to spending all your money on imported Italian silk. Or Dutch wool or whatever they wanted to basically to be spending money on by British. So it was a way I think of regulating behavior. But a lot of it really was about preserving the rank and status of people. Right. And they're extraordinary. And then they do say that we don't know exactly how well they were monitored. You know, and actually kind of implemented, like there wasn't like someone going around going. You need to take that off now. They're called the sumptuary laws. They covered what type of fabric you could wear, depending on your social class. And we didn't have a class system, I suppose, in that time, it was mainly like the nobles, and then there was like everybody else, you know, in that way. But they were controlling what the nobles could wear as well. So like the royals could wear one thing, they could wear the purple and the gold. I think Earl's and ladies. I mean, they could have gold and they could have velvet, but sometimes it could only be on their sleeves. So the amount of how much you could actually have. And even down to like, if you were from the working class, you could wear a wool coat, but you could only use like two and a half yards for it. Really? So you couldn't have these aspirational shapes. Yeah, you couldn't make those because that would be you basically having social aspirations and dressing above your station. So on a recent podcast with a fashion historian called Rachel Elsbeth wrote, we talked about wartime rationing, make do in mend and, you know, I was gargling my eyes at the idea of government telling you that you were restricted into how many buttons you could use, how many pleats you were allowed. But that was about the war effort and ensuring there was enough material to go towards making uniforms for the troops and conserving resources. I was saying, oh, how can you imagine it? But you can imagine it because there's precedent across the centuries except that it was used for other purposes too to basically keep you in your place and tell you that you weren't allowed to look like you were above your station. I mean, totally, yeah, it was totally sort of about that. I mean, and they're very cannily. I think they found some passages from the Bible where it said that is it a luxury or sumptuary goods. Is the right of kings, it's only in the cannon lords. And I suppose the kings were God's representative when you get back to the divine right of kings. The kings of the representative of God and the clergy. So they were allowed to wear all these for these colors, but everyone else wasn't..

Rachel Elsbeth royals Earl kings
"elsbeth" Discussed on On The Ledge

On The Ledge

04:45 min | 5 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on On The Ledge

"And welcome to on the ledge podcast, I've done so many episodes I have, no idea what episode number this is, but welcome to the show. In this week's on the ledge, I'm talking about how some common household items you normally throw away can be used for your plants. Plus, I answer a question about a droopy allocation and we hear from Natalie in meet the listener. Thank you to all of you who've been adding hashtag so along to your social posts. This in case your new to the show is my annual seed sowing extravaganza for anyone who wants to grow houseplants from scratch from a seed. And listeners are never ending adventurous in what they choose to sew. You can start with a cactus or a coleus or you could be like leafy exotics and go for an amorphous phallus, pee on folius. Wow. Amorphous phallus is a really incredible genus. I don't know what pionius looks like I'm guessing it that it has pee and he like leaves from that name, but well done leafy exotics that looks awesome. I'm just going to click follow on your Instagram because for some reason I'm not following you. And in fact, leafy exotics I've just noticed has posted loads of great ceiling pictures including some begonia species while you really are upping your game leafy exotics and I'm excited about olive hates trixie on Instagram who has got some coffee, arabica beans, coffee beans, to germinate. And notes, the first step to my coffee plantation empire LOL. They're amazingly beautiful those berries actually aren't they. I don't know how you go about germinating those. I imagine you've got to get that seed casing off, but I look forward to finding out more. Olive heats trixie. Over on the houseplant fans of on the ledge Facebook group things have been getting busy with the so long too. Chris has got some tentative good news thinks that a caladium galaxy is finally coming up, although Chris noted that it was necessary to check it wasn't just a piece of perlite. Now, I think we've all been there with that particular problem. Just as long as the piece of perlite doesn't turn out to be a root mealybug because that's my worst nightmare. And elsewhere has posted a picture of an appointe baby and it's a good picture actually because Elsbeth has included a pen for scale, so you can just see how tiny these cute little pointier cotyledons, that's a fancy name for the seed leaves. The first leaves that emerge when a seed germinates. Ashley's been sewing lotus seeds and has been updating the Facebook page with images of them as they grow and wow. There are curious looking seedlings that's for sure. And I was also interested to see on a post about forest cacti that Jeff has crossed pollinated two Thanksgiving cacti. Waited two years for the seed pods to ripen and has seedlings that are still pretty small at 6 months old, but so fascinating to see. Thanks for sharing that Jeff on a post by Jake about cross pollination that is planned between a red and a pink Easter cactus could get very interesting. And finally, JB posted a lovely post about an environmental club at west Los Angeles college and they are taking part in the OTR so long and have got hold of some seed, excellent news JB and do let us know how it's going. Thank you to Catherine, Lucy and Nick, who all became patrons this week. I've been looking at my Patreon stats and you really are a global bunch. One recent patron signed up from the Falkland Islands and another one is in Hong Kong. I just love picturing you with your plants. So thank you to everyone who has been supporting me on Patreon and I do hope you liked the repot with me, shared based episode that came out yesterday and extra leaf number 89. These extra episodes, there are two of them a month for Patreon subscribers at the legend and superfan level and I love making these extra episodes and I hope you enjoy them too. Find out more about joining the Patreon on the ledge clan. In.

Elsbeth Natalie Chris Facebook west Los Angeles college Jeff Ashley Jake Patreon Falkland Islands Catherine Lucy Nick Hong Kong
"elsbeth" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

05:08 min | 6 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"At misses press and the show is at the wardrobe crisis. And you can find and follow Rachel. She's at Rachel elspeth gross. Please do share the podcast if you like it. It really helps us find new listeners. And now, let's get on with the show. Welcome to the wardrobe crisis podcast, Rachel Elsbeth gross. I'm thrilled to be here. This is one of those lovely times when Instagram delivers on its promise of inspiration and connection because I feel like we've all been there with social media that it can be a time sink, it can make you feel bad, it's an endless opportunity to convey it up with other people and find yourself lacking. But I love it when it does what it should do, which is connect you to a window on people's fantastic work. A post of yours popped up in my feed and I became an instant fan. Thank you. I love it. It's a place that I get to tell stories. My favorite thing in the whole world is stories. I want to know about people's lives. I studied apparel design. I studied costume history. I worked in the fashion industry. I work now as a fashion historian. And if you study the history of fashion, you can not help but learn the history of the world. And the way the world has treated people, whoever they were. It's impossible to separate a culture from what they choose to adorn themselves with and what they choose to assign value to. If someone were to hop on your Instagram after listening to this, what would they find? I hope they find inspiration. I mean, that's kind of cheesy. But a wide selection of biographies about fashion designers, photographers, models, muses, and other figures in and around the history of fashion that I find to be personally intriguing. What I loved was that there might be a familiar to me iconic photograph of, let's say, a Dior dress or of the iconic model in a Dior dress. But also for me, there were loads of new discoveries. So people that I'm not going to say, they're obscure, but just they went on my radar. So they could be fashion designers that aren't hugely well known or popular or they could be costume designers from Hollywood's golden era. And I love how the captions tell stories that I found completely new. So that's why I loved it. I do try to focus on people. I think of them as left behind by history. These are people who did work that impacted either their culture or the planet while they were alive and after death for a variety of reasons that usually turn out to be unpleasant at best, have sort of been left out of the canon of history. It's usually race or ethnicity, gender, sexuality, sometimes it's because you're a woman. And those are the stories that I find the most fascinating, a friend of mine said, you know, it's like breaking a story in journalism, but, you know, from history, it's a story that's already there. But we've just moved on and didn't bother to pay attention. Wow, okay, we're going to get into some of the stories that you tell. But first of all, I just wanted to ask about you. What fascinates you about the history of fashion? I mean, we all like to feel pretty or whatever gendered version of that word. We all want to feel good about the way that we love. And we all communicate.

Rachel elspeth Rachel Elsbeth Instagram Rachel Hollywood
"elsbeth" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

02:46 min | 6 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"Again, how are you doing this week? I can't wait to share this week's episode because we haven't done a fashion a straight fashion story if you like for a while. And of course this is a fashion podcast, but I do love to go into the related topics around sustainability and so I make shows about science and the environment and workers, but I don't want to forget what got me into this world in the first place, which is clothes. Seems obvious, but actually, sometimes, look back and be like, wow, I didn't make an episode about clothes for ages. So here is one. Because I still love how we make clothes and the stories about designers, and also the history of fashion. You've heard that phrase that fashion mirrors the times. It can really kind of be a bit of a barometer for what's happening right now. But also it's an amazing lens to look through to understand what happened in the past. Fashion and culture and history are all intertwined and I think there's such a rich place to play. So I'm always looking for resources on this. I love it when I find books and documentaries about different areas in fashion. And I love when I find Instagram accounts that tell these kinds of stories. My guest today is one of those she is the wonderful American fashion historian and instagrammer Rachel Elsbeth gross. And we connected on Instagram and we decided it could be super interesting and fun to pull out some of her posts and look at the pictures and search for the sustainability angles. And they range from things like wartime rationing and make do and mend to how home sewing used to be the norm rather than the exception. And some of the ways in which designers of the 60s, for example, were experimenting with new materials. And we also talk about this amazing story around how disposable fashion was once a fad that began with a paper dress, literally designed to be thrown away. That says a lot about where we are today, right? This conversation is full of intriguing stories like that from fashion's past. And we think that it might help us make sense of the present and encourage us to look at it in new ways. I hope you agree. I hope you enjoy this episode. It's a fun one. And actually, I'll just give you the heads up that we've got another one in the works along similar lines with a fantastic costume designer, and that one will look at the history of power dressing. Now, if you want to check out the visuals for what Rachel and I are discussing as you listen, and I think you should. Open the show notes on the wardrobe crisis dot com to see all the photographs. And tell us what you think. I thought you might like to tag us on Instagram with your own favorite fashion history moments. And if you do our grams, some of them, maybe I'll even put them in our newsletter too..

Rachel Elsbeth Instagram Rachel
"elsbeth" Discussed on The Cloisters

The Cloisters

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on The Cloisters

"Different. Words for word got that one down. Yeah. With that, we turn over and you see a skinny sort of physically meek looking woman in the Ann Arbor section, a woman named Elsbeth rose turned to the woman next to her. Oh, honey, you look so good, but it would be nice if you sat up a little straighter, we are trying to present ourselves to all of these new cloisters. I mean, you look wonderful, but if you decided to present yourself a little bit better, that would be lovely. Ipsy turns to her as if she heard absolutely not a single word. Said, and says, do you think they have, you know, any amount of technological progress here, I just, I have really not been impressed, I feel.

Ann Arbor section Elsbeth rose
"elsbeth" Discussed on On The Ledge

On The Ledge

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on On The Ledge

"And also, sometimes infuriating. My name is Jane perrone, and in this week's show. I talk to the lovely rose about allocations and more. We review the latest developments in the on the ledge so long. And I answer a question about Hoya seeds. Thank you for all of you who've been quick off the mark and are already getting involved in the on the ledge so long this year as announced in last week's episode episode two ten. So if you haven't listened to that episode, here's the lowdown, it's a project where I encourage as many people as possible to grow house plants of any kind from seed and you can chart your progress on social media using the hashtag oats so long. So just use hashtag OTR so long, don't put the year or anything because I might not pick it up. The post I mainly look at are hashtag so long. And that is what quite a number of you have been doing on Facebook and Instagram. Over on the house plant fans, Facebook group that's been lots of updates on what you've been up to. Julia's sewing seeds from the American begonia society. Kelly, my assistant well, she's sowing blue bell vine seeds, clitoria, turn artia. Which come from Thompson and Morgan, their house plant seeds range never grown that one, Kelly, let me know how you get on. Helen has been getting an avocado pit to bust open. I mean, Helen's wondering if that doesn't count as the so long, but I mean, you are going to sew it eventually. It's more of a sprout along right now, though. I do agree. It looks good though. Well done. And of course, that was one of my early episodes looking at growing avocados from the stone, so well done for that. And Elsbeth has got ten packs of 25 cactus seeds from the cactus store dot com, including serious, appointe, trichos, and malaria. Oh, those are cool. And over on Instagram, round rabbit has got foxtail fern, asparagus fern babies on the go, while in the troponin has got a fantastic range of succulent seeds ready to sew. So it's not too late if you want to take part, have a listen to episode two ten if you haven't already done so in which the lovely Ian thwaites give some tips on sewing cacti and succulents and if you look at that episode also you can find all the previous so long episodes to find out everything you need to know about sewing house plants from seed and just crack on and have a go. I'm going to be so I still haven't got Brown to doing my sewing yet, but I will be doing some this weekend and yes, I'll be sharing that on the old social media with the hashtag say it after me. Hashtag solo..

Jane perrone American begonia society Hoya Kelly Helen Facebook Elsbeth Instagram The post Julia Thompson Morgan Ian thwaites malaria Brown
"elsbeth" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

06:07 min | 8 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Native America Calling

"We look at the overall survival. Of the colony that comes from the United states. Over here we call invitational wildfires in 2016, has become one of the biggest sort of days on account of the protests have this also in all these issues. Sure, sure. So there's your podcast, the work Dixon is doing with his arts. You've mentioned some of these huge protests on Australia day. How else are activists working to change these narratives and uplift people stories and culture? And so one of the ways I heard you talking to the historian a bit earlier is sort of mentioned something about change today. That was sort of a progressive or so called sort of progressive idea that came I think around the earth 2000s from the great sort of wing political party, which has support a lot of sort of First Nations issues. Later on in the mid 2000s and the protests from coverage will act as this was abolished a bullish on the day. And one of the reasons why we say this is because what we wanted to do was give people an understanding that hey wait a minute because of all of these things that have happened not just on this day, but if we go and change it to another day, all we're doing is sort of celebrating the genocide of average of playful and other data. And at this point in time, we believe that Australia or the government don't have the right to sort of celebrate because like you've mentioned previously on your show. We haven't entered into a negotiation process for treaty. The story hasn't sort of been honest. And accepted sort of what they've done towards average. It has the most process. But I'm interested because I mean, some of these stories, these experiences that you've shared, that Dixon has shared the history that we've heard from doctor martini. I just wonder could the country of Australia recognize both its colonial past and still be respectful of its Aboriginal populations? Are these two paths just too hard to reconcile? What's your thought on that? Well, I think we might have lost both. So I'm going to go to doctor martini Martin, doctor Martin, did you hear that question I just asked? Oh, yeah, Sean. Well, when Bo gets on the line, you can answer it, but yeah, I mean, one thing I've heard discussed by people who really think about these issues and activists is recognition and celebration aren't necessarily the same thing. And so like we were saying they need to be a real confronting of the true history of the British colonization of Australia before there can be any kind of commemorative day that perhaps brings these two together. What about like an education campaign recognizing the origins of Australia day? And these decisions to create a holiday time to raise awareness of Aboriginal culture and challenges with something like that help yeah, and I mean, I'm not sure what's changed in the Australian curriculum, but I assume sort of among non Indigenous Australians, the majority of the population, of course, in Australia. Assume there is more history told your artist guest talked about. There's more interest in Aboriginal culture and history among the general settler population. But, you know, when I was in school, sort of in the 80s and 90s, there wasn't much. So it's really similar to the curriculum on the east coast definitely in the U.S. that most people don't get a lot of Native American history in the same in Australia. And yes that has to change. And I hope it is changing. Yeah, absolutely. And I know that these arguments to abolish Australia day have gained steam in recent years and it'll be interesting to see going forward if the government will hear these opposition voices, are they merely waiting until the movement loses steam, so we'll definitely want to pay attention to that. I do want to ask quickly if Bo is still on the line if he could share information about how folks can learn more about his podcast. Bow, are you still there? Doesn't look like we have bow. So I'm sorry about that, but I think if you Google name both sphere and I think you'll find some really good information in some great resources. Folks, that's all the time we have for a day's show and an enlightening discussion about Aboriginal peoples and their efforts to redefine Australia day into a more inclusive holiday. I want to thank my guests, doctor Elsbeth, martini, and Bo sporum, also thanks to Dixon Patton. We're back live tomorrow with a show about recognizing and addressing generational trauma on a personal level. We hope you can join us. I'm.

Australia Dixon martini Martin United states Bo Sean Martin east coast Elsbeth Bo sporum Dixon Patton Google martini
"elsbeth" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:33 min | 8 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Tribal colleges and universities at AI HEC dot org. Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is Native American calling. I'm Sean spruce. January 26th marks a day of national pride in Australia. It's a date set aside to pay tribute to the day in 1788, the British naval fleet sailed into Sydney harbor. The other side of the story is one in which Aboriginal and Torres island people see the day is commemorating the start of colonial oppression. The first protest against Australia day came in 1938, but the arguments to dispense with or recast today have gained more traction in recent years. Once again, this year, protesters at several events across the country are raising their voices against what they call invasion day. You may not be aware of Australia day, but it has parallels in the U.S. to Columbus day and the 4th of July. We'd like you to join today's conversation. What do you think of holidays that commemorate the arrival of colonizers who transformed indigenous populations? Can there be holidays honoring both colonial and indigenous achievements? Give us a call the number one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's one 809 9 native phones are open. Joining us today from New York City is doctor Elsbeth martini. She's an assistant Professor of history at montclair state university. Welcome to Native American calling doctor martini. Thanks, Sean. Good to be with you. Doctor martini, I'd like to provide some background. Please give us a history. What led up to Australia day? Well, the holiday, I'm sorry, you probably have to ask another gift for the actual commemorative history. But it does, as you said in your introduction, it's similar to Columbus day in the United States in that it's remembering that this moment of the so called European landing on the Australian continent. And the first permanent settlement, in fact, for Australia day, and it was originally in 1788 when the S.W.A.T. Australia calls the first fleet, a fleet of 11 ships, 6 of them were carrying convicts, so they were transported to Australia for crimes. That was the sentence. And it was set up as a penal colony as a place to take these convex. And that actually does link to U.S. history or North American history as well because the British were sending their convicts to the North American colonies until the revolution, of course, in the U.S. wouldn't accept them anymore. So yeah, Australia is kind of interesting because it was chosen as the day of nationalism to celebrate the nation, but Australia is a nation with informed until 1901 when 6 of the original British colonies formed a nation. So it's commemorating something over a hundred years ago that they're British invasion of indigenous Australia. So you mentioned this all occurred in 1788, the British navy was transporting convicts and they saw Australia as a place to house those people. But the British were already relatively familiar with Australia. They had been there before, right? Could you talk about when they first arrived predating 1788? Yes. So the sort of great man style European history, the person who celebrated his captain James cook and historians people familiar with Pacific history would also know captain cook because what he did in the island in the Pacific. But yeah, he made the first kind of British contact with the east coast of Australia. So there had been European to it kind of chatted the coast made contact with other parts of the Australian continent, but yeah, cook was the first British person in 1770. He made contact with Australia. And he had a mandate to kind of report back on what he found on the people there, that kind of thing. Okay. So that captain cook, holy cow, he really got around. Especially in what are now U.S. states of Hawaii and Alaska and also Australia too. So really, really fascinating. I think what's interesting and a lot of our listeners today in the states might not be familiar with how recent a lot of this history is and European contact did not occur in Australia until roughly 250 years ago. So, you know, you look at an American history and we go back to the late 1400s. So this is a much, much more recent timeline that we're looking at, which I think is really, really interesting. Elsbeth, can you explain how do Australians typically celebrate Australia day today? Well sort of, I guess mainstream felicie. I wouldn't say Australia doesn't quite have the same sort of patriotic spirit as the U.S. but people they get a day off work mostly as the Australian open. Being played is always a cricket match being played to people normally spend it with friends and family having a grill kind of cook out that kind of that kind of thing. It's seen as this sort of relaxed holiday, but it's also this day when the Australian government announces the award so the Australian of the year, the order of Australia metals, those kind of things. So you mentioned that Australia has only been a country since 1901. When exactly did Australia day become a national holiday? Oh, that's something I would have to look up, I'm sorry. I'm not being a historian of the commemoration, but yeah, I can find out for you. When it became a day. And I know part of just discussing this with friends and family back home in Australia that the part of the discussion is to change the date because rather than commemorate the invasion perhaps there's a more feeding date to remember the actual coming together of the Australian nation, it's problematic is that is too for the perspective of indigenous peoples, but at least it wouldn't be a commemoration of that first invasion. Okay. Now, earlier you mentioned some of the history 1788 convicts being transported from Great Britain. There were colonies that were set up as well. What were the initial interactions between the British and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders? To cook had a.

Australia Sean spruce U.S. Torres island Elsbeth martini Sydney harbor Columbus captain cook montclair state university British navy Sean New York City Elsbeth east coast Pacific cook Hawaii Alaska Australian government cricket
"elsbeth" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:05 min | 8 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Backlisted

"Not published in the UK. It's published by Random House in the states. It was an NPR 2020 book of the year, as I say it's a second collection. I think you'll write more. Really, he's an educator. He works. I think he's assistant professor at Colorado. But he's also a musician. There are some really, really great poems in this collection. And this, I think, is one of them. The valley of its making. Poetry makes nothing happen. WH auden. The people in the streets are plucked up like radishes from dark earth. Heads beat the purplish red of ripeness. The women lead the stupid and brutish to a future they don't deserve. The organized are still unbearably human. They still fuck and hurt and harm and are not actually sorry. The people still fight each other too much and the system not enough and too often it is not a fight but a bullet too many men want to be in the front and don't want to march anywhere in particular. Some of us have degrees and noses to look down. So many want a version of old days that never existed. Many are still unwilling to grow a vocabulary for personhood, even from the words already in them. So many will deny they to a sibling simply because our people are messy and messed up and a mess, nothing about our people is romantic. And it shouldn't be. Our people deserve poetry without meter. We deserve our own jagged rhythm and our own uneven walk towards sun. You make happening happen. We happen to love this is our greatest action. Yeah. Sold. Yeah, just some really love. You know, I've been thinking a lot about rhyme and internal rhyme and rhythm. And I just think it's a really difficult Andy. What have you been reading? I've been reading a book a novel by Elsbeth Barker so far her only novel.

WH auden Random House Colorado UK Andy Elsbeth Barker
"elsbeth" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:34 min | 10 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on American Scandal

"The next night, Daniel ellsberg sits down for dinner with his wife, Patricia marks. Marks cooked up a delicious looking meal, and as ellsberg sits staring at his plate, he knows he should eat. He hasn't had a thing all day. But elsberg isn't hungry. And he can't stop thinking about the grim possibilities for his own future. Mark sets are forked down and looks Dallas. Daniel. You said you wouldn't allow McGowan's decision to get you down. You were going to keep fighting. Guess I didn't say that? But? Come on. He Jerome decision puts for sure what do you want from me? Oh, no, you're mad at me, huh? No, I'm not. I'm not mad. I'm just tired, okay? And I don't want to talk about mcgovern or The Pentagon study of any of it. I think you do want to talk about it. Ellsberg takes a swig of red wine and sets down the glass and anger. You're right. I'm sitting on 7000 pages that could end the war. And apparently now my only option is to go to the media. And after that, go to prison. Daniel, listen to me. I'm a journalist. I know the field. You could give someone the study and request an annuity. And they'll give it to you. Any journals will kill for this kind of scoop. But the problem is in the press itself, it's the FBI. It wouldn't take them long to figure out who leaked the study. And look, I told myself I wasn't afraid of prison, but I my kids are so young. And I have you now. I'm just not ready to say goodbye. Ellsberg stops, as tears form in his eyes. Marks reaches out and takes his hand, Daniel. I'm so sorry. I know what this is doing to you. You know, I was thinking about something. Remember, remember that night in Saigon, I was angry at you because you were part of the military. You were culpable. And I thought you could have done more. But now you're a civilian. I mean, you're working at MIT. What are you getting at? What I'm saying is maybe you've done enough. Maybe it's time to stop. Mcgovern didn't think it was worth it to leak those papers and maybe he was right. You know, Patricia. I discourage you from reading the study because I wanted to protect you. If someone were to interrogate you, I wanted you to be able to say completely honestly that you didn't know what was in the report. But maybe you should read it. Maybe it's time you see what all this is about. So it's not some abstraction. Ellsberg rises from the table. Here, come with me. There are a couple of volumes on the desk in the bedroom. Let me get you those. Read them. And if you still feel that I've done enough already, and I should quit. And maybe I will. Ellsberg and Marx walk into the bedroom, and alberic hands over several excerpts from The Pentagon study. Then he returns to the kitchen table, picks up his glass of wine and waits for his wife to finish reading. While later, marks opens the bedroom door, holding pages from the study. Her eyes are Bloodshot and her cheeks bright red. When she returns to the kitchen table, ellsberg can see that her hands are trembling. Marks explains that she just read several memos from military generals. They describe what sounds like torture and not just on enemy soldiers. But civilians, too. Marks drops the documents on the table. Furious and tres fallen. She tells ellsberg that he was right. He has to do whatever he can to get the truth out to the public. It's the evening of March 12th, 1971 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Daniel ellsberg is waiting inside the entryway of an apartment. There's a knock on the door, and ellsberg takes a deep breath. Things are about to get complicated. When he opens the door, ellsberg finds Neil Sheehan standing out in the cold. She hann is an old friend and a fellow critic of the Vietnam War. But more importantly, he's reporter with The New York Times. Ellsberg rushes she hand into the apartment, explaining that he's heard rumors that FBI agents have been making inquiries about him. The bureau could be actively spying on Elsbeth. So he doesn't want she hand to be seen by anyone. Ellsberg close to the door and locks it. He looks around, making sure all blinds are drawn. And then he turns back to Sheehan, reminding him why he asked for this meeting. Ellsberg has copies of The Pentagon's secret study about Vietnam. With federal agents, perhaps now investigating him, ellsberg has stashed his copies of the study all around town, including at this apartment, which belongs to ellsberg's brother in law. Ellsberg says it's imperative to prevent government agents from seizing the documents. Because the study is a trove of horrifying details about the war. NASA journalist and fellow critic of the war, she hand needs to see the study, so we can report on it for The New York Times. She hand blows into his hands to warm them up. And he tells elsberg that he's keen to see the study for himself, he's ready to start reading. Whatever ellsberg is ready to show him the documents. Ellsberg nods and leads she hand into the other room, where there's a single cardboard box sitting on a desk. She hand stops and stares at the box, gazing at it with almost reverence. Then he opens the lid, pulls out a folder and starts reading. Almost right away, she hand mutters a curse under his breath. The material is shocking. Both in its breadth and the damning portrait paints of the war. Violence against civilians brewed escalations of the conflict, all while American leaders said otherwise. She hand looks up appalled, and he tells ellsberg he'd like to return to the office to make copies of the report. It's stunning. But ellsberg isn't ready to hand over the documents yet. Ellsberg tells she hand that he needs some kind of commitment from The New York Times. He knows he can't dictate their reporting, but he needs an assurance that they will publish a large portion of the study, and that they'll move quickly. She hand raises his hand, telling elsberg to slow down. The Pentagon study is damning, but she hand just can't whip up a story overnight. He has an obligation to perform due diligence as a reporter. He has to carefully read the entire study and take notes, comprehend its true meaning. And then she hand will have to engage in high level discussions with managers and lawyers at The New York Times. It's sensitive government material and its publication has to be careful. Ellsberg understands the times position, but he's in serious legal jeopardy. He needs some guarantee that the paper won't kill the story. She hand lays a hand on ellsberg's shoulder, and tells his old friend what he did was heroic. The public needs to know about this study. And while he can't make any ironclad promises, ellsberg was right to reach out to The New York Times. This is exactly the kind of story that the times is eager to publish. He's not ready for she hand to start making his own copies of the study, but he is right. The New York Times is committed to exposing the truth, and this may be his best chance to get the study in front of the public. So Albert thanks, Jahan, and hands over a few of the documents. After she hand walked out of the apartment, ellsberg collapses into account, feeling emotionally depleted. His fate is now in the hands of a journalist and his editors. And at this point, all that's left to do is pray that The New York Times.

Ellsberg ellsberg Patricia marks Daniel ellsberg Pentagon Daniel alberic The New York Times elsberg FBI Neil Sheehan McGowan mcgovern Elsbeth Jerome Mcgovern Saigon Vietnam Dallas MIT
"elsbeth" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:27 min | 11 months ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Should she get in touch when she deems appropriate, we will continue to remain in contact with the Chinese Olympic Committee at the same time she's also her privacy be respected in all aspects of please understand in order to respect her privacy, we will not be commenting further. While you've been commenting and getting in touch about when you've spoken out and what the repercussions have been in all sorts of scenarios and whether you regretted it or whether it was the best thing you did or perhaps somewhere in the middle things are not always that clear. Yes, I spoke out to my karate teacher, teased a young student for several minutes about her performance, including calling her a loser. I spoke to him privately and he dismissed me. I felt stunned. I didn't know what to say, I left the class, and never went back, I was 55, says Elsbeth. Stunned and never going back. A lot of people here were getting in touch. I'm noticing, you know, you have to take an action to move away from whatever the situation is, or you find yourself ostracized. I was grapes as a dance. I said to him, if you ever do that again, I'll scream. He did. I scream. Everything stopped, and I shamed him in front of everyone there, says Jane. Thank you very much. Keep those messages coming in and also this particular message that's just come in, which I know will intrigue my next guest because it's with regards to makeup for black actors after an issue on a theater job. Well, who better to talk to in many ways about having a voice and holding your voice than Beverly knight, the singer and actor. She's starring in the drifters girl, which is currently on stage at the garrick theater in London, of course, like so many productions. It was delayed from last year due to the pandemic, but it tells a story of Faye treadwell. One of the first black women to manage a vocal group in the U.S. with the death of her husband in 1967, she decided to continue managing the drifters on her own and the musical tells the story of her struggle to make the group successful in the face of ongoing racism, sexism and legal battles. Let's remind ourselves of one of the drifters greatest hits..

Chinese Olympic Committee Elsbeth Beverly knight garrick theater Faye treadwell Jane London U.S.
"elsbeth" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on WBAI

"It was the lost boys with Peter and lost girls with Elspeth and never the Twain would meet. And then, of course it happened. Morning dawned when they were both girls and boys with Elspeth and only boys with Peter. Nothing I could do tank else. Beth told me. I've been taking their sister's away for years, and the sisters have been telling stories and they wanted in on the fun. Sure, I said no, it first. Then I realized how unfair it was. After all, Pier's been doing just that very thing with the girls. That's how I got started in the first place. It's ridiculous to have the boys only with boys and girls only with girls. It's not how anyone lives. All the pirates are all male, but they're pirates. You don't expect pirates to be enlightened E had a feeling the Pirates Day was coming. Yeah, but they weren't my concern that could take care of themselves. Couldn't you just combine the bands? I said lost girls and lost boys together on Leah Fire. One of the other girls will be the mother. Who else Best said grimly, and we won't do it. We won't. If Peter can be stubborn, we can be justice. Stubborn. And there it sits Peter on one side of the island with this little band and Elspeth on her side with her somewhat larger band. What's really sad is that Peter's been gets smaller. Every year going was, Elsbeth has so much more to offer. She gets all the good fights for the Pirates and all the good parties with the Indians, and she's even you, Sir Peter's drowning scene on the rock. Peter mopes around and cuts himself whittling a lot. Occasionally, a boy goes over to Elspeth and that rains for a week on Peter Side, I guess what it is, really is that eternal childhood is Well, little lie exactly. But a half truth At some point, perhaps the very point at which a child is ready for. Never never land childhood is actually more of a choice than a condition. Elspeth chose Peter could choose to, but so far, he won't I think, because he's so afraid that doing such a thing will mean he's growing up, and it won't mean any such thing at all. And there's the whole difference between childhood and childish. Shouldn't try to be an expert because I am after all, a theory, And as I said, it's all magic with fairies, magic and no worries unless you drink poison. And believe me. I'm not stupid enough to try that twice. Not the way things are today. Sometimes. Sometimes I wonder, though, what would happened if my life depended on somebody's faith? Whose faith would save me. Is Peter's still strong enough. Does he still believe all those little Children out there in the dark belief After all, after all that's happened. I like to think that's so. So. I like to think that that's what keeps Peter the eternal boy he is and that someday he'll go over to the other side of the island. Inhale Elspeth as his ally and friend. Forget this silly mother business once and for all. It's not like he's got anything to lose. Then he'll really be himself again. He'll go back to being brave Peter Pan. The boy who won't grow up instead of poor Peter, the boy that the Children hardly ever fly with anymore. Thank you..

Elspeth Peter Peter Pan Beth twice Pier today Pirates first One Elsbeth one side Twain both girls a week years Pirates Day Leah Fire Indians
"elsbeth" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Or cry or laugh or whatever do you do that really kaleidoscope of just all happiness? When I see you on kmph? Sometimes I get the sad or frustrated, angry. Does it at some point Get to the point where you say cheese? I'm tired of waking up a two o'clock. Oh, yes, And is there a point of thinking it's time to hang it up and retire. Well, I'm too young to retire for I am the one who brings home the money to pay the mortgage. So it's not like I could just say that I'm just going to not wake up tomorrow and not go toe. Work tomorrow. I mean, there's still the logical and responsible aspects of a job. So yeah, I I very much look forward to not waking up a 2 30 in the morning. I don't know what I would do instead, maybe a late night show. That's what I used to do all before All of this. I was a nighttime anchor. Oh, you were Yes. And I am I think more or I thought I was more of a night owl but now well, even on the weekends a week Up really early. We were all night Elsbeth back. That's true, But I love what I do know. You certainly do seem to love what you D'oh We've been on with Kim Stevens from Campion's Channel. 26 were going to say it right now. We want everybody to have a great day. Thanks you very much for being on.

Kim Stevens Campion
"elsbeth" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"elsbeth" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"For black lives matter. And New York's former mayor. Stepping up the gems in the 11th hour. Billionaire Mike Bloomberg says he's going to spend at least $100 million to help Biden's Florida numbers. And finally, San Francisco is on track to be the first major city to allow 16 year olds to vote. Will others follow? That's it? That's what's training. Long Island's news and talk station is 1071 and 77. W. A. B C. You know, it's so interesting Is that my wife's mother? Whose name is actually Nancy. And my wife's name is Beth. That's right. But is there an identity crisis? No, my mother in law. Her name is Nancy. As you know, she lives in Pennsylvania now. I loved. My wife is referred to his Nancy, but her real name is Beth. I can't even find out how old she is. His hips, the millennial This This requires quite an investigation. Also the confusing part about all this is her email. Is Beth. So I'm going to email from Bethancourt Elsbeth. Exactly And it comes up, Nancy, but this makes no sense. So the other day, her mother in law, Nancy, who I thought was best comes in from Pennsylvania out there where there are more dear than people. And she had a whole basket full of cucumbers, peppers, cherry tomatoes that she grows, in fact, right in these big flowerpots in her backyard. She does it a memorial day. And then the veggies get planet And in August, the plants began to produce veggies and she is she has so many kids in the family and friends, So we benefited from that. But still if I had to eat all the cucumbers, peppers, cherry tomatoes she brought over, I'd be having to go to the dental office down the block. Teo maybe have a venue or a capri place like this can't do it anymore. I've had too many dental issues, and a lot of you folks are in the same way. So look, you can get the same number of fruits and vegetables but on tablet form important to build up your immunity Strengthening cause Corona virus is coming back for a second bite at the same time that the normal flu kicks in And what's the one thing that seems More likely to make you less of a victim of coronavirus and the flute. A strong immunity and you get dad from having more fruits and vegetables. I get mine. I take two tablets in the morning to a night gives me the equivalent of 32 31 different fruits and vegetables today I'm good to go. So can you You need to order your own supply. Call 802 46 87 51..

Nancy Beth Mike Bloomberg New York Bethancourt Elsbeth Pennsylvania Long Island Biden San Francisco W. A. B Florida Teo flu