35 Burst results for "Elsa"

"elsa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

04:59 min | Last month

"elsa" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"New york all right slurp slurp slurp slurp we are back from mark. Goth is seat. They'll break less thirsty but guys we're ready to make you more thirsty with our guest. Today she is a change maker at the detour. We have she is a co founder of this is about humanity that east thousand founding member of voter mother and humanitarian. And i'd like to say Also top top five apps on instagram. Baby top okay all right. What an intro him. there and there are a lot. there are so many apps on. Are you saying avs or apps. No ads abs- abdominal instagram thing. Rolling out. I don't know my god. Elsa collins in the longest in i mean i thought it was held graham originally. Yes i mean. Listen we could get into it from the beginning. Elsa is you guys. Think i'm obsessive. Working out like elsa is so fire like sometimes. I'm like i'm going to be lazy today. And see her story. And she does like her like commodore rattles. And you're like. Oh yeah. I'm like and i'm just like i can't what i shouldn't eat.

Elsa Today New york elsa today five apps instagram so many apps commodore
"elsa" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

02:59 min | Last month

"elsa" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

"Picking in. I think we learned something. Tim appreciate what we have you. That's right. I could not understand the value of elsa if i was not able to i think be analytical about the past. You know i'm in this lung. And if i couldn't understand bad.

Tim
"elsa" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

08:18 min | Last month

"elsa" Discussed on Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

"It was to head down to the nation's capital for a visit with bob woodward and elsa walsh to journalists under one roof as an old news man myself i felt right at home elon. Bob began talking about how to save the world. The moment we walked in they live in a beautiful section of georgetown by bought this great colonial house just a few years before he and elsa matt but they've turned it into a lovely home by maggie their miniature poodle who followed us from room to room as we set up our gear. Just a cub reporter. They had laid out some delicious snacks. Which i'm afraid. We dove into somewhat noisily at times once we settled in also talked about growing up as one of six kids with four sisters and a brother. I was surprised to learn that. Just like marlowe. As a young girl. She never dreamt of getting married. My parents were irish immigrants. My mom was actually eight months pregnant with me when she came with my dad. My dad was a civil engineer. Any sort of all over the world and wanted to go to san francisco for a year. He thought it would be fun. My dad was on bipolar and Handsome intelligent but you know pretty up and down meaty so she had a rough time with your father. You know a lot of fun but he could be difficult and My mom she was just this sort of safe harbor of of both love and on and acceptance. And when i think about marriage and what was important that i learned from her was just that you're in it and you you stay in it. Is that what you did want to get married because you have to stick with it forever. Now you know you always like to think of yourself as being sort of an independent operator with all your own thoughts being very original but all the great icons at that time. Gloria steinem back girl. They weren't getting married now. That was being strong and that in spain Adventurous and so. I think i wanted to be part of that movement. So when i met. Bob i didn't want to marry you but i wanted to be with you. You met in the newsroom. We use smitten. Right away is interesting. Then bradley swiped silly runner in to meet the editor of the local at your you. There's just something. How old were you really out. You're not two thousand. Eighteen thirty seven hundred sixty six thirty seven and just hit over heels in love physically emotionally and the added benefit of the risk. Now you may not agree is you sometimes didn't like the secrecy now. That's true. But i understood why we secret. We married right now. But i wasn't working for him but he was in the chain of command and You know being in journalism. It was like a hotbed of gossip all the time. Yeah part of it is so much of what you do during your reporting processes secretive. And you can't talk about it with a lot of people and you can trust. You can trust right. I mean one of the things we were talking about is that we were just this weekend when i tell you about deep throat. When did i tell you who it was again. Was it like eighty two or eighty three. That's now i think it was eighty one. I think we've been going out and head of relationship for maybe year and we were up to dinner on street member that you list who was deep throat and i said well allow you told her out. How many people who told up till then curl bradley and it was. So why did you trust her. Be be around. You know when you see it. You must have been really impressed that he trusted you with. I was really. I was surprised to realize very ever talked about afterwards. Thought you might check back. I just love that. He instinctively trusted her with one of the biggest secret in american history. I got the sense that their connection to each other has a lot to do with their childhoods. Elsa had this incredibly stable family over father's was bipolar but my was not stable at all. My parents were divorced. When i was quite young about twelve or thirteen and her mother hospital hit a nervous breakdown and my father came to say that my mother kris of out of the hospital now. And she's married tom. Barnes who was my father's best friend. And i remember thinking to myself. You're in this alone. Well you can have a mother. The father and friends and you're in alum in was very kind of just you know in your view. Think your mom's loves you enough to leave the marriage and marry somebody else let alone my best friend and it was so painful but also kind of off okay. I'm this. I'm in this alone. And i gotta figure it out how hand After college i was in the navy. And i present signed up for naval. Rotc and i married a woman. Who is my high school sweetheart is they say she was very smart. Lovely person and when i was off on your marriage just fell apart and it was kind of second act of the. Oh okay and then. After nixon resigned i was in a romance and got married second time and we had tell league in that didn't last and i didn't last because she essentially we had tell and left with tally and that was kind of the third act of okay. You're in this lung so when we started going now and when my mother died i wanted to get married but i was embarrassed to propose to you because i felt i had all of these. Two earlier failed marriages and you were. You know wonderful and we were married in nineteen eighty nine. I think i was surprised when bob asked me to marry him. Because it was unexpected. And i remember we've been together long nine years. And it was unexpected fabulous unexpected. We were out at our house in maryland and we were sitting out on this little small sun room that we have and we were talking about his mom on who died and he said Nothing would make their happier than if you would marry me. And instead of shocked. I was.

Bob Gloria steinem eight months bob woodward nine years curl bradley san francisco Rotc two thousand four sisters tom elsa walsh Two Elsa bob one bradley second act third act american
MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

BBC World Service

09:11 min | 2 months ago

MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

"This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Totally unnecessary. That is what a top lieutenant in the Minneapolis Police Department said today about the way that former police officer Derrick Show Vin Pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd, he testified on the fifth day of Sheldon's murder trial. NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the proceedings and joins us again from Minneapolis. Hey, Adrian. Hi, Elsa. All right. So today wrapped up the trial's first week, which, as you know, I've been talking about has been packed with so much emotional testimony, like from bystanders who watched Floyd died to first responders who couldn't revive him. But today the trial seemed to shift a little right. Tell us a little bit about that. Yeah. Today, the prosecution worked to build its case that Derrick show Vin used excessive force on George Floyd. And to do that they called Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman to the stand. He is the longest serving police officer in the Minneapolis PD. He's been on the force since 1985. He's the head of the homicide division. And importantly, after George Floyd's death, he was one of the department employees who publicly condemned what show Vin did. Prosecutor Matthew Frank spent time today asking him about the dangers of restraining a suspect by laying them face down. Have you ever in all the years you've been working for the Minneapolis Police department. On been trained. To kneel on the neck of someone who is handcuffed behind their back in a prone position. No, I haven't. Is that if that were done with that be considered force absolutely. What level of force might that be? That would be the top tier the deadly force. Why? Because of The fact that if you need is on a person's neck That can kill him. Not not mincing words. They're obviously right. Well, what exactly did Lieutenant Zimmerman's say about the way show Vin handle George Floyd. So here is the same prosecutor asking Zimmerman a question about what he saw in the body cam footage of George Boyd's arrest. What is your? You know, your View of that use of force during that time period. Totally unnecessary. What do you mean? Well, first of all. Pulling him down to the ground face down. And putting your knee on the neck. For that amount of time. Is just Uncalled for. I saw no reason why The officers felt they were in danger if that's what they felt. And he said, the danger is what show then I would've had to field to justify keeping his his knee on Floyd's neck for that, Monk. E mean it's not every day that you hear. A police officer, especially a senior police officer criticized Another officer, even a former one, right, right? Yeah. But on cross examination, eyes show, Vin's attorney, Eric Nelson, worked to poke holes in his testimony, his main focus being the latitude that police officers are allowed during under the police department's use of force policy when they're responding to incidents, So here's Nelson asking that the same witness a question. You would agree, however, that in the fight for your life generally speaking in a fight for your life, you is an officer are allowed to use whatever force is reasonable and necessary. Correct? Yes. And that could even involve improvisation, agreed. Yes. Minneapolis Police department policy allows a police officer to use whatever means there never are available to him to protect himself and others, right? Yes. The defense attorney there, obviously giving clues about the kind of arguments he's going to make when it's his turn to present his case that show been feared for his life that he was dealing with the dynamic situation. Struggling suspect an angry crowd. And real quick. When do we expect the defense to start calling their own witnesses? Well. The prosecution is expected to wrap up their case by the end of next week. And then it'll be the defense's turn. We expect starting the following week that is NPR's Adrian Florido in Minneapolis. Thank you, Adrian. Thank you, Elsa. Critics say that George is controversial New election law restricts voter access and disproportionately effects people of color and in protest Major League Baseball announced today It will relocate the summer's All Star game and draft out of Georgia and under pressure from voting rights advocates. Major companies like Delta and Coca Cola have issued critical statements. Now. Stetson University law professor Ciara Tourist Spellissy studies the influence of corporations and lawmaking earlier today, I spoke to her about what she found striking about this wave of corporate criticism. One of the things that's remarkable about the new statements from Delta and Coca Cola is that they have changed positions a few days ago. They put out pretty Tepid criticisms and or support for the Georgia legislation, and now that the legislation has become law, and they've been under pressure from voting rights advocates They have changed their tune on. That doesn't happen that often. Let's dig into that a little more, because obviously corporate America lobbies. Statehouses Congress for all kinds of things, right? Can you talk about how aggressive they can be in this area or how reluctant they have been in this area in the past? So corporations have two main ways that they influence policy. One is through corporate donations to particular candidates. They then spend even more money lobbying lawmakers to get the policies that they want. Now, most of the policies that a corporation wants are for its own benefit. No, this is a little bit different because voting rights advocates in Georgia put pressure on corporations not just because they were located in Georgia, but also because they had given money to Some of the politicians who created this regressive Election law in Georgia. Can you talk about a moment in recent history where we've seen corporate activism lead to significant legislative change? I think the biggest Example of this was the 2017 tax cut. And the tax cut was literally for corporations. So you had political donors putting enormous pressure on Members of Congress and the corporate tax rate was cut significantly. Another example is bathroom bills and so by bathroom bills. These are Laws at the state level that direct individuals to only use the bathroom of the gender of their birth. And one of these bathroom bills was passed in North Carolina. The end see double a pulled championship games from North North Carolina. And that got AH lot of attention and and North Carolina. Rolled back that bathroom, Phil. We've been hearing a lot, especially in the last year about corporate responsibility, so to speak. What you going to be looking for going forward to see whether this is Real or not, well, one of the things that we saw after the riots at the Capitol on January 6th. Woz corporations deciding to pull back corporate PAC money from the Republicans who objected to The electoral college votes for Joe Biden. But now there is pressure from the U. S Chamber of Commerce, which is one of the largest trade associations in America. It's also one of the largest Dark money, political spenders in America, and they're urging their members to get back in the political spending game. So one of the things that I will look at After Georgia and after the riots on January, 6th is Do any of these corporations actually changed their political spending behavior. Ciara Torres Spellissy is a professor of law at Stetson University in Gulf Port Florida. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. There is a new attempt to bring the U. S and Iran back to the 2015 nuclear deal with one The Trump administration left in direct talks are set to begin in Vienna next Tuesday.

George Floyd Minneapolis Police Department Adrian Florido VIN Audie Cornish Elsa Chang Derrick Show Vin Minneapolis Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman Matthew Frank Lieutenant Zimmerman Elsa George Boyd Floyd NPR Adrian Georgia Sheldon Eric Nelson Coca Cola
Biden addresses Atlanta attacks: ‘words have consequences’ whatever the motivation

All Things Considered

03:11 min | 3 months ago

Biden addresses Atlanta attacks: ‘words have consequences’ whatever the motivation

"This afternoon, President Biden and Vice President Harris mourned the deaths of the eight people killed this week during a serious of shootings in the area. Six of those who died were women of Asian descent. A 21 year old white man is charged with their murders. The president and vice president met with members of the Asian American community and spoke to lawmakers about a sharp increase in crime against Asian Americans in the past year. Ever since the pandemic began. We're joined now by a meal. Moffett of member Station W. A. B in Atlanta Welcome I also high, so I understand the president and vice president spent about what two hours in a closed door meeting, speaking with members of Georgia's Asian American community, elected officials, others do we have a sense of what they all talked about today? Yeah, The president called those discussions, Heart wrenching. The talks were originally scheduled to last an hour and, as you say, went two hours. The president vice president condemned the violence and mention that of the eight people who were killed this week, seven were women and six were of Asian descent. In remarks after the meeting, President Biden spoke passionately about the fears that many people have felt Too many Asian Americans have been walking Up and down the streets and worry waking up each morning the past year failing their safety and the safety of their loved ones are at stake. We've been attacked. Lame scapegoating harassed. They've been verbally assaulted, physically assaulted, killed. And Elsa, the president said after their meeting today with members of a P I Asian, American and Pacific Islanders, it was important to draw attention to what's been happening over the past year. Nearly 3800 incidents of race attacks have been recorded. The conversation we had today with the A P I leaders And that we're hearing all across the countries that hate and violence. Often hide in plain sight. It's often met with silence. That's been true throughout our history. That has to change. And I know that Vice President Harris spoke just before the president did. Her presence, I imagine added particular meaning to this White House visit in Atlanta today. Yes, She, of course, is the first woman to be elected vice president. She's also both black and Asian American. She said that the president and she will not be silent and will always speak out against violence, hate crimes and discrimination. Racism is real in America. And it has always been Xenophobia is real in America. And always has been Sexism, too. Without mentioning former President Trump by name. Vice President Harris implicitly criticized Trump when she said this for the last year we've had people in positions of incredible power scapegoating Asian Americans, and Harris continued people with the biggest pulpits spreading this kind of hate. Of course, President Trump often used the phrase the China virus. President Biden echoed his VP saying. Quote We've always known that words have consequences.

President Biden Vice President Harris Station W. A. B Asian American Community Moffett Atlanta Georgia Elsa President Trump White House America Donald Trump Harris China
"elsa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:09 min | 3 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on KCRW

"Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. The Biden administration is facing a big challenge at the US Mexico border. Hundreds of unaccompanied minors are arriving every day, overwhelming the government's ability to process and transfer them to sponsors. Usually, these are family members. As a result, thousands of Children without guardians are being held in warehouse like detention facilities. FEMA has been mobilized to help out Melissa Lopez is an immigration attorney and director of diocesan, migrant and refugee services in El Paso, Texas. Welcome Hello. How are you? Good. So your organization I understand provides legal representation for many of these unaccompanied minors. Can you just talk about How has this surge been affecting your work right now? I mean, the reality is is that a lot of these Children are still stuck at the border. And so it hasn't really affected us too much at this point, because we're still waiting for the Children to actually reach. Shelters where we provide services and so were anxiously waiting for them, you know? Well, ah, Lot concerned about the conditions of the Children might be in and these border patrol Holding facilities and these temporary shelters that have been set up obviously not ideal conditions for Children, and so we would much prefer that they be in the regular or our shelters. Well. The governor of Texas Greg Abbott and Republican members of Congress have blamed this most recent surge on the Biden administration, saying that President Biden's policies are a green light to migrants. Crossing the border. Do you think the influx were seeing right now is being driven by the change in administration. No, I don't. I think that the reality is is that so long as their push factors in these countries that require people to leave in order to be able to eat regularly in order to have be able to have a safe place to sleep at night. These numbers will continue. Trump on by his administration did absolutely everything possible to keep people from even being able to step foot on U. S soil because Once they step foot on U s soil than they have rights. So you see this influx being made up of people who are just simply waiting to enter the U. S during the Trump administration and now don't have to wait anymore. I think that many of them Knew that if they tried to enter, they would probably, you know, face severe injuries, physical injuries or even death. If they tried to enter, you know, I think that it's just People are actually now being allowed to enter, which is well within the law and which should have been done under the Trump administration as well with respect to the current surge in migrants, especially unaccompanied. Miners. How would you assess the Biden administration's efforts and handling the situation right now? You know, it's It's really tough, I think under the Biden administration, I think, unfortunately, they were so laser focused on the migrant protection protocols or remain in Mexico on baking Sure that those asylum seekers could enter the United States as quickly as possible that I did. I don't think that they saw The surge of immigrant Children, but I am really happy to see that additional resource is air being put into The need for migrant Children to be in a safe place again. I'm not advocating for beast temporary shelters along the border, but The more quickly that Children can be tested for Cove in to make sure that they can safely go into a shelter or could be returned and reunified with her family. I hope that the help that's being requested from FEMA will ensure that the Children won't languish in these temporary shelters. Along at all. Melissa Lopez is director of diocesan migrant and refugee services in El Paso, Texas. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you. West Virginia has been hemorrhaging population over the last decade, and Governor Jim Justice has an idea to turn it around. The Republican governor wants to reduce the state's personal income tax by 60%. He and some other leading Republicans at the Capitol hope this plan will bring in thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of new residents. They've missed each of West Virginia. Public Broadcasting gives us a look at the plan and whether it could work in rolling out his plan. Earlier this month, Governor Jim Justice referred to maps and charts. According to the Census Bureau, West Virginia is the only state that lost population overall. Since 1950 all others have grown. But now Governor Justice says this is the moment to turn that all around, especially with such a successful vaccine roll out here. The spotlight of the world's on West Virginia right now. Absolutely. We know from the standpoint of how we've handled Co vered. And how we've handled the economics of covert. Really and truly, we have knocked it out of the far the governor's income tax reduction plan, formally introduced by the Legislature last week would cost the state nearly a quarter of its general revenue budget. He will come for that revenue loss. Governor Justice has proposed massive hikes on tobacco, alcohol and soda, and most notably, the proposal would bump the consumer sales tax from 6% to 7.9%. Making it the highest base rate of any state in the nation. Governor Justice is it would be a net win for taxpayers that would provide much needed economic growth in a state that scene the decline of the once dominant coal industry. He also dreams of another win for the state that he's promoted under the tax reform plan. I really, really believe that there is a real chance. Of landing real entertainment landing. You know, the next Disney the next Dollywood, But the seats Chamber of Commerce says justice is sweeping proposal misses the mark. I think that proponents Of the current plan might simply have overlooked or underestimated. The impact of these proposals on businesses. That's West Virginia Chamber president Steve Roberts. Among other concerns, he takes issue with the proposed increase to the consumer sales tax. Especially considering the higher populations are concentrated in many of the state's border counties. We want to do everything we can to keep those purchases in West Virginia. And if we adopt a sales tax rate that would make our state sales tax so much higher than surrounding states were afraid that people will find the incentive to run next door to do their shopping where people spend their money is one thing getting them to come to West Virginia and droves by reducing the income tax as the governor hopes..

Elsa Chang Melissa Lopez Los Angeles Trump United States Disney 60% Census Bureau Republican 6% thousands Dollywood U. S FEMA Congress Greg Abbott Steve Roberts Mexico last week Governor
With 'Raya,' Disney has their biggest animated action hero to date — and yes, she's still a princess

Fresh Air

06:10 min | 3 months ago

With 'Raya,' Disney has their biggest animated action hero to date — and yes, she's still a princess

"Chang says the new Disney film Riot, and the last Dragon is not just for kids. He calls it a gorgeously animated fantasy adventure with a hopeful message. For this moment, the movie began streaming on Disney plus today. Ryan and the last Dragon is the lovely moving surprise. Its big selling point is that it's the first Disney animated film to feature Southeast Asian characters. Like so many movies that break ground in terms of representation, it tells a story that's actually woven from reassuringly familiar parts. Didn't mind that in the slightest. The movie directed by the Disney veteran Don Hall and the animation newcomer Carlos Lopez. Estrada brings us into a fantasy world that's been beautifully visualized and populated with engaging characters. And it builds to an emotional climax that I'm still thinking about days later. Story is a little complicated as these stories tend to be It takes place in command Ra and enchanted realm inspired by various Southeast Asian cultures and divided into five kingdoms, named after a dragon's body parts heart Thing, spine, Talyn and tail. Before they became extinct centuries ago. Dragons once roamed the land and served as friendly guardians to humanity. Their magic lives on in a Jule called the Dragon Gym, which is kept in a cave in the heart, but the other four kingdoms covet. It's mighty powers. One day all five factions come together and try to reach a peace agreement. But tensions erupt. Ah fight breaks out, and the gem shatters into five pieces that are scattered across come, Andhra. This opens the doorway to an ancient enemy called Bedroom, a terrible plague that turns people to stone. Actually, a hero must rise and save the day. Her name is Ryan. And she's a young warrior princess from heart voiced by the excellent Kelly Marie Tran from Star Wars. The last Jedi. I Ryan manages to escape the drone, though her father, her body whose leader of heart isn't so lucky. Now Ryan must recover the pieces of the Dragon Jim, reverse the damage and banished that room for good. This is the first time we've seen a brave young character embark on a quest for magical bottles. And Ryan and the last Dragon is rooted in traditional fantasy lore with the Lord of the Rings and game of Thrones being just the most obvious influences. Movies, Intense scenes of sword play and hand to hand combat. Give it a tougher, more grown up field and most Disney animated fantasies. My own young daughter had to cover her eyes a few times. Some other recent Disney princesses, including marijuana, and Elsa Ryan has a bold, adventurous streak and isn't all that interested in romance? Unlike them, she doesn't even have time to sing a song. That said the movie still has plenty of lightness and humor. Screenwriters. Quick win and Adele Limb have provided the usual Disney array of cute critters and lively supporting characters. None of them is more colorful than see Soo Ah friendly water Dragon who is magically resurrected during riots journey. She's the last of her kind, and she has a crucial role to play in the story. She's voiced delightfully by Aquafina doing one of her signature chatterbox comedy routines and selling everyone of ceases and naturalistic wisecracks. In one scene, she touches a piece of the dragon Jim and magically Lights up. Which riots sees as a hopeful sign. You were glowing. Oh, thank you. I use Alan Rivers climb. Maintain my know this'd my little sister office magic. I got that glow in your little sister's much jack. Yet. Every dragon has a unique magic. Okay, What's yours? I am a really strong swimmer. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. You touch this gym piece, and it gave you powers. You know what this means? Right? I no longer need a night light. What? No, you're still connected to the jumps. Magic, not means you can still use it to save the world. If we can get all the other Jen pieces, you can reassemble it and, well, the drooling away. And bring my bar back and bring all of commander back Ryan and sees his journey takes them toe. All five kingdoms of command ra all of which are so vivid and transporting, I found myself wishing they really existed. More than I could have at least seen them on a proper movie screen. There's the town of talent, which is built at the edge of a river and the desert wasteland of tail where Ryan and See Soo must enter a cave of obstacles straight out of an Indiana Jones adventure. As the two of them search for more dragon Jim pieces. They, of course, pick up a few friends along the way. There's a street smart boy who cooks a mean shrimp Con ji and a toddler pickpocket, whom I found more creepy than cute. The movie's most intriguing character is no Mari arrival. Princess from Fang, who's voiced by Gemma Chan. As a side note. Chan and Aquafina both appeared in crazy rich Asians, which, like this movie was co written by Adele Limb. Mari and Roya used to be friends until the fight over the dragon Jim rip them apart. Now they're bitter enemies, and their emotional dynamic is fierce and complicated in ways that relationships are rarely allowed to be in Children's animated films, especially between women. Contrast, See, Sue is all feel good vibes. She's a dragon, after all, with little understanding of how treacherous humans can be. She doesn't get by riot and the Mari distrust each other so why they can't just set their differences aside and defeat the drone together. It's Caesar's sincerity and purity of heart. That makes the stories finale so unexpectedly stirring, especially now. Our fates are closely bound together. It reminds us as it builds a case for forgiveness, reconciliation and mutual sacrifice. The emotional power of riot and the last dragon sneaks up on you. Its lessons aren't knew exactly, but it makes you feel like you're learning them for the first time. Justin

Disney Ryan Don Hall Carlos Lopez Adele Limb Kelly Marie Tran Aquafina Elsa Ryan Estrada Chang Alan Rivers Andhra See Soo Jim Pieces Con Ji Gemma Chan Mari Roya Indiana Jones Fang
"elsa" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

02:52 min | 3 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

"These She is our house. I have never seen a woman. So oh i have watched someone such a long time and she she she does everything. She doesn't just do it. She dies it's gone. Well she is a vase and she just. She commands everyone attention. She is someone who is. She's such kind also one such strong personality. She's everything is she's on the first line. I freaking out and i sent her about like five west note of need screaming of sexy for such a long time. But i've been so scared. I hope doesn't scare you end. She was so nice about inch of like you can call them down. It's fine but she just i'd love. She's amazing vos is big sister of life and how people see as this powerhouse like she's a fighter for people who she loves like the best thing about her is bose leads as well as she loves. And i think that's really why she continues to soar like what you see is actually real and then even deeper. She's magic that's that's that's the homey and i think like it's oakland when i'm interviewing context and right now we were. What's that right now. It's going to be a good conversation but she's she's amazing. So yeah that's going to be a good parent. I'm really glad that you have her. You have access to her because you this. You're only nineteen elsa. Think you understand the fact that you're only nineteen is actually wild because you are already getting doors open for you. Your opening doors that most people would never even know exist. I it's it's what's happening for you right now is magical and deserved and i hope that you get all the insight about all the mistakes we made. So you don't have to make the good thing is i. Have you guys to tell me what's up. So that's them was beautiful about all this. I of view. I don't need to watch you guys ended. I know you'll you'll be very straight with me and you'll be like no elsa that's messed stop. Why would he do that. Don't do the odds you know not to do i. You and i.

nineteen first line nineteen elsa one such oakland five west bose
His business is building ice castles. Will that get harder in a warming world?

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 months ago

His business is building ice castles. Will that get harder in a warming world?

"In the movie frozen queen elsa magically creates a palace maid of sparkling ice for brent christianson making an ice palace is harder but the results are still enchanting. We tried to create. What feels like a other worldly experience. Christensen is the founder of ice castles. His company builds elaborate structures that tower up to forty feet high. They start by making thousands of icicles. Which the fuse together. And then spray repeatedly with water so given a month of good cold weather we can create some pretty massive structures. Low temperatures are good for building but visitors dislike extreme cold so the company's sites in utah. Colorado new hampshire and wisconsin are in areas that often hover near thirty two degrees some years. It's really cold some years. It's not and we just gotta hold our breath and work with what we have last year. The wisconsin locations opening was delayed because the ice was melting and climate. Change is bringing more warm days. Long-term definitely if i were to pass this down generation generation. We'd be moving further north. I'm sure but for now. Christianson is coping with the uncertainty and this year his team was able to build. Ice castles fit for queen elsa

Elsa Magically Brent Christianson Ice Palace Christensen Wisconsin New Hampshire Utah Colorado Christianson Queen Elsa
Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

Marketplace

03:42 min | 4 months ago

Facebook 'Supreme Court' Orders Social Network To Restore 4 Posts In 1st Rulings

"Facebook has created its own sort of Supreme Court. It's an oversight board that has the final say on some of its hardest decisions over what users can and cannot post. Today. That board issued its first rulings it ordered the social network to restore several posts that it had removed for breaking Facebook rules. NPR TECH correspondent Shannon Bond joins us now to explain Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. So we should first note. Facebook is among MPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon tell us a little more about some of the cases this board considered. Yeah, there were five and total announced today. And in each of these, the board was reviewing post that Facebook had taken down for violating policies against things like hate speech, nudity and harmful misinformation about covert 19. And when you dig into the details of these rulings, you know, enforcing these rules is really complicated. And ultimately, the board overturned. Facebook's decision to remove in four of these first five cases, huh? Okay, so give us a quick example. Right. So in one case, Facebook had removed a post from a user in Myanmar, who had suggested there was something wrong with Muslims and Facebook says this broke its rules against hate speech. This is an especially fraught issue because, of course, Facebook has been criticized for its role in the genocide of the country's Muslim minority. The board looked at this and said, You know, if you take into consideration the full context this post was pejorative. But the board didn't think it crossed the line into hate speech. And so it said, Facebook needs more justification. If it's going to take down post like this. And the board told Facebook to reinstate it Now Facebook has agreed to abide by these rulings and the post is already back up. Wait. So who is on this board? Exactly? Admit up of 20 international experts. They're mainly and things like law and human rights. But there's also a Nobel peace Laureates and journalists and even the former prime minister of Denmark. It was created by Facebook last year, and it's funded by Facebook through an independent trust. And do you think these decisions give us any clues as to how the board sees its overall role? I spoke to Evelyn Do ek Harvard Law School lecture has been following the board very closely. These five cases even though it's only five cases out of the thousands or millions of decisions that Facebook makes in awake are a true shot across the bow from the oversight board to Facebook. She says. It's a shot across the bop bow because the board is taking aim directly at some of Facebook's policies and enforcement, you know, warned about the extent to which the company relies on artificial intelligence that says those systems need more human oversight. It emphasized taking context into account, and it wants Facebook to just be much more clear about its rules on policies like health, misinformation or Dangerous groups. You know, Elsa, we know Facebook has this immense power over what it's billions of users composed. Now it's created this board and from what we've seen today, the board has ambitions to be a real check on that power. You know, it's kind of flexing its muscles so interesting. Well, what I did notice is we did not here today about Facebook's decision to suspend former President Trump after The whole insurrection at the Capitol in January. 6th. What do we know about the board's review of that case? Right. Facebook reviewed the Trump suspension to the board last week. This is the case everyone has their eyes on. Of course, right. It's a huge deal. The board is opening up for public comment tomorrow, and it has about three months to make a ruling, And ultimately it's going to be up to the board to settle this very fraught debate over whether Trump should get his account back, so we'll stay tuned. That is NPR's Shannon Bond. Thank you, Shannon. Thanks, Elsa.

Facebook Shannon Bond Shannon Elsa MPR Ek Harvard Law School NPR Supreme Court Myanmar Evelyn Denmark President Trump Donald Trump
Trump Has Been Silenced On Social Media

The Takeaway

03:14 min | 5 months ago

Trump Has Been Silenced On Social Media

"A lot about Big Tech and certainly the past few days show just how powerful these companies are. First, Twitter and Facebook suspended President Trump's access to his biggest online megaphones. Then Apple, Google and Amazon cut off parlor, a social media site popular with Trump supporters and joining us now to unpack. All of this is NPR's tech correspondent Shannon Bond. Hey, Shannon. Hey, Elsa. All right, so we should first know that Facebook, Google, Apple and Amazon are all among NPR's financial supporters. All right, So Shannon, what do you think He's pretty aggressive moves. Tell us about Silicon Valley right now. Also, you know when Facebook and Twitter cut off President Trump it really put the spotlight on something I think we've known for a long time. But I just seeing so starkly, Which is how much power these big tech companies wield because we conduct so much of our lives online. So there were the examples you mentioned. But also others that go beyond the question of speech really, to the bottom line stripe and papal cut off the ability of the president's campaign and his supporters to raise money and take payments. The e commerce companies, Shopify shut down an online shop connected to Trump that sold merchandise like Make America Great again. Hats and another shop owned by the Trump Organization that sold things like golf accessories and So these decisions they're raising some really big questions. What are some of those questions? Well, maybe the biggest one is all about access. So Amazon Apple Google. They have a lot of power over kind of what we think of more of the infrastructure of the Internet. In Apple and Google's cases, they you know, they decide what APS can go into the APP stores. So They decided this weekend to block parlor, the alternative social media site that Trump supporters had flocked to And that means it's much harder to get parlor on your smartphone, which is, of course, where most people use Social media, and then even more significantly, Amazon kicks parlor off its Web hosting service, so it's gone dark. You can't access it all today. Parlor sued Amazon. And basically, you know, we're really realizing seeing very tangibly Just how much power Big tech has to decide which companies which brands which businesses can effectively exist online, Okay, sure. That is a lot of power. But isn't all of this bound to But these companies even under more scrutiny going forward, Yeah, I think that's absolutely fair, and I spoke with Ben Weisner at the American Civil Liberties Union piece of the same thing. He's really concerned about these individual companies. Power. Here's what he told me. And it may be that by exercising their right their constitutional right to decide who can use their products right now they're going to bring a different kind of regulatory focus down on them about whether we should have let these companies get this big in the first place. So you know, this isn't gonna go away else. I mean, remember these companies they're already under a lot of scrutiny. Facebook and Google are facing any trust investigations. Now we have Congress promising new investigations here, so I think the spotlight just continues. Well, I mean, turning to President Trump. He got off. He got cut off from Twitter and Facebook now parlor. It was a momentary alternative, but that's gone. Now, where will trump go? You think that is the big question? There are plenty of upstart sites that want him. He might even start his own outlet. I think, Elsa, it's safe to assume he's not getting off of the Internet for good. I

President Trump Amazon Donald Trump Apple Shannon Bond Google Facebook NPR Shannon Twitter App Stores Elsa Trump Organization Shopify Silicon Valley Ben Weisner Golf America American Civil Liberties Union Congress
Would the Philadelphia 76ers Regret Trading Ben Simmons for James Harden?

Mason & Ireland

03:46 min | 6 months ago

Would the Philadelphia 76ers Regret Trading Ben Simmons for James Harden?

"So a wo- jr is reporting. Adrian roggin ascii that. The sixers are now willing to include. Ben simmons intrigued todd for james harden but they are nowhere close to a deal. Lt would you. Trade ben simmons for james harden if power which team six. So if i'm the sixers. Do i want a pair. James harden with joel embiid. You see pictures of james harden yesterday. He looks like he may have put on the greg bergman little extra little extra dance harda and was one of the big criticisms with joel embiid that embeds outta shape the beat is oftentimes out of shape as well. Yes i haven't heard that hurt a lot but oh no him. Being out of shape is a thing. So okay if you're asking me. If i want to trade away my fit superstar bring in an odor. Maybe not always fit superstar to pair with my youngest not so thin superstar. I'm gonna say no. I don't wanna do that. Trae now for ben simmons. You have to buy. His hair's not taken benson yeah. I don't think that's going to sell the the one thing. And we've we've read this tim. Tim macmahon i think wrote this article about james harden that he really alienated his teammates. Because it's described in that article that when you have. The james harden experienced that means he's running the entire show he decides if he's late for film session film session weights if he wants to go to atlanta or if he wants to fly somewhere early to party you go where james goes when you sign up for the james harden experienced. He runs your organization. I read that. I read this piece today. After i heard you guys talking about it and the line that caught me was it was an organized. Aau team that that. If if they were they were playing in la. James one of the team to stick around an extra night because he wanted to do as parting reminded me of watching the michael jordan documentary earlier this year. When phil jackson talks about letting dennis rodman go do what he needs to do. But could you imagine if rodman were the leader you know. Could you imagine if rodman showed up out of shape. See people forget robin party but he never showed about shape. He party but the next day he bought out everything. Great billable z. That's the rub though hardened balls out i mean you can sail even if all this stuff that masons brought up his true and there's no reason to think that tim macmahon made it up so i think it's all true one of the quotes in that piece that scott was talking about. Is we knew if we had more than one day off in a row. The james harden was on a plane. Go into party. But we also knew he would come back and drop fifty point triple double on people the problem with this whole this whole issue. The whole heart issue is there's only fifteen guys in the world they can lead your team to a title and you need to have at least one and maybe two of them and hardens one of those guys so he's not. What are you talking about his first team all nba four times your conflict eighty accolades from the media and stats with being. Do lead your team to a championship. Those aren't bra. Elsa elsie you're right. He's great with the counting stats guy won the won the mvp two years ago. He walked up to the podium. And said you're listening to k spn los angeles but can't you make a distinction between a guy who can can put up stats and a guy who can score versus a guy who can lead a team to a championship. Yup there is a

James Harden Joel Embiid Ben Simmons Sixers Adrian Roggin Greg Bergman Harda Tim Macmahon Trae Rodman JR Robin Party Todd Benson AAU Dennis Rodman Phil Jackson TIM
New York Braces For What Could Be "The Biggest Snow Storm In Several Years"

710 WOR Programming

00:39 sec | 6 months ago

New York Braces For What Could Be "The Biggest Snow Storm In Several Years"

"And Mayor de Blasio is readying the city for that big winter storm That's forecast the snow expected to start falling. This afternoon. We have not had a lot of storms like this in the last few years. Thank God we've seen much less snowfall. Then we did a few years back, so this could be the biggest storm in several years. Right now we're getting a projection of between eight inches and 12 inches, and it could dunk and power for residents across the water in New Jersey with wind gusts of up to 40 MPH. In fact, New Jersey Board of Public Utility says crews are ready to respond to outages throughout the region. Elsa, reminding residents to charge their phones and do travel carefully if you have to go

Mayor De Blasio New Jersey Board Of Public Uti New Jersey Elsa
Biden Names His Picks For Key Players On His Pandemic Advisory Team

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 6 months ago

Biden Names His Picks For Key Players On His Pandemic Advisory Team

"Joe Biden takes office next month, one of his first priorities will be responding to the pandemic, and today he named his picks for key players who will advise him on how to contain it and how to get people vaccinated. His picks include some very familiar faces and some new faces to joining us now from Wilmington, Delaware. To talk about all of this is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Hey, Tam. Hey, Elsa. All right, so let's just start off with perhaps the most familiar face on this team, Dr Anthony Fauci. What, exactly Well, his will be one bite and becomes president. Dr. Fauci will continue to lead the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases where he's been involved in vaccine development. And he will also be an adviser to the president. The president elect now On covert 19. He said on CNN that he thought his role would be similar, though What he didn't say is that Biden is a lot more likely to listen to him on a regular basis than President Trump has been certainly of late. Fauci will bring continuity between the administration's and he knows all the new players, including Biden's pick for the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rachelle Wolinsky, as well as his pick for surgeon general Vivek Murthy. Here's what he said on CNN today. I know both Rochelle Walensky and Vivek Murthy very well. I mean, I've been working with the back for years when he was the surgeon general during the Obama administration and Rochelle Wolinsky has been a colleague of mine. She's an infectious disease expert. From Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts General Hospital. Now the CDC director job doesn't require Senate confirmation, but surgeon General will and Murthy had a difficult time getting confirmed last time because of his work on gun safety issues, Right. Okay, there's another doctor on this list. Marcella newness, Smith. Of Yale School of Medicine. What is her role going to be? She's going to lead something that Biden is creating called the Cove it 19 Equity Task Force. As we all know. By now, the burden of covert 19 has been disproportionately felt by people of color, and Nunez Smith is the founding director. Of Yale's Equity Research and Innovation Center. She's been working on this issue extensively and building trust in communities that don't necessarily trust the medical community or vaccines. Let's Turn now to the pick for health and human services secretary. The person who will be getting that job is state Attorney general of California, Javi Airbus era. He's also former congressman. Why do you think the Sarah was selected for this particular job? You know, he's been actively involved in defending the Affordable Care act, leading a coalition of states fighting to save it all the way to the Supreme Court. He spoke about that effort last year on all things considered, Americans are fed up with uncertainty. When it comes to whether or not they can send their child to a doctor or the hospital. We deserve to have certainty. Health care is not some widget that you play with its life and death. But beyond that, while attorney general in California he went after a major hospital system in the state for anti competitive practices. He backed legislation aimed at preventing drug companies from keeping generic drugs off the market. And the thought is that he may be able to bring some of that experience and energy to bringing down health care costs. He would also be the first Latino to lead the department. He grew up in Sacramento with working class immigrant parents. He got into Stanford, according to his official bio after fishing and application out of the trash that his friend and thrown away his personal story is something that you can expect to see Biden and his team highlight, especially since Biden's been under pressure to make good on his promise to have a diverse cabinet, right. Lastly, there is a White House position. Jeff Science will be the coordinator of the pandemic response. He's also gonna be a counselor to the president. There has been some pushback right to this particular selection from progressives right? He was a top economic official in the Obama White House. He famously was brought in to help after that disastrous rollout of healthcare dot Gove and save the launch of the Affordable Care Act. There has been pushed back as you say, from progressives to his appointment. He comes from the business world since leaving government he's Leading investment firm, and he also served on the Facebook board of directors for a time. The reality, though, is that this doesn't require Senate confirmation. And even those who object to some of his connections concede he is good at managing systems and solving problems in a crisis that is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Thank you, Tam. You're welcome, Elsa.

Vivek Murthy Biden Tamara Keith Dr Anthony Fauci Dr. Fauci President Trump Rachelle Wolinsky Rochelle Walensky Obama Administration Rochelle Wolinsky Centers For Disease Control An CNN Equity Task Force Nunez Smith Equity Research And Innovation National Institute Of Allergy Joe Biden Fauci White House Elsa
'Happiest Season' Makes the Yuletide Gay

Tim Conway Jr.

02:07 min | 7 months ago

'Happiest Season' Makes the Yuletide Gay

"Actually got kind of Ah, new wrinkle in terms of Christmas films with happiest season, which is basically Hannibal Hallmark Christmas movie style. Look at a relationship between two lesbians in Love. Who go, Tonto. The family of one of the women. And obviously, mom and dad don't know about their daughter's Proclivities. And, you know, I guess hilarity ensues, but it zoom in here or is it a good nature? Romcom ish kind of thing, Or is it home isn't a hallmark E Christmassy. What is it? Yeah, I would say, you know if you ever said to yourself, where are the corny Hallmark Channel style movies about same sex couples at Christmas? This? Well, here's your answer. Happiest season is actually made the Elsa cut above most of those films because you have good actors involved here. Kristen Stewart that's right from the Twilight franchise and a few better films plays one of the young women and Mackenzie Davis, who some people will recognize as the android heroin from the recent Terminator movie. They're the two women and they're going to spend Christmas With the parents played by Victor Garber and Mary Steenburgen. They didn't stand in terms of the cast. You get Daniel Levy of that very popular Emmy winning a sitcom that has Creek in its name and Aubrey Plaza on the gas tire. It's a good cast and obviously You know you're gonna have some meat, cute stuff going on and some deception and what have you, but But truly, it follows the standard formula for these movies, except it's a couple of women in love. And of course, they've got to, you know, kind of keep the secret until everything is revealed and get a basically it generates some laughs and real emotional tension and, wow, moments it. You know, you could see it on Who, Lou, if you have

Hannibal Hallmark Twilight Franchise Mackenzie Davis Elsa Kristen Stewart Aubrey Plaza Victor Garber Mary Steenburgen Daniel Levy Emmy LOU
Back to the Future actress Elsa Raven dies

Jason and Alexis

01:18 min | 7 months ago

Back to the Future actress Elsa Raven dies

"Of Kenny talking talking about about the the back back to to the the future future set set also, also, Raven, Raven, you you may may know know her her as as the the Save Save the the clock clock tower. tower. Yeah, Yeah, she she has has passed passed away away at at the the age age of of 91 91 peacefully peacefully in in her her home home in in Los Los Angeles Angeles on on Monday. Monday. Boy, Boy, It's It's just, just, you you know, know, I I don't don't know know if if it's it's just just the the microscope microscope of of being being in in the the pandemic, pandemic, but but it it just just seems seems like like we're we're losing losing so many, you know? Stars that air Classic stars Sean Connery just passed. It's just Yeah, she was born on and this is what I didn't realize that she was kind of this into Hollywood. She was born on September 21st 1929. And she appeared in over 75 television shows and movies. Oh, wow. I'm gonna have to look her up and remind myself what she looks like. I'm sure I'd recognize ER Yeah, If she's the one shaking the coin thing in the movie, she kind of looks old back in that, you know, back when the movie was on eighties. I think that was yes. Yeah. Raven also appeared in TV shows like General Hospital. Fresh Prince of Bel Air Seinfeld, Murphy Brown. Days of our lives. Everybody loves Raymond Chicago Hope she was all over the place. Now, days of our lives. You're talking to Kenny and I here. I wonder who she played on days of our lives. We'll have to investigate that. We're going to need you. We need to find that out right away. Stop what you're doing and figure it out for okay. Dirt alert's over. Alright weapon so

Los Los Angeles Angeles Raven Kenny Sean Connery Fresh Prince Of Bel Air Seinfe Raymond Chicago Hollywood Murphy Brown General Hospital
Billy Joe Shaver, Seminal Outlaw-Country Songwriter, Dead at 81

Doug Stephan

02:25 min | 8 months ago

Billy Joe Shaver, Seminal Outlaw-Country Songwriter, Dead at 81

"Well, Here's an interesting story. One interesting fellow that many this may not know about. You know his music Billy Joe Shaver. Seminal outlaw country songwriter passed away at the age of 81. He had no unspecified illness was in Waco, Texas. He's a Texas native. In fact, he burst onto the scene in 1973, a debut album entitled Old Five and Dime. Er's Like Me. I was known for contributing the Outlaw country movement. Who's friends with Willie once our shaver, as you said he called him the greatest living songwriter. His songs recorded by the likes of Johnny Cash. Elvis, Kris Kristofferson, Jerry Lee Lewis. His rep said his hardscrabble songs reflected his tough life dropped out of high school hitchhiked, drove trucks across the country, married and divorced. The same woman three times for him can't be too sure, and the 2007 shot a man in the face outside a bar in Texas. It was acquitted of the charges, claiming self defense had a heart attack on stage Andrada memoir about it 2005 and Title honky tonk hero. When he was young. He lost the top three fingers in a sawmill accident. His son, Eddie, died of a heroin overdose in 2000. He was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame Year was 2006. For that was also a member of the National Songwriters Hall of Fame that that honor in 2002 Americana Music Association gave him a lifetime achievement award for song writing most recently last year, the Academy of Country Music gave him the Poets Award. So they both may wise Williams shaver together hard to be an outlaw crack shovel. It'll go right. And it's hard to be the only thing. This was part of it. I think this was in one of those TV shows that Kenny Rogers did those that called a gambler. And I think this song is willing. Elsa was in a couple of those with willing with Kristofferson was in One or two of them in that bunch. That song was in that

Texas Billy Joe Shaver Outlaw Country Movement Kris Kristofferson Williams Shaver Academy Of Country Music Eddie National Songwriters Hall Of F Honky Tonk Kenny Rogers Johnny Cash Waco Americana Music Association Lifetime Achievement Award Jerry Lee Lewis Willie Andrada Elsa Heroin Poets Award
"elsa" Discussed on JustATouchof_J

JustATouchof_J

03:50 min | 8 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on JustATouchof_J

"Guess Elsa say..

Elsa
U.K. "challenge" trials will infect healthy volunteers with COVID-19

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

01:21 min | 8 months ago

U.K. "challenge" trials will infect healthy volunteers with COVID-19

"At this London hospital are preparing to deliberately infect. Cheers with the corona. To test the effectiveness of vaccines and treatments The so called challenge trial is much faster than what's happening now with volunteers around the world who live normally at home and may or may not ever become infected in a challenge trial infection is guaranteed sophie rose a student at Johns Hopkins University studying in the UK wants to take part way to tackle. This problem is to stop with these trials, an young healthy population and where the risk is lower what happens if one of these volunteers? Does. When these trials are designed, they are definitely informed is acknowledged that there is a risk of the first step infect ninety volunteers eighteen thirty years old with the minimum required to get them sick enough to then test vaccines or treatments, but not enough to make them seriously ill at some researchers object on ethical grounds I inject Elsa volunteers. With the virus for which we have no cure at the moment if we would have a cure. And effective treatment I would be all for it. The challenge trial still approval here in the. UK. But that is expected to be granted. They could start as early as January.

Cure UK Johns Hopkins University London Hospital
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 8 months ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"News. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up force. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports burnt banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 8 months ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up for us. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports parent banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film that

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
League of Legends Worlds Preview - Bracket Stage

The Esports Minute

04:51 min | 8 months ago

League of Legends Worlds Preview - Bracket Stage

"We have to go through groups for people unfamiliar with illegal. World Format two teams to advance through the group stage over four groups that means eight teams advanced. These groups were created through finishes in the split and through play in qualifiers five regional leagues account for the vast majority of teams, EU China Korea and Southeast Asia and North America. North America sent three teams to groups and three teams are headed right back home team liquid fly quest Tsm were the three representatives and each has been eliminated. It's a poor showing for the lads from a and shows na has clearly fallen behind the other three major regions. Now, before I get too ahead of myself, let's go through the groups individually group. As saw China's Suining in Europe's G to advance team liquid almost pulled out a miracle. Of An advanced after a poor start but ultimately finished with a record of three and three, just a half game behind G2's for three in Group B Damn Lan gaming from Korea took the top spot with jd gaming from China, in second ease rogue and PSG talent from Southeast Asia were eliminated. Group sees suck res, Jen Gee and use fanatic advance. China's Lg de Gaming finished third enemies biggest disappointment team finished fourth going entirely witness at Owen six. Brutal. Finally Group D tops's sports from China took I D Rx from in second and five finished third with a record of three and three just like liquid about one wasn't quite as close now group also saw the only other winless team Unicorns of love join Tsm and Unicorn Love was to be expected as they were the only team from outside of a major region with the UNICORNS coming from Russia. So breaking it down by region brings down to just three leaks. Europe's L.. E. Had two teams Vance out of a possible four China's L. P. L. had three teams advance auto possible for and Korea's Elsa had all three teams advanced. Well groups are a round robin best of one setup in brackets. We do a best of five that's a different strategy than that round robin format. It'll be interesting to see how teens adjust. The Games will start tomorrow morning at three Am Pacific Time that six am on the East Coast and four pm on Thursday in Shanghai where the Games are actually being helped that will be the time of every matchup in world from this point on. Unfortunately before we dive into the matchups for clarity purposes, every record and finish I mentioned will be from the summer split. It's the best marker of a teams. Current Form Has the biggest impact on world's the spring split is also important, but it can get confusing when mentioning where teams finished in two different playoffs and in two different regular seasons. So as I go through these ups and I talk about where they finished, every single finish will be from the summer split or the summer playoffs with that being said, let's get into the match ups. Tomorrow's match will pit to Korean teams against each other Damon Gaming brothers overall pick to win the championship will take on Rx Damon Finish first in the UK this year with DX right behind them in the regional finals damn ones swept dear x one see if they can do it again with the pressure of world still you have to go in assuming Dan one's A. Favourite here, Friday morning is a regional matchups. This time two teams from China in Suining Jd gaming sooner has really emerged as a dark horse world after beating favourite G to in Group A but JD gaming is also dominate the team finished second in the L. P.. l., and lost a close finals match against tops's sports that team swept soothing earlier in those same playoffs. It's JD. Gaming is the favourite, but soon has quite a bit of momentum right now. So that'll be an interesting match to watch Saturday the first of the Western teams playing fanatic takes on T. o. p. e. sports man if fanatic pulls this off, it'll be insane no doubt about it. This would be the biggest upset of the bracket stage by a pretty considerable margin. GOP Finish first in the L. P.. L. And when the playoffs that's an incredibly impressive feat as the opio is considered the best region for all of League of legends. Sports two-piece words are the favorites to win the event according to a few betting places I checked out fanatic is going to have a very tough task. But if they pull it out, expect to see a reddit thread with thirty thousand votes when you wake up on Saturday morning. And our final matchup is to or most of our listeners will probably recognize Europe's G to and careers. Jen Gee it's to absolute power houses here. GINGY has finally regained form after a restructuring from the days of Samsung, Galaxy and g two went to the finals last year and ran. You're basically all year long if these two teams weren't playing each other, I'd be rooting for them both in their bracket matchup unfortunately, one of them has to go home the oddsmakers have g to a slight favorite, but this one should be super

China Europe Southeast Asia Jen Gee North America Korea China Korea Unicorns Damon Gaming Lg De Gaming Reddit Suining Jd EU Samsung East Coast Russia Gingy Vance League Of Legends GOP
Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek CEO of Women in Voice on Linguistics and its Place in Voice

The Voicebot Podcast

06:12 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Joan Palmiter Bajorek CEO of Women in Voice on Linguistics and its Place in Voice

"Know that's now I. I. Kinda WanNa. Go back a little bit because you're a linguist. And I mean I don't know how you characterize yourself to characterize yourself as a linguist. Yeah. Usually when people ask me say I consider myself primarily a linguist and researcher those are the two core identities that I inhabit most of the time. Okay. Great. So What originally got you interested in linguistics Yeah, I mean I think. I. Consider Myself as being linguist when I was little I like played with code things and you know babbling around I started taking French quote unquote foreign language. In Middle School, I would have been like eleven and. I just thought an unlocked, the coolest world's travel and culture, and you know my parents have always really prioritize travel instead of like buying a big screen TV's let's run off to Thailand So that kind of interesting language culture has always been there for me. Actually, my mom found his old document of mine working career stuff for high schoolers where you like plan out potential career directions. Apparently on this document, I circled linguistics French, and photography as the three things I was interested in which ended up being my undergraduate degrees, my master's degree. Topics right there. In my teenage years, I knew. That's perfect. Yeah. Well, maybe maybe we do. I. Say there's a sense that we ask college students to make decisions about the rest of their lives. You know it's such a young age but maybe we know at least some of us know much younger. I feel like I got really lucky I feel like. I. Don't necessarily know the names of the topics but I feel like there's a light at the end of the horizon that I'm walking towards at all times sometimes running a mostly walking in just knowing that directionality and honestly the privileged to be able to pursue the things that I'm so passionate about. Now given the you've spent so much time. Going into linguistics study research have you had time to keep up with your French photography? My I I taught French previously to pay the bills in my graduate studies and I worked in France between UNDERGRAD and graduate school. So I'm was very proficient I mean, my dad hopes one day become famous photographer. You know as a retirement career but no, I have A. Busy schedule today and those things take away backburner. Got It. Okay. So you started out French in photography you moved into linguistics and why don't you share with listeners? What some of the areas of study you focused initially and then how that evolved. Yes. So I don't masters in linguistics from UC Davis. And they did a really phenomenal job of forcing you to take all the courses. In the range of things I was always really interested in phonetics and sociolinguistics, but taking morphology and Syntax and typology natural language processing was of course it was very new at that time. And really. It's when I started actually studying to a link goes interfaces from a LP phonetics standpoint that I felt like I had a moment of like wait a minute. This is a big data multi-lingual back end. Used by millions of users worldwide. Like who is deciding what good enough means for the Audio You know At that time I focused a lot on ed tech but I think the multi lingual multi modal interfaces that I was looking at Babbel Rosetta. Stone presented at Rosetta Stone really thinking about the research that space blew my mind that was back in two, thousand, fourteen, two, thousand, fifteen. Yeah. So When you think about those systems because they've been around for a while and some of them very good is that a stone has been doing this a pretty high level for a long time before we had cloud computing to new redoing this office CDs. Because I remember. At least one of my daughters maybe both of them took a couple of full programs you know through. through his stump Are there elements of that that of of the language learning process? You think that help move the industry forward or was that always just sort of a fork in on its own I think. Educational Technology has such power especially in twenty twenty. You know anyone who has kids I don't finds this stuff wonderful I think Rosetta stone you're right I think back in the day was really innovative software I haven't seen significant innovation in the last decade I can't I'm under NDA can't tell you what I told her engineering team but my research that is public I mean the. The back end with they're doing the acoustics in the visuals that they show users and most users aren't linguists. An most users aren't fun additions like me. Or mostly incomprehensible. So I felt like there was a huge mismatch between what the back end was doing in the educational pieces of it. Could you actually learn and get better at your pronunciation from these tools? Right. So that's that's a critique on the application of the technology though correct? Yeah. Is opposed to the core technology in terms of being. Listen and. and. That's what I. Mike Critique is the scaffolding or like how it's structured could be significantly rated and their companies like Elsa and blue canoe that are doing the work to make it interpreted. Because we do have back ends that should be able to do this very well.

Rosetta Stone Researcher Babbel Rosetta I. Mike Critique Middle School Stone Educational Technology Thailand Uc Davis France LP
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 8 months ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:04 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Slash work. Now when We think about. What's happening at the border you know when when any of US goes with you guys, we are visit shelters where families are still together. Yeah. But we know that there are tens of thousands of kids right now who've been separated from their families babies toddlers. Young Children Teenagers? To your point haven't seen their families maybe from the time they were two and a half to four, which is horrifying. WHAT OUR OPTIONS As people who are listening and are enraged by this idea that we would rip children of their mother's arms for literally no reason other than just to do it be cruel, right What would you? With your expertise, what can we do? How do we advocate on this stuff? Well, I. Think a is to realize that your voice is so powerful at the whole reason why we even were able to kind of expose what was happening is because regular people who found out about it we're like that is not okay. You know it wasn't just the people with the loudest voices are the people that we expect to hear from but it was regular mothers and fathers and human beings all across the country who said like I'm not okay with that. That's that is not okay. So A. Feeling comfortable to continue talking about how you're not okay with that I think is hugely important. Be I think if you? WanNa get more engaged. You can go to immigration advocates, dot org, and it's a website it's nationwide and it basically, you can put in your location and it tells you who is doing pro bono legal services all around the country you have a second language they do look for interpreters volunteer, but they also look for English speakers to volunteer show up drive people to court. Even, like started back drive if you want I think that you know it doesn't have to be like you don't need to start your own organization. It can be something as simple as that if that even sounds too much I always tell people you know. Having a conversation with your kids. That's invaluable to me talking to your kids about what's going on and I hear you a lot of people think this is a very scary topic and they don't want to traumatize her kids and obviously everything at an age appropriate level but I'm interested in you helping your kids. Develop their empathy muscle it needs to be exercised they need to they need to. Know. How to say cut if that happened to me how would I feel because that is how? Everyone who's listening hopefully feels like some of the things that I've said that affected them. It's because you imagine how would that feel if it were you or your child and when we sort of don't let people or teach people how to empathy. They're able to just not feel any way about that. So having a conversation with your kids is hugely important and then the last thing I'll say is You can visit this about humanity and look at different ways you can engage there but also look in your own lives there. So I guarantee you there are people in your life whether they're working for you their friends, people in school classmates, colleagues who. One hundred percent are. Being affected by this crisis whether they, themselves are undocumented are part of a mixed out his family went through asylum or getting their papers themselves I think that you. Who are listening probably haven't been looking around very much and I think if you do, you'll see that there are. Friends and people in your life that you could be advocating better for and I think you know I mean obviously. Looking and seeing like who's making decisions that are affecting these families is huge. You know think the more you know. The better you'll do and so. You know read up on WHO's..

US
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:12 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Wow and you know you do you see it Even in our denial of visas for kids you know whether it's from south and Central America or around the world to come here to study things like engineering things that are so important. You know without immigration the US falls behind in technology as well. So it's it's every single level. The country is always better and stronger when people come here and contribute to it. Yeah, and it's interesting because you know for you I know you're first generation college educated in your family. I know for me you know my dad's emigrant I'm a first generation American. My my mother was born here, but her mother emigrated here. So you can sort of debate on my first or second depending on what side of the family but. My family came here you your family sent you to school here you became a dual citizen because we love this place and we want to contribute to it. And it's weird that. You know my family was allowed, but now families are not allowed. We have the resources we have the space where allocating improperly rape. and. And I think maybe we allocate improperly because we've lost. The human quotient. So it makes me really excited to see what you're doing and how you're reminding people and I'll say you know for the the bus trip that we went on back in August just to be. With the kids and to see their parents and check in with them, and even just to ask people how they're doing. When no one's asked in a while you know to make sure kid has a new pair of shoes and we can go and play soccer and we can visit the pop up school that this is about humanity has helped to build for them. That's something people don't consider as when these kids are in this. When they're when the migration of their families halted so their education. So how do we make sure? To keep some sort of structure to lessen the the trauma that they're going through. Totally Yeah Yes we can is the name of the of the school and. Yeah, what people don't realize is these families are also undocumented in Mexico. So it's not like they can just start school era either and so..

Central America US soccer Mexico rape.
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:34 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Then I felt like, okay. Now I feel comfortable saying. Come do this because I know we're going to get it to them. That's kind of been one of the markets that I'm super proud of about this is about humanity which is like you know what's happening. You know where we're going you know what we're raising money for you know where the goods are. Your they're gonNA give it to them. You're going to see it there. We're going to tell you. and. So that's been kind of One of the most important things to me is that people just know when they're supporting us they're literally supporting the exact families that you would wanna be supporting. You know what I mean. Yet Super Special. Can you talk to people a little bit about what you're collecting and why and what the conditions are for these families who are stuck at the border? Yeah, I mean. In the past. I don't know maybe like. Year ever since we started the MP program, we've returned about sixty thousand people to Mexico regardless or not whether they're from. Mexico and there are sort of. Kind of the you know the majority are in these border towns waiting for their asylum case or waiting for their number in shelters that have either existed for a long time or have just sprung up. I would probably say now there's probably over thirty three sort of like official and unofficial shelters doina alone we work with about six or seven of them and so we work to help. Make their lives better in situations a lot of these shelters are overcrowded They are over capacity. The conditions are not great. You would probably be. Shocked but. Know that these people are grateful there even there and he have even gotten that far. so we usually do You know will fundraise to..

Mexico official
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:20 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"That's just not who I am visiting about running that is love is I can go anywhere travel anywhere and I don't need a gym I just need some air pods and I'm little google map to make sure I don't like run off the you know whatever and I'm gone I mean, I'll go around five or six miles in a new city I've never visited and I've just toured it. It's very call. I've heard other runners talk about that my wow. What is that like for you? Kind of? Kind of fun. I love it. I just love it so. We catch up. Your at Stamford. You meet Jaren. Yeah and then how do you guys wind up in La? Well, he's originally from L. A.. He grew up here in the valley very much lay born and raised, and yeah, we I get so excited when people are. So he's so loves it Deep City Pride. There's an aggressive amount of pride actually. And I'm GonNa just say like good on you but it was the kind of thing where I remember. You know. Again, as I said, my mom being very traditional Mexican like she had never even really seen a black person until she was like in her mid twenties, she'd come to the states you know. So I think she was like. What's happening here and I was like Oh this person So So I think I love. I know like what? Yeah. So I think that it was definitely kind of a big shock to my mom and my family just being like, wow. Okay. This is like who Elsa at when we were first dating. Now you know and when we got married it was. Less of a shock, but I think at the beginning it was definitely. Like kind of a surprise and you know and even. Like now I mean we we just had our twenty-second Valentine's Day. We've been married for fifteen years even in the beginning of our relationship because I sort of really hadn't kind of grown up in.

Jaren google Stamford Elsa La
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:24 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"And then for me to come home. Call my husband to be like you will not believe what Valentine has just told me. She heard in school today and be so upset and him be like okay. So are you ready to have the dock and I was like I? Guess so you know so that's like for me was very indicative of okay. This is a new space here and I need to be preparing my kids for the things that they may hear people may say to them and how they need to be not just armed and equipped with like what is the correct response but understanding why are people even saying? Like what is what does that even mean you know you tell your kids when you talk about how to explain to them why people would say such a thing like how do you start that conversation? I mean honestly, we really actually started with looking back just historically at like we looked at a map and I showed them maps over the ages about how California used to be part of Mexico, and then it became part of the United States and sort of like teaching men that things weren't always the way that they seem now. So they could understand a little bit of historical context and Talking a little bit I mean. Obviously everything is age appropriate but talking about like okay and then we put a border because people thought that the border made them safer. Here's this wall and so. People want to extend this wall or or quote unquote build a wall even though as you've seen a wall already exists to in fact. Yes. To walls to walls that exists order, which you know for people who think that it keeps them safer keeps you pull out it doesn't and so just sort of explaining to them like. So this is what this person meant. They wanted you basically to be on the other side in Mexico, but you're born in the United States. So there's no reason for that but and then talking a little bit about you know this is a way of he's probably heard it somewhere I mean a five year old doesn't kind of make this stuff up on their own. and so just explaining about having empathy for them and maybe like. That they may not have all the information and so but my kids do and so they don't need to. Feel any type of way about it because that statement is actually just like an untruth and so yeah. That's gotta just be so. Crushing it was I mean again I just I can't really think of a time where I was so. Just no words the only words I had were like. Grabbing my phone. call him up Jaren and just being like you will not believe and being so upset because you're just like I can't protect my kids from that and that's very hard to deal with when you think of all the things you try to dude like set your kids up for success and protect them and help.

Valentine Mexico United States California Jaren
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:09 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"I I remember standing on stage when it was my turn to go and give my talk thinking like, what am I doing here? Nancy Pelosi just talked what am I doing here? It was so. Amazing and they brought in. Women, and some incredible men in people from all these different sort of age brackets and backgrounds and. Yeah and then they were talking about how do we take that inspiration on the road? How do we share this with more cities? How do we get you know more local heroes in spaces up on stages to to motivate their communities and not hand? That's right. That's very were never go well, I like it. and fast forward to now you have helped to create an you run this incredible organization called this about humanity which I've had the honor of working with and alongside and. I've been able to go on a trip with you guys and follow along on all of the other trips that you've done and. I. I wonder if you can explain to everybody listening a little bit about what this is about humanity does. Yeah. So it's it's a movement We like to call it and essentially what it does is it helps. Raise awareness around families and children on both sides of the border So I'm originally from the Obama and when everything sort of started to. When everyone became aware that we were separating families and interest was more in the news. I was very. Motivated to do what I do especially when it was around in area where I grew up and so it had originally started out as a donation drive sort of me saying like, Hey, you know we're going to get these things to the kids. Do you mind if you want to? Send Me To my house fast forward to like an Amazon warehouse. It was the reaction was so powerful. So along with my sister. Yolanda and Zoe Winkler who kind of both wanted to do more we decided like well I wonder if people would wanna come on a trip and learn more about what is happening because it's one thing to feel like you can give and you can donate and that's incredible. But I'm looking for people who want to. Learn more and become better advocates and I think once you have come and you've learned, you are so much more effective at speaking on the issue and can. Explain why certain things aren't right or have very negative effects and consequences, and so we started doing these trips to the border. We've done about eighteen. And been able to take over, you know two hundred people and to really just be in community with each other and with these families and children and listen to their stories and their journeys and understand. Why this is happening and Yeah. That's kind of what's going on. This is humanity. So it's but it's really we it's about you know bringing people together in a time where we seem very far apart and divided, and that's why we call it. This is about humanity because it's really focusing on who we are as human beings and what we think is okay and not okay to do to human kind Yeah. Yeah. It's really amazing and I I to get into the organization and certainly. Talk about from each of our perspectives. What you're hitting on which is I think the importance of witnessing. It's the reason that I've always wanted to travel for advocacy work because to read about something is one thing and it matters. It matters each of us has the luxury now to be able to educate ourselves on what's going on out there but. I really believe that if you want to. Advocate for people there's no better way to do that. Then standing shoulder to shoulder with them so I think that's a great thing for us to come back to you but you said something..

Nancy Pelosi Obama Amazon Zoe Winkler Yolanda
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

03:03 min | 9 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Before, we start today's episode. I wanted to just take a moment to check in with all of you and. Task you to check in with your sauce because. Let's be honest. It's been a really. Rough an emotional few days. We lost someone that. I'm not quite sure I have the words to do justice to who she was. Who she was as a human as a woman as an activist and humanitarian and a literal game changer in the course of human history and the rights of women as a wife, a mother her. And so many other things to so many people. I'm talking about the legendary. Ruth Bader GINSBURG WHO Very. Sadly passed away at the age of eighty seven years old on Friday evening. And while the notorious RPG accomplished so much in her life including becoming the second female justice of only four to ever be confirmed to the Supreme Court. To me and to so many others one of her greatest accomplishments and an enormous part of her legacy is how she was a champion for women and really for humanity. She spent her entire life advocating for the advancement of gender equality and women's rights because women's rights are human rights. She stood for integrity and strength and justice for all and was truly a beacon of light in many many difficult eras. This is a huge loss for us as a community. As a community of women and as a community of individuals who truly believe that all humans are and deserve to be treated. As equals. I think it's incredibly important for each of us to take the time that we need to mourn and to feel our grief. Over. This great loss. I also believe that RPG would want us to keep fighting. Fighting against injustice in all its forms fighting for change and to continue to listen to and learn from one another. One of the best ways that we can do that that we can carry on her legacy and work to make meaningful changes is to get out there and vote. So while I could probably go on for an entire podcast episode or two or three or seventeen about how brilliant and powerful and inspiring. RPG was. I feel confident that she would rather her legacy live on in the changes that we make forward. So for today, I'm simply going to say thank you. Thank you so very much. To the honorable Justice Ginsburg, you are sorely missed you will never be forgotten. And we will take this heartbreaking moment and turn it.

Ruth Bader GINSBURG Supreme Court
"elsa" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Hey guys, it's canvas and Kayla. And we are directionally talent. We thought we would know every single thing to know in the entire universe by the time we were in our thirties. Guess what we don't we don't at all will stay tuned. Because today we have our live episode that we are airing with our guest, Elsa Collins. Just wanted to thank you so much for coming. It means so much that you came from MIR and fire, thank you to the bungalows Fairmont for. Rarely bungalow. Well, yeah, we, we've been recording in in my living room for the past year. We've been we've started this venture about a eight months ago, we started this podcast. And so if you've listened to before, thank you so much. We were so scared to put ourselves out there and try come from new and get out of our comfort zone. So thank you for supporting that and, and growing with growing pains. And speaking going pains, this is a I live up, so. Well, we tried, we tried really hard. We tried so hard. Okay. Here's the deal. We had an incredibly successful I live show. Thank you, guys, so much. Everyone who was able to come and make it. Thank you, Elsa. Thank you, Melissa, our producer and our editor, unfortunately, it just didn't work out. The sound quality did not come through. We wanted to make sure that you guys really got the full experience of this conversation that we had with Elsa about this is about humanity. It was such a powerful conversation that we're like you know what? Let's just do this again. Let's start over. Let's sit down with Elsa on, we're talking about a lot of the same topics that we brought up that night we have a lot of the same questions, and we just kind of wanted to have a more personal conversation. A deeper dive in some of these issues, and we wanted to give you guys the best opportunity to really be able to listen and absorb the conversation that we were having because we. Felt it was really important. You guys so Elsa was raised on both sides of the border in San Diego, and Tijuana, Mexico. Both of her parents were born in Mexico. She is the last of five children. She's a first generation college graduate, receiving her b in communications and master's degree in sociology from Stanford University. She then pursued a juris doctor at from Columbia law school. She is the co founder of the idea tour. She is on the board of alliance for a healthier generation, and an ambassador for the good plus foundation, when she heard about the news of the young children being detained and separated from their parents. Also, along with her sister said that we have to do something, so they took their experience in social impact, and border issues. And they started this is about humanity and this is about humanity's a movement, whose main goal is to help those affected at the border through education and donation efforts, they worked identified those in need, and then they help fill that need. So basically is a about how she is sickly. Superwoman and without further. Ado here is Elsa Collins. Also, we are so glad that you are back with us. Our live episode was a huge success, but this'll be even better second time is the charm who knows..

Elsa Collins co founder Mexico Elsa Kayla MIR Fairmont Melissa Columbia law school Stanford University San Diego Tijuana producer editor eight months
"elsa" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Elsa elsa yeltsin mark barnaby am well hello nope oh no many and montaigne this hello pundits not a word bags at cash put my mind on a cofounder known for no miles on hundred we go oh free so these.

Elsa elsa yeltsin mark barnaby montaigne
"elsa" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

08:17 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Elsa don't kick whitney home break a few nickel come simmered saving needs to the twin if we bring it back because maddow crackdown even older death row nicot boy in your fist naked check style now tap me more swag take over eat nickel themes what no weapon protection than happen something that can make you do wrong make you somewhat she can happen really feel some together welcome love.

Elsa whitney maddow
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Like consumer polaroid's her pictures develop instantly normally for a client shall take to the client picks their favorite and she keeps the other one that she calls the b side now that polaroid film is discontinued and elsa is eighty years old she's mostly retired in eyrle's film she looks back over hundreds of photos and reflects on her career that innocent of any the explanation is in my life i've ever had not to meet life when you down this had met here need to walk around the euro elsa never had much of a national profile but in cambridge she's an institution aero moved their 27 years ago with his wife julia and their son hamilton he told me way i described cambridge's this city fill with very very smart people none of whom have any desire to talk to you but erl and julia became friends with elsa and her husband harvey silverglate in attorney and criminal defense and civil liberties elsa says about harvey so the only people he will have separate with a julian narrow busied rather work lucky me as an aside i should note that one harvey's defense clients is jeffrey macdonald the infamous surgeon convicted of killing his family his case was reexamined in a book by errol called a wilderness of error as our conversation began errol gave credit to julia for bringing the couple's together leads the result of my wife may all of whom i might add including myself love julia every good and i wouldn't know neither elsa or harvey if not for her i always complain that.

polaroid eyrle cambridge julia hamilton erl elsa harvey silverglate attorney jeffrey macdonald errol eighty years 27 years