35 Burst results for "Elsa"

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:04 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Slash work. Now when We think about. What's happening at the border you know when when any of US goes with you guys, we are visit shelters where families are still together. Yeah. But we know that there are tens of thousands of kids right now who've been separated from their families babies toddlers. Young Children Teenagers? To your point haven't seen their families maybe from the time they were two and a half to four, which is horrifying. WHAT OUR OPTIONS As people who are listening and are enraged by this idea that we would rip children of their mother's arms for literally no reason other than just to do it be cruel, right What would you? With your expertise, what can we do? How do we advocate on this stuff? Well, I. Think a is to realize that your voice is so powerful at the whole reason why we even were able to kind of expose what was happening is because regular people who found out about it we're like that is not okay. You know it wasn't just the people with the loudest voices are the people that we expect to hear from but it was regular mothers and fathers and human beings all across the country who said like I'm not okay with that. That's that is not okay. So A. Feeling comfortable to continue talking about how you're not okay with that I think is hugely important. Be I think if you? WanNa get more engaged. You can go to immigration advocates, dot org, and it's a website it's nationwide and it basically, you can put in your location and it tells you who is doing pro bono legal services all around the country you have a second language they do look for interpreters volunteer, but they also look for English speakers to volunteer show up drive people to court. Even, like started back drive if you want I think that you know it doesn't have to be like you don't need to start your own organization. It can be something as simple as that if that even sounds too much I always tell people you know. Having a conversation with your kids. That's invaluable to me talking to your kids about what's going on and I hear you a lot of people think this is a very scary topic and they don't want to traumatize her kids and obviously everything at an age appropriate level but I'm interested in you helping your kids. Develop their empathy muscle it needs to be exercised they need to they need to. Know. How to say cut if that happened to me how would I feel because that is how? Everyone who's listening hopefully feels like some of the things that I've said that affected them. It's because you imagine how would that feel if it were you or your child and when we sort of don't let people or teach people how to empathy. They're able to just not feel any way about that. So having a conversation with your kids is hugely important and then the last thing I'll say is You can visit this about humanity and look at different ways you can engage there but also look in your own lives there. So I guarantee you there are people in your life whether they're working for you their friends, people in school classmates, colleagues who. One hundred percent are. Being affected by this crisis whether they, themselves are undocumented are part of a mixed out his family went through asylum or getting their papers themselves I think that you. Who are listening probably haven't been looking around very much and I think if you do, you'll see that there are. Friends and people in your life that you could be advocating better for and I think you know I mean obviously. Looking and seeing like who's making decisions that are affecting these families is huge. You know think the more you know. The better you'll do and so. You know read up on WHO's..

US
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

03:37 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"To human beings. Yeah. Most of us are here are juggling a million things at once. So being able to offload, even the smallest tasks can make a huge difference. I'm always looking for tips and tricks to make my.

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:12 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Wow and you know you do you see it Even in our denial of visas for kids you know whether it's from south and Central America or around the world to come here to study things like engineering things that are so important. You know without immigration the US falls behind in technology as well. So it's it's every single level. The country is always better and stronger when people come here and contribute to it. Yeah, and it's interesting because you know for you I know you're first generation college educated in your family. I know for me you know my dad's emigrant I'm a first generation American. My my mother was born here, but her mother emigrated here. So you can sort of debate on my first or second depending on what side of the family but. My family came here you your family sent you to school here you became a dual citizen because we love this place and we want to contribute to it. And it's weird that. You know my family was allowed, but now families are not allowed. We have the resources we have the space where allocating improperly rape. and. And I think maybe we allocate improperly because we've lost. The human quotient. So it makes me really excited to see what you're doing and how you're reminding people and I'll say you know for the the bus trip that we went on back in August just to be. With the kids and to see their parents and check in with them, and even just to ask people how they're doing. When no one's asked in a while you know to make sure kid has a new pair of shoes and we can go and play soccer and we can visit the pop up school that this is about humanity has helped to build for them. That's something people don't consider as when these kids are in this. When they're when the migration of their families halted so their education. So how do we make sure? To keep some sort of structure to lessen the the trauma that they're going through. Totally Yeah Yes we can is the name of the of the school and. Yeah, what people don't realize is these families are also undocumented in Mexico. So it's not like they can just start school era either and so..

Central America US soccer Mexico rape.
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:34 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Then I felt like, okay. Now I feel comfortable saying. Come do this because I know we're going to get it to them. That's kind of been one of the markets that I'm super proud of about this is about humanity which is like you know what's happening. You know where we're going you know what we're raising money for you know where the goods are. Your they're gonNA give it to them. You're going to see it there. We're going to tell you. and. So that's been kind of One of the most important things to me is that people just know when they're supporting us they're literally supporting the exact families that you would wanna be supporting. You know what I mean. Yet Super Special. Can you talk to people a little bit about what you're collecting and why and what the conditions are for these families who are stuck at the border? Yeah, I mean. In the past. I don't know maybe like. Year ever since we started the MP program, we've returned about sixty thousand people to Mexico regardless or not whether they're from. Mexico and there are sort of. Kind of the you know the majority are in these border towns waiting for their asylum case or waiting for their number in shelters that have either existed for a long time or have just sprung up. I would probably say now there's probably over thirty three sort of like official and unofficial shelters doina alone we work with about six or seven of them and so we work to help. Make their lives better in situations a lot of these shelters are overcrowded They are over capacity. The conditions are not great. You would probably be. Shocked but. Know that these people are grateful there even there and he have even gotten that far. so we usually do You know will fundraise to..

Mexico official
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:20 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"That's just not who I am visiting about running that is love is I can go anywhere travel anywhere and I don't need a gym I just need some air pods and I'm little google map to make sure I don't like run off the you know whatever and I'm gone I mean, I'll go around five or six miles in a new city I've never visited and I've just toured it. It's very call. I've heard other runners talk about that my wow. What is that like for you? Kind of? Kind of fun. I love it. I just love it so. We catch up. Your at Stamford. You meet Jaren. Yeah and then how do you guys wind up in La? Well, he's originally from L. A.. He grew up here in the valley very much lay born and raised, and yeah, we I get so excited when people are. So he's so loves it Deep City Pride. There's an aggressive amount of pride actually. And I'm GonNa just say like good on you but it was the kind of thing where I remember. You know. Again, as I said, my mom being very traditional Mexican like she had never even really seen a black person until she was like in her mid twenties, she'd come to the states you know. So I think she was like. What's happening here and I was like Oh this person So So I think I love. I know like what? Yeah. So I think that it was definitely kind of a big shock to my mom and my family just being like, wow. Okay. This is like who Elsa at when we were first dating. Now you know and when we got married it was. Less of a shock, but I think at the beginning it was definitely. Like kind of a surprise and you know and even. Like now I mean we we just had our twenty-second Valentine's Day. We've been married for fifteen years even in the beginning of our relationship because I sort of really hadn't kind of grown up in.

Jaren google Stamford Elsa La
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:07 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"So, Inbetween. Running this organization and you know being this powerhouse mom and leader. An Where we left off sort of in the in the coming of age story junior high in. Mexico coming back to high school in the US what what happens in between What happens in between I mean. I. It's funny because you. When I started. High School in the states I was still crossing the border like my freshman halfway through my sophomore year and I just remember being so. Loving that. I. Was like. You know I was really into my Mexican. South about point like I was digging the feminine and sort of had had a little bit of A. Of A mind shift And I remember my mom being like, okay. When you gotta get ready for the sat be like Oh does not like matter. Okay I guess. Yeah I guess I kind of do want to go to college but I think for a minute I was Sort of thinking like maybe I should just get married and start when working as a secretary. I've have no idea you know and so i. I came back to the states and very quickly after like six months like back into sports and like it just now thinking back on, it just shows me and even when you know I'm down at the border now it just reminds me how children and kids are so. Have the special ability to just. Get into whatever the situation is and make the best of it. So that's kind of where I was that I remember my mom said Okay you can apply anywhere but you know you're going to go to the Catholic University and I was like, okay got it. But she did say I could apply anywhere. So I took her at her word and I had applied early to Stanford and then I had gotten in mom's like well, that's great but you're going to go to you know the Catholic University at that point the benefit of being the fifth child was I had my older siblings being.

High School Catholic University Mexico secretary US Stanford
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:24 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"And then for me to come home. Call my husband to be like you will not believe what Valentine has just told me. She heard in school today and be so upset and him be like okay. So are you ready to have the dock and I was like I? Guess so you know so that's like for me was very indicative of okay. This is a new space here and I need to be preparing my kids for the things that they may hear people may say to them and how they need to be not just armed and equipped with like what is the correct response but understanding why are people even saying? Like what is what does that even mean you know you tell your kids when you talk about how to explain to them why people would say such a thing like how do you start that conversation? I mean honestly, we really actually started with looking back just historically at like we looked at a map and I showed them maps over the ages about how California used to be part of Mexico, and then it became part of the United States and sort of like teaching men that things weren't always the way that they seem now. So they could understand a little bit of historical context and Talking a little bit I mean. Obviously everything is age appropriate but talking about like okay and then we put a border because people thought that the border made them safer. Here's this wall and so. People want to extend this wall or or quote unquote build a wall even though as you've seen a wall already exists to in fact. Yes. To walls to walls that exists order, which you know for people who think that it keeps them safer keeps you pull out it doesn't and so just sort of explaining to them like. So this is what this person meant. They wanted you basically to be on the other side in Mexico, but you're born in the United States. So there's no reason for that but and then talking a little bit about you know this is a way of he's probably heard it somewhere I mean a five year old doesn't kind of make this stuff up on their own. and so just explaining about having empathy for them and maybe like. That they may not have all the information and so but my kids do and so they don't need to. Feel any type of way about it because that statement is actually just like an untruth and so yeah. That's gotta just be so. Crushing it was I mean again I just I can't really think of a time where I was so. Just no words the only words I had were like. Grabbing my phone. call him up Jaren and just being like you will not believe and being so upset because you're just like I can't protect my kids from that and that's very hard to deal with when you think of all the things you try to dude like set your kids up for success and protect them and help.

Valentine Mexico United States California Jaren
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:09 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"I I remember standing on stage when it was my turn to go and give my talk thinking like, what am I doing here? Nancy Pelosi just talked what am I doing here? It was so. Amazing and they brought in. Women, and some incredible men in people from all these different sort of age brackets and backgrounds and. Yeah and then they were talking about how do we take that inspiration on the road? How do we share this with more cities? How do we get you know more local heroes in spaces up on stages to to motivate their communities and not hand? That's right. That's very were never go well, I like it. and fast forward to now you have helped to create an you run this incredible organization called this about humanity which I've had the honor of working with and alongside and. I've been able to go on a trip with you guys and follow along on all of the other trips that you've done and. I. I wonder if you can explain to everybody listening a little bit about what this is about humanity does. Yeah. So it's it's a movement We like to call it and essentially what it does is it helps. Raise awareness around families and children on both sides of the border So I'm originally from the Obama and when everything sort of started to. When everyone became aware that we were separating families and interest was more in the news. I was very. Motivated to do what I do especially when it was around in area where I grew up and so it had originally started out as a donation drive sort of me saying like, Hey, you know we're going to get these things to the kids. Do you mind if you want to? Send Me To my house fast forward to like an Amazon warehouse. It was the reaction was so powerful. So along with my sister. Yolanda and Zoe Winkler who kind of both wanted to do more we decided like well I wonder if people would wanna come on a trip and learn more about what is happening because it's one thing to feel like you can give and you can donate and that's incredible. But I'm looking for people who want to. Learn more and become better advocates and I think once you have come and you've learned, you are so much more effective at speaking on the issue and can. Explain why certain things aren't right or have very negative effects and consequences, and so we started doing these trips to the border. We've done about eighteen. And been able to take over, you know two hundred people and to really just be in community with each other and with these families and children and listen to their stories and their journeys and understand. Why this is happening and Yeah. That's kind of what's going on. This is humanity. So it's but it's really we it's about you know bringing people together in a time where we seem very far apart and divided, and that's why we call it. This is about humanity because it's really focusing on who we are as human beings and what we think is okay and not okay to do to human kind Yeah. Yeah. It's really amazing and I I to get into the organization and certainly. Talk about from each of our perspectives. What you're hitting on which is I think the importance of witnessing. It's the reason that I've always wanted to travel for advocacy work because to read about something is one thing and it matters. It matters each of us has the luxury now to be able to educate ourselves on what's going on out there but. I really believe that if you want to. Advocate for people there's no better way to do that. Then standing shoulder to shoulder with them so I think that's a great thing for us to come back to you but you said something..

Nancy Pelosi Obama Amazon Zoe Winkler Yolanda
"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

03:03 min | 1 d ago

"elsa" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Before, we start today's episode. I wanted to just take a moment to check in with all of you and. Task you to check in with your sauce because. Let's be honest. It's been a really. Rough an emotional few days. We lost someone that. I'm not quite sure I have the words to do justice to who she was. Who she was as a human as a woman as an activist and humanitarian and a literal game changer in the course of human history and the rights of women as a wife, a mother her. And so many other things to so many people. I'm talking about the legendary. Ruth Bader GINSBURG WHO Very. Sadly passed away at the age of eighty seven years old on Friday evening. And while the notorious RPG accomplished so much in her life including becoming the second female justice of only four to ever be confirmed to the Supreme Court. To me and to so many others one of her greatest accomplishments and an enormous part of her legacy is how she was a champion for women and really for humanity. She spent her entire life advocating for the advancement of gender equality and women's rights because women's rights are human rights. She stood for integrity and strength and justice for all and was truly a beacon of light in many many difficult eras. This is a huge loss for us as a community. As a community of women and as a community of individuals who truly believe that all humans are and deserve to be treated. As equals. I think it's incredibly important for each of us to take the time that we need to mourn and to feel our grief. Over. This great loss. I also believe that RPG would want us to keep fighting. Fighting against injustice in all its forms fighting for change and to continue to listen to and learn from one another. One of the best ways that we can do that that we can carry on her legacy and work to make meaningful changes is to get out there and vote. So while I could probably go on for an entire podcast episode or two or three or seventeen about how brilliant and powerful and inspiring. RPG was. I feel confident that she would rather her legacy live on in the changes that we make forward. So for today, I'm simply going to say thank you. Thank you so very much. To the honorable Justice Ginsburg, you are sorely missed you will never be forgotten. And we will take this heartbreaking moment and turn it.

Ruth Bader GINSBURG Supreme Court
Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 1 d ago

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"Today of the pain of lethal injection. This is a process the federal government plans to use to execute two inmates in a prison in Terre Haute, Indiana this week. Lethal injection is supposed to be a quick and painless death. Our colleagues it all things considered. Asked if it really is no one called well reported this story with a TC host, Elsa Chang. Hey, there. What were you looking for? S so we've been looking at the autopsies of inmates executed execution specifically excuse my lethal injections Physically, what's happening to the lungs was first tipped off that something might be going wrong with lungs a few years ago by a doctor in Atlanta named Jules if it had been reviewing some autopsies of inmates executed in Georgia, let's take a listen. I saw that instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death have began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death. A death associated with suffering. What are you seeing was a severe form of something called pulmonary oedema on this is when lungs rapidly fill with fluid, which could make you feel like you're drowning or suffocating. And it's happening here because the massive dose of drugs that inmates receive is damaging the inside of the lungs, all of which is morally important to many people, because we'd like to think it's the society. We're not torturing people that they're being painlessly put to death. And now there's this evidence of something else. Where did that evidence take you? Yes. Oh, Doctors haven't had a handful of autopsies, but we want to see how prevalent this is across the board. So we filed a public records requests. We've got more than 300 autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection from nine states spanning decades. Not all of them had date aboutthe lungs, But in the more than 200 that did we found pulmonary oedema in 84% of the cases. Now, lawyers are also bringing autopsies to federal courts around the country, claiming That the pain of pulmonary oedema amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. They say This explains why we've seen some inmates in recent years gasping for air and choking as they're being executed. Is it clear how much the inmates are feeling in those last moments of their lives? Right. That's the big question that the courts are tackling right now. Many doctors who are testifying have raised serious concerns about the drug states are using to try to anesthetized inmates. One drug that's been used in dozens of executions in recent years, isn't actually an anesthetic can't block pain is often used in hospitals to calm patients down before surgery. Another common drug that states use is an anesthetic, but it's not used in a way that guarantees the inmate warm, remain fully under for the duration of the execution. S O. Considering issues with both of these drugs doctors we spoke to say it's very likely. Many of these inmates could feel those suffocating effects of their lungs filling with fluid okay, so they could feel the effects what arguments or states making to defend lethal injection. Right s O the pushback. We've encountered our reporting of courses thes, and it's have been sentenced to death made us do involve pain. And, of course, many of the family members of the victims of these violent crimes do want justice to be done, regardless of how painful the execution will be. We went to Ohio to speak with a man named Norman Stout. He's 90 years old and his wife was murdered 36 years ago. It is only the bleeding hearts and have words that are involved in this discussion. Cruel and unusual punishment is laying out there in the cemetery, and I should point out that despite all the recent problems with lethal injection pulling does show that the majority of Americans still support the death penalty, and at the end of the day, Of course, it's up to the courts to decide whether or not lethal injection amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. But having autopsy evidence to consider during that process gives a much clearer picture of what lethal injection is actually doing the human body. Noah.

Norman Stout Terre Haute Elsa Chang Indiana Noah Atlanta Jules Georgia Ohio
Here are the 2020 Emmy Awards highlights

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:30 min | 2 d ago

Here are the 2020 Emmy Awards highlights

"So much nowadays traditional Glam, gathering of the EMMYS was shrunk down to a virtual version. This year, the winners had to dial in from their sofas but did to scale down show remove any of the fun while I'm joined by the phone critic Karen Cranach from welcome back Karen. Now, Jimmy Kimmel called this the pandemic. What was it like? You. Don't I was reading about the run up because of course, they had five days of the creative emmys, which was very interesting which covered documentarian sports things like that. We don't really get to see those its role waiting for the television ones television on comedy and they're all saying, oh, it's can be terrible to glitches and there were absolutely no. Glitches at all the writing was sensitive national it probably would have worked alive, and in fact, what they were doing is they were cutting back into the audience of previous years. So at first we thought Kimmel was presented to reluctance of couldn't be, and then of course, we see that it's an empty staple center with cardboard cutouts except one person Jason Bateman. It worked really really well, and as you said, he called the Pan Denny's. You can't have virus without a host modest M.. It. Last year it was host free. So he's making a double point there isn't he? Will he is I mean there is a discussion for all the wards shows that you know do we really need a host to carry through to give a a link King presents between all of the awards and sometimes you need that sometimes you don't, but he's very, very good in this effect was. Nominated himself didn't win but for for this year. So he solid reacted really well, and particularly with Jennifer Aniston was was there in I'm assuming was a prerecorded, extra it live. Where he's burning one of the emmy envelopes to sanitize it, and if the fire gets out of control, she actually does put put. The. Fire. Out on stage. Tell US little bit more than about. Who won who lost how things went? Arguably, this was possibly our final reminder. Some was that it was a blissful reminder of our recent past, but people could still make television in the same room. I think we're we're all I. Think we're we're going to get nostalgic about these virtual awards shows really because they could do so much more with with a with a regular live show somebody sends in a prerecorded or televisual link you feel cheated. Now you feel that you've got more possibility because the people can actually record something or talk to you live. So it Kinda works really well, for example, before I go to the awards there was almost apprentice reunion lease a Jennifer Aniston Courtney Cox and Lisa kudrow showed up altogether and Jimmy Kimmel's going what are you doing together and he goes she goes well, we've Jennifer says. We've been living together since nineteen ninety four. It was just a lovely surprised wouldn't have been able to happen in real life. So it was great now. watchmen with the big re reimagined science fiction. Series was for twenty six nominations at one eleven including UN series. Star. Regina. King and also best limited series which is amazing and that helped push the HBO show to Thirty Wins in total, which is very important and also Shits Creek, of course, we have to put little tm on there because it's spelled S. C. H. W. T. s. did a sweep a to record for comedy shows of nine wins and it was yeah it's it's incredible. It's last is the final. Season for that show and it was wonderful to see all of our beloved. Canadian actors. That was a hugely hugely popular series it turned up on flicks. But it didn't start with nets, which is weird. Yes it has found that second life. Elsa Bell Rutland. Well, it was really pop TV and it just it got a cult following because. I mean, these I've been watching Catherine O'Hara Levy since the seventies I mean they were at second city which the rivals Saturday night live we've seen them in American pie everywhere. These are very, very good season actors and writers and the fact that they show up with this unique show on pop TV it just goes to show you that if something's good against audience people will see

Jimmy Kimmel Jennifer Aniston Jason Bateman Karen Cranach United States Elsa Bell Rutland Catherine O'hara Levy Lisa Kudrow Pan Denny UN HBO Regina King Shits Creek S. C. H. W. T. Courtney Cox
'Patriotic Education': Trump Says He Will Start New Commission

Marketplace

04:27 min | 5 d ago

'Patriotic Education': Trump Says He Will Start New Commission

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. President Trump waded into the classroom today. He says he thinks American students need to be taught what he calls patriotic education, and he accused his political opponents of trying to brainwash Children about racism. Must clear away the twisted Web of lies in our schools, classrooms and teach your Children the magnificent truth. About our country. We want our sons and daughters to know that they are the citizens of the most exceptional nation. In the history of the world. It's the latest development in the cultural divisions. Trump is trying to promote as part of his reelection campaign. White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins me now to talk about this item. Hello. And the president says he's going to create a new commission about this. Can you working? Tell us about that commission? Yes. So he went to the National Archives to announce that he is creating a commission to promote history education that focuses on quote the legacy of 17 76. Of course, that is the year when American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain, and this is a reaction in part against the 16 19 project. President Trump made it explicit. He said that That was the project led by the New York Times that focuses on a view of American history stemming from the year when the first enslaved Africans were brought to these shores. But it's also a reaction to the protest that we've seen this year against racial injustice. One thing about the commission to be clear about, though the federal government does not have jurisdiction over school curriculum, so it is up to schools and local and state governments to decide what to teach. And they do and they teach very different things depending on where you are. This isn't the first time the president has talked about these themes. Would you put in context? Put this in context for us politically? Yes. Oh, he's wrapping a few things together here. People on the right have long complained about the liberal bent on college campuses. That is not new. But there has been a growing effort by educators at all levels, even in elementary schools to teach Children about systemic racism. Slavery as a founding sin of the nation. The genocide of Native Americans as part of westward expansion, and President Trump objects to that strongly, saying schools are teaching Children to hate America. Our Children are instructed from propaganda tracks. Like those of Howard's in Try to make students ashamed of their own history. The left has warped, distorted and to file The American story. With deceptions, fall suits and lives. This also comes in the midst of the racial justice protests where some protesters tour down or vandalize statues of Confederate generals and founding fathers who owned slaves, and Trump has come to the defense of these statues, making them a cause of sorts as part of his re election. There is often a reason or an impetus for why Trump will say things that he knows will be provocative. Is there Do we know what he's talking about this now? Well, he's been talking about it for a little while. It's it's clear. This is part of his re election. This is a variation on themes that he talked about it during speeches and at Mount Rushmore on July 3rd the White House on July 4th. It's a theme he has been coming back to to fire up his base, sort of a variation on make America great again, harkening back to a different time. A different America. He is presenting himself as a great defender of American values and and even Western civilisation, as if to say that people who don't agree with his view of history or of what makes America great. That they are just wrong, but fundamentally trying to destroy the country. It is a very different reelection message than those used by past presidents. It's not about uplift or unifying. It's a long way. From morning in America and as if it wasn't clear already that this is part of his reelection campaign. As part of his remarks, President Trump took a very unsettle shot at Joe Biden holding up a statue of a a notable Delaware founding father and saying that when his statue was taken down by the city of Wilmington, Biden didn't speak out. That's white House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Thank you to him. You're welcome. For

President Trump America White House Correspondent Tamara Keith Joe Biden Elsa Chang Great Britain Federal Government Sasha Pfeiffer New York Times Delaware White House Howard Mount Rushmore National Archives Wilmington
New York City Will Again Delay Start of In-Person Classes for Most Students

Marketplace

03:32 min | 5 d ago

New York City Will Again Delay Start of In-Person Classes for Most Students

"New York City has announced a second delay to the start of the school year. For most students, parents are having to up end their plans once again as the nation's largest school district faces divisions over staffing and safety in school buildings. NPR's Anya Kamenetz has been following the story and joins us now. Hey, Anya, how are you? Hey, I think I think the description for a lot of teachers and parents is whiplash thiss coming. They was supposed to be the start of in person learning as you mentioned in this district of 1.1 million students with four days to go. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today at a press conference that only the youngest students in three K and pre K as well as those with significant special needs called district 75. Only then will be coming back on Monday, and the rest of our students are going to phase in by grade level between now and October, 1st. And what reason did he give her this additional delay? So the mayor framed this, as you know, abundant caution as well as compassion. Here. He is a today's press conference. We have got to get it right for a kid's. They lost a lot. But there are a lot of questions about the timing of this decision. You know. New York City's educator unions have for weeks been raising concerns over the issues of safety and staffing that the mayor cited today. And this is the second time the first being just a couple of weeks ago, But the district has announced changes the start of school year just a few days in advance on DH. That was the frustration voice. Hi Taj Sutton. She's a public school parent and an education advocate in Brooklyn in this so called planning that's happening. We're seeing all these vests because they didn't inform families. They didn't include teachers. They didn't include students. Okay, So what are the specific safety issues facing New York City schools right now? Well, that's so interesting, because New York City's Corona virus situation remains well under control. In fact, the CDC just released new guidance for safe school reopening and New York is in the light Green zone that puts it far, far ahead of most places around the country. However, in the past couple of weeks, what has happened is that teachers have started to come back to buildings, and that is solidified Existing complaints about ventilation about Peopie 17,000 teachers have gotten tested recently for Corona virus, and 55 of them reportedly tested positive. Now that's a very low ratio lower than the city as a whole, actually, But there has been at least one school in Flatbush, Brooklyn. That had to shut down because they had two positive cases, and that makes people Uneasy. Yeah. I mean, it sounds like tensions are really running high right now. You also mentioned staffing and budget issues. Yes, Principles have been saying for weeks that they just don't have the people to cover both in person and online classes. The mayor talk today about beating the bushes to hire 4500 more teachers, well somehow in the next couple of weeks, including possibly community college ad junks, he said. Maybe people that are studying education right now, and this is coming in the midst of an ongoing dispute with the governor over possibly withholding Funds to districts around the state to education and the city's Independent Budget office also released an estimate today that said, for schools to be fully in compliance with the stated plans would cost 32 million extra dollars a week. I don't know where that's going to come from. Wow. How is all of this impacting parents right now? You know, parents are really tearing their hair out. Also, I mean information is kind of leaking out in dribs and drabs. Whatever we else you can say, you know, over half of parents had opted into in person learning, although that's changing everyday. So you know they're all having to change your plans and definitely sent disappointed kids out there. That is NPR's Anya Kamenetz. Thank you. Anya. Thanks, Elsa. As covert outbreaks are

New York City Anya Kamenetz Mayor Bill De Blasio NPR Brooklyn CDC Taj Sutton Elsa Peopie Dribs Flatbush
Creating Your Own Opportunities with Wendy Amara

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Creating Your Own Opportunities with Wendy Amara

"Okay Wendy, we have you ever combined finally. League and we are actually live in person. We are saying I, know I know let's start from the beginning. So what's your heritage? So my family came from what they might lack Yes, they came here in the nineteen seventies and then I was born here and my brother was born here and the originally came to Hollywood is funny because my. To my aunt, still live in the scene apartment building that they first came two years ago. Wow. Yeah. Crazy Ray. At one point they were invited to purchase the apartment building in the apartment building is near the border of Hollywood end those fees. Okay. Feeding in La. has become a hot property location where values of homes and apartment buildings and everything has skyrocketed anything boulder but I don't know ten times more than it would have been years ago. So it's interesting because back in the day they turned it down. To permit building because I think at one point, they were renting three different apartments or for I mean everybody has like a little apartment in that building. So that's part of why the owner was like. Would you guys up to purchase it and I think a fear? A fear is not knowing the rules of this new country, what they were getting into and people were. I remember my mom being like Oh no no I think that's too much for us to handle its and they could have actually afforded it back. Then they all would have pulled their money. So the moral of the story is I would be a millionaire. I. Bought this apartment building that's on the corner near the border of Hollywood near Lexington ear Hollywood handle species have you talked to them about it? No you know what? I haven't in years I remember low and I was like twenty over twenty years ago when I was in college, I was starting to learn about like wealth and property and how property gets handed down development of wealth over the years I remember then saying something to my aunt into my mom and be like you guys have an amazing opportunity where you could purchase the apartment building a two of my ex deliver to the state and they were looking at the time. You know that was a lot of money for us at the time. We couldn't see how can make that happen. So yeah all my God as these shadow. So that's so interested in like looking back like how with the story be different, right? Yeah. So if would have been me, I would have been like, let's pull our money and let's make it happen. Now no one was gonNA predict necessarily that see ray s off of a place. Yes has it has become but either way you just know if you're GONNA set for the next thirty years, it makes sense to own the building if half of the people renting or your family. Because you can count on them and the you know. Yeah. So it's interesting. Yeah. Now how the area has changed because it's going through like an urban renewal and so there's all these hippies moving like yeah gentle ricky gentrification. Oh. That's crazy. So you've been California at Your Life I've been in California my whole life except I lived in Spain for about nine months. Okay. Senior your college how did you decide that you go to college? So I I went to a community college. I didn't do all that great in high school. I was very distracted with. With, having fun and socializing a lot again. But it's interesting because I did really well in elementary and parts of middle school, and so I knew I had the capacity to do epidemically. In fact when I met up with people that I used to go to elementary school with they were like Oh. My God. But you wouldn't smartest people in our caused or you used to get straight They remember me getting awards for academics. So I knew I had the capacity to do But in highschool got really lost I got really depressed at tie-ins. There was just you know problems with friends or boyfriends or might focus was health sweat So I didn't actually focus that much on academics. So in typical in their community college which I loved and met some amazing friends that are still friends to this day and I think something's sparked in me that I was like, okay, I gotTA. Get my act together I got to figure out what to do to get together, and for that to happen I was like I got a transfer actually get on the and I saw people that were at the Community College for like ten years. I do not want to be that person I do not want to be twenty, seven and stuff. Can you call junk that there's anything wrong with that but for me I was like, no, I need to go to you know I need to go to college college and fell in love with Ucla Gone Eliot Matisse Salad, for Undergrad. For graduates collection. Elsa. WanNa do it from your vantage sociology okay. Because I loved you know, of course back to the socializing part learning about people learning about cultures. Yeah and you know it was interesting major and loved the campus I loved everything about learning. It felt like such a privilege to take your life and spend time learning rate full-time like that's it. That's doing. Yeah. It's all you do. Yeah. So that felt really empowering is you stayed at Ucla Graduate School too. I did okay I took a year or two years off in between I worked I came back. Yeah. What's your graduates urban planning interesting yes. Okay. Let me tell you about the school of Urban Planning's housed in was many years ago things have changed. Now, but was housed in the school social policy in school public policy in social planning, and there were three majors under that school urban planning social work in public policy. Okay. In all three of them interrelated to classes together and all that

Hollywood School Of Urban Planning RAY Ucla Graduate School Wendy California Spain LA. Ricky Ucla Lexington
The Major Differences Between the LPL and LCK in Casting, Drafting, and Playing

The Pog State

06:08 min | Last month

The Major Differences Between the LPL and LCK in Casting, Drafting, and Playing

"We've missed you on the broadcast LS because there has been many many goings on. Liliana, she was enabled. For this week's play, we've also seen Godzilla comeback and absolutely destroy people. And godzillas not something that we're used to here in the L. C. K. on as very confused when all these reactions were being picked and. Just destroying folk and yet we are dealing with it dude absolutely. Do you have a bit of an opinion on the uprising of the because I've got a few thoughts as to why it's working but I'd like to hear from you or an it's just one of the best champions the game. All right I guess we'll end the episode here. For much working guys. Go from there. Know. I mean. He's being picked pretty much everywhere This is right after dignity in some series where they they they picked twice in a row only to produce do nothing with it and lose laying the. Both Times We've we've seen like it coming out a lot I like I'm screaming about attracts all over again and fortunately he died. So no Godzilla will come to US though. You know the thing about about the reacting pick that up being noticing in games where he's being doing well. Is. The amount of jungle attention that he gets and even into on the side of the map if you've got the respect in general, you win right like he just looks extraordinarily strong and technology for example, like they ran in Italy twice in a row much like they love doing over in the P. L. you're talking about I picks I. Believe the same thing. This was yesterday so it would have been. Saturday's matches. which was I believe soon, buses V five, but I've been busy doing the commentary of the Elsa K. hasn't been super easy to keep up with the opium but I believe that was what happened. So they will making some rejected as well. We saw finds a success, but we also saw connections getting like three kills before like level eight. Yeah, and I think that's a way that he can actually work really well. I mean. The champion needs to get ahead. And then you have the people that should argue that he should get ahead and then obviously there's going to be people that. Dissent against that notion So when he doesn't get ahead He's obviously is terrible when he does get ahead, I mean if you look at some of the people that are playing them are like the teams that are playing him I, mean there was an interesting reddit thread that actually went deep into like the teams that pick when they pick him and then what ends up happening in the games with the champion perhaps people can find their like Lincoln and the comments, but it was it was it was a really it was very interesting deep dive So obviously, I mulled over the champion quite a lot and just like into like attracts two point Oh and trucks gone so I don't know I mean he'll. Probably he'll probably be a mainstay at worlds. So I mean we'll. We'll see what happens to be honest. Moving forward to seeing how goes because the one big problem that I have with respect and I don't really have too much of an issue because I like making crocodile jokes as an Australian certainly suits me very well. So that's absolutely fine. The problem that I have is during draft and with what happens to win conditions in the game if you pick the rejected. Because we know like you had dignity reference, which is if you pick rejected and then don't do anything in Lane you lose right. Just. Because he doesn't do anything as far as the game progresses with neutral gold, he needs to snuggle. Find ways to win and he needs to do that with the help of his jungle of very early in the game because Renton Pass bike is very very early like he hits level six. No one wanted him right like. It's basically playing with your cards face up is what I'm saying and. I. Think Strategically Shooting Yourself in the foot by going with a strategy like that. However, if you can make it work and demand that it works like Olso, an like a giga winning jungle matchup as well. Then theoretically with the incredible gang consists that you get with her enacting his w with the fact that you can just stunned people on command like. I think that there is a place for him to be intelligently drafted. But I also think that a lot of that are going interconnecting I just letting him go and they just dying and then not necessarily playing. That top line all that top two in the correct way is that sort of like the correct correct assessment? I mean I think and the all CK. If you look at some of the teams that are winning with them, they would probably be winning the game anyway. So have you had you had a freak aversa sandbox was one of the more recent ones you had t one versus Afrita connor was playing at Like I think, the context is always important, you had you had inaugural versus dynamics these these aren't. Like. They're gonNA. Win The games anyway the context is always like super important. You can go through these games and see the top players like blundering really bad Yeah I mean he he champions obviously getting picked a lot but Yeah he's. He's definitely weird I. mean he was he was around last year to at world's own with the lease as the bread and butter. Now, he's being paired with aid because farming jugglers have more power and so you hit the line break point you start accelerating faster release obviously not being picked as much because of her volatility it's interesting that actually two of the very simple tramps died. He's the only one that still like exists. I guess that's an Ode Godzilla so Because You're going to release him. Right yeah. Yeah.

Elsa K. Liliana United States Renton Pass Olso Opium Italy Afrita Connor Lincoln
The Major Differences Between the LPL and LCK in Casting, Drafting, and Playing

The Pog State

06:08 min | Last month

The Major Differences Between the LPL and LCK in Casting, Drafting, and Playing

"We've missed you on the broadcast LS because there has been many many goings on. Liliana, she was enabled. For this week's play, we've also seen Godzilla comeback and absolutely destroy people. And godzillas not something that we're used to here in the L. C. K. on as very confused when all these reactions were being picked and. Just destroying folk and yet we are dealing with it dude absolutely. Do you have a bit of an opinion on the uprising of the because I've got a few thoughts as to why it's working but I'd like to hear from you or an it's just one of the best champions the game. All right I guess we'll end the episode here. For much working guys. Go from there. Know. I mean. He's being picked pretty much everywhere This is right after dignity in some series where they they they picked twice in a row only to produce do nothing with it and lose laying the. Both Times We've we've seen like it coming out a lot I like I'm screaming about attracts all over again and fortunately he died. So no Godzilla will come to US though. You know the thing about about the reacting pick that up being noticing in games where he's being doing well. Is. The amount of jungle attention that he gets and even into on the side of the map if you've got the respect in general, you win right like he just looks extraordinarily strong and technology for example, like they ran in Italy twice in a row much like they love doing over in the P. L. you're talking about I picks I. Believe the same thing. This was yesterday so it would have been. Saturday's matches. which was I believe soon, buses V five, but I've been busy doing the commentary of the Elsa K. hasn't been super easy to keep up with the opium but I believe that was what happened. So they will making some rejected as well. We saw finds a success, but we also saw connections getting like three kills before like level eight. Yeah, and I think that's a way that he can actually work really well. I mean. The champion needs to get ahead. And then you have the people that should argue that he should get ahead and then obviously there's going to be people that. Dissent against that notion So when he doesn't get ahead He's obviously is terrible when he does get ahead, I mean if you look at some of the people that are playing them are like the teams that are playing him I, mean there was an interesting reddit thread that actually went deep into like the teams that pick when they pick him and then what ends up happening in the games with the champion perhaps people can find their like Lincoln and the comments, but it was it was it was a really it was very interesting deep dive So obviously, I mulled over the champion quite a lot and just like into like attracts two point Oh and trucks gone so I don't know I mean he'll. Probably he'll probably be a mainstay at worlds. So I mean we'll. We'll see what happens to be honest. Moving forward to seeing how goes because the one big problem that I have with respect and I don't really have too much of an issue because I like making crocodile jokes as an Australian certainly suits me very well. So that's absolutely fine. The problem that I have is during draft and with what happens to win conditions in the game if you pick the rejected. Because we know like you had dignity reference, which is if you pick rejected and then don't do anything in Lane you lose right. Just. Because he doesn't do anything as far as the game progresses with neutral gold, he needs to snuggle. Find ways to win and he needs to do that with the help of his jungle of very early in the game because Renton Pass bike is very very early like he hits level six. No one wanted him right like. It's basically playing with your cards face up is what I'm saying and. I. Think Strategically Shooting Yourself in the foot by going with a strategy like that. However, if you can make it work and demand that it works like Olso, an like a giga winning jungle matchup as well. Then theoretically with the incredible gang consists that you get with her enacting his w with the fact that you can just stunned people on command like. I think that there is a place for him to be intelligently drafted. But I also think that a lot of that are going interconnecting I just letting him go and they just dying and then not necessarily playing. That top line all that top two in the correct way is that sort of like the correct correct assessment? I mean I think and the all CK. If you look at some of the teams that are winning with them, they would probably be winning the game anyway. So have you had you had a freak aversa sandbox was one of the more recent ones you had t one versus Afrita connor was playing at Like I think, the context is always important, you had you had inaugural versus dynamics these these aren't. Like. They're gonNA. Win The games anyway the context is always like super important. You can go through these games and see the top players like blundering really bad Yeah I mean he he champions obviously getting picked a lot but Yeah he's. He's definitely weird I. mean he was he was around last year to at world's own with the lease as the bread and butter. Now, he's being paired with aid because farming jugglers have more power and so you hit the line break point you start accelerating faster release obviously not being picked as much because of her volatility it's interesting that actually two of the very simple tramps died. He's the only one that still like exists. I guess that's an Ode Godzilla so Because You're going to release him. Right yeah. Yeah.

Elsa K. Liliana United States Renton Pass Olso Opium Italy Afrita Connor Lincoln
Millions displaced and starving to death in Yemen

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:42 min | 3 months ago

Millions displaced and starving to death in Yemen

"Pre publication review process had decided otherwise the book titled The Room where it happened. A White House memoir, which is set to be released on Tuesday, by Simon and Schuster has been the subject of a lengthy battle between Bolton and the White House. In the Book Bolton describes every trump decision as being guided by consent for his own reelection. A claim that evokes the scandal that sparks trump's impeachment last year. When Jamile Elsa boot and his family were told by a Yemeni agency to self isolate to stop the spread of Corona virus. He knew he would not heed the advice. For the forty year, old father of ten uprooted by civil war and living in a tent on a hillside above the southwestern city of today's staying home means giving up on life. The covid nineteen. has exposed inequalities around the world with low income workers from Bogota to London this week risking their health by returning to work in countries, easing lockdowns while wealthier people stay home. In impoverished Yemen. Where the pandemic is now taking hold, millions of displaced people face an even bleaker choice, head out and risk infection, or stay home and go hungry. We are scared of Corona virus, but we can't stay at the camp as we do not have enough food even for one day. Staying here means starving, said SA- boot. The arrival of the pandemic added to afflictions, already facing the Arab world's poorest nation, including widespread hunger and a

White House Bolton Yemen SA Schuster Simon Bogota London
The trouble with embryos

Science Friction

06:43 min | 3 months ago

The trouble with embryos

"Welcome to science fiction. Years coming to you from the Home Studio Bunker, still. Can't seem to get the doves and waterbirds to be quite when I need them to be, but look in today's show. It's a wild story about biology ethics, politics and to millionaires on a personal mission that went horribly. Why would on the case is reported John Lee? Who joins me for this show? Hi Natasha Yeah. This starts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one with Mario and elsevier. They would to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together, but they were an older couple. Yeah, that's right also was forty and Mario was fifty seven, and they couldn't do it on their own. So in one thousand, nine, hundred one. They decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing in fertilize. Fertilize Ation Ivf I mean today creating a baby using his totally commonplace, and it's a big industry over familiar. But this was the early eighties when the technology and the science was so new that this just was we'd this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of a woman's womb, and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds. The moment of conception. An event that has taken place in its natural environment, the womb since the doing of human existence. Now it comes in gloss. And with a host of problems, moral, ethical and legal. So Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV. If that when the real couple come here, the techniques still very much being Susta, this is experimental stuff. Yeah, and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab, Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University, but back then he was the clinical. Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. was very difficult to Queen Victoria hospitals over General Hospital and everyone sort that. Is Just a phase. He wasn't going to work. It wasn't a last and we wasting. Everybody's time. When we started doing collections. We have to me. Natural Song goes on spontaneous relation, so it's not unusual to have to collect exit to I. Am for am six I am. So we had a lot of opposition. All IV of treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method, which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg. She created every month. If they collected at the right time, it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo. If they time too late, they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature. Mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here of actually getting a baby out of IV, if treatment would have been extremely low when the Rayo says rock up in Australia yet, but a talented trio at the Queen. Victoria, hospital was changing all of that, and they were about to put Australia. In the history books so I wanted to do the IV. If in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to utilize. Methods developed in animals, scientists Alan, trounson originally trained as a bit and he was to the hospital by IVF. Pioneer cal would car would he allowed me to work with John? Laden to develop a totally different system, which was using fertility drugs to stimulate than women, so we could get more eggs and hence more embryos. Well what happened is is that actually worked? It was the system that actually work. It was a huge leap forward. They found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time and freeze them, and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is, but every stage in artificial production is still precarious. So in those early days, a significant proportion of those embers just were lost in the phrasing. Prices will only about thirteen percent five treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent, but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for Wannabe Parents Alan Trounson. An iphone they could cope with disappointment. Absolutely, you know very well essentially because. They understood. This was a very early in in terms of the research, so the chances of getting outcomes would very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods with using John in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the Heck did you do? Do that. Okay, so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jane. They land in Australia headed. Elsa Riaz respond to treatment will Gab Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story, but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea. Just Shiva's is trashed and she spoke. In Mississippi we didn't look very well off. You ever probably struggling to spend the money to Florida squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight foods relatively much more than what they are now and with quality deal to come over here and leave over here. We felt sorry for him and most secretary always. suggestively discounted faithful porpoises Riaz who've had no idea that they were quite wealthy. He Remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with, but she had good reason to be all. She was very strong that a terrible history. I'll guess you've gone through Easter beforehand and they've were pretty strengthening to fly over here. They had one child who they'd lost. He was murdered. I think or an accident. Remember the D. Tough, and that's why they're really chained to have another child and off. If they're only hype, that's why to throw you. Both Mario and L.. Serena's had had children with previous partners, but they'd been a tragedy. Else's ten year old daughter had only recently died should been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that he's absolutely horrific are so that means that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process. That's right. There was, but the process started well. Three embryos were created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm, so they had three chances of success. And I don't think we did about eleven o'clock midnight on a Saturday evening and she was very dramatic. Everything was sound. What's the drama? So she would her ex collected to street is beforehand a fertilize, and they would have developed and. Would have chosen the best probably wanting to Australian bureaus back, which would then be tempted to be

Australia Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital John Lee Elsa Riaz Mario Alan Trounson Natasha Yeah Elsevier Monash University Los Angeles Victoria Laden Director Jane Mississippi Serena
Texas appeals court backs expanding mail-in voting to those fearful of coronavirus

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Texas appeals court backs expanding mail-in voting to those fearful of coronavirus

"Just a day after a state appeals court ruled in favor of all Texans having the right to vote by mail during the pandemic Texas Democrats are in federal court making a similar argument K. R. Lees Austin bureau chief Chris fox has more in a federal court in San Antonio Texas Democrats argued that all Texans fearful of contracting covert nineteen should have the right to vote by mail Texas Democratic Party chair Gilbertine Elsa lines will be long the number of polling places will be less and the time to hold will take much longer increasing the possibility that a voter will subject themselves to this deadly disease on Wednesday Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton petitioned the state Supreme Court to get involved now Paxton's also asking the Supreme Court to block Thursday's appeals court decision

Chris Fox Ken Paxton Supreme Court Texas K. R. Lees Austin Bureau Chief San Antonio Texas Democratic Party Gilbertine Elsa Attorney
A Little Hack To Make Amazing Ads That Convert

Marketing Secrets

05:00 min | 4 months ago

A Little Hack To Make Amazing Ads That Convert

"Alright. So we've seen our spent a Lotta Times creating ads and thinking about like what's the ad hoc where we can get someone's attention and The other day I was swiping through instagram or something and I try attention. What are the things? Get me to stop right where things I read. Look at him. I was looking different things. And that's sort of like a watch. My kids my kids. They're really big into all these. These things that are satisfying will satisfying. This is the thing so satisfying like these weird art things with slime sand or with shredding metal in a metal shredder. Like all these crazy things and I was like Oh man. What if we did these different things and tournament ads right and the other day so I was when instagram search and start searching for like cool art or satisfying or slime or is type in keywords and I started seeing all these different cool art things And I started disliking a bunch of like falling their pages of steps. Then start showing up on my feet and now it's my newsfeed are seeing all these cool crazy aren't things that people do right by drying and All sorts of things but the other day I saw one that caught my attention I watched for men probably a minute straight and it was this guy and he does pancake art and so the cameras above this pancake and he's drawing this pitcher and you're seeing it. It's pretty cool. And then we gets done. He takes it and flips it over and as soon as he flips over pancake you see the finished pancake and now. I watched that I went to watch like probably ten or fifteen of them. My kids and it was so cool. You kinda like always drawing. Elsa is drying whatever sees everything's until he flips the pancake over your exactly what it is and he flips it over and the details looks amazing and It says like Oh my gosh. Look how much this sucked into the into watching this and I watched so many kids them I was like how can I get this to become an ad and I was like a pancake on my face? That's annoying no one wants to see pancake my face on what can you do? What can I do and I was like what if I haven't the pancake of the the book covers of dotcom secrets. Expert Secrets Traffic Secrets and say emailed the the guys on the channel as they. Hey how much it would cost for me to have you. Pancake art my books and it was a couple of hundred bucks per book. It was not not that expensive wired the money and just today I got back three pancake. That were flipped over. Then doing my book and flipping over and they turned out so cool. They're amazing nominate goes tournament a little ads. Youtube ads facebook ads. Instagram is budget variations. Because look at come back to to step number one right. We talk a lot about like Hook Story. Offer hoax story off the hook grabs attention and the story and then the offers. I figure the pancakes the hook right. You're like what does he drawing the boom over while the watching that can tell the story of what's happening with what he's doing why wrote book flips over. It's done and then make the offer from you'll get free copy of the book so I have no idea now if the ads can work if it's not gonNA work because it'd be successful or not successful but I do notice to get hook and it's GonNa be really fun and I'm excited to test it out Especially look at some of the ADS. We make we spend tons of my just my phone but you never know what the hooks going to be the grab. Someone's attention so for a couple hundred bucks to test it. It's it's really exciting so I'm excited for that started. After that I started looking into clean Mesa Google or finding claymation and I've message probably ten different claymation. Artists are making claymation ads and stuff like that. So it's just fun new things. You brought up when he goes to start going to instagram and facebook. Reverend started looking at art but the arts the cool designers look at People. That are doodling sketching. That are doing just whatever. Or they're creating things their hands like just any kind of art that that grabs. Your attention are falling over channels. You can in the more towns you follow them all the moral chopin. Your search results please are seeing all these have been cool cool things and then go reach out to the creators is Hey. Dot added created the image. That was amazing. Pay You whatever. Have you Chris on that for for me my company and like I said for us the pancake art? It was a couple hundred bucks per per book covering the turnout socal and who knows that could be the AD. That's the one that blows up. It's funny because I remember Folks are GONNA work a couple years ago. We had the harm brothers. Do our very first video with them. In turn amazing we loved it. We spent tons of energy and money. We just big launch with big bubble soccer also stuff in the did good he got on a million or so views and it was good And then like a week later Chris. Record Wrap Sunny D. rappers. Quick Funnels Rep and he just made it as as a joke. Essential get red and that and that video actually got more impressions. More views and more cells. Click funnels in this one. We'd spent hundreds of thousands of dollars creating so you never know what the hooks going to be created tons of hooks and try thing after thing after thing after thing just trying to think this is really fun unique way so for my side time embarrassing around like what I'm doing now is looking for artists. Who create little things that you a quick thirty second grab their tension just to tell your story and and and do the next thing

Instagram Chris Soccer Youtube Elsa Socal Facebook DOT
Bloomberg News Killed Investigation, Fired Reporter, Then Sought To Silence His Wife

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:47 min | 5 months ago

Bloomberg News Killed Investigation, Fired Reporter, Then Sought To Silence His Wife

"Mike Bloomberg's presidential bid led to tough scrutiny particularly about his company's frequent reliance on nondisclosure agreements for employees. One of the people under a nondisclosure agreement is a former employee who years ago worked on an investigative story about Chinese leaders. Bloomberg News killed that story. It also tried to silence his spouse. Npr's David Folkenflik reveals. What happened at debate? Elizabeth Warren Challenge Bloomberg. What about complaints about him Mr Mayor? Are you willing to release all of those women from those nondisclosure agreements? So we can hear their side of the story. Bloomberg tried to move past it. We have a very few nondisclosure agreements. Finish Bloomberg's blase response outrage the writer late. Hong fincher full disclosure award supporter finger points to the widespread use of such as by the company. Bloomberg founded the company uses them to handle complaints of sexual harassment and hostile work environment. According to reports ventures complaint is not that. I don't know exactly what happened to those women but I do know how incredibly terrifying it is to be threatened and bullied into signing a nondisclosure agreement in two thousand thirteen ventures husband. Michael Forsyth was a reporter for Bloomberg News in Beijing Bloomberg had already published his team's investigation into the wealth of the families of Communist Party leaders. The Chinese Ambassador had warned the company against publishing death threats followed venture and forsyth moved to Hong Kong yet. The team kept reporting. He continued to do an investigation and it was that story. This story on longed in China's honest man and his ties to senior Chinese Communist leaders including Jinping Z. Had just become president of China and I saw these emails from the editors praising it meaning the reporting saying that. Yeah it's it's. We're really excited about this. We can't wait to move it forward. Three former Bloomberg journalists verified this account after that however radio silence. The story never ran Serrao Mike. Her husband Mike and some of the other reporters. And Editors who had been working on this story. Just we're asking for answers about why. Why was this story killed the famously intense founding editor in chief of Bloomberg News finally weighed in? That's Matthew Winkler back then. To Editors told me the story needed work. That's not the reason we are cited for killing it. It is for sure going to invite the Communist Party to completely shut us down. Take us out of the country so I just don't see that a story that is just divide. This recording winkler on in October twenty thirteen conference call weekly praised the team but warned about covering the Chinese regime which he called it everywhere and who they are and we should have no illusions that the Chinese authorities had search Bloomberg's bureaus delayed visas for reporters and ordered state owned companies not to sign new leases for Bloomberg terminals the terminals offer subscribers specialized financial data and are the most important source of the company's profits and China was seen as a growing market and a strategic priority again. Matthew Winkler is the information they do have away that enables car to report but not Elsa Prophet Bloomberg News N Winkler. Who's retired as editor in chief declined to comment in two thousand thirteen? Mike Bloomberg was mayor of New York City and denied Bloomberg News Killed The China Story. Two months later back at the company he founded asked about the China controversy again. Mike Bloomberg said it was arrogant to impose American values on others if a country gives you a license to do something off with certain restrictions. You have two choices either. Accept the license and do it that way. Well you don't do business there. Npr also obtained audio of these remarks. Mike Bloomberg to his global newsroom Bloomberg said the newsroom should be proud of its China coverage then said all organizations have bad apples. Some staffers thought that was aimed at the China. Investigative team. Bloomberg News fired Mike Foresight. He was accused of leaking news of the killed project other outlets. He landed at the New York Times and would not comment for the story. He signed a nondisclosure agreement with Bloomberg LP lawyers for Bloomberg's company pressured someone else to sign one foresights wife later Hong fincher. The company's lawyers threatened to force her to pay a six figure sum if she didn't agree to keep silent about her husband's work. Here's venture. There was no reason why I should have to sign a nondisclosure agreement. Because I didn't possess any damaging material about the company venture recalls being summoned to the high rise offices of Bloomberg's Hong Kong lawyers. Her husband was there too. And then this lawyer from New York on that. I mean giant image of his face on the video screens said but what about all the evidence? That's in her head venture says. She walked out of the conference room and left the building. They assumed that because I was the wife of their employees. I was the wife I was just an appendage of their employees I was not a human being ventures former CNBC correspondent who was finishing up PhD. She bristled and hired top-flight lawyers and finally the company let it go now. Mike Bloomberg has returned to his company. Wants more but venture isn't letting her question go. What else in his newsroom she asks is hidden by those nondisclosure agreements.

Bloomberg Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg News Elsa Prophet Bloomberg News N Beijing Bloomberg China Matthew Winkler Communist Party Hong Fincher Hong Kong Serrao Mike NPR Michael Forsyth New York City Elizabeth Warren David Folkenflik Reporter Mike Foresight
Vocalis Health CEO Tal Wenderow

The Voicebot Podcast

02:26 min | 5 months ago

Vocalis Health CEO Tal Wenderow

"County. Health is actually an Israeli. Start up with our in the clinical de Science in Israel headquarters out of the Boston area. High actually leaving Newton outside of Boston and what we're doing can think you know that vocal by Maka right so we analyzing the voice and we collate that to disease symptoms and conditions and what happened is Which not only we walk in disruptive area by trying to learn and teach democracy new vocal about a mock we kind of disruptive ways so two point two full months ago a we merged two Israeli startups beyond verbal. Health is for both do in the vocal biomarker space to foam vocalists company which is not a trivial thing to do to get to startups together. That each one they can change the world. Come to the realization. I cannot do it by myself right with. Find the right partner to do that right. But it's all about people so Mike Mike Partner in crimes shoddy facilities actually physician that he was the CEO of Elsa mice and we're both raising money and we met not together but we met in Israeli one of the leading Israeli. He'll stick fun named Aimal Alot. Nda distractedly decided to enter voice face in healthcare but there are looking for the right company. And the Roy. Who's chairman of the board right now? Said we don't know which one to pick if you merge invest in both of you. Yeah sure that's not a big deal. So so so. That's why he's sounds like it's not a big deal but it's usually. It is a big deal. It is a big real so that was probably June shoddy and I. We met two days later on a good cup of Espresso couple of Russell. In four weeks later we presented to investment committee and then a fortune lawyers to cover. It took US another three months to close but we were done after. One are right because it makes sense. It's not just because we got the money. We can do to realization one. If we don't match we'RE GONNA compete with it right so you know it's it's

CEO Israel Boston Partner Mike Mike Maka Newton United States Chairman Russell
Walkin and Talkin Disney

The Ride Through Pavilion

09:46 min | 6 months ago

Walkin and Talkin Disney

"Hey everybody welcome to another episode of daily Magic. This is this is a take two of this podcast. We just Gave you some really good information for about two minutes or arm. Sorry for about ten minutes and then I realized I wasn't recording. So this do over. What are we doing well? We're taking a walk or second side the House all day. It's my lunch break and I just thought you know what we're not gonNA have an opportunity to record around the studio today. So let's Let's just pull out the recorder and talk while we walk so we have. Oh boy lots of cars so we have a skating for the first time. She's here with US trying to escape but she figured out that she does best when she just sits on the skateboard and goes down hill. We got any with us. She's walking our dog Elsa and we have Mr Liam with this right here and I'm Jeremy and we thought well. What could we chat about today? You know we've been doing a bunch of silly stuff we've been doing a bunch of games pulling out all the stops. The best we can and amy was like well. Why don't we talk about how we came to to be family? Yeah so I would say definitely we inherited some of the Disney genes from our families having grown up in southern California and the West Coast and the West Coast having family in southern California. Even after I moved away always out there every time we went out there my parents were. We gotta go to Disneyland. We gotta go to Disneyland. And then and then of course we settled in Phoenix. Amy was already there and it was just like six hours away. Like why not go? It was it was amazing. When we got married we went when we had. Liam became his fifth birthday. Were like this is it. We're taken Liam. It's like the rite of passage. It's the birthday trip. Liam hated it. Hates is not a strong enough word for what this kid felt about Disney. Yeah it was. It was almost scarring. Yeah for everybody. We felt so bad. Thankfully Amy's mom and then a friend from church was there. This is the sound of Fiona trying not to kill herself or us on that last attempt So we were able to kind of they got tired and you know what we'll take Liam and you guys go have fun but we were just so bombed because you know at that time. Liam had more of his hearing more of a site And it was just sensory overload. I think and it wasn't the kind of thing where we could. You know put headphones. Because he just doesn't tolerate any of that and it was it was we. Were only on like a deaf awareness. Day Yes so the so there are some accommodations. There it just. It just wasn't having it was not it was. It would be irresponsible for us and I think it was more about all of this is i. Don't think he quite knew where he was in space like. He wasn't really in good muscle control of his body at that point. Remember those posters of space like it had the whole galaxy and then it had like a thing that said you are here to know that part. No He's not a mushroom or is that a brown egg. We live in the southern suburbs of a Lanta beautiful gorgeous day here and I gotta say a brown exciting would be more rare than a mushroom so it's probably a mushroom anyway. Oh you did. Yeah that's why I kept going. Oh my God how because I was dying just because I think filling in the details with God is a rooster would have been helpful for all of us to share in that experience so we took Fiona for her birthday of everything. Went fine if you want to. Being are typical child home. Yeah we might push him over the edge if we took him again. Here's Yeah Oh yeah you were scared of some of the rights as being for your and a new four year old like she was barely not three was on her fourth birthday. Yeah well so you fast forward Liam Gets Omega wish trip. A bunch of stuff happened there. We moved cities we moved houses. And we kind of found ourselves saying we want to get this. Make a wish granted and we. We really just ended up deciding. Let's under the suggestion of Mika wish. Yeah but at that point. We said you know what let's do it. Liam hated it. It's free the worst that can happen is we can hang out if this village we hear about and just have a good time for a week the May give kids. The world. Village is an incredible incredible place. Yeah it was. It was just as hard to leave the village itself than it was. You know how you feel doubt on your last day of Disney vacation. It was difficult to leave the village itself. But that and you'd water so we you know. We ended up having such a good time and again like here's huge. Assist to give kids the world. They met us at the airport Harrison tears before we were even helped adjust our expectations immediately and they were like they're like look Liam special than they look at. Funen they say but you know what your special and they looked at us in there like mom. Your Special Dad your special. This is for you. You need to cut loose. You need to leave everything behind and this week is everything and and I mean they just they just said our expectation up to where we were softened up already so by the time we got to Disney and got the full red carpet treatment. You know with that Mak- wish button. I think we just like we were sold and it W- and so when we when we left we decided you know what I think. Because Liam is there's something for everybody Liam is Liam is aware of where he is when he's there Liam's aware of where he is when he's there and You know of course we are to now. Liam is aware in in a way that maybe we didn't expect being deaf blind at this point. Liam was you know he he? He enjoyed the parks by the smells and the different motions of the ride vehicles. And the different You know the the different lilting of the the ride vehicles. The way the ride vehicles were constructed on pirates of the Caribbean he's scratching at the grip tape We're looking at the pirates going nuts. He's he's scratching at the grip tape and cracking up. He's got a huge smile on his face because that was sensory to him. That was the input that was the experience provided to him. And we just thought to ourselves. You know what we're going to. We decided look. We're going to go back all the time. And so the very first trip back was a little nerve racking and I was a little apprehensive because we had really experienced this red carpet treatment and I mean where do you go from there. Yeah because I think it's important to note like the myth is if you're in a wheelchair or you need assistance that you somehow get this red carpet treatment and while you do get accommodations that are other than say a typical family or people who have typical needs You still it. They try to make this fair as possible. We need to contrast this with the absolute like free stuff top with Give kids the world because you have a make a wish button and the cast members are trained to look for that and give extra magic whenever they see literally bypassed the lines. I mean it's every it's all the myths that you hear about just Special needs families. But it's really only a Mako. Wish experience the thing I will say about going back to Disney and the reason that we keep going back to Disney is they do make accommodations for us and they do have some special things and every once in a while we get a little extra magic just like everybody else. But that's those are the key words is that it's like everybody else we Kinda Day. What they do is they level the the vacation experience so if you have typical children my experience may look to you. Like I'm getting special accommodations but I must special needs family. So there are some special accommodations that we need to bring us up to a normal family experience

Mr Liam Disney AMY United States Fiona California Disneyland Phoenix Lanta West Coast Elsa Mika Jeremy MAK Harrison
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro charged in U.S. drug trafficking inquiry

BBC World Service

01:00 min | 6 months ago

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro charged in U.S. drug trafficking inquiry

"The Venezuelan government is accused the US of making baseless drug trafficking charges against president Nicolas Maduro to hide its failures in tackling the spread of cave it nineteen American prosecutors have offered a fifteen million dollar reward for information leading to Mr Maduro's arrest they accuse him and other senior officials of colluding with Colombian former left wing rebels to smuggle tons of cocaine into the U. S. the Venezuelan foreign minister Jorge Arreaza Elsa said the trump administration's efforts would not succeed reporter the guy come here they will be at no for the for the same Venezuela the United States policy in trying to force change in Venezuela is destined to file offering a one to reward like grace's cal boys shows the desperation of the elite supremacists in Washington and his obsession with attacking Venezuela in order to gain electoral support in the state of Florida

Venezuelan Government United States President Trump Nicolas Maduro Cocaine Jorge Arreaza Elsa Reporter Venezuela Washington Florida
Fear is What Cant Be Trusted

Energy Healing

09:27 min | 6 months ago

Fear is What Cant Be Trusted

"I'll be perfectly honest with you in saying that. I don't know exactly where this episode is going to go. It has been a rather crazy two weeks here. I live in the Seattle area and things have progressed rather rapidly in the last week you know My son school decided last Friday. So I don't know ten day ten days ago too close for a couple of weeks and then. The state made the decision to close all schools. Statewide until April Twenty. Fourth hospitals are pretty overrun. Healthcare personnel are burned out bars. Restaurants are now required to be closed except for delivery and takeout in that there has been a lot of fear and panic circulating around. Because there's just so much uncertainty and there's so much unknown and this creates a lot of shadow aspects. I would say that are surfacing in a lot of people and we see this take shape in the form of scarcity so scarcity mindset. Watch sparks the hoarding. And feeling like there's not enough. There's and there's not enough to go around so you have to hold it all and it surfaces racism whether that is outright not subtle racism violent racism or whether it's micro aggression. They're both awful. I kind of went through this metamorphosis over the last couple of weeks where at first I was like. I'm not GonNa talk about this virus. I am not going to put any more energy into this than there already is because everybody is panicking about it too okay. I'm going to talk about it but this is not going to be from a place of panic or fear. I am approaching this from a place of vigilance and being informed but not over informed and not feeding into the fear and panic that is surrounding it. So kind of want to touch on this fear you know. I just made the decision and yesterday afternoon. After meditating on it to cancel the rest of my clients for March my in-person clients them not because of fear but because of my love and compassion for them in my community. I care very deeply for them. And it's just what felt was right to do. I have not made any decisions based out of fear because fear is not going to help us get through. This fear will paralyze us. It will cause us to make terrible decisions. Then it'll cause us to say and do things that may hurt someone or our cells is actually just watching frozen to again with my son. And there's this quote net the were Elsa says yes. I'm going to share an elsa quote from frozen. Okay deal with it. She says that's just your fear. Fear is what can't be trusted as like. Oh man that is just so on point for right now. Fear cannot be trusted because fear will screw you over every single time. So how do we deal with fear? How do we deal with the panic? How do we deal with the anxiety? Staying grounded so being present in your body sending roots down into the ground doing some breath work even if you are self quarantining or if you are under a mandatory self quarantine you can still a window and if you have a porch you can go out on your porch getting some fresh air. Some sort of nature. Maybe planting something. Maybe this is a good time to plant some indoor plants and do a little herb garden focusing on things that are within your control. You can't control whatever is going on outside in the world or outside your front doorstep can't control really was going on inside your home either but you can control how you want to feel and how you WanNa react to things and you can control what you decide to do with your time. I understand this is a really stressful time for small businesses and not even just small businesses. I know people who work for bigger and those corporations have closed and now those employees have no income except maybe some unemployment money and that can be very stressful because well how am I going to afford rent helmet going to afford food. How am I going to Ford? Xyz and those are very valid fears? Right I don't WanNA minimize that. That is very valid. But you can control not giving too much into that not feeding that fear too much and just kind of focusing on what is abundant in your life. Community is abundant. Please reach out to your community and just see how anyone can help even virtually. Maybe this is a time for you to think about restructuring your life and maybe there is some kind of offering that you could offer online that will pay for. I have seen a lot of small businesses doing this thinking of ways that they can restructure their business and I think this restructuring piece is going to be really crucial for us and make us push past are limits of what we thought was possible and challenges to push past any self limiting beliefs. That are keeping us from moving forward now before you get caught up in this. How can I help myself? I really encourage you to think about well. How can I help my community munity because we're all going to have to work together to get through this? So how can you help your community whether that's from a standpoint or not? There was somebody in a local facebook group in my community who suggested creating virtual videos and sending them to people in nursing homes because many elderly who are in nursing homes right now are not allowed visitors so even doing something like that. A cow powerful is that and how compassionate is that it's been inspiring to see community. Come together all of the free offerings. That are happening for kids right now. Who aren't in school. All of the offerings to provide kids in low income families with free lunches while schools are closed the people stepping up and helping small businesses. Even I just saw an article yesterday as well about a Seattle business who are doing virtual happy hours to help maintain morale within their company. And I think that's really cool to just finding ways to support each other and keep up. Morale and mental health is so important. Mental health is so important. I always talk about how important mental health as and right now is a challenge to mental health so finding ways to take care of yourself and connecting with others without physical contact. How can we connect? Yeah I feel like this whole thing is also a push for human connection and then also getting us back into the earth because with people more and more people working from home if you have the luxury to do that if that is an option for you more and more people working from home more and more people. Not Out mindlessly consuming. Think about how that's going to help the environment as well not saying that people getting sick is awesome or anything but just thinking about how this has forced us to see how making these changes has created some positive outcomes and how we can evolve that wants this pandemic is under control and were over this hump.

Seattle Elsa Facebook Ford
Introducing SUPERNATURAL WITH ASHLEY FLOWERS

Haunted Places

09:57 min | 6 months ago

Introducing SUPERNATURAL WITH ASHLEY FLOWERS

"By the time police got the call about the bodies Invitation Hill. It was already starting to get dark. The Hill is surrounded by thick forest and brush so for everyone's safety. They decided to hold off until morning. Of course the press didn't take the same precautions when officers finally did arrive on the morning of August. Twenty first nineteen sixty six vin. Tame Hill was already swarming with reporters. The even snapped a few photos before the bodies were carried away unfortunately all the original sources are in Portuguese and more than fifty years later. It's hard to track them all down but some of them were summarized in English in the flying saucer review which despite the name was fairly credible journal in the sixties based on those articles. Here's what we know about. The police investigation. The only easy part of this case was identifying the victims thirty two year old men. Well Pereira de Cruz and thirty four year old. Miguel Giuseppe Viana. Both men were electronics. Technicians from the town called compost dose. Go to causes. Which is about one hundred and seventy five miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro. Both of them were happily married. Well respected in the community and led pretty normal. Unassuming lives according to their families. Miguel and Manuel had left town. On the morning of Wednesday August Seventeenth nineteen sixty six three days before their bodies were found. They said they were heading to Sao Paulo to buy some electronics equipment. Along with a used car. They've been looking at. They took some money with them somewhere. Between two and three million Cruzeiros the conversion rate is a little hard to calculate. But that's somewhere worth like a few thousand. Us dollars today at about nine am. Miguel and Manuel headed out to the bus station accompanied by a friend named L. CEO Gomez. Elsa wanted to go into the bus station. See them off but the other two men insisted that he just drop them off outside. Elsia didn't understand what the big deal was but he didn't think too much of it. He watched Miguel men walk into the bus depot and then he went back home. That was the last time he ever saw his two friends alive now. Even with the minimal evidence police had at this point. There were a few things about this story. That didn't add up. When the bodies were found the only had a combined one hundred sixty one thousand Cruzeiro on them. The rest of the two three million is unaccounted for still to this day. And of course they didn't go to Sao Paulo like they told everyone else. They went to a town called NITA. Roy which is a suburb of Rio de Janeiro. Which is a good couple hundred miles away. The investigators went back to Nita. Roy Hoping to find some answers there but once they piece together the rest of August seventeenth nineteen sixty six. All they had were more questions. Miguel and men wells bus would have arrived in Nita Roy at around two or two thirty that afternoon their first stop was an electronic store. They'd been to that store before so we can assume it carried some kind of equipment that wasn't sold in their own town but for some reason they left the store without buying anything and they didn't even talk to the sales clerk there now. Maybe the store was out of whatever they were looking for. But the taken a five hour bus ride to get there. Why on Earth wouldn't they at least check with the clerk? Before leaving either way after they lead the electronic store it starts to rain so they stop into a clothing store nearby and buy a pair of matching raincoats again. This doesn't raise any red flags on its own. But what is weird? The clerk said that they left in such a rush that they didn't even bother to put on the coats before running out into the rain. The coach that they just bought now. You might assume that the big appointment that they were rushing to was with the owner of that used car that they were looking to buy. But you'd be wrong. They didn't buy any car during the trip so if they weren't buying electronics and they weren't buying a car. What were they doing there? Oddly the next time may surface is at a bar in the same neighborhood as the clothing store and when they get to the bar. They're still very anxious about the time. Miguel goes to the counter and orders a bottle of mineral water according to the bartender. He's acting very like nervous and impatient and while he's ordering he keeps glancing over at the clock after paying for the water. Miguel keeps the receipt and this might not seem like a big clue but Brazil has a recycling policy where you could return empty bottles for a deposit. So whatever or whoever they're waiting for. Miguel assumes won't take too long and he'll have time to return the bottle before heading home that evening no one saw Miguel. Well leave the bar so we don't know if they met someone there or they left alone but at five PM. They're seen at the foot of ENTAME Hill. Which is just outside town. They pull up in a jeep driven by someone with blonde hair. There were two other men in the car as well but the witness couldn't see them clearly. Whoever these three men were they were the last people to see Miguel and well alive. So by this point police had mapped out all of their movements from leaving home in the morning to arriving at the hill that night but none of it offered any clues about what actually happened next. We already mentioned a few the strange details at the scene of the deaths. But if we take a closer look it's even more baffling. Let's start off with what they didn't have the money that they brought with them. The most obvious possibility is that this was a robbery gone wrong but staging a scene like this would have taken a lot of time and effort for not a ton of money and they also left some behind also. There were no injuries on either of the bodies. No CUTS NO BRUISES. No Burns no sign of violence at all. When the corner didn't autopsy there were no internal damages either and strangely. Despite sitting out in the open for three days on a hill that's swarming with wildlife. The bodies were totally untouched by animals. No one can really say what that means but it kind of seems like there was something unnatural about the death if even the vultures didn't WanNa touch them if this wasn't a murder the next possibility was suicide but this theory sort of falls apart too because Miguel still had the empty water bottle and the receipt. If he knew he was going to die. Why go through the trouble of saving that receipt beyond that police find three pages of handwritten notes? That definitely didn't suggest a suicide pact. The first page has a a list of electronics parts. Numbers along with some Algebra work. The equation uses Ohm's law which is E. equals. I are which is used to calculate the strength of an electrical current now. The two men were electronics technicians. After all so everyone assumes these are just notes for a work project now. The next page though is more of an enigma translated from Portuguese. It says quote Sunday one tablet after the meal. Monday one tablet in the morning on an empty stomach. Tuesday one tablet after the meal Wednesday one tablet before bedtime and quote. Obviously this is talking about some kind of prescription. But as far as anyone knows neither Miguel or amend well were sick now. The last dose that Wednesday before bedtime dose would have been taken right before they died but due to decomposition the corner couldn't get useful out of the toxicology report so we still don't know what was in those mysterious tablets and this was a little hard for me to understand because just a second ago I know. He said the bodies kind of untouched by wildlife. I expected them to be in. Good condition. But whatever's going on at the time they either didn't have the technology they didn't have the time and they weren't able to test for it so finally. The third page has another set of instructions. This one said quote sixteen thirty be at the determined location. Eighteen thirty swallow capsules after the effect protect metals week for mask signal end quote. Now the confusion isn't a translation issue. It doesn't make any sense in Portuguese either. It almost seems like the note was kind of scribbled down quickly in some kind of shorthand which probably means someone gave the instructions verbally and someone else wrote them down putting it all together. We can at least gathered that Miguel Aiman. Well weren't the victims of some kind of random attack. They came to the hill for a reason. And that brings us to our last piece of evidence. The lead masks themselves now. You're probably picturing a full mask. That covers your entire face. Almost like what welders wear but these were about the size and shape of sunglasses made out of solid lead. They were apparently homemade and cut. Roughly FROM SCRAP METAL. Lead blocks radiation. So it's often used as a coating protective goggles and facials but these masks were too small to offer any real protection and since they were solid metal. It'd be impossible to see or do anything while wearing them so at first police had no idea what to make of these masks but after some digging it turned out that this wasn't an isolated incident according to flying saucer review. There was another case four years earlier. Where another electronics technician had been found dead on a hill with a lead mask in that previous case the police determined that the man went up to the hill and took some kind of drugs because he was convinced it would allow him to pick up radio and TV signals with his

Miguel Miguel Giuseppe Viana Nita Roy Sao Paulo Rio De Janeiro Tame Hill Invitation Hill Miguel Aiman Technician Entame Hill Pereira De Cruz Manuel United States Elsa Elsia Brazil L. Ceo Gomez Robbery
The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

The Big Picture

13:11 min | 7 months ago

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

"Later in the show. I'll have an interview with Lebron L. The writer director of the new updated edition of the invisible man. A movie that shifts the perspective of the classic horror movie to the victim in this case played by the Amazing Elizabeth Moss when Elsa Clever Jonah craftsman and we had a fun chat about how he's reinventing the work of the historic universal monster movies and some of his aides filmaker. Heroes like James Cameron and Paul Hogan and John Carpenter but I I am joined by ringer contributor and one of the best film minds around Adam Neiman. Thanks for joining me Adam. Thanks for having me Adam. We're here to build another wing in the movie hall of fame. Today we said post and beam on the monster movie hall of fame. Now you know monster. Movies are tricky because there are two distinctions between them. One is your classical scare movie that enrapture audiences but maybe doesn't really mean very much and then. The other is the load-bearing bearing metaphorical monster that communicate something to the world about maybe it's ills or human psychology or things of that nature I assume that you are more fan of the latter. But May maybe that's not the case. I think I'm a fan of the ladder when it's less calculated You know the the joke I liked to tell his one day. Someone's GonNa make really good specific movie about a social problem like documentary and then at a press conference the director. She's going to be like this movie's a metaphor for zombies and just waiting for someone to do but I mean I think that in the last couple years because you have some like Jordan. Peele who has spoken not in terms of monster movies but in terms of horror movies. He's talked about you. Know his office for those social thrillers or Social Horror Movies and the metaphorical dimension to them. And so you know because monsters are a subset of horror movies as you say a delivery device for for scares those streams often do cross but yeah. I think some of the best monster movies of all time are definitely ones where monsters represent something whether it's something inside or outside society or something inside or outside people but I'm also just a a big fan of movies. Where like spooky things jump out at people in eat them? So it's a IT'S A. It's a fine balance before we get started on constructing this this list that we've put together here. Do you remember your first monster movie experience at the movie. That felt like a monster movie to me and I mean it it is a monster is when Pinocchio gets swallowed by the whale. Oh yeah which is. Obviously you know I mean there's a biblical reference there to to Joan in the whale and it's You know like for for for kids. Who Who who see Pinocchio? That whale is just nightmarish and terrifying and and gigantic. I mean my dad. I think that's the first movie he ever told you to. Took me to it. Just absolutely scared the hell out of me that and the giant squid in Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. Same thing oh great both Some Disney spun con there. Well done by in and and you. Well I'm thinking about Pinocchio as you say it and the thing that scared me more than the whale is the sequence in which the boys turn into donkeys boys which is just absolutely disturbing and also kind of metaphorical in its way Not to put too fine a parasite point on it I'm trying to think of my first true scary movie experience. I feel like what I got two young Frankenstein before I got to Frankenstein in. It's funny. How when something like that happens how it can obscure your relationship to movies and I think it actually made me Not so much scared movie theaters but just just sort of happy and smiling and laughing. I tend to laugh at horror movies and monster movies because I get kind of perverse thrill out of them and I so I if young Frankenstein. Ken Count that would be. That would be my number one. I mean obviously. I saw a bunch movies that we'll talk about here on this list that a very young age. And maybe that's an opportunity to just go right into it. So here's what we're going to do. We'RE GOING TO GO CHRONOLOGICALLY. So there's a long history. I would say monster. Movies are essentially as old as movies themselves. So we're going to try to walk through. Essentially I don't know eighty ninety years of movie history and try to capture. What are the absolute most representative interesting compelling fascinating monster movies ever made and the monsters? I think the conversation should really be about the monsters inside of the movies and why they're so effective as devices for either sending those messages or just scaring the shit out of us. So you chosen five. I've chosen five. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA Ariffin vamp little bit. Why don't you give me your first pick going all the way back to the nineteen thirties? Sure and you know it's interesting because now when we've got it arranged chronologically we've got this this interesting blindspot which. Kinda be filled in as we go along. Which is we've both bypassed. The true initial cohort of Universal Monster. Movies right the very late twenties very early thirties because the first movie on my list is King Kong. So I have bypassed Dracula Frankenstein you know bride of Frankenstein Which are all these enduring literary properties that have been made and remade for a long time and I think the thing about King Kong. It just feels like the primal scene for me of monster as spectacle because he's not human sized right. He's not an actor costume he's not You know someone doing an accent or wearing makeup. He's a special effects creation and the thing about the original King Kong. Every time I watch it is. It is just so spectacular visually. In an analog era. You know the the integration of those stop motion special effects into old sets and the exaggerated camera angles on the actors and just the the surrealism of it. I've read that. The actual surrealists the the practicing artists within that within that movement re huge fans of King Kong for one thing. 'cause monster just keeps changing size. You know it's inconsistent it's inconsistent but it's also just stunning because from scene to scene you know when he's just represented by giant hander giants foot or the close ups on the is and then you can also still cut backing these establishing shots and seeing him in these different environments and. I think it's the way also that it goes from this primal island to this urban city. The monster in his home context. And then sort of you know thrashing around in the middle of maternity causing chaos. It's just like the deepest the deepest core horror fantasy. You know that that that I can think of I. I just think it's absolutely astonishing and I never tire of watching it. It's funny I think a lot of the monsters on our list Get repeated and reused and re contextualize over and over again the thing with King Kong is is the actual character of King Kong comes up over and over and over and over again. We're getting another King Kong movie this year. And for whatever reason I would say between King Kong and Godzilla. Those are really the only two significant monsters that we never tire of somehow. That don't don't expire. You know I think that the idea behind what King Kong represents and there's obviously been an extraordinary amount of both academic critical just fun writing about What happens when colonialists enter a less developed world and attempt to steal things from it But in addition to that it is this grand spectacle and we talk a lot on the show about is. It doesn't move. You have a reason to be seen in a movie theater. Then I feel like the original King. Kong is is one of the landmark achievements and you have to see this on a giant screen. There's nowhere else for to be seen. We'll for sure. I maybe just in terms of bridging King Kong with those other brand name monsters of the period he in genders the same kind of complex sympathy. That you have with Boris. Karloff Frankenstein. Right I mean you even have a rhyme in those two movies wherein Frankenstein. He picks the little girl up by the river without doing what he's doing. And you know drowns her accidentally and certainly king kongs intentions towards Aren't violent. They're they're in his sort of chivalrous or desirous or somewhere in between there. I think the reason he endures an even the point that God's Zilla as a character eventually got bent in King kongs direction because the original godzillas dot anthropomorphized sympathetic at all. And then over the years. And they made Godzilla more like King Kong. I think being inside that sort of like destructive force but you're also misunderstood and you're more a victim of circumstance than anything else that's a really appealing escapist fantasy for filmgoers even thinking the original King Kong as terrifying as it is and as brutal as the violences like a people have never seen it. He smush is people into Goo on screen. You know You're still with him and I think that that's a really great monster. Movie needs on some kinds of great monster movies that you need that possible level of identification or sympathy. So it's not just purely a nightmare. I think the original King Kong does that just just amazingly well. So you're next pick actually doesn't do the former thing that you were just describing which is there's no crushing there's no Gu. There's no absolute violence of a kind in your next week. What's your next movie? The next movie I have is is cap. People which is part of a cycle of really low key atmospheric horror movies produced in the mostly in the nineteen forties. Bhai guy named Val Luton and I would say that if you get a chance to see Ken. Jones documentary thou loot man in the shadows. I think it's the best documentary I've ever seen about a filmmaker at particularly about how Luton changed horror movies by using the lack of a budget. And the lack of franchise -able characters. You Know He. He didn't have the roster that universal was working with all these all star. You know horror icons so he made it less more. It's the it's the the the the cinema of of of suggestion and scary around the edges. But it's also movie about people transforming into cats I. It's a booby that plays the the ambiguity of is this or isn't this real up. You know for for a long time but it really does give over to the idea that the main character the heroin does when stimulated or afraid you know actually transform into A cat due to this this this Eastern European mysticism and it's also a movie. I'm sure they'll come later. That gets remade in the eighties and completely liberalised because instead of just talking with someone turning into a cat or remembering someone turning into a cat you actually see it on screen with with special effects and it's It's less effective to me. Do you do you like the Paul schrader version that you're describing the eighties version. I like the Paul schrader version. Because it's wild acid trippy. Paul schrader horror movie. And it's it's glory and it's actually not as full-on like latex hydraulic special effects. His other movies from the period. But I I love the original are you are you. Are you fond of the delude films directed by Jacques Turner? Who did a bunch of the other ones is it a? Is it a a a source of Phantom for you it is? I saw cat people and the Leopard men in a couple of them many many years ago and then actually over Halloween this year my wife and I were looking and you know as I get older Halloween. Getting more and more difficult to program. If we're not gonNA rewatch something. But we watched a couple movies. We watched The criterion collection had the ghost ship which I had never seen which I thought had. It has a very similar approach to kind of What's happening in the shadows? Which is most of his films are using that strategy of not showing the thing and then I watched by myself. The body snatcher and both of them. I thought were pretty great. I mean I this is also a case where I I. I probably saw Kent Jones's documentary before seeing any of the films and while that was a great thing for my film education it also kind of warped perception of the movie because I was seeing it as a kind of intellectual exercise in a way where I understood technique as opposed to some of these other movies that we're GonNa talk about here where I just happened to be nine years old when I saw it in a completely reorganized my brain chemistry in a way but I do like his movies. And especially this one that you've chosen well and then also just the last thing to say but it may be that because it's not special effects and spectacle it anticipates where horror movies would go in the sixties with the idea of the monster within right. I mean here. It's not a an invading apor vampire. It's the idea of a woman who's subconscious and her inner life motivates this transformations client about the link between monstrous and desire and monstrous and repression. Which is why it tends to be. You Know Pretty Beloved Academically but I mean by the sixties. Neither US talk about these movies. But you start having the idea of the human monster in movies like psycho or whatever else and you can kind of trace aligned from the way cat. People stages horror towards that stuff. I think I think that's right. And I think it's probably a capitals nifty double feature with the peg for this film the invisible man because that movie is also as much about.

King Kong Dracula Frankenstein Pinocchio Adam Neiman Paul Schrader Kent Jones King Kongs Ken Count Elizabeth Moss Godzilla James Cameron Lebron L. Director United States Disney Karloff Frankenstein Peele John Carpenter Joan
"elsa" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:32 min | 10 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Just when you thought you had pushed it out of your consciousness it's back manager. Danny that of course is the theme song from frozen. The movie was a massive. Hit the Disney film long-held the crown as the highest grossing animated movie worldwide frozen was written and Co directed by Jennifer Lee who has since been named Walt Disney animation studios chief creative officer the first woman to hold such a position during the making making of frozen to. NPR's Elizabeth Blair sent some time. Spent some time with her in frozen to water. Air Fire and earth are important to the story so he's the wind in the movie the characters call her gail sometimes. She's he's playful and sometimes she's angry. We played a little louder in a windowless room at the Disney animation studios in Burbank. Supervising sound editor Odin. Benny test test plays the different wind. Sounds for a group of people working on the film including Jennifer Lien and her co director. Chris Buck because she blasts that. That tree tree limb away from Ana. That's gale goes your the magic and Gail starts to go around Elsa and then spits the others out. This kind of collaboration goes on on for just about every aspect of an animated Disney movie says Jennifer Lea and you go shot by shot moment by moment frame by frame and discuss everything everything from the emotion to the effects to the camera. The first frozen was inspired by Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale the snow queen one of the heroines. Elsa has magical powers she can make ice and snow in a split second for inspiration for the new movie Lee and a team from Disney traveled to Norway Finland and Iceland wasted on a glacier for the first time really hit us. What would elsa feel standing here? The glacier it's a thousand feet deep is thousand years old it's of nature completely and something she would probably be so connected to and we realized is sort of the mythic round her power. That opened up the story to be something even bigger for us. That's something begins as a secret. Siren that calls astounds..

Disney gail Jennifer Lee Jennifer Lien Walt Disney Elsa Hans Christian Andersen Elizabeth Blair Jennifer Lea Danny Burbank Chris Buck NPR Benny Norway Finland Iceland
"elsa" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"elsa" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Hey guys, it's canvas and Kayla. And we are directionally talent. We thought we would know every single thing to know in the entire universe by the time we were in our thirties. Guess what we don't we don't at all will stay tuned. Because today we have our live episode that we are airing with our guest, Elsa Collins. Just wanted to thank you so much for coming. It means so much that you came from MIR and fire, thank you to the bungalows Fairmont for. Rarely bungalow. Well, yeah, we, we've been recording in in my living room for the past year. We've been we've started this venture about a eight months ago, we started this podcast. And so if you've listened to before, thank you so much. We were so scared to put ourselves out there and try come from new and get out of our comfort zone. So thank you for supporting that and, and growing with growing pains. And speaking going pains, this is a I live up, so. Well, we tried, we tried really hard. We tried so hard. Okay. Here's the deal. We had an incredibly successful I live show. Thank you, guys, so much. Everyone who was able to come and make it. Thank you, Elsa. Thank you, Melissa, our producer and our editor, unfortunately, it just didn't work out. The sound quality did not come through. We wanted to make sure that you guys really got the full experience of this conversation that we had with Elsa about this is about humanity. It was such a powerful conversation that we're like you know what? Let's just do this again. Let's start over. Let's sit down with Elsa on, we're talking about a lot of the same topics that we brought up that night we have a lot of the same questions, and we just kind of wanted to have a more personal conversation. A deeper dive in some of these issues, and we wanted to give you guys the best opportunity to really be able to listen and absorb the conversation that we were having because we. Felt it was really important. You guys so Elsa was raised on both sides of the border in San Diego, and Tijuana, Mexico. Both of her parents were born in Mexico. She is the last of five children. She's a first generation college graduate, receiving her b in communications and master's degree in sociology from Stanford University. She then pursued a juris doctor at from Columbia law school. She is the co founder of the idea tour. She is on the board of alliance for a healthier generation, and an ambassador for the good plus foundation, when she heard about the news of the young children being detained and separated from their parents. Also, along with her sister said that we have to do something, so they took their experience in social impact, and border issues. And they started this is about humanity and this is about humanity's a movement, whose main goal is to help those affected at the border through education and donation efforts, they worked identified those in need, and then they help fill that need. So basically is a about how she is sickly. Superwoman and without further. Ado here is Elsa Collins. Also, we are so glad that you are back with us. Our live episode was a huge success, but this'll be even better second time is the charm who knows..

Elsa Collins co founder Mexico Elsa Kayla MIR Fairmont Melissa Columbia law school Stanford University San Diego Tijuana producer editor eight months
"elsa" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"In recent history. American military technological vantage has been accused pillar of power and predominance today that is starting to change. It's no longer the case that China can't innovate by contrast. Sometimes there's too much hyper exaggeration of China's potential and innovation and reality always falls somewhere between those extreme perspectives. But it is clear that China is catching up and is devoting and mobilize and considerable resources for quantum computing communications and other technologies, applications in the space. This will be important space to watch going forward. And it's been exciting to have the chance to attempt to create an initial baseline and we're China is today what we're they're looking to go and what some of the potential implications of those ambitions maybe. I'm Scott are Anderson. This is the law for podcast for September twenty second two thousand eighteen. If you ask scientists, what is most likely to kick off the next great wave of technological change? Good number winter, quantum mechanics a field whose physics Albert Einstein once described as spooky potential once tapped couldn't exponentially faster computer processors on breakable, cryptography, and new frontiers surveillance technology. No one understands this better than the People's Republic of China over the last several years has built up an aggressive, state-driven campaigned, accelerate the development of quantum technology. I set of policies intended to put it at the very front of the pack for the next two knowledgeable revolution and give it all the competitive advantages. Such technology is likely to bring to discuss this development what it may mean for the future and how the United States should respond. I sat down with Elsa Kenya, Najib fellow with the center for a new American security and the co author of a new report on China's efforts to achieve quantum hegemony. It's the law fair podcast episode, three forty, nine Elsa Kenya on China's quantum quest. This is a really fascinating report, but I wanna start people out with something a little more foundational. You're talking here about quantum technology which encompasses a whole range of different applications. Walk us through this a little bit. What is quantum technology would you mentioned that it's been described as having spooky properties? I think by Stein, what does that mean in application? Where does it were these properties come from? So I find quantum science and technology fascinating that I will admit French. I am not a scientist. I am limited technical understanding of this. I've done my best in this report to present a readable and realistic impression of what the state of science and technology in this field is and where it's going. And with the potential is though I think I'm in good company. Albert Einstein is said to have said, if this is correct, it's advise the end of science. Neal's bore said those were not shocked when they first come across quantum theory cannot possibly have understood it. So it is indeed a spooky and was actually being quite derisive when he characterized. The notion of quantum entanglement as spooky action at a distance. There was a lot of skepticism at first about whether the physics underlying what are today, becoming technologies could possibly make any sense, but it is a fascinating because technologies that actually start to leverage an employee quantum properties such a superposition entangled, intellectually starting to be used to develop a technology such as quantum computing communications togr Affi as well as different forms of radar and sensing. So quantum computing has received the most attention so far. It uses a cubic day quantum analog of the bitch that can be essentially in a superposition between zero and water simultaneously across all possible states rather than a binary that provides exponential increases and computing power. A lot of excitement about the notion of quantum surpremacy or the point at which a quantum computer can surpass, a classical computer, at least by some metrics and certain players in the field, including Google, including. Researchers in China claim to be on track to achieving quantum supremacy as early as this year or next though that is just one quite symbolic milestone in what will be very long road or perhaps a marathon to the development of quantum computers that are actually fully functional and capable of delivering those massive increases in computing power against broad range of applications..

China Albert Einstein scientist Elsa Kenya Google United States Neal togr Affi Stein Scott Anderson Najib twenty second
"elsa" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Elsa elsa yeltsin mark barnaby am well hello nope oh no many and montaigne this hello pundits not a word bags at cash put my mind on a cofounder known for no miles on hundred we go oh free so these.

Elsa elsa yeltsin mark barnaby montaigne
"elsa" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Elsa don't kick whitney home break a few nickel come simmered saving needs to the twin if we bring it back because maddow crackdown even older death row nicot boy in your fist naked check style now tap me more swag take over eat nickel themes what no weapon protection than happen something that can make you do wrong make you somewhat she can happen really feel some together welcome love.

Elsa whitney maddow
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"She's a pleaser in ah whereas i even add five raza styler lake i know cornered with ash no you have some water hunter warning water for one at all so it was that at five and i ask darrell how the film got started argued spooned an afternoon with also garage and also was taking without account reduce his killing time like say he came by elsa me in the flood files and she would take out twenty by 24 is and then she would tell the story about the people of the photograph and i did think at that time this is a movie that certainly occurred to me and then i kept not putting it off but not doing it was never on the list of of things that i was going to do accept that over the years more so than ever i've come to believe that i should stop thinking about making movies and just make them so win also started pulling polaroid's out of the flat files i remember this very well she held up wad of them she hell it in such a way as to sort of block out almost everything on except you could see the top of her head or hans holding the edges of photograph and they thought is that so good i can't even see elsa and then i thought yes this is really really good he's kind of a literally eat it in some way not obliterated but supplanted it's what you do when you take take your oxy's i'll say half that black screen and anti holding for the person to see it and so help me this is a very.

darrell elsa polaroid hans
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Death hmm mortality in general uh i suppose you could appendage l i t e il it but i don't quite see it that way i think in many ways it's it's one of the richest things that i've done it may not be the longest but i think there are a lot of really really rich theme i mean i guess there's all kinds of reasons we could speculator on for white people that view it that that way may because it's not about war politics i'll this other people that responded to it overwhelmingly very very early on for which i am grateful you're self being one of them might add errol shared the b side with me last summer and i invited it to the toronto film festival like most people outside cambridge i never heard of elsa dorfmann so the film came as a revelation here's a clip in which he describes her struggle to obtain one of polaroid's few twenty by 24 cameras and you had to be in this in this circle it was really had to faith the line of their pets really i was never a path and i just hung in there i always was charged for every roll of film i never got a free bucks a film i never blatter free essex seven d i never got anything than any how i can't complain 'cause i ended up with a camera but that was firm being in nag elsa when erol undertook this project did you have any apprehensions about him no i didn't i took it is a hoops i didn't take it seriously i i thought oh earl he's tomorrow.

errol elsa dorfmann polaroid essex erol toronto
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Like consumer polaroid's her pictures develop instantly normally for a client shall take to the client picks their favorite and she keeps the other one that she calls the b side now that polaroid film is discontinued and elsa is eighty years old she's mostly retired in eyrle's film she looks back over hundreds of photos and reflects on her career that innocent of any the explanation is in my life i've ever had not to meet life when you down this had met here need to walk around the euro elsa never had much of a national profile but in cambridge she's an institution aero moved their 27 years ago with his wife julia and their son hamilton he told me way i described cambridge's this city fill with very very smart people none of whom have any desire to talk to you but erl and julia became friends with elsa and her husband harvey silverglate in attorney and criminal defense and civil liberties elsa says about harvey so the only people he will have separate with a julian narrow busied rather work lucky me as an aside i should note that one harvey's defense clients is jeffrey macdonald the infamous surgeon convicted of killing his family his case was reexamined in a book by errol called a wilderness of error as our conversation began errol gave credit to julia for bringing the couple's together leads the result of my wife may all of whom i might add including myself love julia every good and i wouldn't know neither elsa or harvey if not for her i always complain that.

polaroid eyrle cambridge julia hamilton erl elsa harvey silverglate attorney jeffrey macdonald errol eighty years 27 years