24 Burst results for "Elsa Chang"

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 2 d ago

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"Today of the pain of lethal injection. This is a process the federal government plans to use to execute two inmates in a prison in Terre Haute, Indiana this week. Lethal injection is supposed to be a quick and painless death. Our colleagues it all things considered. Asked if it really is no one called well reported this story with a TC host, Elsa Chang. Hey, there. What were you looking for? S so we've been looking at the autopsies of inmates executed execution specifically excuse my lethal injections Physically, what's happening to the lungs was first tipped off that something might be going wrong with lungs a few years ago by a doctor in Atlanta named Jules if it had been reviewing some autopsies of inmates executed in Georgia, let's take a listen. I saw that instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death have began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death. A death associated with suffering. What are you seeing was a severe form of something called pulmonary oedema on this is when lungs rapidly fill with fluid, which could make you feel like you're drowning or suffocating. And it's happening here because the massive dose of drugs that inmates receive is damaging the inside of the lungs, all of which is morally important to many people, because we'd like to think it's the society. We're not torturing people that they're being painlessly put to death. And now there's this evidence of something else. Where did that evidence take you? Yes. Oh, Doctors haven't had a handful of autopsies, but we want to see how prevalent this is across the board. So we filed a public records requests. We've got more than 300 autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection from nine states spanning decades. Not all of them had date aboutthe lungs, But in the more than 200 that did we found pulmonary oedema in 84% of the cases. Now, lawyers are also bringing autopsies to federal courts around the country, claiming That the pain of pulmonary oedema amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. They say This explains why we've seen some inmates in recent years gasping for air and choking as they're being executed. Is it clear how much the inmates are feeling in those last moments of their lives? Right. That's the big question that the courts are tackling right now. Many doctors who are testifying have raised serious concerns about the drug states are using to try to anesthetized inmates. One drug that's been used in dozens of executions in recent years, isn't actually an anesthetic can't block pain is often used in hospitals to calm patients down before surgery. Another common drug that states use is an anesthetic, but it's not used in a way that guarantees the inmate warm, remain fully under for the duration of the execution. S O. Considering issues with both of these drugs doctors we spoke to say it's very likely. Many of these inmates could feel those suffocating effects of their lungs filling with fluid okay, so they could feel the effects what arguments or states making to defend lethal injection. Right s O the pushback. We've encountered our reporting of courses thes, and it's have been sentenced to death made us do involve pain. And, of course, many of the family members of the victims of these violent crimes do want justice to be done, regardless of how painful the execution will be. We went to Ohio to speak with a man named Norman Stout. He's 90 years old and his wife was murdered 36 years ago. It is only the bleeding hearts and have words that are involved in this discussion. Cruel and unusual punishment is laying out there in the cemetery, and I should point out that despite all the recent problems with lethal injection pulling does show that the majority of Americans still support the death penalty, and at the end of the day, Of course, it's up to the courts to decide whether or not lethal injection amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. But having autopsy evidence to consider during that process gives a much clearer picture of what lethal injection is actually doing the human body. Noah.

Norman Stout Terre Haute Elsa Chang Indiana Noah Atlanta Jules Georgia Ohio
'Patriotic Education': Trump Says He Will Start New Commission

Marketplace

04:27 min | 6 d ago

'Patriotic Education': Trump Says He Will Start New Commission

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. President Trump waded into the classroom today. He says he thinks American students need to be taught what he calls patriotic education, and he accused his political opponents of trying to brainwash Children about racism. Must clear away the twisted Web of lies in our schools, classrooms and teach your Children the magnificent truth. About our country. We want our sons and daughters to know that they are the citizens of the most exceptional nation. In the history of the world. It's the latest development in the cultural divisions. Trump is trying to promote as part of his reelection campaign. White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins me now to talk about this item. Hello. And the president says he's going to create a new commission about this. Can you working? Tell us about that commission? Yes. So he went to the National Archives to announce that he is creating a commission to promote history education that focuses on quote the legacy of 17 76. Of course, that is the year when American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain, and this is a reaction in part against the 16 19 project. President Trump made it explicit. He said that That was the project led by the New York Times that focuses on a view of American history stemming from the year when the first enslaved Africans were brought to these shores. But it's also a reaction to the protest that we've seen this year against racial injustice. One thing about the commission to be clear about, though the federal government does not have jurisdiction over school curriculum, so it is up to schools and local and state governments to decide what to teach. And they do and they teach very different things depending on where you are. This isn't the first time the president has talked about these themes. Would you put in context? Put this in context for us politically? Yes. Oh, he's wrapping a few things together here. People on the right have long complained about the liberal bent on college campuses. That is not new. But there has been a growing effort by educators at all levels, even in elementary schools to teach Children about systemic racism. Slavery as a founding sin of the nation. The genocide of Native Americans as part of westward expansion, and President Trump objects to that strongly, saying schools are teaching Children to hate America. Our Children are instructed from propaganda tracks. Like those of Howard's in Try to make students ashamed of their own history. The left has warped, distorted and to file The American story. With deceptions, fall suits and lives. This also comes in the midst of the racial justice protests where some protesters tour down or vandalize statues of Confederate generals and founding fathers who owned slaves, and Trump has come to the defense of these statues, making them a cause of sorts as part of his re election. There is often a reason or an impetus for why Trump will say things that he knows will be provocative. Is there Do we know what he's talking about this now? Well, he's been talking about it for a little while. It's it's clear. This is part of his re election. This is a variation on themes that he talked about it during speeches and at Mount Rushmore on July 3rd the White House on July 4th. It's a theme he has been coming back to to fire up his base, sort of a variation on make America great again, harkening back to a different time. A different America. He is presenting himself as a great defender of American values and and even Western civilisation, as if to say that people who don't agree with his view of history or of what makes America great. That they are just wrong, but fundamentally trying to destroy the country. It is a very different reelection message than those used by past presidents. It's not about uplift or unifying. It's a long way. From morning in America and as if it wasn't clear already that this is part of his reelection campaign. As part of his remarks, President Trump took a very unsettle shot at Joe Biden holding up a statue of a a notable Delaware founding father and saying that when his statue was taken down by the city of Wilmington, Biden didn't speak out. That's white House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Thank you to him. You're welcome. For

President Trump America White House Correspondent Tamara Keith Joe Biden Elsa Chang Great Britain Federal Government Sasha Pfeiffer New York Times Delaware White House Howard Mount Rushmore National Archives Wilmington
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. This hour, nearly a decade after the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan, some towns are still picking up the pieces into Mr Everything is different now to go. But it's a different town, even if it has the same name. Also a black service member from World War two might suit And executives at a company developing a Cupid vaccine are dumping millions of dollars in stocks now news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Senate Republicans say they are planning to vote on their version of the next Corona virus relief legislation later this week. NPR's Windsor Johnson reports, Congressional Democrats and Republicans remain deadlocked on the next measure, mainly over the cost of the bill. The roughly $1 trillion Republican bill includes $300 per week in additional jobless benefits. It also includes liability protections that would limit lawsuits against businesses from employees or customers who contract Cove in 19. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is going to vote on this targeted proposal. We're going to get the stone walling of Democratic leaders out from behind closed doors and put this to a vote. Congressional Democrats who have proposed a $2.2 trillion bills say the Republican measure doesn't go far enough in providing Americans what they need during the pandemic. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington What's being billed as a historic deal involving Israel and the United Arab Emirates is due to be signed September 15th at the White House. A deal, which is aimed at normalizing relations reflects a changing Middle East and also delivers a key foreign policy victory for President Trump Is he seeks reelection agreement involves senior delegations from both countries, led by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Amarante, Foreign Minister Mohammad Bin Zayed God, the brother of the Crown Prince. Today was the first day of back to school for millions of students around the country. As NPR's genuine reports. College campuses are already getting blamed for nationwide increase in Corona virus cases. New Jersey, New York and Connecticut have quarantine requirements for people coming in from a majority of states and territories. Even so, New York governor Andrew Cuomo Warren's college students gathering in large groups could set the area's progress back. He pointed to a celebration in Manhattan's Washington Square Park last weekend. You have a large gathering. Many people without masks went on for hours. What do you think is going to happen? Cuomo says colleges in New York will now need to notify the state if they reach 100 covert 19 cases, which could force them to transition to remote learning. Jen. HUMAN NPR NEWS Union representing auto workers in Canada says its chosen Ford is its potential strike target is talks on a new contract it underway. Unions Contract for the Big Three Detroit car companies expired. 11 59 PM September 21st. Canadian autoworkers union says it wants product commitments from Ford's assembly plant in Oakville, Ontario, near Toronto. Another difficult day for Wall Street, where a tech sector lead sell off that started last week roiled through a third trading session today, the Dow was down 632 points. The NASDAQ fell 465 points, a drop of more than 4%. S and P 500 closed down 95 points today. You're listening to NPR. Georgia State election officials are investigating how 1000 voters managed to allegedly cast two ballots in the June primary election. Stephen Fowler with Georgia Public broadcasting reports, none of the outcomes of the primary contests were affected by the suspected double voting. Georgia's Republican Secretary of state, Brad Grafton's Berger says there is evidence that about 1000 voters returned in absentee ballot and then voted in person and the primary. Clean. The conductor, state director for the nonprofit All Voting is local says the state needs better poll worker training and more voter education poll workers could not successfully Check whether a person had already voted. They couldn't successfully give voters the information that they needed to cast a ballot successfully. Georgia elections officials are also investigating whether any of those double votes were counted twice. President Trump recently suggested voters might consider casting two ballots, which is a felony in Georgia. For NPR news. I'm Stephen Fowler in Atlanta rapper Kanye West has qualified to appear on the ballot in another state West will appear as a presidential candidate on Mississippi's November ballot. As he will in states, including Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Utah. To qualify in Mississippi West had to pay a $2500 fee to the secretary of state's office get 1000 signatures of Mississippi voters was too Once back Donald Trump's reelection announced last month he was launching his own presidential bid. Griddle of futures prices plunged following equities markets lower today. Oil down $3 a barrel to close a 36 76 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. I'm Jack Spear..

NPR President Trump Andrew Cuomo Warren Georgia Jack Spear Senate Ford New York Stephen Fowler Mississippi NPR NEWS Union New York Mercantile Exchange Kanye West Fukushima Japan Elsa Chang
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:33 min | 2 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, Black and Latin. Next, people are more likely to get sick and die from Cove in 19. That's also true of older people and those with underlying health conditions. These groups are generally among the least likely to be included in vaccine trials, which is important as two companies have announced that they're starting Corona virus vaccine trials that may enroll up to 30,000 people each. Reporter Jonelle. Alicia wrote about this for Kaiser Health news and joins us now. Welcome. Thanks for having me why is it important that these groups that are more likely to be affected by Cove in 19 also be represented in trials for a Corona virus vaccine? Well, The short answer is we want to test a vaccine in the population that's most at risk for serious problems and the population most likely to receive the vaccine. If we don't testing groups that are representative of the community, we won't really know how well a vaccine will actually work well, these trials are taking place all over the country so far. Is there any evidence of whether they will reflect the demographics of those most affected by the virus will there in some good news. The structure that's been put in place to coordinate these trials is based on four longstanding clinical trial networks, including several that air focused on HIV and AIDS. So they have deep experience and connections with minority and other communities and Khun Draw on those connections for the Koven trials. What are the hurdles? What's standing in the way? Well, one of the things that standing in the way is that there have been in I H rules for more than 25 years, calling for minorities to be included in clinical trials. There's a new policy that took that just last year that would require older adults to be included, and even the FDA is guidelines for conducting these Coben clinical trials. Call for them to include racial and ethnic minorities, older people those with underlying conditions, But even that guidance refers to them as non binding recommendations. And so when I asked the FDA whether they'd refused to accept vaccine trial data that didn't include diverse people. They said no, they would still accept that data. And so what? The experts told me that it is that if you don't require it, it won't necessarily happen. There's another factor as well. Which is there's this hurdle of minority distrust of the medical system? I mean, there's a long history of desperate, even dangerous treatment of minorities. In scientific research and basic care, and many are hesitant to volunteer for a trial because they don't want to become guinea pigs and somebody's research. So what are the companies that are conducting these vaccine trials, telling you well, the companies have to file their demographic goals with the National Institute for Health, but they aren't required to disclose them publicly. So generally, that means we can on. Lee learned about the racial, ethnic and age makeup after the fact. The companies are saying they want these trials to be diverse. They're saying that they're doing everything they can to make them as diverse as possible. This week in my age director Francis Collins noted that they are tracking the enrollment week by week there tracking these diversity goals week by week. And he suggested that it might be made publicly available and said it oughta be if the trials do not include People representative of the group's most affected by covert 19. Is there a risk that the vaccine won't be as helpful as it could be? Yeah, Researchers are starting out with great intentions. Everyone wants to make sure these trials are inclusive. But they're under this enormous pressure to enroll participants quickly to accumulate their data and make sure to hit their internal milestones for development. It can be difficult to recruit and retain minority and older volunteers that Khun take more effort. But it's crucial because if we don't include the vast representation of the community in the trials, then we don't really know how it works in this whole population. It's General Alicia of Kaiser Health News. Thanks for your reporting thanks very much. For some wearing a mask in a place of business has moved from a question of safety to an ideological battle. In Michigan, two high profile altercations involving masks turned deadly. One victim tried to enforce the law. The other sought to defy it. Events like these have prompted some Michigan bar and restaurant owners to offer training designed to de escalate mask related conflicts with customers from member station W. K. R in East Lansing, Kevin Lavery reports. In May, Calvin Merlin found himself in a heated exchange with a customer at a thrift store in Flint. He was trying to enforce the state's mascot law, but his stance cost him his life. He was shot minutes later by a man who arrived at the store with the customer's husband. Weeks later near Lansing, another customer who refused to wear a mask got into an argument with a convenience store worker. He then stabbed another customer and was shot and killed by a sheriff's deputy. Tragedies such as these have put Michigan's frontline customer service workforce on high alert. Mayfair Bar in Hazlett opened a 1930 for when the ink ending Prohibition was still wet. It's rooftop deck overlooks a lakeside park, making it a popular place for drinks. Now you can't walk into the Mayfair without a mask. It's something bartender Joe Hilts contends with. There's a couple of people here that way honestly haven't felt safe.

Michigan Kaiser Health News representative FDA Khun Draw Ari Shapiro Alicia Mayfair Bar Elsa Chang National Institute for Health Los Angeles Reporter Khun Mayfair AIDS Joe Hilts Lansing Washington Francis Collins
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang this is our NPR reporting process a lawsuit alleging that Hoover nineteen fraud scheme it is inexcusable so trying to profit from this pandemic at the expense of people's health in we allege that these defendants have been attempting to do just that also the latest from Minneapolis where the death of a black man in police custody is raising questions again about police use of force and the Oakland A.'s announced they'll stop paying their minor league players were quite special baseball and we're struggling more now than we did we're in college first the news live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer the U. S. has hit another milestone in the ongoing corona virus pandemic and even though deaths and infections are slowing in some parts of the country it still makes it no less Graham one hundred thousand Americans have now lost their lives to pope at nineteen that's more people than have died in the Vietnam and Korean wars combined numbers closing in on the number of Americans who died in the first World War the tally by Johns Hopkins University says the viruses known affected more than five point six million people worldwide and claimed three hundred and fifty thousand lives house Democrats have cast their first remote votes in the chambers two hundred and thirty one year history NPR's quality of which office reports they cast the votes for a bill expressing US support for the Uighurs were dominantly Muslim ethnic group in China more than seventy members voted by proxy for the first time to approve the human rights bill one by one lawmakers announced their colleague's intentions on the house floor don Beyer of Virginia voted on behalf of six other members inform the house that Mr Lowenthal Mister Blumenauer Mr Cohen doctor foster Mr VCM is war will vote yea on S. thirty seven forty four Democrats approved the new rules temporarily allowing remote voting in video conference hearings members can vote for up to ten colleagues who can't travel to Washington DC because of the pandemic Republicans are suing to stop the effort they say it sets a dangerous precedent and that it's unconstitutional cloudy Seles NPR news Washington president trump plans to return to Florida Saturday for the next attempt at launching the SpaceX crew dragon as NPR's camera cater ports he was there as the launch was scrubbed today due to bad weather president trump vice president pence and their spouses were on site at the Kennedy Space Center for the launch as were three of trump's adult children and several grandchildren before the launch was postponed trump said it was a very exciting day for the country this is something the First Lady and I look very much forward to seeing so much so that they're coming back for the next try trump tweeted thanks to SpaceX and NASA says he flew back to Washington on Air Force One quote look forward to being back with you on Saturday exclamation point pence also tweeted that he'd be back to watch history in the making Tamar Keith NPR news after micro blogging site Twitter placed a fact check warning on a couple of his tweets president trump is threatening social media companies with new regulation or even possible closure trump accusing the platforms of seeking to silence conservative voices from campaign is lashing out after Twitter place fact check alerts on messages from the president that called mail in ballots fraudulent and predicted mailboxes will be robbed trump can not unilaterally like later close social media companies that would require an act of Congress or the FCC racks bank on Wall Street stocks closed higher the Dow was up more than five hundred points this is NPR and for the David Barnett foundation news room this is case your W. I'm Laurie Perella Wednesday may twenty seventh here's what's going on at five oh four with nightclubs shuttered because of the corona virus outbreak illicit underground parties are popping up around LA as KCRW's Catherine Barnes reports many of them are being held at short term rentals in the Hollywood Hills cabin fever is getting to everyone but some are becoming more vocal about it than others LAPD captain Steve Laurie told the LA times his Hollywood station received forty nine calls reporting loud parties last week roughly twenty percent more than usual for Memorial Day weekend in a video posted online by the LAPD authorities say they're going to crack down harder on these gatherings server was which is if you play music so allow me to serve your neighbor in his home additionally if you have a live stream voices in the backyard yeah make it hard for your neighbors this week the LAPD says if police are called to a party there could be consequences for both the person throwing it and the homeowner even if they're not there violators could face a citation all the way up to criminal prosecution and six months in jail this case your lease Catherine Barnes reporting well perhaps it was inevitable but LA's Greek theatre has now canceled its entire twenty twenty season we follow suit along with the Hollywood Bowl in other venues across the nation so you basically say that this season will be closed there will be no oblate large events at the great this year A. P. DS is chief of staff of the Los Angeles parks department he told KTLA that canceling the season with the safe and responsible thing to do not only for our fans or our guests and crew members and staff you know we we've done great work in Los Angeles to flatten our curvy we've made tremendous strides and so we want to continue doing positive things that will not jeopardize that this would have been the nineteenth season for.

Kelly Elsa Chang NPR Hoover fraud
"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

16:03 min | 4 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From scrutiny it's Tuesday may twelfth and this is All Things Considered I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang ahead this hour doctor found she warned senators against reopening the country without proper precautions we do not respond a good way when the fall comes then we run the risk of having research also house reopening Europe we check in with NPR correspondents based in Germany Italy and France where the youngest children went back to school today the records include through groups of eight children plus and then we watch handle those ten times a day and what writers are reading during the pandemic down news live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer one of the nation's top health official says the centers for disease control and prevention will soon release step by step guidance on how local authorities can begin to safely reopen churches schools and restaurants but NPR's Frank or donors reports that's not good enough for some lawmakers during a Senate hearing on restarting the economy democratic senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut press the director of the CDC director Robert Redfield to release its detailed plan to help these local groups and businesses reopen Murphy accused Redfield and other trump administration officials with providing quote criminally vague guidance to the states for re opening Connecticut in five days in ten days this guidance is going to be useful to us in two weeks so is it this week isn't actually when we gonna get this expertise from the federal government Redfield said he anticipated the CDC guidance would be posted soon Murphy's response soon isn't terribly helpful Franco or down yes NPR news the White House the California State University system will continue to stream most classes online this fall at this version comes as schools across the country struggle with how long to keep campuses closed amid the corona virus pandemic NPR's Duane brown reports from Los Angeles State University serves about half a million students and faculty across California on twenty three campuses the state university system moved to online classes back in mid March at the height of the corona virus pandemic now chancellor Timothy white says instruction in the fall will remain mostly online with limited exceptions for clinical nursing life science classes and some engineering courses chancellor white says the board's decision to limit in person classes is based on expert predictions about a possible second wave of the virus later this year the Wayne brown NPR news Los Angeles store just say lawmakers are pushing for a hate crimes law after the killing of an unarmed black jogger two white men are charged with the murder and death of almond Arbury court of public broadcasting's Emily Jones has more federal authorities are weighing whether hate crime charges apply in the shooting death of armory in February Georgia is one of four states without its own hate crime law I'm a bill has passed the state house but stalled in the Senate lawmakers now want to pass the bill and are hoping for support from Republican governor Brian can't reporter Emily Jones one of the government's key inflation gauges showed its biggest decline since the two thousand eight financial crisis with millions of Americans sheltering at home during the crime virus pandemic labor department says its consumer price index which measures a market basket of goods eight tenths of a percent in April led by a big drop in gas prices with fewer people on the road spending by consumers is closely watched since it flows roughly two thirds of overall U. S. economic activity on Wall Street today the Dow was down four hundred fifty seven points you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I'm terrace I learned county health officers in California are raising opposition to a state bill that would require a collection of sexual orientation data from cove in nineteen patients KQV politics editor Scott Shafer explains when covert nineteen is diagnosed in someone their gender race and other personal information is collected with their sexual orientation is not Senate bill nine thirty two by San Francisco state senator Scott Wiener would require the state and counties to include that data winner says it's important to know in order to help prioritize and target testing tracing and outreach but the state association of health officers is opposing the bill saying that information should be collected by doctors and nurses not public health officials leaders of the organization say they're working with senator Wiener to address those concerns the bill is set to be heard in the Senate health committee tomorrow I'm Scott Shafer KQED news California's hospitals have lost more than ten billion dollars so far in responding to the pandemic that's according to the state's leading hospital trade groups hospitals have had to buy ventilators and personal protective equipment but they also had to cancel procedures and related to the virus president of the California hospital association Carmela Coyle says that added up to an average loss of between twenty and thirty percent these challenges have now put hospitals in a position where the revenue losses just can't be sustained we are now seeing hospitals having to resort to layoffs and furloughs and asking employees to take paid time off quill is asking governor Newsom to provide one billion dollars in fines by the end of the state's fiscal year in June I'm terrace either in Oakland this is Katie with the news support for NPR comes from the Joyce foundation committed to advancing racial equity and economic economic mobility for the next generation in the Great Lakes region learn more at choice F. D. N. dot org and from Melissa news of KQ weedy support for KQ weedy comes from UCSF health who has collaborated with John Muir health to form the Berkeley outpatient center the Berkeley outpatient center offers primary care urgent care cancer care and specialists from both UCSF and John your health from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington can president trump continued to shield his tax returns and other financial records from scrutiny that was the question at the heart of three cases heard by the Supreme Court today over teleconference the first case we will argue today its case nineteen seven fifteen Donald Trump versus mais ours USA Mr Strawbridge three congressional committees and the Manhattan district attorney have demanded that trump's accounting firm and to banks hand over his tax and business records president trump has fought the subpoenas lower courts have ruled against him his attorneys appealed which is how we have ended up with today's arguments before the Supreme Court will hear to lay out what is at stake is Andrea Bernstein she is co host of the trump Inc podcast from WNYC and ProPublica hither Hey man it was great talking to you and do you okay before we get to today's arguments I do want to go back to just after trump was elected president and his decision not to divest from his business holdings because that is what opened the door to where we are today right so in the case of president trump he did not cut the umbilical cord with his family business so we still don't quite understand how we interact with that business how he profits if he's profiting and that has led to a whole series of questions and investigations because for the first time in modern history president trump has refused to release his tax returns so there are a number of questions that have been raised about possible conflicts about possible avenues of influence there's been a lot of journalism and there's been a number of congressional investigations and one by the Manhattan DA all of which trump has rebuffed his lawyer is his personal lawyers filed three suits to prevent the records from being released and those are the arguments that we heard this from court today okay so to those arguments that we heard today this was a I mentioned the three cases one examines how the trump organization conducted business going back to well before Donald trump's run for president two are tied to the twenty sixteen election just give us a little bit more detail right so it's three house committees that three sets of subpoenas and three cases but they're not all the they don't all line up one of the cases involves the house financial services committee looking into a broad based money laundering investigation and they're asking to speak to Stephanie get records from trump's bankers Deutsche Bank regarding that the other involves the house intelligence committee which is looking into possible interference in the twenty sixteen election and the third one it stems from Michael Cohen trump's personal attorney's testimony before Congress last year in which she said that trump was inflating certain records and deflating certain records and that's why Congress asked to see his tax returns his injury is it the Democrats in Congress and the Manhattan DA what is it they think they can prove if they get their hands on these documents right so that congressional subpoenas are a little bit different from the Manhattan to get with the congressional subpoenas are looking at or how does the president's business interact with his official duties are there areas of conflict of interest are there areas of misconduct are there areas and where he has acted outside the bounds of presidential behavior any ideas should there be legislation that would correct these things he is a little different after the department of justice decided not to pursue the things that Michael Cohen said about how trump had directed him to violate campaign finance laws the Manhattan DA took over the case and began to investigate his tax returns and after his tax records and that's what they're trying to look into and that's what trump lawyers have successfully blocked so far so in the thirty seconds or so we have left how did it go any indication of where the court my land they seem more inclined for the law enforcement investigation to go forward with that would remain a secret lots of skepticism about how you limit congressional oversight that's a question that still remains that is Andrea Bernstein she's author of American oligarchs the Kushners the trumps and the marriage of money and power entry thank you he's a match the details of how much to open in the midst of this pandemic can be seen in Georgia the governor there lifted the state wide shelter in place order for most residents and has allowed some businesses to reopen Atlanta mayor Keisha lance bottoms joins us now to talk about that decision welcome back to All Things Considered thank you for having me again so your state has had over thirty four thousand coronavirus cases and fourteen hundred deaths do you feel like Georgia is even in a place to be re opening well I remain concerned all of the numbers that you are seen now for as high as they are it's been with extreme social distancing measures in place so it does concern me that those numbers will go even higher I can tell you over the past couple of days I haven't seen the numbers take down the bed which is when a bit surprising I think over the next couple weeks we will see whether or not they re opening of our state since that's in the other direction what it Lana do you think it Lana should be on the same time line as the rest of the state now I don't obviously at rampage large urban cities with much more dense population than other parts of the state we had very high at the rate and are you the the one of the newest hot spot that we have in our state is in Gainesville Georgia a primarily hitting the Latino community so I think it's just this reminder whether you are actively populated city or a more role town cobit nineteen can still strike and it can spread very rapidly who do you think then that the governor's decision to start re opening your state is irresponsible I think that there was perhaps a way for us to be very thoughtful about it eight re opening I don't think that that should have the gauntlet hair salons and barber shops and places that people I cannot appropriately social be distant or either and have readily available access to the appropriate PP so I do think that there could have been a more thoughtful approach will have you had direct conversations with governor camp about the specific concerns in do you feel like he really heard them I have spoken with governor can't directly about their and we have agreed to disagree this disease continues to disproportionately hit the black community in the US and in Atlanta have you seen any signs of progress on that front we are just really beginning to gather information on specific ethnic classification so initially the number two are very spotty but I can tell you and I only I knew that it was hitting in our community much harder so now that we are gathering this information we will continue to track it and we will see where those numbers are I've seen that up to eighty percent of people in the state of Georgia who have been hospitalized can American as a mention and I think that has a great deal to do with the jobs that are often accessible to black and brown communities in this country finally I can't let you go without asking about a very disturbing video made public last week this of course was the video of the shooting of a modern armory he was an unarmed black man who was shot while he was jogging to white men have been arrested you called what happened to armory a lynching and I want to ask you how confident are you that justice will be served here it remains to be seen I mean it it is it is tragic it is heartbreaking and I'll tell you quite honestly very selfishly I did not want to watch the video it even sickens me to think about it as I'm speaking with you now and I think it is a reality on that so many people have to template each time they send their children out the door well I recall the last time you and I talked you mentioned you're a mother of three black sons how do you talk to them about what happened to Amman are very you know very very difficult one they can and having a conversation with my eighteen your own there an amount of anger in him and I'm quite frankly he didn't want to talk about it but it's very difficult to have that conversation when a young man and how you conduct yourself when your son is out jogging this is not something that happened in the abstract this was a son that was a brother this was a friend hold that for the sake of his memory justice is served by the larger context of death is scared for the sake of our country this has to stop it happened.

Mary Louise Kelly Elsa Chang Europe NPR Germany Italy
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:05 min | 6 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"In Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Culver city California the corona virus is overwhelming more places than just big cities it's devastating rural Blaine county Idaho a community where the local hospital has just twenty five beds and like anywhere else in the country people in Blaine county are pitching in to help and here's Hannah lamb spoke with one controversial figure involved in the relief effort there his name is Eric Parker he leads one of the biggest militias in the western U. S. and he's trying to create a do it yourself FEMA in Idaho Hannah lamb is here with us now Hannah hi there so what is it exactly that Eric Parker's doing well in short he's trying to build an independent pipeline of goods and supplies in case the crisis gets worse and yeah Parker says hurricane Katrina and other disasters have taught Americans that they shouldn't be putting all their faith in FEMA so he and others have borrowed this warehouse in western Idaho they're using it as a staging ground and mobilizing volunteers to basically build their own relief network I reach Parker in a remote part of the state and it was a poor connection but here is some of what he had to say about it who have those you have you have all I just hope that we can as a state utilize our own network owns a pilot who will help our neighbors so basically I mean the message Parker is trying to send is Idaho can take care of itself Idaho can take care of itself is that is that the ideological aim of his militia so Parker's president of a group called the real three percent of Idaho and broadly speaking we're talking about a militia that's aligned with this broader movement of self described constitutional conservatives and yes they want to curb federal powers typically all these factions get lumped together under one umbrella label anti government extremists but in reality there are a lot of differences in some new ones among them and in this world Eric Parker is a star I mean just a few years ago he face federal trials related to an armed standoff with the government to Nevada prosecutors in court painted him as a domestic terrorist but he beat the most serious charges and today he's part of this effort kind of mainstream the militia movement his group is registered as a nonprofit corporation he's running for state Senate as a Republican and now he's trying to show that his group is also ready to step in and play the role play a role in disaster relief as well you mentioned he's running for state Senate how does all of these other efforts play into his political ambitions well I mean Parker does live in Blaine county he didn't have access to testing but like much of the county his family was sick for weeks with symptoms consistent with covert nineteen they're still getting over it so it's not like he's inserting himself in a crisis it's at his doorstep but all that being said yes he is running for office yes he's trying to remake the scary image of the militia movement and suddenly with a pandemic some of the activities that once raised eyebrows are now more broadly accepted or maybe even look like common sense you know now there is a a national conversation about stockpiling food and supplies and national conversation about whether stay at home home orders violate the constitution and where exactly that line is between public health measures and civil liberties I saw that last week Idaho's governor Brad little who's a Republican issue to stay at home order what is Parker make of that well Parker says he gets it it's an unusual crisis that requires an unusual response at the same time this is where it gets thorny for someone who's positioning himself as both relief worker and constitutional watchdog so he says the governor's order is justifiable but what is enforcement look like a citation is it people getting hauled off to jail and here's what here's what he said about that portent that we realized that the constitutional violations as long as you do not escalate and violence and force are otherwise walk the distance is a legal issue that is NPR's Hannah lamb thank you Hannah thank you some one hundred twenty five thousand retirees call the villagers home it's a sprawling community just northwest of Orlando like much of Florida they were not quick there to heed the CDC's recommendations for social distancing slow the spread of the corona virus now they are say residents Ian and Elena stone they moved to the villages fifteen years ago well right now it is probably the safest place to be because we're following safe practices here I'm gonna put my wife on hold on hello it's definitely not the league here yes in the beginning nobody followed rules people are listening to pull my clothes and our three new six squares but they went in the square anyway in but their own music and they dance they're able to hear how the stones and everybody else in the villages are coping in this era of corona virus we're joined by many to Minton editor of villages news that is an independent paper that covers the community welcome welcome thank you so I know just today the governor of Florida Ron DeSantis issued a stay at home order for the whole state that's going to take effect at midnight Thursday so I know that that will likely change things just up until now take us through today how much his day to day life in the villages changed or they're still out there dancing what if it's changed quite a bit over time because things keep tightening up and people are having less and less to do this is a community where people it's fun for it for vality and eat drink and be merry and is slowly everything's chipped away from that they can't go to the squares the last thing they can do they can play golf and pickleball but the swimming pools are close the dog parks are closed and there's less and less to do every day when Rhonda Sanders the governor came out at one o'clock today and announced this in a shelter home order the million dollar question now is how does that impact in fact impact me today hello we're waiting on some information from some of our local officials to rule on that end this million dollar question as of an hour ago everybody's in a grocery store buy more supplies let me ask how people are doing from a health perspective the population there skews older almost eighty percent of the people who live in the villages are over sixty five according to the census bureau do we know how many people have been tested for covered nineteen we've we've had some independent testing going on by UF health which is with the university of Florida they've tested two thousand two hundred and eighty people so far twenty three have tested positive growth in the number of the villages a little bit more difficult because it covers three different counties right now we have forty three villagers who have tested positive for covert nineteen though and we had anticipate that there will be more I saw also they have managed to set up drive through testing for residents yes that was the that was with the US health and people here if you've ever been to the villages it's golf cart community so they were able to drive through in their golf carts tested so it's kind of a unique unique situation here so as you talk to people who live there how worried are they what are they worried about what are the main.

Washington Elsa Chang California Blaine county Culver Blaine county Idaho
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:20 min | 6 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Elsa Chang and I'm ari Shapiro a two trillion dollar economic relief package has already sailed through the Senate and now the house is poised to pass it to but will another rescue package be needed soon after we got to see how things turn out over the next two three months before next termination about quickly to the next also as the corona virus continues to spread its genetic makeup keeps changing yes viruses are mutating it doesn't mean that they're gonna become more virulent or more deadly and federal prosecutors charged Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro with drug trafficking first the newscast live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the White House coronavirus task force will present president trump with a range of options for potential new social distancing guidelines ahead of next week as NPR's each Roscoe reports the initial guidelines were set to last through Monday president trump says he's helping to get Americans back to work soon he sent a letter to governor saying that the administration would assess the risk for corona virus on a county by county basis Dr Deborah Berks is helping to lead the government's response she offered no timeline for these risk assessments what we have to get all of our data together we owe it to the president and we owe it to the president to be able to make that decision so that's what we're working on right now on Thursday the number of people with the virus in the U. S. are past cases in China for the first time even with that being so Burke said there are nineteen states that have less than two hundred reported cases of coronavirus Asia Rasco MPR news house speaker Nancy Pelosi says she expects quick approval of the massive two point two trillion dollar coronavirus economic relief bill by the house Senate lawmakers unanimously passed the measure it late yesterday it boosts jobless benefits send checks to millions of Americans and helps to backstop some businesses New York City has seen its case numbers explode with many businesses they're closed cupboard nineteen deaths in the U. S. have now topped twelve hundred more than a quarter of those occurring in New York state Washington state governor Jay Inslee is expressing guarded optimism about the state's efforts to slow the spread of the corona virus here's NPR's Martin costing social distancing measures have been in place here now for about two weeks and governor Inslee says he's starting to see the results of the state's infection rate it's a small reduction of the rate of increase but it is a glimmer of hope this is suggestive that some of the things we're doing together is having some very modest improvement but Inslee cautions that it's way too early to declare three the latest university of Washington statistical modeling projects at the peak of the wave of patience will hit here around three weeks from now and the state may have only barely enough medical resources to handle it and that's assuming the rate of infection doesn't go up again Martin Pasti NPR news Seattle despite the corona virus the U. S. space force went ahead with its first launch today as Jennifer glasse reports from new Smyrna beach Florida today's liftoff was deemed a mission essential the first mission of the U. S. space force didn't quite go off without a hitch the first launch was polished forty six seconds before lift off because of a hydraulics issue but just over an hour later the problem was solved and the atlas five rocket carrying a strategic communication satellite took off from Cape Canaveral spaceport officials say it's headed for a high energy geostationary transfer orbit reporter Jennifer glass stocks marched higher putting the market back on track for its first three day rally in six weeks the Dow was up thirteen hundred and fifty one points today you're listening to NPR news in Washington then from the David Barnett foundation news room this is Casey R. W. I'm Larry Perella Thursday March twenty sixth here's what's happening at five oh four the U. S. Forest Service is shutting down all campgrounds day use sites and picnic areas in southern California to slow the spread of the corona virus as KCRW's Catherine Barnes reports that means the weekend trip you had in mind may need to get postponed the closures are meant to dissuade groups of people from gathering in the same outdoor areas Forest Service officials want to prevent instances like we saw last weekend when crowds descended on beaches hiking trails and peers the closures include popular camping and recreation sites like the mount Baldy visitor center in the Angeles National Forest in Kerr creek campground in Los Padres National Forest in Big Sur trail heads trails and dispersed sites in the back country remain open but Rangers strongly encourage people to practice social distancing and pack everything out if the Forest Service finds those areas are becoming dumping grounds or inundated with day a hikers they say they may need to shut them down as well and violators could face a five thousand dollar fine six months in jail or perhaps both well just before the corona virus pandemic struck the city of LA had tried to bring part of its underground economy into the light street vendors have long sold food and merchandise illegally in the city but the only city council voted to change the rules and many folks started applying for licenses but that program has now come to a halt and city authorities are now cracking down on vendors trying to get them off the streets out of fear they could spread covered nineteen in dense urban neighborhoods that's made life difficult for people like Sophia an undocumented immigrant who sell stacks and LA macarthur park neighborhood no and then someone says they aren't letting a cell she said they don't know why that that all they're trying to do is work and says they're not doing anything bad she says people like her or in a bind because they can't expect government to help during the coronavirus crisis she says she plans to keep trying to sell by avoiding the authorities support for NPR comes from progressive insurance with the name your price tool offering a range of coverage and press options to choose from now that's progressive more at progressive dot com or at one eight hundred progressive the cloudy skies tonight breezy as well we'll get to just a slight chance of maybe a shower and thunderstorms as well that would be kind of cool should clear out of the way by a midnight Los tonight forties and fifties sunny continued windy tomorrow with highs mostly in the sixties from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro at my home studio in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Culver city California a state that now has more than three thousand cases of Kobe nineteen a quarter.

Elsa Chang Senate ari Shapiro
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:37 min | 6 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Elsa Chang and I'm ari Shapiro will hear from a hospital executive on his assessment of the federal government's response so far the corona virus outbreak I think that the whole testing process has obviously been very frustrating been government estimates that also gasoline companies are fighting a law that forces them to mix biofuels into their products and after over a decade of anticipation hip hop artist Jay electronica releases his debut album because he really does a great job of throwing as much it as as he possibly can because he knows that we've been waiting and we're going to sit with this for a while those stories after these news headlines live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the house is poised to vote today on legislation to help workers and families affected by the corona virus outbreak NPR's Kelsey Snell reports speaker Nancy Pelosi says the bill includes sick and family leave close he says the bill Democrats plan to pass includes the paid leave as well as expanded unemployment insurance and money to ensure food security during school closures and quarantines and she says those are additional benefits the three most important parts of this bill are testing testing testing this legislation facilitates free corona virus testing for everyone who needs a test she did not respond when asked if the White House supports the bill hello C. as in ongoing talks with treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin in hopes of passing the bill with bipartisan support Kelsey Snell NPR news the capitol president trump announced today he is declaring the corona virus outbreak a national emergency speaking from the White House rose garden today trump announcing he is invoking the Stafford act basically that will give various federal agencies including FEMA broad new powers to deal with the virus outbreak trump said today no resources will be spared in terms of dealing with the virus saying the declaration frees up about fifty billion dollars to help states and cities trump also said he's asking every hospital in the U. S. to activate emergency preparedness plans the state department is summoned to China's ambassador to lodge a protest against a tweet by a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Sean row which explains the tweet said the U. S. army might have brought the corona virus to the Chinese city of Wuhan Wuhan is with the virus was first detected in December scientists believe the corona virus may have jumped from animals to humans in a wet market in Wuhan where meat live animals and other foods are sold a state department official says China has been trying to deflect criticism of its role in quote starting a global pandemic and not to all in the world he says the ambassador was summoned because the state department wanted to put the Chinese government on notice that it won't tolerate the quote dangerous and ridiculous spreading of conspiracy theories John rue H. NPR news Washington the federal reserve has announced that six celebrating its purchase of treasury securities as it seeks to address disruptions in the treasury bond market that announcing plans today to purchase roughly thirty three billion dollars in treasuries out of the eighty billion it says it plans to buy over the course of the next month typically when stock prices plunge as they have this week treasury yields fall as investors flee to safer investments over in some cases bond prices were also falling this week suggesting at least some investors want to sell large volumes of bonds but are having trouble doing so stocks after bouncing around a good bit managed to hold on to some of their gains after nearly ten percent plunge yesterday the markets up more than nine percent today the Dow was nineteen hundred and eighty five points you're listening to NPR news the federal.

Elsa Chang ari Shapiro
"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 7 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm ari Shapiro as the corona virus spreads in the U. S. more people are working from home more schools are holding classes online more events are getting canceled it's all part of an effort to do what's called flattening the curve here's Dr Anthony Fauci explaining this concept at the White House yesterday he's the top infectious disease expert at the national institutes of health if you look at the curves of outbreaks you know they go big peaks and they come down what we need to do is flattened that down that would have less people infected that would ultimately have less dense well explained exactly what it means to flatten the curve of infectious diseases we're joined now by Dr drew Harris he researches the population health at Thomas Jefferson university in Philadelphia welcome thank you for the opportunity so I want to help listeners visualize this graph that you first shared on Twitter about what two weeks ago I see two curves here there's this red curve that's really tall and and really steep like a mountain and then on top of that there is a blue Kerr that's like more gently sloped up and then there's this gradual long sloping down why don't you go ahead and explain the red curve first sure so these curves are essentially representing the number of new cases that occur over a period of time so the fat higher the curve that that hired P. curve this is the red curve the red curve that is showing us that we are seeing a significant number of cases in a very short period of time if you think of the our healthcare system is a subway car and it's rush hour and everybody wants to get on once so they they start piling up at the door they pile up on the platform there's just not enough room in the car to take care of everybody to accommodate everybody that's the first current that's the system that is overwhelmed just can't handle it and people wind up not getting services that they need if we instead of spread out those cases so that everybody on that subway card doesn't show up at the same time but instead shows up at different times than that car can accommodate the right number of people but over a longer period of time so the whole idea is that flat Necker make sure that not everybody shows up in the emergency department or at the same time okay but to take your metaphor of the subway one step further you're assuming with this flatter curve that people will still need to get on the subway in other words you're assuming that we're not gonna see a quick end to the spread of the corona virus that people will still continue to get infected right just today up until until Markle and announced that they're expecting that sixty seventy percent of terms will be getting coming down with this virus they all came down with it at the same time the nav system is overwhelmed we're seeing that in Italy at the moment but if instead you can delay that time when you get that virus a few days later a few weeks later a few months later then the system can adjust and accommodate all the people who are possibly going to get sick and possibly need hospital care now it is possible that we will see fewer cases because you're less likely to be exposed to the disease any particular time and maybe that time will be so far in the future will have a vaccine in which case you'll be protected against the virus first place no I understand these two curves the the steep curve in the gentle curve if he actually played out during the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic can you tell me about how that worked out well didn't work out very well for Philadelphia because they decided to hold their bond parade for World War on bonds when the public health authorities were telling them this is not a good idea because we're seeing flu spread in the community several hundreds of thousands of people together for the parade in within forty eight seventy two hours thousands of people around the Philadelphia region started to die on the other hand Saint Louis they went with a different strategy they really try to limit the travel people and implement public health one a one isolating the in treating the sick quarantine the people who have been exposed to disease closing the schools encouraging us social distancing of people and of course encouraging hand hygiene and other individual activities and he's much smaller percentage of people died as a result of that particular outbreak some lessons even more than a century older still worth learning absolutely that's true Harris he's an assistant professor at the Thomas Jefferson University College of population health thank you very much for joining us today it was my pleasure thank you an NPR survey of American teachers last year found that eighty six percent believe schools should teach climate science the teachers also said they had trouble finding good tools to teach it a NASA climate scientist is working with Nebraska school to develop a curriculum that lets students get their hands on the same tools leading researchers use Becca Costello of N. ET news reports science is clear that earth's climate is changing mostly caused by human activity but there's still a lot of skepticism about it and how to teach it in public schools global warming is a hoax it is junk science this is Paul Meyer a former school board member in Omaha suburb in twenty seventeen he was asking the state board of education not to add climate change to new education standards I had one of my goals was to make sure that our kids were taught in an honest and truthful manner I did not want them brainwashed or indoctrinated with falsehoods sentiment like that frustrates climate scientists like NASA's mark Chandler who use a sophisticated computer models to predict what's going to happen to the climate in the next ten twenty or even a hundred years whenever the tool that most people don't understand they can pull up the whole card is always just rolls out Gigi scientists doing something that none of us understand so a few years ago Chandler started talking with his friend Corey Forbes a science education researcher and professor at the university of Nebraska Lincoln Ford's new public school teachers I had a hard time helping students understand climate science Ford says the two wrote a proposal to develop climate science curriculum and got a grant from the National Science Foundation we're focused on putting an authentic scientific tools in the hands of teachers and students which is not something that they typically don't have access to the curriculum is designed to teach students about climate change by giving them access to the same computer models mark Chandler is using at.

Elsa Chang ari Shapiro
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:11 min | 7 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang this hour the Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing one of president trump's controversial immigration policies also how Twitter is dealing with election interference will remember James Lipton host of inside the actors studio I made a vow to myself that there would be no gossip and we would stick to craft that was my pledged myself into the university and to our students and to our guests and a look back on the history making presidential campaign of people to judge the truth is that in the past has narrowed to a close for our candidacy if not for our calls now news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer six people in Washington state have now died after contracting covert nineteen health officials announced the new deaths today as well as a handful of new cases bring the total number of cases in the Seattle area for nearly twenty we'll start with member station KNKX reports that number is expected to rise state health officials say they're still trying to contain the spread of the virus many of the serious cases involve people who are elderly or have underlying health conditions most are linked to an outbreak at a nearby nursing home Dr Jeff Duchin is with public health Seattle and king county the risk for all of us are becoming infected will be increasing and although most of the cases will be mild or moderate and there's a potential for many people to become ill at the same time Duchin says they're still trying to determine the extent of the spread of the virus and deciding whether to take more drastic measures by canceling public gatherings for NPR news I'm will stone in Seattle health officials announced today there have been twenty six cases of direct person to person transmission of the virus in the U. S. U. S. senator Amy Klobuchar's ending her presidential campaign the lawmaker from Minnesota is the third Democrat in just three days to exit the race following former vice president Joe Biden's when in South Carolina NPR's Susan Davis reports which are is the third candidate in three days to exit the race following billionaire Tom Steiner and former south bend Indiana mayor P. booted judge her decision to endorse Joe Biden is no surprise after she often used her time on the debate stage to attack Bernie Sanders is too far left to win a general election NPR's Susan Davis some in Michigan cast absentee ballots for next week's presidential primary want officials to destroy their ballots as W. D. ET is Quinn Klinefelter reports those voters say they chose candidates who no longer in the race Michigan recently changed its rules to allow voting by absentee ballot with no restrictions but with the likes of Pete booted says and Amy club which are dropping out of the presidential contest some voters say they want to redo absentee ballots they've already sent in Detroit elections official Rosalyn Kimbrough says voters can submit a signed request to quote spoiled their ballots and receive a new one all the way up to election day we're gonna get flooded with a lot of absentee ballots for this election so crazy amounts are coming hundreds of thousands of absentee ballots have been issued across Michigan and increase of roughly two thirds over the state's twenty sixteen presidential primary for NPR news I'm Quinn Klinefelter in Detroit shares of microblogging company Twitter were up sharply today amid reports an activist investor is taken a state in the social media company going to a person familiar with the matter Elliott management's taking a one billion dollar stake in Twitter it is known for pushing for changes at companies it invests in stocks soared on Wall Street today met hope central banks around the world could intervene in the corona virus by cutting rates the Dow was up nearly thirteen hundred points today this is NPR leaders of the militant Taliban say they won't participate in Afghan peace talks that is until the government releases thousands of insurgents held in lock ups throughout the country those talks are part of a broader deal the Taliban signed with the U. S. is D. a de reports from Islamabad the deal signed on Saturday six to have American forces withdraw from Afghanistan within fourteen months it also calls for talks between the Taliban and other off guns to negotiate the country's political future to build confidence for those talks America is meant to help facilitate a prisoner exchange between the Taliban and the Afghan government but the Afghan government which was not a party to this U. S. Taliban deal so the prisoner release should be part of broader negotiations with the insurgents and now a Taliban spokesman says those talks won't go ahead until detainees are released do you have date NPR news Islamabad government subsidize rail line the Amtrak has a new chief executive Amtrak announcing his name to a former air cargo executive to the post William flannel takeover in mid April who will place Richard Anderson who is stepping down after nearly three years on the job Flynn ran air cargo company atlas air worldwide for more than a dozen years he's also been a senior executive at CSX major freight rail company he takes over to time Amtrak has reported record ridership and revenue figures for its most recent fiscal year with predictions the money losing rail service could be back in the black sometime soon crude oil futures prices posted big gains today oil up a dollar and ninety nine cents a barrel to end the session at forty six seventy five a barrel in.

Shapiro Elsa Chang Supreme Court trump president
"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR news I'm Elsa Chang and I Mary Louise Kelley some news tonight NPR has learned that one of the key figures in the impeachment drama ambassador Maria von of which is retiring from the foreign service she was the ambassador to Ukraine until last spring when she was ousted following a disinformation campaign by the president's private lawyer Ivanovic test apart testified before Congress about the moment that she got a call from Washington telling her come home they were concerned about my security and I needed to come home right away if one of its remained on the state department payroll teaching at Georgetown University but sources say she is now retired and your diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen and I have both been reporting out this story and it shows in the studio with us now Hey there hi there alright so let's walk through the details we know I have confirmed that she retired so not resigned but this is months before her current assignment was set to end well she was at Georgetown so this wasn't an ambassadorship that she had and she has been telling colleagues that she would be retiring soon she's been the ambassador and ambassador three times appointed by both democratic and Republican presidents she was a very powerful voice in that impeachment hearing describing how her last post in Ukraine ended when I returned to the United States deputy secretary of state Solomon told me there had been a concerted campaign against me that the president no longer wished me to serve as ambassador to Ukraine and that in fact the president had been pushing for my removal since the prior summer and she felt that she was pushed out because of business interests of private individuals it was a very powerful appearance but perhaps not the way someone like that a non partisan career diplomat would have wanted to go out to access the outlook the follow up on that time line you thought of it she said she felt she had been under pressure since twenty eighteen and we have been learning more lately about that pressure campaign yeah right left harness he's the indicted associate of trump's private lawyer has audio from a dinner in twenty eighteen you can hear him telling president trump that your vantage was bad now the name saying he was going to be impeached and trump said he wanted her out get rid of her rate.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelley NPR Ukraine president Congress Washington Georgetown University Michele Kelemen Georgetown deputy secretary Solomon trump Ivanovic United States
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I am Elsa Chang and a Mary Louise Kelley recession the word has been hanging in the air since the Dow Jones ricocheted around this week at one point Wednesday's close closing down eight hundred points but the economy as we often point out is not just the stock market and a number of factors contribute to its overall health and one of them is manufacturing now if the jury is still out on whether a recession is coming for the broader economy some people are concerned it has arrived in the manufacturing sector to talk more about that I am joined by Sean don and senior economics writer for Bloomberg news Hey there Hey what are the warning signs for manufacturing well I'm one of things we've seen in manufacturing is literally a contraction in production so industrial production in the United States contracted in July but more importantly contracted in the first two quarters of this year two consecutive quarters of contraction is what most economists like to call a reception although there is still job growth in the manufacturing sector right to us and it depends where you look it's clear that president trump at least can point to some positive signs in the first two years of his presidency he's added about five hundred thousand manufacturing jobs by some broad measures since he took office but this year things a flattened out a lot and it depends where you look if you look at Pennsylvania for example we've actually have five thousand less people working in manufacturing than they did at the beginning of this year then I know we've cut you in Wisconsin today are doing some reporting right along these lines what you're hearing from people yeah so I was meeting with the company yesterday that was for allowing workers at the end of this month and that's a direct result of a lack of demand out there they're reducing productions or cutting or weekend shifts they're not hiring new people they're not expanding they're putting a pause on investment in a new R. and D. facility and that's the thing you hear a lot from manufacturers around the country as in Pennsylvania earlier this week and talking to manufacture their who had for the last two years been thinking about expanding into a new lot new seven acre lot behind the current factory and this just put that on hold for for the time being really and what role are terrorists playing in miss fears of trade war so it's a very real world the president likes to say that China is paying for these terrorists and that's something that really irks salon manufacturers who literally get the bill for these tires again that company was visiting yesterday they by about two point three million dollars of ball bearings from China and they're paying a hundred and thirty eight thousand dollars more this year as a result the terrace that's money that's going straight to the US treasury and the the general manager there was and every time he hears the president talk about China paying the costs these tears he just kind of wells up gets angry starts pounding the steering wheels car really so for a president who campaigned on bringing back manufacturing jobs how big a potential liability might this be looking ahead to twenty twenty in states like Pennsylvania Ohio Wisconsin some of the other shipping visiting well look that's the big question the polls are showing that in some of these places he is looking a little bit softer in terms of support than he might have otherwise the real question is going to be where things turn between now and election day and whether this contraction in manufacturing accelerates gets worse it broadens out to other parts of the economy or whether it's just a kinda one time tips that we bounce back from later this year or early next year now so where do you fall on this question of whether manufacturing is headed for a recession and a recession already where is it so one of the most interesting conversations I had yesterday was with a purchasing manager at this this company here in Wisconsin who says six months ago he was going out and trying to find still fabricators to do work for them now he's getting calls almost everyday from companies offering to do work for them that to him as a sign of softness in the economy and he said look that's a leading indicator from where I sit things look a lot worse than they do on Wall Street John donvan thank you thanks for having me Chandana Bloomberg news used clothing it's the fresh hope for two struggling department stores within a day of each other Macy's and JC Penney said they have a new idea to drawn you shoppers and that is my selling not so new clothes and accessories both partnering with a big online consignment store called thread up and here's a lean SLU cliparts a few years back James Ryan hard was getting dressed one morning and I open my closet to closet full of clothes that I wasn't aware she used to be a teacher but was now in business school and at the time I was a poor student so he took his clothes to the local consignment store and they wouldn't take any of my clothing he says they only wanted upscale brands and so the business got started with me trying to figure out how to make some money on my old clothing and now it rained hurts company called thread up promotes itself as the world's largest online consignment site and this week thredup hit the news twice in their latest gasp for fresh ideas first Macy's and then JC Penney both made the same choice I deal with thread up to start selling secondhand clothes here's my readers call from course site research right now eighteen to thirty four year olds really not shopping in department stores that much this is a way to get them in their buying secondhand has become a normal way of shopping ever since the Great Recession at first it might have been purely a financial calculation away to dig up luxury brands like Chanel at a fraction of a price but then the explosion of online shopping suddenly put all these great fines from places like New York and Los Angeles just a click away from any thrift or anywhere people started reselling things on sites like posh mark the pop and the real real which actually went public just in June like Spotify to music and Airbnb to hotels so called re commerce fits neatly into the world view of new generation shoppers people are looking for ways to lead so full lives and get rid of stuff and they can be someone else's treasure all over chin is a retail analyst at Cowen and company and then as you think about the Instagram generation the newness is really important when you photograph yourself when you socialize and having a certain degree of distinction and if you talk to shoppers in their late teens twenties or early thirties they will tell you that distinction is exactly what's been missing from these struggling department store chains I asked twenty two year old mackenzie Campbell from Massachusetts when was the last time she visited and Macy's or JC Penney how did that in a few years to be honest there's a meeting when the Cape Cod mall but I usually just use it to cut through to get to the other stores where she does shop regularly our thrift stores I'm actually wearing a pair of like three dollars but I thought at television army today Campbell says she got into drifting after following an Instagram influencer who put together cute looks with second hand fine spend so to Campbell the appeal is that feeling of a treasure hunt when she's looking for unique vintage items I looks like look like you know what I'd be like a hat a past life with one there's actually term for that in the industry pre lab that's so Alex fitz Gerald put it she's with a consulting firm AT Kearney and she says another drop of the resale business is environmental as a by your you feel like you're giving close another life and as a reseller you feel like bad about getting rid of something especially if you paid yeah the pants are prized for at so read up CO Reinhard says that is part of his company's mission and he says their goals for me season JC Penney are not just to draw traditional drifters to the department stores but also to entice more shoppers to start buying secondhand Alina so you can be our.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelley two years thirty eight thousand dollars three million dollars thirty four year twenty two year three dollars two quarters seven acre six months
"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Elsa Chang and a Mary Louise Kelley the administration also announced big changes to the way the Endangered Species Act is enforced critics say that will be plants and animals vulnerable to extinction now is the time to strengthen PSA talk crippling also a look at how one Alabama county got flooded with tens of millions of prescription opioids pills something that struck me was how much this issue has recalled into every aspect of everyday life in Walker county and the unstoppable Simone Biles becomes the first woman to land a triple double a gymnastics competition downers live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein the trump administration is instituting new rules that govern legal immigration to the U. S. as in Paris Pam Fessler reports they target poor or less educated would be immigrants who seek green cards the administration wants to make sure that immigrants are self sufficient and do not become a public charge or someone who relies on government aid so it's expanding the kinds of assistance I can be held against a green card applicant to include programs such as food stamps and Medicaid Marielena in copier of the national immigration law center sees it as part of a broader effort to limit both illegal and legal immigration which is basically let's make immigrants lives so horrific and impossible that they will either hi I need because the fear or that they will self deport others say they fear that immigrant families will stop seeking necessary medical care even though the rule will only apply to future green card applicants Pam Fessler NPR news Washington federal prosecutors are charging a friend of the gunman who killed nine people in Dayton this month with firearms violations U. S. attorney Benjamin Glassman says Ethan calling he was arrested Friday and has acknowledged buying some of the equipment Connor bets use he had purchased for bats body armor as well as the upper receiver of an A. R. fifteen weapon and the one hundred round double drum magazine that was ultimately used by bats in the August fourth shooting in the Oregon district Glassman says Kali says he bought and store the farm equipment to hide it from bets his parents prosecutors say there's no indication he knew bats was gearing up for a mass shooting outside in el Paso Texas Walmart where twenty two people were killed a makeshift memorial to the dead now stretches the length of a fence almost as far as the eye can see joy pelos Yosef Texas public radio reports the site is giving visitors a place to grieve and to try to heal the memorial that began with a few flowers now is a wall of thousands of candles balloons banners and poster boards messages of love support and prayer there are also twenty two crosses with the names of the dead congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee who represents Houston stop by the site after visiting victims in the hospital and attending a funeral mass.

Elsa Chang
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Elsa Chang. And I'm Audie Cornish. For the past few weeks. We've been bringing you stories about sex. How we talk about it how we don't want. It matters we've explored LGBTQ sex, Ed and abstinence before marriage. Today's story is about pornography. Not whether it's good or bad. But that it's everywhere, and it shaping the way people think about sex millions of people in the US watch porn. Thanks, largely in part to the internet and free tube sites. Like, porn hub. That's night alone has over a hundred million visits a day people in the US make up the biggest chunk of that traffic and most of those views come from people under thirty four years old people who've always had easy access to porn. It's on Twitter Instagram, even in gifts sent around in text messages. The bottom line is porn is easy to view. But it's still hard to talk about NPR's Khatlon store went to Los Angeles to do just that to talk about it. And just. A warning obviously for the next eight minutes. We'll be talking frankly about pornography and sex, which may not be suitable for all listeners. It's nine AM on a Wednesday morning and director Jackie Saint James is worried about patio furniture or the lack thereof. Keep me if I make them sex. We're in back of a big house of a winding road in the San Fernando Valley. This house is a filming location for movies TV shows and today, a porn shoot. Jackie's getting ready to direct a scene that's pretty standard setup. A guy shows up for private yoga lesson without his girlfriend, the tension with the female instructor slowly builds, and well, you.

Jackie Saint James US Audie Cornish Elsa Chang San Fernando Valley Twitter Los Angeles Ed NPR instructor director Khatlon thirty four years eight minutes
Dow ends worst week since 2008 financial crisis; Nasdaq closes in bear market

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Dow ends worst week since 2008 financial crisis; Nasdaq closes in bear market

"The cotton monument. It commemorates a massacre of polish people by the Soviet Union during World War Two. But Jersey City mayor Steven Fulop had hoped to relocated as part of renovation of the city plaza. Now, it is now the case that Phillips announcement didn't go over. Well, and the statute will stay word is community. Outrage has one out the city council voted this morning to leave it at exchange place in perpetuity tonight. We have a forty percent chance of showers mostly before nine o'clock lows around forty five degrees. Currently, it's fifty seven degrees. It's foggy in central park at five. Oh, six. Support for NPR comes from Annapurna pictures with vice starring Christian bale, Amy Adams, Steve corral Sam Rockwell in Tyler Perry. A behind the scenes look at American power based on a true story in theaters everywhere. Christmas day. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang. And Mary Louise Kelley majority leader Mitch McConnell says he is distressed Nebraska Republican Vince asked calls it a sad day for America. And Chris Murphy, Connecticut Democrat describes it as a national security crisis. All senators all talking about the resignation of secretary of defense, Jim Mattis. I am joined now by another Senator Tim Kaine democrat of Virginia Cain sits on the Armed Services Committee, which will have to confirm whoever is nominated to succeed. Mattis Senator Kaine welcome. Could it be on the show? Thanks so much. I gather you're not happy about secretary Mattis impending departure either. No, look, I've been in public life for twenty five years. I'm an armed services member from a state. That's connected to the military. I have a son in the Marine Corps secretary Mattis has one of the best public servants. I've worked with in my career and his resignation, and especially the asserted reasons for the resignation should 'cause every American to be really really worried. Although was this inevitable Madison self in the resignation letter that I soon you're referring to there. He said the president deserves a Defense Secretary who shares his vision of the world, I think that's very diplomatically put. But if you look at the letter, basically, what secretary Mattis says is this that the two pillars of American security that are constant. And this is a guy who spent more than four decades providing security is a marine is one building strong alliances among democracies and second standing up. To thorough -tarian adversaries, and he basically said Mr President on these two values you and I disagree, and we've certainly seen in a president who undercuts allies at many opportunities using national security waivers to punish Canada and Europe, for example, and then cosies up to a thorough Teheran's such as Russia and and Kim Jong Hoon in North Korea. And that reason asserted by secretary Mattis is very very troubling. Have you talked to him if you talk to dramatically? I have not talked to him since the announcement. The announcement set off a firestorm now leave news, but ambassadors of European and other allies reaching out to Senator saying sort of what's going on announcements this week about Syrian Afghanistan, obviously, causing huge concerns among allies who were side by side with us. In those theaters. I mentioned it's your committee armed services that will have to vote on whoever is named to succeed him. Who would you like to see? You know, it's too early to say that there's a person that I'd like to see, but I want somebody who will be willing to stand up and speak truth to power one of the challenges. And this administration is those who do general McMaster, the national security advisor and secretary Mattis, they get pushed aside, but we need people who are experienced who will look the president in the eye and and speak truth. And if the president can handle it he can't handle it. But I don't want an enabler. There's been too many neighbors around this president and the first two years like bobbleheads saying yes to everything, and that's not what this country needs right now changing gears. We're speaking to you from Capitol Hill. Are you all making any progress on a voiding a government shutdown at stroke of midnight? Well, we had a bipartisan deal just two days ago passed the Senate unanimously with the blessing of the White House, but the president yesterday decided to do a one eighty and say he now if you can't get five billion hill shutdown government and punish eight hundred thousand plus federal employees. Who would not get as long as there's a shutdown? Yeah. I heard you on Sarah calling him the Grinch about to steal Christmas, which I will give you credit. It's a good line. But subsidies. Senator or else? Well, thousands of people who are going to have to work without being paid over the holidays. You're you're absolutely right. And that was what we did when we gave them a bipartisan deal less than forty eight hours ago that he agreed to I know. But here we are society afternoon. So what happens? Well, what's going on? Right now is the vice president, Jared, Kushner, and Mick Mulvaney. The new chief of staff were up talking to Senator Schumer, and we're seeing reports out of that meeting that there may be an announcement soon about a path forward possibly a deal. I understand those administration officials went over to talk to speaker Ryan. So this is very much kind of a work in progress right now, no reason to shut the government down. Absolutely. None just a few seconds left. But, but we're also hearing from Shimer's office, and they're saying that this deal would involve funding for border security, but not the wall would you vote for that? I voted for it many many times comprehensive immigration reform and twenty thirteen head border security money. We offered the president deal in February with border security money. He turned it down border security is something that we all support. All right. Thank you so much Senator. Alright thanks much Virginia. Democrat Tim Kaine and we are talking with other Republicans elsewhere on the show. I interview Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg had surgery today for early stage lung cancer the odds for a full recovery from the disease at that stage have dramatically improved in recent years. That said this is the eighty five year old liberal

Jim Mattis Secretary President Trump Senator Senator Kaine Senator Tim Kaine Senator James Lankford Jersey City Soviet Union Steven Fulop NPR Vice President Senator Schumer City Council Phillips Madison
U.S. cuts millions in funding for UN agency that helps Palestinian refugees

All Things Considered

04:42 min | 2 years ago

U.S. cuts millions in funding for UN agency that helps Palestinian refugees

"The Trump administration is. Cutting US aid to Palestinian refugees it will. No longer give money to the United Nations for services in refugee camps that have existed for decades the services. Range from schools to healthcare to garbage collection, this is just the latest White House move shaking up longstanding policy. In the Middle, East and taking a more pro Israel stance NPR's Daniel estrin joins us from Jerusalem to walk us through this Hai Daniel hiring this aid has a long history what was it meant. For this. Is money that's gone to a special u. n. agency devoted to Palestinian refugees it's called the UN relief and Works Agency and it runs all kinds of basic services in Palestinian refugee camps as you mentioned these are camps that, have been around for about seventy. Years when Israel was founded Palestinians fled or were driven out of lands that, became the state of Israel and these refugee camps the today, they're more like like urban slums They're, in the West Bank. In Gaza but they're also in countries like Jordan Syria. Lebanon and the refugee issue is one of the Palestinians core demands they demand the right of return for refugees. Go back to what is today Israel and Israel says. That would spell out the end of the country as a Jewish state now until this year the US has been the largest single donor to the Palestinian refugees and the idea has been that until. A solution to the refugee question comes that. Would be solved in peace talks so what reason does the Trump administration gift for cutting this funding well the. US has had a lot of criticism of, this UN agency and so have Isreaeli leaders is Israel has said. That the UN, is perpetuating the refugee problem rather than rehabilitating it and here the State Department today is saying it wants other countries to pitch in to cover costs it says this agency is quote. Irredeemably flawed, and the US ambassador to the The. UN Nikki Haley spoke about this recently, here's what she said first of all, you're, looking, at the fact that yes there's an endless number of refugees. That continue to get assistance but more importantly. The Palestinians continue to bash America. So two points there she's saying you know there are these third and fourth generations of Palestinians. Descendants, of refugees there, themselves considered refugees Israel says you know that perpetuates this false hope. That millions of Palestinians would one day return to Israel although it has been a common way of dealing with refugee. Situations in the world it's not just the Palestinians the UN has? Given, help to refugees and their descendants as long as they're refugees and then the other thing that Haley said there is something we've heard a lot from this administration which is Palestinians not. Showing respect to the US and what has the reaction been from Palestinians to this move by the. Trump administration yeah Palestinian officials said Eric hot, today is calling this totally unacceptable Well. He says the US is acting. According to the whims. Of Israel Prime, Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leaders, have, seen this coming they think it's part of the Trump administration's, attempt to undermine, the core Palestinian positions one by. One I to Roussillon. When Trump, recognize Jerusalem, as Israel's capital even though Palestinians demand part of, that city and. Now this demand for. Palestinian refugees, to return to today's Israel that's what Palestinians demand but they see Trump is trying to undermine. That what effect you expect these cuts to have on the Palestinian people well this. Is this is money that. Has gone to help feed needy Palestinians it's helps run schools and clinics at the. Moment money is being raised from other sources to recoup what the US hasn't given this year but, the UN says, for instance they only have enough. Money to run their schools for refugees for about a month and there are other? Concerns, including by people in the Israeli defense community that these cuts Could create instability if you don't have basic services and because of. These funding cuts and, remember this, comes just a week after the US cut money for development projects and humanitarian aid. In the Palestinian territories NPR's Daniel estrin speaking with us from Jerusalem thank you you're welcome

Israel UN United States Trump Administration NPR Donald Trump Jerusalem Nikki Haley Daniel Estrin Goto United Nations Ari Shapiro Lebanon White House Elsa Chang Wnyc Hai Daniel State Department Gaza
Paul Taylor, giant of modern dance, dead at 88

All Things Considered

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Paul Taylor, giant of modern dance, dead at 88

"Now to remember one of the most prolific and influential figures in the world of modern dance Paul Taylor the movements he created on stage were inspired, by, everyday, people doing everyday things. And that, includes people, doing nothing. At all. His approach. Turn audiences away at first but he eventually turn them around with dances he created for. The company he founded these were works that were. Eventually adopted by other dance companies around the world Paul Taylor died of renal failure yesterday in Manhattan at the age of eighty eight

Arkansas United States Pennsylvania Dr Sarah Wakeman Secretary Ohio Jennifer Smith Massachusetts General Hospital Heroin NPR Ari Shapiro Elsa Chang Warden Paul Taylor Methadone Jeff Brady Depre Dr Wakeman
Louis C. K., Melinda Hill and New York discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:13 sec | 2 years ago

Louis C. K., Melinda Hill and New York discussed on All Things Considered

"And I'm Ari Shapiro disgraced comedian Louis c. k. made a surprise appearance, at a comedy club in New York on, Sunday night he'd been a powerhouse in the comedy world until last November when the New York Times reported on allegations of sexual. Misconduct

Louis C. K. Melinda Hill New York Louis C Louis C. Elizabeth Blair New York Times Melinda Hills NPR Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Allergy Arman Dworman Nathan Lewis Lucy Que Dormann
UN Report: Myanmar Generals Must Face Justice

All Things Considered

03:29 min | 2 years ago

UN Report: Myanmar Generals Must Face Justice

"UN human rights investigators say they think. Top generals in Myanmar should be tried for genocide the investigators are calling on the UN Security Council to move swiftly and get. The international criminal court involved there report goes into details about the atrocities carried out against, Rohingya Muslims in an ethnic cleansing campaign that began a year ago NPR's Michele Keleman reports the UN human rights experts poured over satellite imagery videos and photographs and interviewed, eight hundred seventy five people to. Come to their conclusion that the military had. Genocidal intent when it carried out attacks against Rohingya Muslims in March kind state they, call it a human. Rights, catastrophe with, widespread sexual violence and mass killings one of the authors Christopher Doty says six top. Generals should be prosecuted? For genocide war crimes and crimes again Humanity there is no doubt in our. Minds whatsoever the what we. Saw happen in, real time as a whole would not have happened, without firstly being within the knowledge of the senior military leadership. And Secondly under their effective control and it's because of the clarity of the China of command in may. And Ma that we have recommended the investigation and prosecution of these six investigators also say that the civilian government led by angst. Onto Chee has blocked investigations here's another panel member Rediker kumarisami we just feel that the, Nobel prize winner has such moral authority perhaps you should act the US has been waiting for that to according to Akshay Kumar of Human Rights Watch there's been an, effort in Washington to really tread. Softly and try to give her the space. To let do the right thing unfortunately she just hasn't human rights experts have been, raising concerns about the. Face Eight of Muslim Rohingya and other minorities in Myanmar for decades last year after rebels attacked police stations the military stepped up a brutal campaign against. The Roe hang up hundreds of. Thousands have since fled to neighboring Bangladesh the UN Security Council is. Expected to discuss this. Tuesday but Kumar who follows the UN for Human Rights Watch is not expecting much it. Doesn't look like they're going to take any action after this meeting it might just be one of those sections for people talk. A, good game but don't follow things up and that's what we're really seeking Groups I want the UN Security Council, to impose sanctions on top generals in. Myanmar and stop arms sales to the. Country Daniel Sullivan of another advocacy group refugees international also wants to see the Trump administration speak up what, really has been lacking. Is further measures of targeted sanctions referral to the international criminal court or really at, the ten day right at the base is a lack of leadership from the top I mean this is one of the worst crimes we've seen in. Our generation and we haven't heard anything, from from the president we don't feel that leadership in pressure from. The United States and that's been really disappointing so. Far the US has stopped short of Colleen Nisa genocide, and the State Department has not yet released its own report on the mass. Exodus of row Hindu Muslims from Myanmar the treasury department has imposed some. Targeted sanctions on four military and border guard commanders but not on all the, top generals that the UN. Human rights experts say should be Tried for

UN Un Security Council Myanmar Akshay Kumar United States NPR Joshua Johnson State Department Michele Keleman Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro China Daniel Sullivan Bangladesh MA Christopher Doty Colleen Nisa Treasury Department
"elsa chang" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KPCC

"See that happening anytime soon for now the best thing a high schooler can do to turn around parents reluctant to fill out the facts are get them to talk to your school's college counselor and do it well before senior year covering education i'm focus my lopez it's all things considered from npr news i'm elsa chang in washington and i'm mary louise kelley in moscow v south by southwest music festival is a wrap that means the musicians are back on tour or back to recording studios and the journalists who went to cover the festival are back at their desk jobs among those journalists are npr's felix contributors and rodney carmichael but before they left they sat down to talk about their highlights from the week and they did it intrusive south by southwest fashion over some roadside barbecue so allston so with the spirits is not just about the music you gotta you gotta get your raw volunteers they started with one of rodney's favorites she has a song called mumble jumbled so good at her stage was so incredible i mean she totally blew me away.

elsa chang washington mary louise kelley rodney carmichael npr moscow felix
"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from npr news with rachel martin i'm elsa chang in washington dc and i'm david greene in houston texas where this weather event has this city and really an entire region in crisis right now tropical storm harvey has edged back over the gulf of mexico but it is dry ragagnin moisture so there's been even more rain here in houston and surrounding areas that is expected to last through the middle of the week in the storm now could have its sights set on louisiana bringing floodwaters with a tens of thousands of people have been displaced so far and we can these rescues helicopters plucking people from rooftops fishing vogts grabbing families from in front of an on top of their homes and of course later in the day also were expecting president trump to fly into the region to take a look at the damage himself that's right the federal government has sent in almost eight thousand five hundred workers to assist with rescue and relief throughout texas and louisiana just ahead work and hear about the situation in lake cia charles louisiana david you've been in houston and it sounds like a chess has not let up at all they're not at all in the rangers keeps coming it fell all night and into the sworn in and they say there could be an additional tenure maybe even twenty inches of rain through the end of wednesday right now but one hundred thousand people without electricity to death toll is unclear and agencies have been overwhelmed responding to you know the immediate need you where exactly are you right now will were in north houston were along a street that runs under the interstate under interstate forty five a couple of hotels here i'm a few people try to walk along that street to reach the only restaurant where here's open and they've just see them waiting in this waist deep water holding the food they've purchased above their heads to try and make it an there's also the single white cars submerged in the water on the street the driver he escaped yesterday and made his way to the hotel and blitz hotels become i would say in a vacuum asian center but it's for people who were lucky enough.

rachel martin elsa chang david greene texas harvey mexico houston louisiana federal government rangers houston npr washington president twenty inches
"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A healthy productive life at gatesfoundationorg this is morning edition from npr news good morning i'm david greene and i'm elsa chang today in your health were going to tackle an issue that affects about half of all mothers the technical term is dia stasis wrecked he that many of us know at my and other name mommy pooch you know that soft belly that bolger's out of beit well ladies now a fitness trainer and a doctors say they have come up with a quick way to fix it npr's michael lean duke left tried it out to see if it really works okay so i admit it i have mommy i had my first bb about a year and a half ago and my stomach well it feels a bit like pudding even though i've lost all the baby weight so when i saw fawn on on facebook for classic possibly fix the kirch i thought 'why not a few weeks later and rolling out a yoga mat on the floor with a dozen other months in san francisco the class and played by lee account a personal trainer from new york city thank you feel as her colleen excited said he's decked out in yoga pains in cowboy boots she's aim heck of our shape and has seemingly endless knowledge about abdominal muscles are going to get the oblique the fire along with the transverse rector summit in our compassion she starts off by explaining what causes mommy coach in the first place if you've had a baby and all of you in here have mentioned that you have aib's our children and you probably had some degree of abdominal separation domino's separation that's the key basically when you're pregnant the growing fetus pushes apart your abdominal muscles right around you belly button in some cases the separation closes on its own but often it stays open so if.

david greene elsa chang bolger beit fitness trainer facebook san francisco aib npr michael lee new york
"elsa chang" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"It's been admitted with sam sanders is brought to you by npr's new is podcast it's been 45 minutes with samsung immediately following today's discussion with elsa chang and audie cornish npr seem sanders will record another podcast to talk about the podcast you just heard was audie cornish a good guest which elsa chang's observations made you go in to hear panelists brent bachman who will reveal which parts got cut for time and sand and brands bastide nelson who express concern about the cell referential nature of this ad subscribe to it's been 45 minutes sam sanders wherever you get your podcasts or on the impure one alcatel's funny i like shout out to travis larger of the great podcast asked me another he writes i copy for us he's the little break in a moment travis we love you danes travis but now it's time for part of the show when we swab some stories from the week that was pc worked on a didn't work on were obsessed with what else i got a story this retires yep yeah it's about beer can i tell you about it is so around monday to this what is seen all these headlines that were just really brash and inyourface basically the headlines were millennials are killing the beer industry and i was just like oh not again these articles that like blame young people for the demise of everything here so i spent a good few days just looking into it and behind these headlines there's actually a study from goldman sachs they look at all kinds of industries and they basically found that young people today are just consuming beer differently.

sam sanders npr elsa chang brent bachman alcatel goldman sachs samsung travis larger 45 minutes