28 Burst results for "Elsa Chang"

"elsa chang" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:30 min | 4 months ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"I'm Elsa Chang and Culver City California And I married Louise Kelly in Washington In Thompson Illinois There's a federal prison set aside for gang leaders and other men who are considered the most dangerous because they have caused violence at other prisons But sometimes men get sent who may be shouldn't be there Maybe because when they got attacked at another prison they fought back or because they have a mental illness and acted out Now imagine trying to survive at that prison where you were surrounded by men who want to attack you and guards who use harsh methods to control you And pure investigative correspondent Joseph Shapiro and Christy Thompson of the Marshall project investigated that prison and found frequent violence prisoners killing other prisoners A warning this story contains graphic descriptions of violence and abuse Here's Ampere's Joseph Shapiro Last summer Bobby Everson got transferred to the federal prison in Thompson Illinois In his letters home like this one read by his sister he started sounding more scared This facility is for disciplinary inmates I'm doing my best to stay out there way I'm just a couple of years to the door And then those letters started sounding more desperate I got into it with a few officers in a few guys in here Just keep checking up with me At this prison Just days before Bobby Everson died he wrote that corrections officers had it out for him They had given him a new cellmate It was someone he told his cousin he was afraid of And I got in a little scuffle with another dude They put me in the cell with I feel the staff here is purposefully trying to put me in situations of conflict I'm doing all I can to stay out the way Pray for your little cousin that I get through unscathed An investigation by NPR and the Marshall project finds that the U.S. prison at Thompson Illinois is one of the deadliest and most dangerous in the country Prison records say 7 prisoners have died violently since March of 2020 In 2016 we investigated violence at an earlier version of that disciplinary unit That one was at lewisburg Pennsylvania Then the federal government shut it down and moved it to Thompson Now at the new prison we found more violence and more killings caused by the same problems of two men locked down for 23 hours a day or more in one small cell about the size of a parking space Of men placed in restraints often painful four point restraints for hours or days Of corrections officers putting two men together who they had reason to believe would fight The chaplain had called me On December 16th Sabrina Everson got a phone call from the prison chaplain at Thompson About her son Bobby who the family called AJ He said he was sorry to inform me that they had found AJ on They found him unresponsive in his cell at 9 a.m. in the morning That's ebony ever since sister Yeah Yeah When the body was returned to them in Syracuse New York they saw the many cuts and bruises to his face and body At one point a federal agent told them that Everson had died as a result of blunt force trauma But that's it They can't get any other details not even the death certificate More than 5 months after ever since death Not even after calling and calling The funeral home director back near the prison he's trying to help Yes yes I just checked this past week They're not available to us yet But I would expect them to not be too long So within a couple of weeks NPR knows more of the details than ever since family because the day after he was attacked in his cell another prisoner wrote a letter The hill says he was a witness to the death of Bobby AJ Everson A young prisoner was killed and sailed F three 13 Amen himself 15 That someone reading the letter from hill we knew hill and he knew us because we interviewed him for our stories about abuse of the prison at lewisburg His description of how Everson died is disturbing For one thing Everson was small and slight about 5 foot 6 inches tall Hill says the summit is a large man heavy and tall The bureau of prison says it can't talk to us about a pending investigation Hill says corrections officers should have known ever since was in danger because the cellmate was telling them He was going to get violent He had been telling the COs for two weeks Get the dew out of his sail or he'd kill him He told us the numeracy oaths even on the night it happened at 10 o'clock he told the seal during his rounds to get him out the sail or he would kill him Hill says corrections officers ignored the threat and even worse on the night of the killing one corrections officer even encouraged the cellmate the CO totem Just do it Do it The CO then slammed the metal flap close over the window the cell door window We're not naming the man who hill says killed Everson because he hasn't been charged with a crime But hill says other prisoners fear that man He had at least at a minimum at least ten different fights with ten different inmates He had numerous assaults on the staff That's Demetrius hill Recently he was transferred from Thompson I spoke to him on the phone about the death of Bobby H J Everson To force this kid in the cell with this madman they knew the results He had just beaten another prisoner who had been in the cell with him I'm talking about maybe two weeks maybe two weeks prior another prisoner I don't know his name and he was beating that inmate for days on end Days on it he was beating that prison Finally they took him out and stuffed loopy in it Loopy That's the nickname Bobby Everson used in prison On this and some of the details we've been able to confirm hill's story is accurate We found federal bureau of prisons documents that list ever since death as a homicide Even though the BOP had not said that publicly NPR was not able to independently verify other details of hill's account He will also wrote letters to a federal judge in Illinois with some of these same details We asked for more confirmation from BOP and the FBI which is responsible for investigating ever since death did the cellmate kill Everson was the cellmate known to be violent Both the BOP and the FBI said they can't discuss a matter under investigation I was scared for him 'cause we don't know what's happening in them prisons you know That's ever since father Also named Bobby Everson The family wanted to know more I read part of the hills letters to them About how he says their son died and about how he was terrorized in those last weeks by his cellmate and Whoopi stayed in his bed pressed to the top monk Clearly spooked.

Bobby Everson Joseph Shapiro Elsa Chang Thompson Culver City California Louise Kelly Everson Illinois Christy Thompson Marshall project lewisburg Sabrina Everson NPR AJ Bobby AJ Everson hill bureau of prison Hill Washington
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Shapiro and I'm Elsa Chang. For Americans, with family living in Israel and Gaza. The recent fighting their hit close to home. Many stayed in constant touch with their loved ones as Hamas fired rockets into Israel and as Israeli warplanes carried out air strikes on Gaza. And with an uneasy ceasefire holding after 11 days of hostilities, their fears and feelings about a conflict thousands of miles away are still quite wrong. NPR's Connor Donovan spoke to some of those Americans. Never Libby Lynn Kinski its attacks to a call from her sister or parents. She's the same reaction. I'm like, Wow, I was just thinking of them, but that's because there is never a moment that I'm not thinking of them. When Kinski lives in Brooklyn. Her immediate family lives in Tel Aviv, which was a target of Hamas rocket barrages. When she checked in with her sister. Hi. Hi. How are you? The Rockets were a constant topic of conversation on a call late last week just before the ceasefire. Sister worried about a last burst of attacks. Everyone's expecting the finale will be tonight. So I'm a little bit more edgy was in the last couple of days so far, any sirens or anything today? Nothing. Then Kinski says her sister had panic attacks. Worried about leaving the house and having to sprint to a bomb shelter with her two girls, she says, the conflict even intrudes on her niece's play dates. The first thing that they talk about these eight year olds is what did you do when you heard the sirens? Were you scared? I wasn't scared of my mom was crying. Oh, my mom wasn't quite you know, just that's what's on their minds and That is really devastating and awful when Kinski works for the New Israel Fund, the left leaning group that she says is staunchly anti occupation and is working to build Arab Jewish partnerships. He's worried as she is for her own family, She knows the danger is much greater for Palestinians living in Gaza. Palestinians in Gaza don't have any protection from the bombs that are being dropped by by Israel on their homes. They don't have anywhere to run. Israel's Iron Dome defense system prevented most Tomas rockets from reaching their targets. Indian 12 people were killed in Israel. More than 240 were killed in Gaza and hundreds of businesses and homes were destroyed. Their video clips on social media captured the damage. No. How no one of what And no more than 70.

Connor Donovan Elsa Chang Israel Kinski Tel Aviv Brooklyn Gaza Shapiro Hamas two girls tonight 12 people More than 240 NPR today Libby Lynn Kinski eight year New Israel Fund Arab hundreds of businesses
MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

BBC World Service

09:11 min | 1 year ago

MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

"This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Totally unnecessary. That is what a top lieutenant in the Minneapolis Police Department said today about the way that former police officer Derrick Show Vin Pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd, he testified on the fifth day of Sheldon's murder trial. NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the proceedings and joins us again from Minneapolis. Hey, Adrian. Hi, Elsa. All right. So today wrapped up the trial's first week, which, as you know, I've been talking about has been packed with so much emotional testimony, like from bystanders who watched Floyd died to first responders who couldn't revive him. But today the trial seemed to shift a little right. Tell us a little bit about that. Yeah. Today, the prosecution worked to build its case that Derrick show Vin used excessive force on George Floyd. And to do that they called Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman to the stand. He is the longest serving police officer in the Minneapolis PD. He's been on the force since 1985. He's the head of the homicide division. And importantly, after George Floyd's death, he was one of the department employees who publicly condemned what show Vin did. Prosecutor Matthew Frank spent time today asking him about the dangers of restraining a suspect by laying them face down. Have you ever in all the years you've been working for the Minneapolis Police department. On been trained. To kneel on the neck of someone who is handcuffed behind their back in a prone position. No, I haven't. Is that if that were done with that be considered force absolutely. What level of force might that be? That would be the top tier the deadly force. Why? Because of The fact that if you need is on a person's neck That can kill him. Not not mincing words. They're obviously right. Well, what exactly did Lieutenant Zimmerman's say about the way show Vin handle George Floyd. So here is the same prosecutor asking Zimmerman a question about what he saw in the body cam footage of George Boyd's arrest. What is your? You know, your View of that use of force during that time period. Totally unnecessary. What do you mean? Well, first of all. Pulling him down to the ground face down. And putting your knee on the neck. For that amount of time. Is just Uncalled for. I saw no reason why The officers felt they were in danger if that's what they felt. And he said, the danger is what show then I would've had to field to justify keeping his his knee on Floyd's neck for that, Monk. E mean it's not every day that you hear. A police officer, especially a senior police officer criticized Another officer, even a former one, right, right? Yeah. But on cross examination, eyes show, Vin's attorney, Eric Nelson, worked to poke holes in his testimony, his main focus being the latitude that police officers are allowed during under the police department's use of force policy when they're responding to incidents, So here's Nelson asking that the same witness a question. You would agree, however, that in the fight for your life generally speaking in a fight for your life, you is an officer are allowed to use whatever force is reasonable and necessary. Correct? Yes. And that could even involve improvisation, agreed. Yes. Minneapolis Police department policy allows a police officer to use whatever means there never are available to him to protect himself and others, right? Yes. The defense attorney there, obviously giving clues about the kind of arguments he's going to make when it's his turn to present his case that show been feared for his life that he was dealing with the dynamic situation. Struggling suspect an angry crowd. And real quick. When do we expect the defense to start calling their own witnesses? Well. The prosecution is expected to wrap up their case by the end of next week. And then it'll be the defense's turn. We expect starting the following week that is NPR's Adrian Florido in Minneapolis. Thank you, Adrian. Thank you, Elsa. Critics say that George is controversial New election law restricts voter access and disproportionately effects people of color and in protest Major League Baseball announced today It will relocate the summer's All Star game and draft out of Georgia and under pressure from voting rights advocates. Major companies like Delta and Coca Cola have issued critical statements. Now. Stetson University law professor Ciara Tourist Spellissy studies the influence of corporations and lawmaking earlier today, I spoke to her about what she found striking about this wave of corporate criticism. One of the things that's remarkable about the new statements from Delta and Coca Cola is that they have changed positions a few days ago. They put out pretty Tepid criticisms and or support for the Georgia legislation, and now that the legislation has become law, and they've been under pressure from voting rights advocates They have changed their tune on. That doesn't happen that often. Let's dig into that a little more, because obviously corporate America lobbies. Statehouses Congress for all kinds of things, right? Can you talk about how aggressive they can be in this area or how reluctant they have been in this area in the past? So corporations have two main ways that they influence policy. One is through corporate donations to particular candidates. They then spend even more money lobbying lawmakers to get the policies that they want. Now, most of the policies that a corporation wants are for its own benefit. No, this is a little bit different because voting rights advocates in Georgia put pressure on corporations not just because they were located in Georgia, but also because they had given money to Some of the politicians who created this regressive Election law in Georgia. Can you talk about a moment in recent history where we've seen corporate activism lead to significant legislative change? I think the biggest Example of this was the 2017 tax cut. And the tax cut was literally for corporations. So you had political donors putting enormous pressure on Members of Congress and the corporate tax rate was cut significantly. Another example is bathroom bills and so by bathroom bills. These are Laws at the state level that direct individuals to only use the bathroom of the gender of their birth. And one of these bathroom bills was passed in North Carolina. The end see double a pulled championship games from North North Carolina. And that got AH lot of attention and and North Carolina. Rolled back that bathroom, Phil. We've been hearing a lot, especially in the last year about corporate responsibility, so to speak. What you going to be looking for going forward to see whether this is Real or not, well, one of the things that we saw after the riots at the Capitol on January 6th. Woz corporations deciding to pull back corporate PAC money from the Republicans who objected to The electoral college votes for Joe Biden. But now there is pressure from the U. S Chamber of Commerce, which is one of the largest trade associations in America. It's also one of the largest Dark money, political spenders in America, and they're urging their members to get back in the political spending game. So one of the things that I will look at After Georgia and after the riots on January, 6th is Do any of these corporations actually changed their political spending behavior. Ciara Torres Spellissy is a professor of law at Stetson University in Gulf Port Florida. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. There is a new attempt to bring the U. S and Iran back to the 2015 nuclear deal with one The Trump administration left in direct talks are set to begin in Vienna next Tuesday.

George Floyd Minneapolis Police Department Adrian Florido VIN Audie Cornish Elsa Chang Derrick Show Vin Minneapolis Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman Matthew Frank Lieutenant Zimmerman Elsa George Boyd Floyd NPR Adrian Georgia Sheldon Eric Nelson Coca Cola
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Elsa Chang. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly. This hour what the U. S. Could learn from the way the UK traced a new corona virus variant. It's very important to do as the UK did, because if you start to identify where the most concerning variants exist, you can move your public health effort to stop that one. Also, young voters in Uganda are turning out in force ahead of Thursday's election. I think that benchmark off democracy they cannot take an excuse of democracy, and that's why they're on the streets fighting and a promising new medical treatment for meth addiction. First, these news headlines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. The house has voted 232 to 1 97 to impeach President Donald Trump for second time. NPR's costly snow. Reports 10 Republicans voted with Democrats to impeach the president on a charge of incitement of insurrection. In a capital surrounded by fence, razor wire and armed guards. Members of the House voted for a second time to impeach President Trump. The historic moment comes one week after a violent mob attacked the U. S Capitol as Congress met to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says blamed for the attacks lies with President Trump. He must go. He is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love. The house is expected to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate shortly. Senate Republicans do not plan to return to Washington to begin impeachment proceedings, meaning and eventual trial will almost certainly begin on Lee after Trump leaves office on January 20th. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Federal authorities now say they've arrested dozens of people in connection with last week's U. S. Capitol insurrection as their nationwide search for suspects continues. NPR's Kirk Siegler. Reports in Idaho Man seen jumping onto the floor of the U. S. Senate is now in custody. 34 year old Josiah Kal El to Boise has turned himself into custody here on his own videos posted to Facebook, he admits being part of the mob, according to authorities falsely boasting. He was the first to sit in Nancy Pelosi's chair. He refers to her as a derogatory expletive, and she's a traitor, she treasonous, according to a court filing. Federal authorities say cold actually jumped down into the Senate chamber and appears to have sat in the vice president's chair. This day been given to the local CBS News affiliate called appears to now regret his involvement in the insurrection, reportedly saying in the moment he thought he was doing the right thing. Kirk Siegler NPR news boys he never Covad 19 vaccine could be available for American soon as NPR's Joel Palka explains. It's a vaccine that appears to be effective after a.

President Trump NPR House Speaker Nancy Pelosi U. S. Senate president Josiah Kal El Kirk Siegler Mary Louise Kelly Senate chamber vice president Elsa Chang UK CBS News Uganda Jack Spear Kelsey Snell Washington
"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Atlanta, where it is Election Day. Finally, the day that Georgians and the country have been waiting for As these two Senate run offs come to a vote. Millions of people in Georgia have already voted. They are expecting hundreds of thousands. Maybe up to a million people voting in person today on Election Day. We have just pulled up to A church, which is a polling site, Mrs Cobb County, Georgia, So we're actually just a tiny bit outside the city limits. Watching people come and go about to walk up and try to talk to a few of them. And you just gotta go. There was a line early this morning at the life Church, Smyrna Assembly of God, we heard, But when we were there, just a steady stream of people heading in coming out earning stickers with I voted scrawled across a Georgia peach. One of them. Angie Carmichael, lifelong resident of Smyrna. Regular voter voted in November, but she was not sure she was going to vote in this runoff because I didn't want to read it all. That my husband's taking me to lunch and I told him I would vote like a number of people we've met here in Georgia. Carmichael has taken on board the president's claims of fraud and a stolen election claims that have no facts to support them. But that have raised doubts and voters minds about the integrity of the election system. I just don't like everything that's going on right now, and I feel like the first election was rigged, so I don't see my point and voting. We'll see what happens. At least I did my part. Also here today, Ken Jones holding the hand of his daughter, Addison. She's only five. But this is not the first time he's brought her along to watch him vote. Even me. I didn't vote early on in my younger days. I started to feel more empowered. In the process, probably over the last, maybe 20 years, and so, you know, just taking an active role in. I want that to instill that in my kids, so yeah. Ken Jones also has his concerns about election security. Jones, who is black, says part of that stems from the history of Georgia elections not being free and fair for all voters also the possibility of human error. I just hope that there are enough people that want to see a fair Election are standing by and fighting the fight to make sure that that doesn't happen. But I do feel like in this situation. Well, you know, hopefully we'll have enough of a turnout. That it leaves you? No, no doubt. Well from or on today's election. We turn now to Emma hurt political reporter with our member station W A. B here in Atlanta. Hi there, Emma. Hi, Mary Louise. So you just got will taste there of the the polling station where we were out reporting this morning. I'm told you're outside yourself. How's the voting going? There? I am. I'm at Chastain Park in Buckhead. And the voting here is really study. No line. I haven't told there was a line of the beginning of the day, but it quickly dissipated once they got through it and It's just been really study turn out. They said that the turnout they've had so far today is more than the general election. Uh huh. And are you hearing either there or from any other polling stations? Any reports of voting regularities problems with machines? Anything like that? Nothing major at all. Not in metro Atlanta. There were some isolated instances in Columbia County. But I'm told that was taking care of really quickly this morning. So beyond that, not much. Okay, um, this runoff election as you and I have been discussing as it has unfolded deeds you might have expected it would rally Republicans and Republican voters together in an effort to hold the Senate for the GOP. Instead, it appears to have fractured at the party of fractures that were on vivid display here in Georgia as you are out in about reporting. What are Republicans telling you about the party's future? After this election is finally over. Yeah, I mean, there's really two questions in that right. There is the short term Are they going to be able to win these run offs will turn out come through for Republicans today, and will they be able to pull out a win? Despite you know the drama and the fracture that we've seen as you said, And then there's the long term of what happens in 2022 beyond. Republicans in Georgia who have controlled this state when the president as we heard last night is is actively undermining Republican officials here, But I'm gonna be here in a year and a half..

Georgia Atlanta Ken Jones Angie Carmichael Senate Mary Louise Kelly Emma president Mrs Cobb County Elsa Chang Los Angeles Mary Louise Addison life Church Smyrna fraud Chastain Park Columbia County Buckhead
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"And I'm Elsa Chang watching and waiting and counting. That is where we are Today. This hour we visit voters in Georgia, one of the key states that could decide whether President Trump wins reelection. There's something to people who don't get their way, and they have temper tantrums like him. Right the fragility because some don't go your way. How dare you also the latest on election related litigation and a taskforce takes on discrimination in the U. S navy. They're active behaviors that are happening to people because they don't like working for a black person or a minority. Now news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear, speaking at the White House tonight, with his path to the 270 electoral votes needed to stay in office. Narrowing President Donald Trump is showing no signs of conceding the race. Two days after voters went to the polls. There is still no clear winner in the election to find Trump tonight, continue to allege voting irregularities without evidence and saying he still thinks he's the winner. I'd like to provide the American people with an update on our efforts. To protect the integrity of very important 2020 election. If you count the legal votes Easily when If you count the illegal votes They can try to steal. The election from us if you count the votes that came in late Looking at them very strongly. But a lot of votes came in late on the key states where ballots are still being counted Pennsylvania, Georgia and North Carolina. Earlier today, Democrat Joe Biden said he remains confident when the vote counting has done, he will prevail. The Trump campaign has found a federal lawsuit trying to halt the counting of ballots in Philadelphia. The campaign has filed several complaints like this about not getting the access it wants to counting sites. But some of those cases have already been thrown out. NPR's Lena sell you cause more In Pennsylvania. The Trump campaign is claiming that it's observers are not getting close enough access to the vote count in the massive center in Philadelphia. Here's Trump surrogate Pam Bondi, speaking to reporters in the middle of protests by the vote counting center.

President Trump Trump Elsa Chang NPR Joe Biden Georgia Pennsylvania Philadelphia Pam Bondi President U. S navy Jack Spear White House North Carolina
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 2 years ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"News. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up force. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports burnt banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 2 years ago

What Are The Presidential Candidates' Views On Climate Change?

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. We're spending a few days this week digging into where the presidential candidates stand on some of the key issues in this election. Today, it's climate change. President Trump and Joe Biden have dramatically different views. Biden has an aggressive plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. President Trump is focused on boosting fossil fuels. We learn more. We're joined by Jeff Brady of NPR's climate team. Hi Jeff Diary start by summing up for us. What President Trump has done on climate in his first term climate change is not a priority for him in the past. He's even called it a hoax. But Trump has softened his language a bit on this. At the first presidential debate Last month, the president was asked what he believes about climate change. I want crystal clean water and air. I want beautiful, clean air. We have now the lowest carbon. If you look at our numbers right now, we are doing phenomenally, but I haven't destroyed our businesses. Trump's still doesn't display much understanding about how humans are changing the climate. But as you heard there, he does brag about carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector going down. That's not because of anything Trump has done. It's because cleaner and cheaper renewable energy and natural gas air replacing coal for generating electricity. Trump has this energy dominance agenda. It's a combination of promoting domestic energy, mostly fossil fuels. And getting rid of regulations that might hinder the drilling and mining that produces those fuels. So he pulled out of the Paris climate agreement. He's rolled back dozens of environmental regulations, including President Obama's clean power plan, and also strict fuel efficiency standards for cars. On the campaign trail. President Trump often ties Joe Biden two proposals like the Green new Deal and banning fracking. Those issues might hurt biting and ki energy producing swing states like Pennsylvania but clear this up for us What our Biden's position On those topics and what are his actual climate proposals? Well, Biden says the green new deal is a good framework. But he has his own climate plan, and the only supports parent banning new fracking on public land. And there's very little of that. In Pennsylvania on climate change bite an echo scientists that humans are changing the climate and emissions must be reduced quickly. His detailed climate plan has a big job creation focus. He calls for spending $2 trillion over four years for a wide range of environmental projects, Things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations across the country. There's so many things that we can do now to create thousands of thousands of jobs. We can get to net zero in terms of energy production by 2035, not only not costing people jobs, creating jobs. On top of that 2035 goal for the electricity sector that he mentioned at the first debate. Biden's plan aims for net zero carbon emissions across the entire US economy, including transportation by 2050. That seems like an enormous pivot. When you think of all the power plant's vehicles, airplanes in the U. S it zbig reach. Is it possible it would cost trillions of dollars and require big changes really fast. Under this plan, fossil fuels, though, would still be used, but there would be offsets and carbon capture projects to reach that. Net zero goal. Biden has a long list of what he calls day. One executive actions Some are about reversing trumps rollback. Something's like methane emissions and those car fuel efficiency standards. There's also directives for the federal government by zero emission vehicles and make buildings more efficient. He has an ambitious legislative agenda that includes an enforcement mechanism mechanism to meet that net zero by 2050 goal. And to do all this. Given the political polarization around climate change, his party probably will have to control both houses of Congress. Looks like Democrats will hold on to the house, but the Senate is still in question there. And if President Trump is re elected, what is his second term climate agenda look like AA lot of the environmental rollbacks from his first four years are being challenged in court now, so resolving those battles and cementing trumps deregulation agenda would be a big focus. He'd continue pushing for more exploration and drilling on public land and offshore. But very little focus on addressing climate change, which you know, scientists say the world needs to do that to minimize its worst effects in coming decades. That's NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks, Jeff. Thank you. The film that

President Trump Joe Biden Jeff Brady Pennsylvania NPR President Obama Jeff Diary Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Jeff
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 2 years ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"Today of the pain of lethal injection. This is a process the federal government plans to use to execute two inmates in a prison in Terre Haute, Indiana this week. Lethal injection is supposed to be a quick and painless death. Our colleagues it all things considered. Asked if it really is no one called well reported this story with a TC host, Elsa Chang. Hey, there. What were you looking for? S so we've been looking at the autopsies of inmates executed execution specifically excuse my lethal injections Physically, what's happening to the lungs was first tipped off that something might be going wrong with lungs a few years ago by a doctor in Atlanta named Jules if it had been reviewing some autopsies of inmates executed in Georgia, let's take a listen. I saw that instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death have began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death. A death associated with suffering. What are you seeing was a severe form of something called pulmonary oedema on this is when lungs rapidly fill with fluid, which could make you feel like you're drowning or suffocating. And it's happening here because the massive dose of drugs that inmates receive is damaging the inside of the lungs, all of which is morally important to many people, because we'd like to think it's the society. We're not torturing people that they're being painlessly put to death. And now there's this evidence of something else. Where did that evidence take you? Yes. Oh, Doctors haven't had a handful of autopsies, but we want to see how prevalent this is across the board. So we filed a public records requests. We've got more than 300 autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection from nine states spanning decades. Not all of them had date aboutthe lungs, But in the more than 200 that did we found pulmonary oedema in 84% of the cases. Now, lawyers are also bringing autopsies to federal courts around the country, claiming That the pain of pulmonary oedema amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. They say This explains why we've seen some inmates in recent years gasping for air and choking as they're being executed. Is it clear how much the inmates are feeling in those last moments of their lives? Right. That's the big question that the courts are tackling right now. Many doctors who are testifying have raised serious concerns about the drug states are using to try to anesthetized inmates. One drug that's been used in dozens of executions in recent years, isn't actually an anesthetic can't block pain is often used in hospitals to calm patients down before surgery. Another common drug that states use is an anesthetic, but it's not used in a way that guarantees the inmate warm, remain fully under for the duration of the execution. S O. Considering issues with both of these drugs doctors we spoke to say it's very likely. Many of these inmates could feel those suffocating effects of their lungs filling with fluid okay, so they could feel the effects what arguments or states making to defend lethal injection. Right s O the pushback. We've encountered our reporting of courses thes, and it's have been sentenced to death made us do involve pain. And, of course, many of the family members of the victims of these violent crimes do want justice to be done, regardless of how painful the execution will be. We went to Ohio to speak with a man named Norman Stout. He's 90 years old and his wife was murdered 36 years ago. It is only the bleeding hearts and have words that are involved in this discussion. Cruel and unusual punishment is laying out there in the cemetery, and I should point out that despite all the recent problems with lethal injection pulling does show that the majority of Americans still support the death penalty, and at the end of the day, Of course, it's up to the courts to decide whether or not lethal injection amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. But having autopsy evidence to consider during that process gives a much clearer picture of what lethal injection is actually doing the human body. Noah.

Norman Stout Terre Haute Elsa Chang Indiana Noah Atlanta Jules Georgia Ohio
'Patriotic Education': Trump Says He Will Start New Commission

Marketplace

04:27 min | 2 years ago

'Patriotic Education': Trump Says He Will Start New Commission

"All things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. President Trump waded into the classroom today. He says he thinks American students need to be taught what he calls patriotic education, and he accused his political opponents of trying to brainwash Children about racism. Must clear away the twisted Web of lies in our schools, classrooms and teach your Children the magnificent truth. About our country. We want our sons and daughters to know that they are the citizens of the most exceptional nation. In the history of the world. It's the latest development in the cultural divisions. Trump is trying to promote as part of his reelection campaign. White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins me now to talk about this item. Hello. And the president says he's going to create a new commission about this. Can you working? Tell us about that commission? Yes. So he went to the National Archives to announce that he is creating a commission to promote history education that focuses on quote the legacy of 17 76. Of course, that is the year when American colonies declared their independence from Great Britain, and this is a reaction in part against the 16 19 project. President Trump made it explicit. He said that That was the project led by the New York Times that focuses on a view of American history stemming from the year when the first enslaved Africans were brought to these shores. But it's also a reaction to the protest that we've seen this year against racial injustice. One thing about the commission to be clear about, though the federal government does not have jurisdiction over school curriculum, so it is up to schools and local and state governments to decide what to teach. And they do and they teach very different things depending on where you are. This isn't the first time the president has talked about these themes. Would you put in context? Put this in context for us politically? Yes. Oh, he's wrapping a few things together here. People on the right have long complained about the liberal bent on college campuses. That is not new. But there has been a growing effort by educators at all levels, even in elementary schools to teach Children about systemic racism. Slavery as a founding sin of the nation. The genocide of Native Americans as part of westward expansion, and President Trump objects to that strongly, saying schools are teaching Children to hate America. Our Children are instructed from propaganda tracks. Like those of Howard's in Try to make students ashamed of their own history. The left has warped, distorted and to file The American story. With deceptions, fall suits and lives. This also comes in the midst of the racial justice protests where some protesters tour down or vandalize statues of Confederate generals and founding fathers who owned slaves, and Trump has come to the defense of these statues, making them a cause of sorts as part of his re election. There is often a reason or an impetus for why Trump will say things that he knows will be provocative. Is there Do we know what he's talking about this now? Well, he's been talking about it for a little while. It's it's clear. This is part of his re election. This is a variation on themes that he talked about it during speeches and at Mount Rushmore on July 3rd the White House on July 4th. It's a theme he has been coming back to to fire up his base, sort of a variation on make America great again, harkening back to a different time. A different America. He is presenting himself as a great defender of American values and and even Western civilisation, as if to say that people who don't agree with his view of history or of what makes America great. That they are just wrong, but fundamentally trying to destroy the country. It is a very different reelection message than those used by past presidents. It's not about uplift or unifying. It's a long way. From morning in America and as if it wasn't clear already that this is part of his reelection campaign. As part of his remarks, President Trump took a very unsettle shot at Joe Biden holding up a statue of a a notable Delaware founding father and saying that when his statue was taken down by the city of Wilmington, Biden didn't speak out. That's white House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Thank you to him. You're welcome. For

President Trump America White House Correspondent Tamara Keith Joe Biden Elsa Chang Great Britain Federal Government Sasha Pfeiffer New York Times Delaware White House Howard Mount Rushmore National Archives Wilmington
"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All things considered from NPR news. I'm Leila Fadel and I'm Elsa Chang. If there has been one constant of the Trump presidency, it has been the president's willingness to set aside the norms of the office. It happened yesterday when President Trump declined to speak out against the far right conspiracy theory. Q. And on theory is this belief that you are secretly saving the world from this Titanic? Cold pedophiles and cannibals? Does that sound like something? You are behind. I haven't. I haven't heard that. But is that supposed to be a bad thing? If if I can help save the world from problems, I'm willing to do it. I'm willing to put myself out there because of Cunanan's connection to violence. It has been declared a domestic terrorism threat by the FBI. Susan Glasser writes the letter from Washington column For The New Yorker. This topic has been a frequent one for her over the years. She joins us now welcome. Thank you so much for having me So let me just start by getting your reaction to what the president said yesterday about Cuban on What did you make? Well, it shouldn't have been. Ah, hard answer just to say, you know that's an absurd theory. And no, of course not. But the thing is, is that President for him. Conspiracy theories are almost the original Cynthy origin myth off his political career going back to, of course, his promotion of the untrue birtherism conspiracy theory about President Barack Obama. So You know, On the one hand, it's like many things in the Trump era. It is completely shocking and yet not surprising. How much of a deviation would you say that President Trump has handled controversial topics compared to past presidents? Well, what's striking to me is that it's not just controversial topic. He has a knack actually, for turning things that we didn't even realize were previously controversial into controversial subjects. Remember was just a few weeks ago, I think one of the biggest norms in American life was exploded by President Trump when he actually openly mused about delaying The U. S presidential election, even though of course it's outside of his power to do so. So you know that's turning something that we didn't even know was up for grabs into something that would call into question and then You know you have something like this press conference yesterday, which just goes deep and dark into the world of what's been described as a satanic cult, but because they support him. Donald Trump seems unwilling even to disavow that. I mean, as we mentioned that you've written about these erosion, this erosion of norms over the past few years, what would you say is The most concerning impact while you're watching this erosion of norms. Well, you know, I think it's really important and it's almost impossible at the same time for us to remember how striking this is. You know, there's the metaphor of the the boiling frog right that. You know this happened with such frequency that by the time things really come to a head when it's too late to do anything where were already dead and boiled the frog, I spent the day part of the day looking back at some of the speeches. From the Democratic Convention of four years ago, and what President Obama, Hillary Clinton and others had to say about Donald Trump then and if you had told your 2016 self, that some of the things that the president now says, and does would actually pass without even much comment. You know, you would have been truly worried and concerned, and this sheer scale of the erosions of our norms is, I think what has been the big surprise of the Trump Aaron? Not the fact that the president is willing to embrace conspiracy theories since that's how he came into politics in the first place. Well, I guess that begs the question of how permanent is this erosion? I mean, how do you see the next president? Whether that be someone a few months from now or someone four years from now? How do you think that President will be affected by this current president? You know, it's a great question. You know what you hear from Democrats is sort of this line. Well, America can survive four years of Donald Trump. But after eight years, the damage would be permanent. You know, I'm not so sanguine about it. It strikes me. That, you know, we can't go back in time and pretend that this all didn't happen. That's Susan Glasser. She writes the letter from Washington column for The New Yorker. Thank you. Thank you so much. Experts say one crucial element in the fight against the Corona virus is invisible. It's indoor air quality. The risk of transmitting the disease is much higher if people gather indoors in poorly ventilated spaces. What does that mean for schools and businesses that are reopening NPR's Camilla Romanowski reports? Dennis night talks to a lot of building owners who want one thing. One thing he can't give them. You cannot guarantee that someone might not get sick night is with ashtray, an organization of heating ventilation and air conditioning professionals. The group has set guidelines for preventing the spread of Cove in 19 through indoor air and night says, Watch out for anyone selling a device and promising it will eliminate the risk from the Corona virus. That's when the hairs stand upon the back on that, and I get really suspicious. Just that it's being Approached by a snake oil salesman, right? There is no silver bullet, he says. Big buildings like offices and schools need better air filters in their age HVAC systems and they need better maintenance and more fresh air coming in and fans running for longer. You've got to do everything and you've got to do it with diligence, And even then there's no guarantee The guidance hasn't always been clear on what to Dio for awhile. Experts couldn't even confirm if the disease could be spread through the air beyond 6 ft. Now there's a growing consensus that is a risk Heffley no and is an air filtration consultant and Cary, North Carolina. It's tricky, and it's confusing. And in large part, it's scary. It's tricky and confusing, in part because every building is different and the best most effective air filters. Many heating air conditioning and ventilation systems can't handle them. The answer to it is first don't panic. Second do what you can think about how we wear masks and in 95 his ideal, But not everyone, Conjugate one, so a cloth mask is better than nothing. Similarly, Owen says. If the most effective filter is not an option, used the best filter your machine can handle. Run your system for longer. Consider adding portable purifiers and don't overlook the low tech solutions.

President Trump president President Barack Obama Susan Glasser NPR Leila Fadel FBI Cunanan Elsa Chang Washington Dennis night Owen Aaron America North Carolina Camilla Romanowski Dio
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Hospital dot org's 10 is for 48 here a case here W Thanks for being with us on this Thursday afternoon. For all things considered coming up out of the break the go Go's are considered one of the most successful all female rock groups in history. Have a conversation with guitarist Charlotte Caffey and drummer Gene Shock of the Go, Go's about the new documentary that charts the band's rise to global stardom. I still can't get the water skiing image out of my head from the video I think was from vacation. Anyway, coming up next. Our president Trump tweeted today that perhaps the November election should be delayed suggestion that even his party quickly rejected despite its support of Trump being against mail in voting. More about that in the five o'clock hour right now, Look at your roads. Let's continue with the singular in Azusa. This is on send Gabriel Canyon Road. The 39 brushfire. All lanes blocked there. That's what's caused that and this is between old San Gabriel Canyon Road and East Fork Road. That fire broke out around 2 p.m. Today and has burned at least 240 acres and some evacuations happening right now as we speak. It is for 50 here, Casey ar w thanks for being with us. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Elsa Chang Go Go's are widely considered the most successful all female rock history and they're the only all female band that wrote their own songs and play their own instruments to have a chart topping album. That was their debut Beauty and the beat, released in 1981. Now they are the subjects of a new documentary called.

San Gabriel Canyon Trump Charlotte Caffey Ari Shapiro Elsa Chang Azusa NPR Gene Shock president Casey
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, Black and Latin. Next, people are more likely to get sick and die from Cove in 19. That's also true of older people and those with underlying health conditions. These groups are generally among the least likely to be included in vaccine trials, which is important as two companies have announced that they're starting Corona virus vaccine trials that may enroll up to 30,000 people each. Reporter Jonelle. Alicia wrote about this for Kaiser Health news and joins us now. Welcome. Thanks for having me why is it important that these groups that are more likely to be affected by Cove in 19 also be represented in trials for a Corona virus vaccine? Well, The short answer is we want to test a vaccine in the population that's most at risk for serious problems and the population most likely to receive the vaccine. If we don't testing groups that are representative of the community, we won't really know how well a vaccine will actually work well, these trials are taking place all over the country so far. Is there any evidence of whether they will reflect the demographics of those most affected by the virus will there in some good news. The structure that's been put in place to coordinate these trials is based on four longstanding clinical trial networks, including several that air focused on HIV and AIDS. So they have deep experience and connections with minority and other communities and Khun Draw on those connections for the Koven trials. What are the hurdles? What's standing in the way? Well, one of the things that standing in the way is that there have been in I H rules for more than 25 years, calling for minorities to be included in clinical trials. There's a new policy that took that just last year that would require older adults to be included, and even the FDA is guidelines for conducting these Coben clinical trials. Call for them to include racial and ethnic minorities, older people those with underlying conditions, But even that guidance refers to them as non binding recommendations. And so when I asked the FDA whether they'd refused to accept vaccine trial data that didn't include diverse people. They said no, they would still accept that data. And so what? The experts told me that it is that if you don't require it, it won't necessarily happen. There's another factor as well. Which is there's this hurdle of minority distrust of the medical system? I mean, there's a long history of desperate, even dangerous treatment of minorities. In scientific research and basic care, and many are hesitant to volunteer for a trial because they don't want to become guinea pigs and somebody's research. So what are the companies that are conducting these vaccine trials, telling you well, the companies have to file their demographic goals with the National Institute for Health, but they aren't required to disclose them publicly. So generally, that means we can on. Lee learned about the racial, ethnic and age makeup after the fact. The companies are saying they want these trials to be diverse. They're saying that they're doing everything they can to make them as diverse as possible. This week in my age director Francis Collins noted that they are tracking the enrollment week by week there tracking these diversity goals week by week. And he suggested that it might be made publicly available and said it oughta be if the trials do not include People representative of the group's most affected by covert 19. Is there a risk that the vaccine won't be as helpful as it could be? Yeah, Researchers are starting out with great intentions. Everyone wants to make sure these trials are inclusive. But they're under this enormous pressure to enroll participants quickly to accumulate their data and make sure to hit their internal milestones for development. It can be difficult to recruit and retain minority and older volunteers that Khun take more effort. But it's crucial because if we don't include the vast representation of the community in the trials, then we don't really know how it works in this whole population. It's General Alicia of Kaiser Health News. Thanks for your reporting thanks very much. For some wearing a mask in a place of business has moved from a question of safety to an ideological battle. In Michigan, two high profile altercations involving masks turned deadly. One victim tried to enforce the law. The other sought to defy it. Events like these have prompted some Michigan bar and restaurant owners to offer training designed to de escalate mask related conflicts with customers from member station W. K. R in East Lansing, Kevin Lavery reports. In May, Calvin Merlin found himself in a heated exchange with a customer at a thrift store in Flint. He was trying to enforce the state's mascot law, but his stance cost him his life. He was shot minutes later by a man who arrived at the store with the customer's husband. Weeks later near Lansing, another customer who refused to wear a mask got into an argument with a convenience store worker. He then stabbed another customer and was shot and killed by a sheriff's deputy. Tragedies such as these have put Michigan's frontline customer service workforce on high alert. Mayfair Bar in Hazlett opened a 1930 for when the ink ending Prohibition was still wet. It's rooftop deck overlooks a lakeside park, making it a popular place for drinks. Now you can't walk into the Mayfair without a mask. It's something bartender Joe Hilts contends with. There's a couple of people here that way honestly haven't felt safe.

Michigan Kaiser Health News representative FDA Khun Draw Ari Shapiro Alicia Mayfair Bar Elsa Chang National Institute for Health Los Angeles Reporter Khun Mayfair AIDS Joe Hilts Lansing Washington Francis Collins
"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Sarah McCammon in San Diego. The Navy is still working to put out a fire that started on board the USS Bonham Rashard more than 24 hours ago. Nearly 60 sailors and civilians have been taken to the hospital for minor injuries. Mat Hoffman from member station KPBS reports The navy doesn't know yet if the ship can be saved. The Navy says the fire started below deck in an area where marine equipment is stored. All of USS Bon Hammer shards crews have been accounted for. Since Sunday morning. Thick smoke has been poring over naval base San Diego were Admiral Philip Sobek says There won't be a complete damage assessment until the fire is out. The superstructure and the upper decks continued to burn and have sustained damage. The Ford, Mass has collapsed and the ship is listing. However, dewatering is in progress, and we're keeping a good balance between both crews on the ground on San Diego Bay and now in the air using helicopters are hitting the ship with water. For the last 24 hours, 400 sailors have been onboard that ship. To make sure that we make every effort to save that ship. San Diego County officials are telling residents to assume the air quality near the ship is unhealthy to limit their exposure and to stay indoors. So back says no ordinance or aircraft are on the amphibious assault ship. But there is a 1,000,000 gallons of fuel, which is worrisome for officials absolutely concerned. But again, we're doing the mitigation. We're making sure that again, the risk of that is low. Right now. Navy officials say there are about two deaths in between the fire and the fuel something so back says they're closely monitoring we go after and we planned for worst case all the time. We trained to it and we're going to make sure we don't get there. The Navy still doesn't know how the fire started. The ship was at naval base, San Diego for maintenance. But Sobek says the fire wasn't sparked by any crews doing work. Flames have spread throughout the ship, and there isn't a timeline for when the fire could be out. For NPR news. I'm Matt Hoffman in San Diego. One.

San Diego Navy San Diego Bay San Diego County Admiral Philip Sobek Matt Hoffman USS Bon Hammer shards Elsa Chang Bonham Rashard NPR Sarah McCammon KPBS assault Mass
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang this is our NPR reporting process a lawsuit alleging that Hoover nineteen fraud scheme it is inexcusable so trying to profit from this pandemic at the expense of people's health in we allege that these defendants have been attempting to do just that also the latest from Minneapolis where the death of a black man in police custody is raising questions again about police use of force and the Oakland A.'s announced they'll stop paying their minor league players were quite special baseball and we're struggling more now than we did we're in college first the news live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer the U. S. has hit another milestone in the ongoing corona virus pandemic and even though deaths and infections are slowing in some parts of the country it still makes it no less Graham one hundred thousand Americans have now lost their lives to pope at nineteen that's more people than have died in the Vietnam and Korean wars combined numbers closing in on the number of Americans who died in the first World War the tally by Johns Hopkins University says the viruses known affected more than five point six million people worldwide and claimed three hundred and fifty thousand lives house Democrats have cast their first remote votes in the chambers two hundred and thirty one year history NPR's quality of which office reports they cast the votes for a bill expressing US support for the Uighurs were dominantly Muslim ethnic group in China more than seventy members voted by proxy for the first time to approve the human rights bill one by one lawmakers announced their colleague's intentions on the house floor don Beyer of Virginia voted on behalf of six other members inform the house that Mr Lowenthal Mister Blumenauer Mr Cohen doctor foster Mr VCM is war will vote yea on S. thirty seven forty four Democrats approved the new rules temporarily allowing remote voting in video conference hearings members can vote for up to ten colleagues who can't travel to Washington DC because of the pandemic Republicans are suing to stop the effort they say it sets a dangerous precedent and that it's unconstitutional cloudy Seles NPR news Washington president trump plans to return to Florida Saturday for the next attempt at launching the SpaceX crew dragon as NPR's camera cater ports he was there as the launch was scrubbed today due to bad weather president trump vice president pence and their spouses were on site at the Kennedy Space Center for the launch as were three of trump's adult children and several grandchildren before the launch was postponed trump said it was a very exciting day for the country this is something the First Lady and I look very much forward to seeing so much so that they're coming back for the next try trump tweeted thanks to SpaceX and NASA says he flew back to Washington on Air Force One quote look forward to being back with you on Saturday exclamation point pence also tweeted that he'd be back to watch history in the making Tamar Keith NPR news after micro blogging site Twitter placed a fact check warning on a couple of his tweets president trump is threatening social media companies with new regulation or even possible closure trump accusing the platforms of seeking to silence conservative voices from campaign is lashing out after Twitter place fact check alerts on messages from the president that called mail in ballots fraudulent and predicted mailboxes will be robbed trump can not unilaterally like later close social media companies that would require an act of Congress or the FCC racks bank on Wall Street stocks closed higher the Dow was up more than five hundred points this is NPR and for the David Barnett foundation news room this is case your W. I'm Laurie Perella Wednesday may twenty seventh here's what's going on at five oh four with nightclubs shuttered because of the corona virus outbreak illicit underground parties are popping up around LA as KCRW's Catherine Barnes reports many of them are being held at short term rentals in the Hollywood Hills cabin fever is getting to everyone but some are becoming more vocal about it than others LAPD captain Steve Laurie told the LA times his Hollywood station received forty nine calls reporting loud parties last week roughly twenty percent more than usual for Memorial Day weekend in a video posted online by the LAPD authorities say they're going to crack down harder on these gatherings server was which is if you play music so allow me to serve your neighbor in his home additionally if you have a live stream voices in the backyard yeah make it hard for your neighbors this week the LAPD says if police are called to a party there could be consequences for both the person throwing it and the homeowner even if they're not there violators could face a citation all the way up to criminal prosecution and six months in jail this case your lease Catherine Barnes reporting well perhaps it was inevitable but LA's Greek theatre has now canceled its entire twenty twenty season we follow suit along with the Hollywood Bowl in other venues across the nation so you basically say that this season will be closed there will be no oblate large events at the great this year A. P. DS is chief of staff of the Los Angeles parks department he told KTLA that canceling the season with the safe and responsible thing to do not only for our fans or our guests and crew members and staff you know we we've done great work in Los Angeles to flatten our curvy we've made tremendous strides and so we want to continue doing positive things that will not jeopardize that this would have been the nineteenth season for.

Kelly Elsa Chang NPR Hoover fraud
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the pandemic has pushed many of us to our limits there is the isolation the need to wear protective gear masks gloves when making essential trips out of the house there is working from our learning from home now imagine doing all of this while living with or caring for someone with a profound disabilities like severe autism everything becomes exponentially more difficult and that has been the case for many people who have the disorder and for those who care for them feeder only tape is the mother of fifteen year old Mohammed who has severe autism she's also vice president of the National Council on severe autism and she joins me now welcome hi Merrill Rees how are you today I am all right and I'm glad to have you with us I wonder if you would start by just telling us a little bit about your son yeah my son Muhammad so he's fifteen he's pretty severely impacted by his disability by autism Mohammed is an energetic loving boy who doesn't understand what's going on right now he doesn't understand why he can't go to school and souls one of his favorite place to go he doesn't understand why he can't go take a walk in the mall when that was on his favorite things to do he doesn't know why he can't go to the park why he can't go down to the grocery store so he's incredibly confused in this time when we're all confused but he really doesn't understand that yeah yeah and I can't imagine how much it compounds things when you when you can't explain to him why why why all of it has changed I mean the rest of us are having enough trouble getting our heads around yeah wearing gloves or masks you know things like that that's just not gonna happen here now for for school for him how does distance learning work doesn't work for for someone like him with limited language and and other difficulties it does not work for him and I don't think it works for a lot of kids like him our kids need highly structured one to one you know specialized teachers and staff to teach them things we can't do that over the internet what has the impact been on you I saw you reroute of NSA and you quoted a study from the university of Wisconsin Madison that had found the mothers of children with autism experience levels of stress comparable to those of combat soldiers and that is that is before you wear a a deadly pandemic on top of things yeah I mean it's been so hard and it's just the stress level it's it's not a knowing we don't know what's gonna happen we don't know what's going to end we don't know what's going on and to deal with autism home makes it even harder the only the support that I get to get through is through fellow autism parents that we you know we have these little zoom calls and we tried it finds humor in this thing that's going on every single day you know that we're just trying to lean on each others to get through because I can't do it alone nobody can of course what what about the rest of your family how are they coping you know everyone's doing the best they can I try to always look at that you know that they're doing the best they can every day but you know I don't know how to just accurately convey like it's really hard but it's not just really hard it's really hard because it's like I almost feel like nobody hears us nobody should have my son doesn't really talk she doesn't talk and I'm supposed to have a voice and no one's listening to what's going on for our families you know no one gets dot we are just as vulnerable as corona virus people I mean the kind of virus is gonna come and go right autism is here to stay the autism pandemic is here to stay and we need to define like what our families need to get through this and going forward like to define what essential as we'll stay with our first second what essential is in terms of you're talking about is for families that have kids with autism I mean we desperately need extra help to get through this and I firmly believe the autism support workers aids their teachers and caregivers are as essential as nurses and doctors and should be given the same accommodations people don't understand that for our families caregivers our first responders special needs schools our hospitals our teachers are ventilators and we can't do this without them what's giving you hope right now to get through this to get your son and the rest your family through this honestly seeing the way communities have come together I don't think in my whole life I've seen neighbors community is banding together asking each other how they're doing talking more in the street it's it's we become so frankly right you know you live in the city were not a lot of people just say hi to pass by and everyone saying hi and everyone smiling anything because we're all in this together they are suddenly everybody's going through something really hard yeah that is feeder only T. mother of fifteen year old mu and vice president of the National Council on severe autism she's been giving us a glimpse of what it is like to live through this pandemic when your child has severe autism thank you so much for talking with us thank you murderous and.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly NPR
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A Friday it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles the corona virus has no political bias but the reaction to the pandemic has gotten political in some quarters response measures like social distancing and wearing masks have become litmus tests for political identity and here's Hannah lamb has been reporting on how the pandemic is inflaming an already divided country she joins me now Hey Hannah hi there so I mean it goes without saying that political divisions were already pretty bad before the corona virus so just take us through what you see happening to those divisions now that's right I mean the kind of polarization has taken hold in recent years is way beyond the old Republican democratic divides the debates over policies and issues social scientists say it's now about identity and these competing visions of what it means to be an American and there's pressure to be all in for one camper the other and it's such a hyper partisan climate of course the pandemic was going to be a politicized and exploited in the case of extremist groups are trying to use the fear in the chaos to their advantage even setting aside the extremist fringe we've seen a really nasty turn in the political fights over when and how to re open about stay at home orders and this posturing on masks that extends all the way to the White House yeah let's let's take masks for example how it masks become a symbol of this polarization that you're talking about right now well there are lots of reasons why people masker don't mask but for many it's become another signifier of political identity there's a sector of society that just refuses to mask their means about it it's for the week it's government overreach it's mind control and some of the symbolism from that comes from the very top from president trump I spoke to Rachel Kleinfeld at the Carnegie endowment for international peace she studies polarization and violence she said even the mask itself is kind of a flash point now especially in an election year and trump is on the record saying that wearing a mask is not for him and Kleinfeld argues that that stance sends a powerful message trump recognizes that by talking about masking in a certain way he can play on an identity and it's like an idea for a reality versus fear and identity of urban versus rural and identity race seat and given his being hit by the virus and he can do all those things by triggering something that was not polarizing before which is whether or not you wear a mask in public okay we'll give in these heightened tensions how concerned do you think we should be about these frustrations turning into something bigger yeah well we're already seeing some violence related to the pandemic response and I'm talking up beyond the guys with guns showing up to the state capitals it's low level and it's isolated but it's still pretty chilling a shooting at a McDonald's are breaking the arm of a target employee the beating of a seven eleven clerk all related to enforcing distancing measures and their stories every day about intimidation around whether you do or don't mask right now those are extreme reactions are not the norm the majority of Americans are abiding by stay at home orders and masking required but the worry is polarization fosters and if left unchecked it has a way of spilling into the streets I talked to Tim Phillips about that risk he runs a nonprofit beyond conflict it studies polarization and global conflicts and they have a report coming out soon that finds that Americans are polarized but not as polarized as they think that on both sides sort of S. and overestimate how much mutual disdain there is yes Phillips is concerned but he says it's important to keep things in perspective yes when we see the armed militia Michigan when we see people's orders defining the please not just mayors and governors to open up their stores are open up other locations we tend to think that that's representative of the other shocked that they must all think that way and yet this polling the last two weeks last week in the United States that showed that across the Republican and democratic divide majority of Americans recognize that as a public health crisis and we have to do something about it so he's saying it's a challenging moment but not hopeless one right that is N. here's Hannah on land thank you Hannah thanks also officials in Florida say fewer than two thousand people have died from the corona virus a death toll that ranks it behind ten other states but how old governor Rhonda sentences administration is compiling its numbers is in question from Miami NPR's Greg Allen reports governor to set aside the decision to begin re opening Florida's economy this month was based on data including the declining rate of infections hospitalizations and deaths from covert nineteen at a news conference last month he listed several states with higher numbers in New York at the time the death rate was more than one hundred per one hundred thousand people in Florida is much lower it for for calories per one hundred thousand and I think part of that is because we've had a a lot of great work done with our medical professionals but some medical professionals in Florida aren't happy with how the state is counting deaths and sharing that information with the public for nearly thirty years medical examiners have been the officials in charge of tracking the number of deaths from natural disasters or diseases it began after hurricane Andrew when rumors circulated that the death toll was much higher than the official tally of sixty five Steven Nelson head of the state medical examiners commission says putting them in charge help build public confidence in the numbers every time the governor of Florida issues an executive order that deals with a natural disaster the medical examiners commission have encountered the dead take beneficial counters of the dead that changed last month when the sentiment extraction told medical examiners they could no longer released account of covert nineteen deaths to the public Florida's department of health publishes its own daily list of the numbers of people infected and the number who have died last month the Tampa Bay times reported that those numbers were often lower than the count provided by medical examiners after that story ran lawyers with the health department instructed medical examiners to stop releasing the information Nelson who's the medical examiner for three Florida counties says the lawyers told him information on the deaths was confidential and eggs AMP from Florida's expansive open records laws nobody has ever said that to list that we maintain at the state level no one has ever claims that it's confidential except now the department of health in a statement the health department says it remains dedicated to providing Floridians with transparent information regarding covert nineteen and that includes data provided by the medical examiners commission J. Wilson a professor of public health at the university of South Florida says he's seen differences among medical examiners and the criteria they use in recording a death from covert nineteen there's also I think a concern at the executive level in Florida from the beginning of this that the data could be misused that it could create panic and uncertainty which is a real concern we all have but it's not just about who controls the data they're also disagreements about which death should be counted Steven Nelson says there's a reason the numbers compiled by medical examiners are typically higher than those reported by the state health department the medical examiners commission is counting every person that dies in Florida the department of health by their own statements have said that they are not counting snowbirds they're not counting out of state visitors they're only counting people that have a in state permanent Florida residents this isn't the only area in which the Senate's administration has been criticized for lack of transparency reporters and others including democratic officials have also had to fight to get information about the numbers of cases in prisons and in long term care facilities Greg Allen NPR news Miami you're listening to.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles NPR
"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed the case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that test ng tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University conceived Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on ZK it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies the guys the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity coronavirus is somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lines and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies very interesting understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of a their diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refinance but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may I get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't Ticketmaster's primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but Nick says with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows at stadiums ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep juggling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly
"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Elsa Chang in Culver city California and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington let me ask you to take yourself back to new year's eve just think for a moment where you were who you were with what you imagined for yourself in twenty twenty safe to say none of us could have imagined the world we're living in today there are no more than one million cases of corona virus worldwide the United States leads the official tally by far more than two hundred sixty thousand confirmed cases and covert nineteen has claimed the lives of nearly seven thousand people here in America we're gonna spend some time today on how we got to this point and ask some hard questions how did we miss what was coming why were we the American public so slow to take the coronavirus seriously to grasp that it could wreck the economy our health care system our daily lives so let's walk back through what we knew and when and what officials were telling us starting with new year's eve December thirty first twenty nineteen that is the day China reported to the World Health Organization a cluster of pneumonia cases in the city of Wuhan the following week Chinese authorities identified the virus behind a cluster of mysterious illnesses in central China may involve a new strain of virus that includes sars by then dozens of people were sick here in the US the centers for disease control and prevention issued an alert told health care providers be on the lookout for respiratory symptoms in patients who had recently been to Wuhan the CDC also began work on a test for.

Elsa Chang California Mary Louise Kelly Washington United States America China World Health Organization Wuhan CDC NPR Culver official pneumonia
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"In Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Culver city California the corona virus is overwhelming more places than just big cities it's devastating rural Blaine county Idaho a community where the local hospital has just twenty five beds and like anywhere else in the country people in Blaine county are pitching in to help and here's Hannah lamb spoke with one controversial figure involved in the relief effort there his name is Eric Parker he leads one of the biggest militias in the western U. S. and he's trying to create a do it yourself FEMA in Idaho Hannah lamb is here with us now Hannah hi there so what is it exactly that Eric Parker's doing well in short he's trying to build an independent pipeline of goods and supplies in case the crisis gets worse and yeah Parker says hurricane Katrina and other disasters have taught Americans that they shouldn't be putting all their faith in FEMA so he and others have borrowed this warehouse in western Idaho they're using it as a staging ground and mobilizing volunteers to basically build their own relief network I reach Parker in a remote part of the state and it was a poor connection but here is some of what he had to say about it who have those you have you have all I just hope that we can as a state utilize our own network owns a pilot who will help our neighbors so basically I mean the message Parker is trying to send is Idaho can take care of itself Idaho can take care of itself is that is that the ideological aim of his militia so Parker's president of a group called the real three percent of Idaho and broadly speaking we're talking about a militia that's aligned with this broader movement of self described constitutional conservatives and yes they want to curb federal powers typically all these factions get lumped together under one umbrella label anti government extremists but in reality there are a lot of differences in some new ones among them and in this world Eric Parker is a star I mean just a few years ago he face federal trials related to an armed standoff with the government to Nevada prosecutors in court painted him as a domestic terrorist but he beat the most serious charges and today he's part of this effort kind of mainstream the militia movement his group is registered as a nonprofit corporation he's running for state Senate as a Republican and now he's trying to show that his group is also ready to step in and play the role play a role in disaster relief as well you mentioned he's running for state Senate how does all of these other efforts play into his political ambitions well I mean Parker does live in Blaine county he didn't have access to testing but like much of the county his family was sick for weeks with symptoms consistent with covert nineteen they're still getting over it so it's not like he's inserting himself in a crisis it's at his doorstep but all that being said yes he is running for office yes he's trying to remake the scary image of the militia movement and suddenly with a pandemic some of the activities that once raised eyebrows are now more broadly accepted or maybe even look like common sense you know now there is a a national conversation about stockpiling food and supplies and national conversation about whether stay at home home orders violate the constitution and where exactly that line is between public health measures and civil liberties I saw that last week Idaho's governor Brad little who's a Republican issue to stay at home order what is Parker make of that well Parker says he gets it it's an unusual crisis that requires an unusual response at the same time this is where it gets thorny for someone who's positioning himself as both relief worker and constitutional watchdog so he says the governor's order is justifiable but what is enforcement look like a citation is it people getting hauled off to jail and here's what here's what he said about that portent that we realized that the constitutional violations as long as you do not escalate and violence and force are otherwise walk the distance is a legal issue that is NPR's Hannah lamb thank you Hannah thank you some one hundred twenty five thousand retirees call the villagers home it's a sprawling community just northwest of Orlando like much of Florida they were not quick there to heed the CDC's recommendations for social distancing slow the spread of the corona virus now they are say residents Ian and Elena stone they moved to the villages fifteen years ago well right now it is probably the safest place to be because we're following safe practices here I'm gonna put my wife on hold on hello it's definitely not the league here yes in the beginning nobody followed rules people are listening to pull my clothes and our three new six squares but they went in the square anyway in but their own music and they dance they're able to hear how the stones and everybody else in the villages are coping in this era of corona virus we're joined by many to Minton editor of villages news that is an independent paper that covers the community welcome welcome thank you so I know just today the governor of Florida Ron DeSantis issued a stay at home order for the whole state that's going to take effect at midnight Thursday so I know that that will likely change things just up until now take us through today how much his day to day life in the villages changed or they're still out there dancing what if it's changed quite a bit over time because things keep tightening up and people are having less and less to do this is a community where people it's fun for it for vality and eat drink and be merry and is slowly everything's chipped away from that they can't go to the squares the last thing they can do they can play golf and pickleball but the swimming pools are close the dog parks are closed and there's less and less to do every day when Rhonda Sanders the governor came out at one o'clock today and announced this in a shelter home order the million dollar question now is how does that impact in fact impact me today hello we're waiting on some information from some of our local officials to rule on that end this million dollar question as of an hour ago everybody's in a grocery store buy more supplies let me ask how people are doing from a health perspective the population there skews older almost eighty percent of the people who live in the villages are over sixty five according to the census bureau do we know how many people have been tested for covered nineteen we've we've had some independent testing going on by UF health which is with the university of Florida they've tested two thousand two hundred and eighty people so far twenty three have tested positive growth in the number of the villages a little bit more difficult because it covers three different counties right now we have forty three villagers who have tested positive for covert nineteen though and we had anticipate that there will be more I saw also they have managed to set up drive through testing for residents yes that was the that was with the US health and people here if you've ever been to the villages it's golf cart community so they were able to drive through in their golf carts tested so it's kind of a unique unique situation here so as you talk to people who live there how worried are they what are they worried about what are the main.

Washington Elsa Chang California Blaine county Culver Blaine county Idaho
"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:20 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Elsa Chang and I'm ari Shapiro a two trillion dollar economic relief package has already sailed through the Senate and now the house is poised to pass it to but will another rescue package be needed soon after we got to see how things turn out over the next two three months before next termination about quickly to the next also as the corona virus continues to spread its genetic makeup keeps changing yes viruses are mutating it doesn't mean that they're gonna become more virulent or more deadly and federal prosecutors charged Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro with drug trafficking first the newscast live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the White House coronavirus task force will present president trump with a range of options for potential new social distancing guidelines ahead of next week as NPR's each Roscoe reports the initial guidelines were set to last through Monday president trump says he's helping to get Americans back to work soon he sent a letter to governor saying that the administration would assess the risk for corona virus on a county by county basis Dr Deborah Berks is helping to lead the government's response she offered no timeline for these risk assessments what we have to get all of our data together we owe it to the president and we owe it to the president to be able to make that decision so that's what we're working on right now on Thursday the number of people with the virus in the U. S. are past cases in China for the first time even with that being so Burke said there are nineteen states that have less than two hundred reported cases of coronavirus Asia Rasco MPR news house speaker Nancy Pelosi says she expects quick approval of the massive two point two trillion dollar coronavirus economic relief bill by the house Senate lawmakers unanimously passed the measure it late yesterday it boosts jobless benefits send checks to millions of Americans and helps to backstop some businesses New York City has seen its case numbers explode with many businesses they're closed cupboard nineteen deaths in the U. S. have now topped twelve hundred more than a quarter of those occurring in New York state Washington state governor Jay Inslee is expressing guarded optimism about the state's efforts to slow the spread of the corona virus here's NPR's Martin costing social distancing measures have been in place here now for about two weeks and governor Inslee says he's starting to see the results of the state's infection rate it's a small reduction of the rate of increase but it is a glimmer of hope this is suggestive that some of the things we're doing together is having some very modest improvement but Inslee cautions that it's way too early to declare three the latest university of Washington statistical modeling projects at the peak of the wave of patience will hit here around three weeks from now and the state may have only barely enough medical resources to handle it and that's assuming the rate of infection doesn't go up again Martin Pasti NPR news Seattle despite the corona virus the U. S. space force went ahead with its first launch today as Jennifer glasse reports from new Smyrna beach Florida today's liftoff was deemed a mission essential the first mission of the U. S. space force didn't quite go off without a hitch the first launch was polished forty six seconds before lift off because of a hydraulics issue but just over an hour later the problem was solved and the atlas five rocket carrying a strategic communication satellite took off from Cape Canaveral spaceport officials say it's headed for a high energy geostationary transfer orbit reporter Jennifer glass stocks marched higher putting the market back on track for its first three day rally in six weeks the Dow was up thirteen hundred and fifty one points today you're listening to NPR news in Washington then from the David Barnett foundation news room this is Casey R. W. I'm Larry Perella Thursday March twenty sixth here's what's happening at five oh four the U. S. Forest Service is shutting down all campgrounds day use sites and picnic areas in southern California to slow the spread of the corona virus as KCRW's Catherine Barnes reports that means the weekend trip you had in mind may need to get postponed the closures are meant to dissuade groups of people from gathering in the same outdoor areas Forest Service officials want to prevent instances like we saw last weekend when crowds descended on beaches hiking trails and peers the closures include popular camping and recreation sites like the mount Baldy visitor center in the Angeles National Forest in Kerr creek campground in Los Padres National Forest in Big Sur trail heads trails and dispersed sites in the back country remain open but Rangers strongly encourage people to practice social distancing and pack everything out if the Forest Service finds those areas are becoming dumping grounds or inundated with day a hikers they say they may need to shut them down as well and violators could face a five thousand dollar fine six months in jail or perhaps both well just before the corona virus pandemic struck the city of LA had tried to bring part of its underground economy into the light street vendors have long sold food and merchandise illegally in the city but the only city council voted to change the rules and many folks started applying for licenses but that program has now come to a halt and city authorities are now cracking down on vendors trying to get them off the streets out of fear they could spread covered nineteen in dense urban neighborhoods that's made life difficult for people like Sophia an undocumented immigrant who sell stacks and LA macarthur park neighborhood no and then someone says they aren't letting a cell she said they don't know why that that all they're trying to do is work and says they're not doing anything bad she says people like her or in a bind because they can't expect government to help during the coronavirus crisis she says she plans to keep trying to sell by avoiding the authorities support for NPR comes from progressive insurance with the name your price tool offering a range of coverage and press options to choose from now that's progressive more at progressive dot com or at one eight hundred progressive the cloudy skies tonight breezy as well we'll get to just a slight chance of maybe a shower and thunderstorms as well that would be kind of cool should clear out of the way by a midnight Los tonight forties and fifties sunny continued windy tomorrow with highs mostly in the sixties from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro at my home studio in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Culver city California a state that now has more than three thousand cases of Kobe nineteen a quarter.

Elsa Chang Senate ari Shapiro
"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"elsa chang" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR news I'm Elsa Chang and I Mary Louise Kelley some news tonight NPR has learned that one of the key figures in the impeachment drama ambassador Maria von of which is retiring from the foreign service she was the ambassador to Ukraine until last spring when she was ousted following a disinformation campaign by the president's private lawyer Ivanovic test apart testified before Congress about the moment that she got a call from Washington telling her come home they were concerned about my security and I needed to come home right away if one of its remained on the state department payroll teaching at Georgetown University but sources say she is now retired and your diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen and I have both been reporting out this story and it shows in the studio with us now Hey there hi there alright so let's walk through the details we know I have confirmed that she retired so not resigned but this is months before her current assignment was set to end well she was at Georgetown so this wasn't an ambassadorship that she had and she has been telling colleagues that she would be retiring soon she's been the ambassador and ambassador three times appointed by both democratic and Republican presidents she was a very powerful voice in that impeachment hearing describing how her last post in Ukraine ended when I returned to the United States deputy secretary of state Solomon told me there had been a concerted campaign against me that the president no longer wished me to serve as ambassador to Ukraine and that in fact the president had been pushing for my removal since the prior summer and she felt that she was pushed out because of business interests of private individuals it was a very powerful appearance but perhaps not the way someone like that a non partisan career diplomat would have wanted to go out to access the outlook the follow up on that time line you thought of it she said she felt she had been under pressure since twenty eighteen and we have been learning more lately about that pressure campaign yeah right left harness he's the indicted associate of trump's private lawyer has audio from a dinner in twenty eighteen you can hear him telling president trump that your vantage was bad now the name saying he was going to be impeached and trump said he wanted her out get rid of her rate.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelley NPR Ukraine president Congress Washington Georgetown University Michele Kelemen Georgetown deputy secretary Solomon trump Ivanovic United States
Dow ends worst week since 2008 financial crisis; Nasdaq closes in bear market

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 4 years ago

Dow ends worst week since 2008 financial crisis; Nasdaq closes in bear market

"The cotton monument. It commemorates a massacre of polish people by the Soviet Union during World War Two. But Jersey City mayor Steven Fulop had hoped to relocated as part of renovation of the city plaza. Now, it is now the case that Phillips announcement didn't go over. Well, and the statute will stay word is community. Outrage has one out the city council voted this morning to leave it at exchange place in perpetuity tonight. We have a forty percent chance of showers mostly before nine o'clock lows around forty five degrees. Currently, it's fifty seven degrees. It's foggy in central park at five. Oh, six. Support for NPR comes from Annapurna pictures with vice starring Christian bale, Amy Adams, Steve corral Sam Rockwell in Tyler Perry. A behind the scenes look at American power based on a true story in theaters everywhere. Christmas day. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang. And Mary Louise Kelley majority leader Mitch McConnell says he is distressed Nebraska Republican Vince asked calls it a sad day for America. And Chris Murphy, Connecticut Democrat describes it as a national security crisis. All senators all talking about the resignation of secretary of defense, Jim Mattis. I am joined now by another Senator Tim Kaine democrat of Virginia Cain sits on the Armed Services Committee, which will have to confirm whoever is nominated to succeed. Mattis Senator Kaine welcome. Could it be on the show? Thanks so much. I gather you're not happy about secretary Mattis impending departure either. No, look, I've been in public life for twenty five years. I'm an armed services member from a state. That's connected to the military. I have a son in the Marine Corps secretary Mattis has one of the best public servants. I've worked with in my career and his resignation, and especially the asserted reasons for the resignation should 'cause every American to be really really worried. Although was this inevitable Madison self in the resignation letter that I soon you're referring to there. He said the president deserves a Defense Secretary who shares his vision of the world, I think that's very diplomatically put. But if you look at the letter, basically, what secretary Mattis says is this that the two pillars of American security that are constant. And this is a guy who spent more than four decades providing security is a marine is one building strong alliances among democracies and second standing up. To thorough -tarian adversaries, and he basically said Mr President on these two values you and I disagree, and we've certainly seen in a president who undercuts allies at many opportunities using national security waivers to punish Canada and Europe, for example, and then cosies up to a thorough Teheran's such as Russia and and Kim Jong Hoon in North Korea. And that reason asserted by secretary Mattis is very very troubling. Have you talked to him if you talk to dramatically? I have not talked to him since the announcement. The announcement set off a firestorm now leave news, but ambassadors of European and other allies reaching out to Senator saying sort of what's going on announcements this week about Syrian Afghanistan, obviously, causing huge concerns among allies who were side by side with us. In those theaters. I mentioned it's your committee armed services that will have to vote on whoever is named to succeed him. Who would you like to see? You know, it's too early to say that there's a person that I'd like to see, but I want somebody who will be willing to stand up and speak truth to power one of the challenges. And this administration is those who do general McMaster, the national security advisor and secretary Mattis, they get pushed aside, but we need people who are experienced who will look the president in the eye and and speak truth. And if the president can handle it he can't handle it. But I don't want an enabler. There's been too many neighbors around this president and the first two years like bobbleheads saying yes to everything, and that's not what this country needs right now changing gears. We're speaking to you from Capitol Hill. Are you all making any progress on a voiding a government shutdown at stroke of midnight? Well, we had a bipartisan deal just two days ago passed the Senate unanimously with the blessing of the White House, but the president yesterday decided to do a one eighty and say he now if you can't get five billion hill shutdown government and punish eight hundred thousand plus federal employees. Who would not get as long as there's a shutdown? Yeah. I heard you on Sarah calling him the Grinch about to steal Christmas, which I will give you credit. It's a good line. But subsidies. Senator or else? Well, thousands of people who are going to have to work without being paid over the holidays. You're you're absolutely right. And that was what we did when we gave them a bipartisan deal less than forty eight hours ago that he agreed to I know. But here we are society afternoon. So what happens? Well, what's going on? Right now is the vice president, Jared, Kushner, and Mick Mulvaney. The new chief of staff were up talking to Senator Schumer, and we're seeing reports out of that meeting that there may be an announcement soon about a path forward possibly a deal. I understand those administration officials went over to talk to speaker Ryan. So this is very much kind of a work in progress right now, no reason to shut the government down. Absolutely. None just a few seconds left. But, but we're also hearing from Shimer's office, and they're saying that this deal would involve funding for border security, but not the wall would you vote for that? I voted for it many many times comprehensive immigration reform and twenty thirteen head border security money. We offered the president deal in February with border security money. He turned it down border security is something that we all support. All right. Thank you so much Senator. Alright thanks much Virginia. Democrat Tim Kaine and we are talking with other Republicans elsewhere on the show. I interview Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg had surgery today for early stage lung cancer the odds for a full recovery from the disease at that stage have dramatically improved in recent years. That said this is the eighty five year old liberal

Jim Mattis Secretary President Trump Senator Senator Kaine Senator Tim Kaine Senator James Lankford Jersey City Soviet Union Steven Fulop NPR Vice President Senator Schumer City Council Phillips Madison
U.S. cuts millions in funding for UN agency that helps Palestinian refugees

All Things Considered

04:42 min | 4 years ago

U.S. cuts millions in funding for UN agency that helps Palestinian refugees

"The Trump administration is. Cutting US aid to Palestinian refugees it will. No longer give money to the United Nations for services in refugee camps that have existed for decades the services. Range from schools to healthcare to garbage collection, this is just the latest White House move shaking up longstanding policy. In the Middle, East and taking a more pro Israel stance NPR's Daniel estrin joins us from Jerusalem to walk us through this Hai Daniel hiring this aid has a long history what was it meant. For this. Is money that's gone to a special u. n. agency devoted to Palestinian refugees it's called the UN relief and Works Agency and it runs all kinds of basic services in Palestinian refugee camps as you mentioned these are camps that, have been around for about seventy. Years when Israel was founded Palestinians fled or were driven out of lands that, became the state of Israel and these refugee camps the today, they're more like like urban slums They're, in the West Bank. In Gaza but they're also in countries like Jordan Syria. Lebanon and the refugee issue is one of the Palestinians core demands they demand the right of return for refugees. Go back to what is today Israel and Israel says. That would spell out the end of the country as a Jewish state now until this year the US has been the largest single donor to the Palestinian refugees and the idea has been that until. A solution to the refugee question comes that. Would be solved in peace talks so what reason does the Trump administration gift for cutting this funding well the. US has had a lot of criticism of, this UN agency and so have Isreaeli leaders is Israel has said. That the UN, is perpetuating the refugee problem rather than rehabilitating it and here the State Department today is saying it wants other countries to pitch in to cover costs it says this agency is quote. Irredeemably flawed, and the US ambassador to the The. UN Nikki Haley spoke about this recently, here's what she said first of all, you're, looking, at the fact that yes there's an endless number of refugees. That continue to get assistance but more importantly. The Palestinians continue to bash America. So two points there she's saying you know there are these third and fourth generations of Palestinians. Descendants, of refugees there, themselves considered refugees Israel says you know that perpetuates this false hope. That millions of Palestinians would one day return to Israel although it has been a common way of dealing with refugee. Situations in the world it's not just the Palestinians the UN has? Given, help to refugees and their descendants as long as they're refugees and then the other thing that Haley said there is something we've heard a lot from this administration which is Palestinians not. Showing respect to the US and what has the reaction been from Palestinians to this move by the. Trump administration yeah Palestinian officials said Eric hot, today is calling this totally unacceptable Well. He says the US is acting. According to the whims. Of Israel Prime, Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leaders, have, seen this coming they think it's part of the Trump administration's, attempt to undermine, the core Palestinian positions one by. One I to Roussillon. When Trump, recognize Jerusalem, as Israel's capital even though Palestinians demand part of, that city and. Now this demand for. Palestinian refugees, to return to today's Israel that's what Palestinians demand but they see Trump is trying to undermine. That what effect you expect these cuts to have on the Palestinian people well this. Is this is money that. Has gone to help feed needy Palestinians it's helps run schools and clinics at the. Moment money is being raised from other sources to recoup what the US hasn't given this year but, the UN says, for instance they only have enough. Money to run their schools for refugees for about a month and there are other? Concerns, including by people in the Israeli defense community that these cuts Could create instability if you don't have basic services and because of. These funding cuts and, remember this, comes just a week after the US cut money for development projects and humanitarian aid. In the Palestinian territories NPR's Daniel estrin speaking with us from Jerusalem thank you you're welcome

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Paul Taylor, giant of modern dance, dead at 88

All Things Considered

00:32 sec | 4 years ago

Paul Taylor, giant of modern dance, dead at 88

"Now to remember one of the most prolific and influential figures in the world of modern dance Paul Taylor the movements he created on stage were inspired, by, everyday, people doing everyday things. And that, includes people, doing nothing. At all. His approach. Turn audiences away at first but he eventually turn them around with dances he created for. The company he founded these were works that were. Eventually adopted by other dance companies around the world Paul Taylor died of renal failure yesterday in Manhattan at the age of eighty eight

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Louis C. K., Melinda Hill and New York discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:13 sec | 4 years ago

Louis C. K., Melinda Hill and New York discussed on All Things Considered

"And I'm Ari Shapiro disgraced comedian Louis c. k. made a surprise appearance, at a comedy club in New York on, Sunday night he'd been a powerhouse in the comedy world until last November when the New York Times reported on allegations of sexual. Misconduct

Louis C. K. Melinda Hill New York Louis C Louis C. Elizabeth Blair New York Times Melinda Hills NPR Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Allergy Arman Dworman Nathan Lewis Lucy Que Dormann
UN Report: Myanmar Generals Must Face Justice

All Things Considered

03:29 min | 4 years ago

UN Report: Myanmar Generals Must Face Justice

"UN human rights investigators say they think. Top generals in Myanmar should be tried for genocide the investigators are calling on the UN Security Council to move swiftly and get. The international criminal court involved there report goes into details about the atrocities carried out against, Rohingya Muslims in an ethnic cleansing campaign that began a year ago NPR's Michele Keleman reports the UN human rights experts poured over satellite imagery videos and photographs and interviewed, eight hundred seventy five people to. Come to their conclusion that the military had. Genocidal intent when it carried out attacks against Rohingya Muslims in March kind state they, call it a human. Rights, catastrophe with, widespread sexual violence and mass killings one of the authors Christopher Doty says six top. Generals should be prosecuted? For genocide war crimes and crimes again Humanity there is no doubt in our. Minds whatsoever the what we. Saw happen in, real time as a whole would not have happened, without firstly being within the knowledge of the senior military leadership. And Secondly under their effective control and it's because of the clarity of the China of command in may. And Ma that we have recommended the investigation and prosecution of these six investigators also say that the civilian government led by angst. Onto Chee has blocked investigations here's another panel member Rediker kumarisami we just feel that the, Nobel prize winner has such moral authority perhaps you should act the US has been waiting for that to according to Akshay Kumar of Human Rights Watch there's been an, effort in Washington to really tread. Softly and try to give her the space. To let do the right thing unfortunately she just hasn't human rights experts have been, raising concerns about the. Face Eight of Muslim Rohingya and other minorities in Myanmar for decades last year after rebels attacked police stations the military stepped up a brutal campaign against. The Roe hang up hundreds of. Thousands have since fled to neighboring Bangladesh the UN Security Council is. Expected to discuss this. Tuesday but Kumar who follows the UN for Human Rights Watch is not expecting much it. Doesn't look like they're going to take any action after this meeting it might just be one of those sections for people talk. A, good game but don't follow things up and that's what we're really seeking Groups I want the UN Security Council, to impose sanctions on top generals in. Myanmar and stop arms sales to the. Country Daniel Sullivan of another advocacy group refugees international also wants to see the Trump administration speak up what, really has been lacking. Is further measures of targeted sanctions referral to the international criminal court or really at, the ten day right at the base is a lack of leadership from the top I mean this is one of the worst crimes we've seen in. Our generation and we haven't heard anything, from from the president we don't feel that leadership in pressure from. The United States and that's been really disappointing so. Far the US has stopped short of Colleen Nisa genocide, and the State Department has not yet released its own report on the mass. Exodus of row Hindu Muslims from Myanmar the treasury department has imposed some. Targeted sanctions on four military and border guard commanders but not on all the, top generals that the UN. Human rights experts say should be Tried for

UN Un Security Council Myanmar Akshay Kumar United States NPR Joshua Johnson State Department Michele Keleman Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro China Daniel Sullivan Bangladesh MA Christopher Doty Colleen Nisa Treasury Department