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Fresh "Elsa" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

05:13 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Elsa" from All Things Considered

"A chance of rain low around 70 degrees, currently 82 degrees in Central Park. Support for NPR comes from HBO. Presenting Welcome to Chechnya, a documentary about a group of activists confronting anti LGBTQ You persecution in Chechnya now streaming on HBO and HBO, Max. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington $1.6 billion to a company to manufacture a vaccine for the Corona virus. The federal government announced that today along with another $450 million to a company to produce a new therapy for covert 19 But neither company actually has a product that has been shown to work not to treat covert 19 nor to prevent it here to help explain why the government is doing such a thing is NPR science correspondent Joe Palka, Joe Hi, Mary Louise. So, So why? Why is the government spending all this money when it sounds quite possible? They may be throwing that money right down the train. Yeah, well, it's it's a conundrum. But here's the thing. Let's say that Regeneron, which is making the treatment, it works, or Novavax, which is making the vaccine says, Yeah, we tested. It's working great. Okay. What do you do? Well, we We don't have any to give to you. We only made enough to test No, that's not gonna work. So what they've done is they're saying, Okay, look, we have to do what's called at risk manufacturing. We have to assume it's gonna work. Make it have it ready to go out the door in the hopes that the testing will show that it actually does work. The from the Department of optimism and Hedging your bets. It sounds like okay, Well, let's talk about both of them. Yeah, the treatment start there. What is it? How's it work? Why does the government think this is the one that they should be investing in? Well, I mean, they're investing in several. This one, in particular is with the Regeneron. The company is they've had a good track record. They made a successful drug for Ebola. Their drug is based on something called antibodies. You remember when someone gets infected their body makes molecules called antibodies, which fight off the disease. Regeneron finds one or two of these potent antibodies and turned purifies them turns them into drug and makes them into a synthetic product. It's actually in this case, a cocktail of to Of two different antibodies. Have you actually tested this on anybody yet? Yep, there they have done preliminary testing and 30 patients look good. They're going forward there going to be doing 3000 sick people, some in hospital. Some not in hospital with covert, and they're actually also testing people who are simply exposed to someone else who's got the covert virus covert 19 virus to see if it'll prevent them from getting infected. Speaking of prevention, Let me flip you to the other matter here. The vaccine. What? What One is the government picking two back? Well, they backed actually several this, but this is the no of expect scene. It's been through initial testing also, and the money is so that they could make millions hundreds of millions of doses and actually have syringes filled, ready to go. And as I said, this isn't the only vaccine that's being supportive. There's five or so but a CZ. We said at the top, the government is hedging its bets. And and all of these vaccines are trying to do essentially the same thing. They're like they show the immune system, something that looks like a virus. What is essentially harmless and the ideas that that will primary immune system so that they'll be ready if the real virus ever comes along, But each of the companies uses a slightly different approach to get the immune system ready. And some of them use a viral vector and some of the use of iris, genetic genetic material and nova of excuses, actually, bits of protein that our representative of what the Virus shows when it infect somebody now, what's interesting? A little scary is that although Novavax has several vaccines in development, including a flu vaccine They haven't yet produced a vaccine that's been approved for general use by the FDA. So you know what you were saying. It's the Department of Optimism. Yeah, I think we can call it that optimism is called for. Thank you, Joe. You're welcome. NPR's Joe Palka. George Floyd's killing by the police has sparked a national movement to reimagine policing. It's opening up new debates in cities large and small and rattling the political status quo, including in San Jose, California. A nation's 10th biggest city has one of the smallest police forces for a metro area of its size. The call there to rethink policing is growing louder. But as NPR's Eric Westervelt reports, there is stiff political resistance. In the heart of Silicon Valley. San Jose likes to see itself is open it narrative and progressive. But during recent protests following George Floyd's killing the San Jose Police reacted with what many called old school excessive force. Warnings devolved into a Malay, complete with rubber bullets and beatings. Several protesters were badly injured by rubber bullets..

Federal Government Regeneron NPR Joe Palka Department Of Optimism Chechnya San Jose HBO Mary Louise Kelly George Floyd Central Park Flu Vaccine Elsa Chang Washington San Jose Police Novavax Los Angeles
Millions displaced and starving to death in Yemen

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Millions displaced and starving to death in Yemen

"Pre publication review process had decided otherwise the book titled The Room where it happened. A White House memoir, which is set to be released on Tuesday, by Simon and Schuster has been the subject of a lengthy battle between Bolton and the White House. In the Book Bolton describes every trump decision as being guided by consent for his own reelection. A claim that evokes the scandal that sparks trump's impeachment last year. When Jamile Elsa boot and his family were told by a Yemeni agency to self isolate to stop the spread of Corona virus. He knew he would not heed the advice. For the forty year, old father of ten uprooted by civil war and living in a tent on a hillside above the southwestern city of today's staying home means giving up on life. The covid nineteen. has exposed inequalities around the world with low income workers from Bogota to London this week risking their health by returning to work in countries, easing lockdowns while wealthier people stay home. In impoverished Yemen. Where the pandemic is now taking hold, millions of displaced people face an even bleaker choice, head out and risk infection, or stay home and go hungry. We are scared of Corona virus, but we can't stay at the camp as we do not have enough food even for one day. Staying here means starving, said SA- boot. The arrival of the pandemic added to afflictions, already facing the Arab world's poorest nation, including widespread hunger and a

White House Bolton Yemen SA Schuster Simon Bogota London
The trouble with embryos

Science Friction

06:43 min | 3 weeks ago

The trouble with embryos

"Welcome to science fiction. Years coming to you from the Home Studio Bunker, still. Can't seem to get the doves and waterbirds to be quite when I need them to be, but look in today's show. It's a wild story about biology ethics, politics and to millionaires on a personal mission that went horribly. Why would on the case is reported John Lee? Who joins me for this show? Hi Natasha Yeah. This starts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one with Mario and elsevier. They would to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together, but they were an older couple. Yeah, that's right also was forty and Mario was fifty seven, and they couldn't do it on their own. So in one thousand, nine, hundred one. They decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing in fertilize. Fertilize Ation Ivf I mean today creating a baby using his totally commonplace, and it's a big industry over familiar. But this was the early eighties when the technology and the science was so new that this just was we'd this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of a woman's womb, and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds. The moment of conception. An event that has taken place in its natural environment, the womb since the doing of human existence. Now it comes in gloss. And with a host of problems, moral, ethical and legal. So Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV. If that when the real couple come here, the techniques still very much being Susta, this is experimental stuff. Yeah, and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab, Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University, but back then he was the clinical. Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. was very difficult to Queen Victoria hospitals over General Hospital and everyone sort that. Is Just a phase. He wasn't going to work. It wasn't a last and we wasting. Everybody's time. When we started doing collections. We have to me. Natural Song goes on spontaneous relation, so it's not unusual to have to collect exit to I. Am for am six I am. So we had a lot of opposition. All IV of treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method, which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg. She created every month. If they collected at the right time, it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo. If they time too late, they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature. Mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here of actually getting a baby out of IV, if treatment would have been extremely low when the Rayo says rock up in Australia yet, but a talented trio at the Queen. Victoria, hospital was changing all of that, and they were about to put Australia. In the history books so I wanted to do the IV. If in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to utilize. Methods developed in animals, scientists Alan, trounson originally trained as a bit and he was to the hospital by IVF. Pioneer cal would car would he allowed me to work with John? Laden to develop a totally different system, which was using fertility drugs to stimulate than women, so we could get more eggs and hence more embryos. Well what happened is is that actually worked? It was the system that actually work. It was a huge leap forward. They found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time and freeze them, and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is, but every stage in artificial production is still precarious. So in those early days, a significant proportion of those embers just were lost in the phrasing. Prices will only about thirteen percent five treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent, but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for Wannabe Parents Alan Trounson. An iphone they could cope with disappointment. Absolutely, you know very well essentially because. They understood. This was a very early in in terms of the research, so the chances of getting outcomes would very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods with using John in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the Heck did you do? Do that. Okay, so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jane. They land in Australia headed. Elsa Riaz respond to treatment will Gab Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story, but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea. Just Shiva's is trashed and she spoke. In Mississippi we didn't look very well off. You ever probably struggling to spend the money to Florida squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight foods relatively much more than what they are now and with quality deal to come over here and leave over here. We felt sorry for him and most secretary always. suggestively discounted faithful porpoises Riaz who've had no idea that they were quite wealthy. He Remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with, but she had good reason to be all. She was very strong that a terrible history. I'll guess you've gone through Easter beforehand and they've were pretty strengthening to fly over here. They had one child who they'd lost. He was murdered. I think or an accident. Remember the D. Tough, and that's why they're really chained to have another child and off. If they're only hype, that's why to throw you. Both Mario and L.. Serena's had had children with previous partners, but they'd been a tragedy. Else's ten year old daughter had only recently died should been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that he's absolutely horrific are so that means that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process. That's right. There was, but the process started well. Three embryos were created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm, so they had three chances of success. And I don't think we did about eleven o'clock midnight on a Saturday evening and she was very dramatic. Everything was sound. What's the drama? So she would her ex collected to street is beforehand a fertilize, and they would have developed and. Would have chosen the best probably wanting to Australian bureaus back, which would then be tempted to be

Australia Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital John Lee Elsa Riaz Mario Alan Trounson Natasha Yeah Elsevier Monash University Los Angeles Victoria Laden Director Jane Mississippi Serena
Texas appeals court backs expanding mail-in voting to those fearful of coronavirus

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:47 sec | Last month

Texas appeals court backs expanding mail-in voting to those fearful of coronavirus

"Just a day after a state appeals court ruled in favor of all Texans having the right to vote by mail during the pandemic Texas Democrats are in federal court making a similar argument K. R. Lees Austin bureau chief Chris fox has more in a federal court in San Antonio Texas Democrats argued that all Texans fearful of contracting covert nineteen should have the right to vote by mail Texas Democratic Party chair Gilbertine Elsa lines will be long the number of polling places will be less and the time to hold will take much longer increasing the possibility that a voter will subject themselves to this deadly disease on Wednesday Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton petitioned the state Supreme Court to get involved now Paxton's also asking the Supreme Court to block Thursday's appeals court decision

Chris Fox Ken Paxton Supreme Court Texas K. R. Lees Austin Bureau Chief San Antonio Texas Democratic Party Gilbertine Elsa Attorney
A Little Hack To Make Amazing Ads That Convert

Marketing Secrets

05:00 min | Last month

A Little Hack To Make Amazing Ads That Convert

"Alright. So we've seen our spent a Lotta Times creating ads and thinking about like what's the ad hoc where we can get someone's attention and The other day I was swiping through instagram or something and I try attention. What are the things? Get me to stop right where things I read. Look at him. I was looking different things. And that's sort of like a watch. My kids my kids. They're really big into all these. These things that are satisfying will satisfying. This is the thing so satisfying like these weird art things with slime sand or with shredding metal in a metal shredder. Like all these crazy things and I was like Oh man. What if we did these different things and tournament ads right and the other day so I was when instagram search and start searching for like cool art or satisfying or slime or is type in keywords and I started seeing all these different cool art things And I started disliking a bunch of like falling their pages of steps. Then start showing up on my feet and now it's my newsfeed are seeing all these cool crazy aren't things that people do right by drying and All sorts of things but the other day I saw one that caught my attention I watched for men probably a minute straight and it was this guy and he does pancake art and so the cameras above this pancake and he's drawing this pitcher and you're seeing it. It's pretty cool. And then we gets done. He takes it and flips it over and as soon as he flips over pancake you see the finished pancake and now. I watched that I went to watch like probably ten or fifteen of them. My kids and it was so cool. You kinda like always drawing. Elsa is drying whatever sees everything's until he flips the pancake over your exactly what it is and he flips it over and the details looks amazing and It says like Oh my gosh. Look how much this sucked into the into watching this and I watched so many kids them I was like how can I get this to become an ad and I was like a pancake on my face? That's annoying no one wants to see pancake my face on what can you do? What can I do and I was like what if I haven't the pancake of the the book covers of dotcom secrets. Expert Secrets Traffic Secrets and say emailed the the guys on the channel as they. Hey how much it would cost for me to have you. Pancake art my books and it was a couple of hundred bucks per book. It was not not that expensive wired the money and just today I got back three pancake. That were flipped over. Then doing my book and flipping over and they turned out so cool. They're amazing nominate goes tournament a little ads. Youtube ads facebook ads. Instagram is budget variations. Because look at come back to to step number one right. We talk a lot about like Hook Story. Offer hoax story off the hook grabs attention and the story and then the offers. I figure the pancakes the hook right. You're like what does he drawing the boom over while the watching that can tell the story of what's happening with what he's doing why wrote book flips over. It's done and then make the offer from you'll get free copy of the book so I have no idea now if the ads can work if it's not gonNA work because it'd be successful or not successful but I do notice to get hook and it's GonNa be really fun and I'm excited to test it out Especially look at some of the ADS. We make we spend tons of my just my phone but you never know what the hooks going to be the grab. Someone's attention so for a couple hundred bucks to test it. It's it's really exciting so I'm excited for that started. After that I started looking into clean Mesa Google or finding claymation and I've message probably ten different claymation. Artists are making claymation ads and stuff like that. So it's just fun new things. You brought up when he goes to start going to instagram and facebook. Reverend started looking at art but the arts the cool designers look at People. That are doodling sketching. That are doing just whatever. Or they're creating things their hands like just any kind of art that that grabs. Your attention are falling over channels. You can in the more towns you follow them all the moral chopin. Your search results please are seeing all these have been cool cool things and then go reach out to the creators is Hey. Dot added created the image. That was amazing. Pay You whatever. Have you Chris on that for for me my company and like I said for us the pancake art? It was a couple hundred bucks per per book covering the turnout socal and who knows that could be the AD. That's the one that blows up. It's funny because I remember Folks are GONNA work a couple years ago. We had the harm brothers. Do our very first video with them. In turn amazing we loved it. We spent tons of energy and money. We just big launch with big bubble soccer also stuff in the did good he got on a million or so views and it was good And then like a week later Chris. Record Wrap Sunny D. rappers. Quick Funnels Rep and he just made it as as a joke. Essential get red and that and that video actually got more impressions. More views and more cells. Click funnels in this one. We'd spent hundreds of thousands of dollars creating so you never know what the hooks going to be created tons of hooks and try thing after thing after thing after thing just trying to think this is really fun unique way so for my side time embarrassing around like what I'm doing now is looking for artists. Who create little things that you a quick thirty second grab their tension just to tell your story and and and do the next thing

Instagram Chris Soccer Youtube Elsa Socal Facebook DOT
"elsa" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

14:52 min | 2 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Complicated understatement on the codes which podcast from NPR we dive right into that complexity to try to make sense of some of the biggest thorniest issues in our society because race shapes our families and friendships and power and politics and sex and money music so come up with US subscribe to the coast which podcast on NPR one. Or wherever you get your podcast. An we're back. I have a question which is how do you think being a black woman has impacted your perspective on this work and the spaces that you occupy doing it. I think it means that when I do this work. I have to unpack my identity as a black woman. I have to acknowledge the privilege that I have Which is why I'm able to do this work in the first place Organizing for free. Most of the time Have that privilege that I can do that. But also unpacking the wrestling entities. I'm an immigrant from Ethiopia moved here when I was two and a half with my family. I'm first nation Ethiopia and Eritrea. Are they deal with worsening worst droughts because of climate change and so? I can see my family's struggle hair but then the United States I have some kind of privileged because of like my economic status and how my family has been able to raise me And so just even like just in those tweet enemies themselves. I just have to unpack them and when I do work in the climate spaces recognizing that there's only in the in the climate space I might see like maybe ten other faces that look like me and so me being there I'm automatically you automatically representing communities that. Look like me Even though I can't speak for everybody It it just means that this is more personal for me and that I not doing this to be cute My communities are on the line And so it's just more personal. We've won a reference episodes being the only black face and a white space and the way that you have to navigate that Just even like a basic work setting and I think for something so big. How are you navigating? How are you navigating that? And are there black elders in the community that you can like give you advice on how to deal with the just the bureaucracy of like yes including activism? Yes so when I first started this activism and I was. I would just hear T- about these different organizations an anti-black okay. Cool not working. They're not working with them and I would just hear stuff I'm like. Oh wow like the environmental spaces. Anti-black cute S- But the entire time for me I I didn't work. I worked with zero hour and we are at the time all of directors or women of color and so in every space that I was in with the youth that I was working with I was always validated. I was never second guessed because of like the complexion of my skin Instead like my experiences and my identities were validated uplifted. And those that give credibility to what I was doing what I was saying Which is complete opposite of? I'd say the adult space I'd say it's opposite for the space as a whole I know lots of mentors I would just tell me like off. It like terrible stories about the spaces. They worked in and they organized in. How anti-black they were and just the things they had to deal with as they were growing up in this movement. I haven't had to deal with simply because we were able to create a space where youth like me and people like me were able to thrive comfortably But they're there's definitely a ratio recommended venues to happen in environmental space. And how that's Lebie leading to so many talented black and Brown youth and women from not joining this movement and joining the space which is ultimately hurting us. Also have you ever experienced a racist moment while you've been doing this work personally me not I actually never mind You always think you do I can't say any names but I was me and two other girls. Were giving a speech at a climate concert Two years ago The start of my junior year of high school so the first time that I had ever really stunned public speaking for climate justice or anything of that sort And our speech was talking about Climate Justice. Indigenous rights black lives matter And things of that nature and just connecting systems of oppression and intersection in our work and one of the people in the audience. A grown man. was just talking so much shit about us and he was just talking. It was just like Things are gone man. Wouldn't be saying about kids but basically just saying where like skinhead lesbians that had no idea what we're talking about And that we shouldn't focus too much on race because it was divisive and just things of that nature and this is a person of big profile Person of big connections A person who is well respected in their spaces They're verified checkmark on twitter instagram. Their work for Really reputable organizations and institutions And they're just saying this about us as youth and saying that other adults in this space and so why people don't approach me with stuff like that they definitely do say it and you hear about it. How did you guys respond to that I'm not going to trip over a forty five year old man. That's saying something about me but it was just very Eye Opening US too I think tackling climate is tackling the very roots of this country. Just like criminal. Justice is tackling climate justice. You're tackling Corneau's Asian white supremacy. You're talking racism and you're taking tackling patriarchy and it just opened my eyes as to dam like this should Israel. There's so much more that we have to do. And that's just not ending climate change. It's abolishing systems of oppression And some are in our way. You're going to have to get out. You Better Tell Him Elsa. I got chills. You just. You're like I've seriously wanted to go out and fight right now. I'm fighting somebody periods. Seriously do you feel like the youth led organizations that are coming up are as anti-black or like segregated I guess as these older ones do you think like? There's I racial reckoning that you're talking about is that happening in the youth yeah Yeah actually Even there our women of Color Board of directors Like aby seventy five percent. Poc membership like yes yup and we still have to recognize how we internalize white supremacy in how that shows up in our works in our workspaces. And so we. We've had two trainings where we had to dissect how white supremacy pops up and how we communicate with each other how we view work. How Work The relationship we have between like work and productivity and management and stuff like that and so learning. Our mind blow. I can't believe the level of all sophisticated. Yeah around this in our thirties. Thinking about the decolonization of my own. Mind when we're absolute so it's it's really inspiring to listen hear. You say that you're doing all these things so the used are doing all these things you know especially the way that you guys are sent to the work and making it important. Because it's it's crucial to the word is and people don't recognize that like the end of the day white supremacy is gonNA shop and every single space day. Why we live in a world that is shaped by white supremacy. Damn thing in this world that you can't touch touch by thing when you guys talk to media do you do you guys talking your training when you're trying to you know Decolonize basically in your own minds. I do you talk about how to talk to the media in a way that gets them to to. I guess portrayed these stories because because even the media talks about environmental issues and an environmentalist of color in a from a lens of white supremacy from an like alinskyites promising. I will say like Magical Unicorn of like they don't exist. It's always like how can we put a whiteface absolutely on this is like how to WHO. Who's reigning them in in the way that they talk about so? I don't know what they've been doing recently but I know that we have a medium page because whenever we would pitch Stories about climate injustice and talking about Like how that relates to race or gender or economic class or something like that It would be denied by like a major publication but if we pitch something that was Like something very basic end just surface level just talking about climate crisis. I'm being a kid Stuff like that always gets published and so I always see kids like having to self publish their own things. are having their own media medium pages and posting their own articles and stuff like that and so Like we've kind of we kind of go around the media A lot of our workers on social media as well Just because media kind of doesn't get it we WANNA they want to paint the face of this movement of two people that popped up like three years ago Who are not acknowledging the legs that white supremacy plays the biggest function of creating these issues. You know it's really interesting. I was like having this conversation with a friend. Who's East Asian? She's like a lot of these countries are labeled as like the world's biggest polluters but there's no way the size of people in this country can create that pollution. But when you look at the companies that are there that are garment factories that are owned by European industrial brands that that creates the pollution in the smaller countries. That then get take the blame. And they're usually brown countries. Yeah no or when we are trashed. Yeah across the world for no reason seems to be a Lag. I think especially with climate change. There's a lack of accountability And I'm interested to get your opinion on this interesting shift that's happening. That's like a focus which I think is a system of white supremacy focus of like. We'll just go vegan or just go like don't use straws but not looking at the corporate impact of like. Why are we not talking about like industrial farming? You know are we not. Why is the onus always placed on an individual and I feel like a negatively placed on like black individuals and people of Color as like? Will you eat too much meat? You do this. And it's like that's not that's going to have an impact but the bigger impact is going to be breaking down capitalism Yeah I was on a panel of fume a few weeks ago and it was the first time that a lot of people audience heard the message that they were not responsible for the climate crisis that their individual actions cannot ever add up to the actions of one corporation that is responsible for the pollution that they create. And there's just a complete self of actual accountability when it comes to talking about. How did we get in this mess? You don't get into this must by not recycling your trash. Can we get into those must by having the top one hundred companies being responsible for forty three percent of emissions? Or something like that. We get into this mess by letting mega-corporations goats other countries extract their resources and then take their trash and put them back. In those countries we get into this issue by having an economic system that pretends that our earth has an informant of infinite amount of resources and that we can just take commodified land water and air. That's how we got into the solution but we want to place blame on individual people so we don't actually have to correct the systems and and revolutionized the way that we live and solve this issue like accurately and how we how we need to be doing Now so they're just not the same thing like not using Straw and having a company that has like fifty airplanes fly out and one day. It's not the same thing. It's just not the same level of damage. That's the word so then I mean. What do we do this like? How do we call these corporations out like since isn't isn't our individual actions like what can we do as individuals to hold them accountable? I mean the end of the day. Our individual actions do add up. So yeah we should keep track on that but as just. GonNa it's just GonNa take us being on the on the government's ass literally because of and at the end of the day. What am I going to do what about? That's how Walmart can you stop using plastic? What at Walmart is not gonNA listen to me ever. But the theory of change that we've been working on Like just a few youth activists that I know miss that you only need three point. I think it's three point. Five percent of the population to be part of a movement for it to be successful And so on the United States. We only need thirty million people that are actively on the government's asks active on everybody's ass advocating for green new deal advocating for a complete transition green energy advocating.

United States Ethiopia Walmart NPR twitter Eritrea Lebie Corneau Israel Decolonize Straw
"elsa" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

The Secret Lives of Black Women

03:36 min | 2 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on The Secret Lives of Black Women

"Think top Wayne Crime adjusters as tackling very roots of this country. Just like from justice is tackling climate justice. You're talking Corneau's ration- white supremacy. You're talking racism and titling patriarchy. Why am I fifteen years old? Sixteen years old spending thirty forty fifty hours a week organizing events and campaigns and lawsuits this so people can have clean air and clean water but at the end of the day. Either I work with you. I work around you and some are in our way. I'm going to have to get out. This is the secret lives of black woman. I'm SHARLA and I'm Laurin and today we're talking about black climate activism. I am so jazzed about this conversation. Because I feel like so often. In media portrayals of climate justice and climate change black and brown voices are left out when they were less gave a real black indigenous Brown. People of Color have been leaders of this movement since jump because we've had two for our survival absolutely Because our neighborhoods our air our laundry the target of corporate environmental attack. Yeah I feel you know. I truly feel like climate. Change is just another one of many things that is a function of white supremacy. And it's like with everything else we've got to fight for ourselves and we've been fighting for ourselves. You know I feel like I'm just so sick of it always just being like a face. That's not ours. We've been doing the work over at you. Guys who can see your favorite now over it. I always get round up when I just talked about. Supremacy really gets you. I don't know what it is about it but you get real pissed because it's just because it's it's the root legit. I can't believe you answer that. It's the weird volleyball manner white proxy. Because it's bad no shit no shit. Yeah but today I feel like I'm I have a feeling in my bones that today's conversation is going to be really enlightening and inspiring today. We're talking to Elsa Mengistu Elsa is an eighteen year old freshman at Howard University and the national climate justice organizer as a student. She's been lobbying the administration to become more sustainable as part of the Howard University Sustainability Student Committee pushing the school to reduce plastic waste and provide free public transportation to students outside of school. She's worked with some of the biggest. You flat environmental advocacy organizations like this is zero hour in consult other organizations on how to engage young people. She's currently planning a four thousand person. Climate Conference train new climate activists in twenty twenty one and she wants to make more people aware of the disproportionate impact. Climate Change will have on the black community. I'm really excited. Talk to Elsa especially because environmental activism is always stereotypically associated with white people. It's given a white voice. It's talked about from the white perspective. And there's always this race blind approach to the way that we talk about it and deal with it and I can't wait to talk to her and get into the nitty gritty.

Elsa Mengistu Elsa Howard University Sustainabili Corneau black community Laurin volleyball Howard University
Bloomberg News Killed Investigation, Fired Reporter, Then Sought To Silence His Wife

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:47 min | 3 months ago

Bloomberg News Killed Investigation, Fired Reporter, Then Sought To Silence His Wife

"Mike Bloomberg's presidential bid led to tough scrutiny particularly about his company's frequent reliance on nondisclosure agreements for employees. One of the people under a nondisclosure agreement is a former employee who years ago worked on an investigative story about Chinese leaders. Bloomberg News killed that story. It also tried to silence his spouse. Npr's David Folkenflik reveals. What happened at debate? Elizabeth Warren Challenge Bloomberg. What about complaints about him Mr Mayor? Are you willing to release all of those women from those nondisclosure agreements? So we can hear their side of the story. Bloomberg tried to move past it. We have a very few nondisclosure agreements. Finish Bloomberg's blase response outrage the writer late. Hong fincher full disclosure award supporter finger points to the widespread use of such as by the company. Bloomberg founded the company uses them to handle complaints of sexual harassment and hostile work environment. According to reports ventures complaint is not that. I don't know exactly what happened to those women but I do know how incredibly terrifying it is to be threatened and bullied into signing a nondisclosure agreement in two thousand thirteen ventures husband. Michael Forsyth was a reporter for Bloomberg News in Beijing Bloomberg had already published his team's investigation into the wealth of the families of Communist Party leaders. The Chinese Ambassador had warned the company against publishing death threats followed venture and forsyth moved to Hong Kong yet. The team kept reporting. He continued to do an investigation and it was that story. This story on longed in China's honest man and his ties to senior Chinese Communist leaders including Jinping Z. Had just become president of China and I saw these emails from the editors praising it meaning the reporting saying that. Yeah it's it's. We're really excited about this. We can't wait to move it forward. Three former Bloomberg journalists verified this account after that however radio silence. The story never ran Serrao Mike. Her husband Mike and some of the other reporters. And Editors who had been working on this story. Just we're asking for answers about why. Why was this story killed the famously intense founding editor in chief of Bloomberg News finally weighed in? That's Matthew Winkler back then. To Editors told me the story needed work. That's not the reason we are cited for killing it. It is for sure going to invite the Communist Party to completely shut us down. Take us out of the country so I just don't see that a story that is just divide. This recording winkler on in October twenty thirteen conference call weekly praised the team but warned about covering the Chinese regime which he called it everywhere and who they are and we should have no illusions that the Chinese authorities had search Bloomberg's bureaus delayed visas for reporters and ordered state owned companies not to sign new leases for Bloomberg terminals the terminals offer subscribers specialized financial data and are the most important source of the company's profits and China was seen as a growing market and a strategic priority again. Matthew Winkler is the information they do have away that enables car to report but not Elsa Prophet Bloomberg News N Winkler. Who's retired as editor in chief declined to comment in two thousand thirteen? Mike Bloomberg was mayor of New York City and denied Bloomberg News Killed The China Story. Two months later back at the company he founded asked about the China controversy again. Mike Bloomberg said it was arrogant to impose American values on others if a country gives you a license to do something off with certain restrictions. You have two choices either. Accept the license and do it that way. Well you don't do business there. Npr also obtained audio of these remarks. Mike Bloomberg to his global newsroom Bloomberg said the newsroom should be proud of its China coverage then said all organizations have bad apples. Some staffers thought that was aimed at the China. Investigative team. Bloomberg News fired Mike Foresight. He was accused of leaking news of the killed project other outlets. He landed at the New York Times and would not comment for the story. He signed a nondisclosure agreement with Bloomberg LP lawyers for Bloomberg's company pressured someone else to sign one foresights wife later Hong fincher. The company's lawyers threatened to force her to pay a six figure sum if she didn't agree to keep silent about her husband's work. Here's venture. There was no reason why I should have to sign a nondisclosure agreement. Because I didn't possess any damaging material about the company venture recalls being summoned to the high rise offices of Bloomberg's Hong Kong lawyers. Her husband was there too. And then this lawyer from New York on that. I mean giant image of his face on the video screens said but what about all the evidence? That's in her head venture says. She walked out of the conference room and left the building. They assumed that because I was the wife of their employees. I was the wife I was just an appendage of their employees I was not a human being ventures former CNBC correspondent who was finishing up PhD. She bristled and hired top-flight lawyers and finally the company let it go now. Mike Bloomberg has returned to his company. Wants more but venture isn't letting her question go. What else in his newsroom she asks is hidden by those nondisclosure agreements.

Bloomberg Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg News Elsa Prophet Bloomberg News N Beijing Bloomberg China Matthew Winkler Communist Party Hong Fincher Hong Kong Serrao Mike NPR Michael Forsyth New York City Elizabeth Warren David Folkenflik Reporter Mike Foresight
Vocalis Health CEO Tal Wenderow

The Voicebot Podcast

02:26 min | 3 months ago

Vocalis Health CEO Tal Wenderow

"County. Health is actually an Israeli. Start up with our in the clinical de Science in Israel headquarters out of the Boston area. High actually leaving Newton outside of Boston and what we're doing can think you know that vocal by Maka right so we analyzing the voice and we collate that to disease symptoms and conditions and what happened is Which not only we walk in disruptive area by trying to learn and teach democracy new vocal about a mock we kind of disruptive ways so two point two full months ago a we merged two Israeli startups beyond verbal. Health is for both do in the vocal biomarker space to foam vocalists company which is not a trivial thing to do to get to startups together. That each one they can change the world. Come to the realization. I cannot do it by myself right with. Find the right partner to do that right. But it's all about people so Mike Mike Partner in crimes shoddy facilities actually physician that he was the CEO of Elsa mice and we're both raising money and we met not together but we met in Israeli one of the leading Israeli. He'll stick fun named Aimal Alot. Nda distractedly decided to enter voice face in healthcare but there are looking for the right company. And the Roy. Who's chairman of the board right now? Said we don't know which one to pick if you merge invest in both of you. Yeah sure that's not a big deal. So so so. That's why he's sounds like it's not a big deal but it's usually. It is a big deal. It is a big real so that was probably June shoddy and I. We met two days later on a good cup of Espresso couple of Russell. In four weeks later we presented to investment committee and then a fortune lawyers to cover. It took US another three months to close but we were done after. One are right because it makes sense. It's not just because we got the money. We can do to realization one. If we don't match we'RE GONNA compete with it right so you know it's it's

CEO Israel Boston Partner Mike Mike Maka Newton United States Chairman Russell
Walkin and Talkin Disney

The Ride Through Pavilion

09:46 min | 3 months ago

Walkin and Talkin Disney

"Hey everybody welcome to another episode of daily Magic. This is this is a take two of this podcast. We just Gave you some really good information for about two minutes or arm. Sorry for about ten minutes and then I realized I wasn't recording. So this do over. What are we doing well? We're taking a walk or second side the House all day. It's my lunch break and I just thought you know what we're not gonNA have an opportunity to record around the studio today. So let's Let's just pull out the recorder and talk while we walk so we have. Oh boy lots of cars so we have a skating for the first time. She's here with US trying to escape but she figured out that she does best when she just sits on the skateboard and goes down hill. We got any with us. She's walking our dog Elsa and we have Mr Liam with this right here and I'm Jeremy and we thought well. What could we chat about today? You know we've been doing a bunch of silly stuff we've been doing a bunch of games pulling out all the stops. The best we can and amy was like well. Why don't we talk about how we came to to be family? Yeah so I would say definitely we inherited some of the Disney genes from our families having grown up in southern California and the West Coast and the West Coast having family in southern California. Even after I moved away always out there every time we went out there my parents were. We gotta go to Disneyland. We gotta go to Disneyland. And then and then of course we settled in Phoenix. Amy was already there and it was just like six hours away. Like why not go? It was it was amazing. When we got married we went when we had. Liam became his fifth birthday. Were like this is it. We're taken Liam. It's like the rite of passage. It's the birthday trip. Liam hated it. Hates is not a strong enough word for what this kid felt about Disney. Yeah it was. It was almost scarring. Yeah for everybody. We felt so bad. Thankfully Amy's mom and then a friend from church was there. This is the sound of Fiona trying not to kill herself or us on that last attempt So we were able to kind of they got tired and you know what we'll take Liam and you guys go have fun but we were just so bombed because you know at that time. Liam had more of his hearing more of a site And it was just sensory overload. I think and it wasn't the kind of thing where we could. You know put headphones. Because he just doesn't tolerate any of that and it was it was we. Were only on like a deaf awareness. Day Yes so the so there are some accommodations. There it just. It just wasn't having it was not it was. It would be irresponsible for us and I think it was more about all of this is i. Don't think he quite knew where he was in space like. He wasn't really in good muscle control of his body at that point. Remember those posters of space like it had the whole galaxy and then it had like a thing that said you are here to know that part. No He's not a mushroom or is that a brown egg. We live in the southern suburbs of a Lanta beautiful gorgeous day here and I gotta say a brown exciting would be more rare than a mushroom so it's probably a mushroom anyway. Oh you did. Yeah that's why I kept going. Oh my God how because I was dying just because I think filling in the details with God is a rooster would have been helpful for all of us to share in that experience so we took Fiona for her birthday of everything. Went fine if you want to. Being are typical child home. Yeah we might push him over the edge if we took him again. Here's Yeah Oh yeah you were scared of some of the rights as being for your and a new four year old like she was barely not three was on her fourth birthday. Yeah well so you fast forward Liam Gets Omega wish trip. A bunch of stuff happened there. We moved cities we moved houses. And we kind of found ourselves saying we want to get this. Make a wish granted and we. We really just ended up deciding. Let's under the suggestion of Mika wish. Yeah but at that point. We said you know what let's do it. Liam hated it. It's free the worst that can happen is we can hang out if this village we hear about and just have a good time for a week the May give kids. The world. Village is an incredible incredible place. Yeah it was. It was just as hard to leave the village itself than it was. You know how you feel doubt on your last day of Disney vacation. It was difficult to leave the village itself. But that and you'd water so we you know. We ended up having such a good time and again like here's huge. Assist to give kids the world. They met us at the airport Harrison tears before we were even helped adjust our expectations immediately and they were like they're like look Liam special than they look at. Funen they say but you know what your special and they looked at us in there like mom. Your Special Dad your special. This is for you. You need to cut loose. You need to leave everything behind and this week is everything and and I mean they just they just said our expectation up to where we were softened up already so by the time we got to Disney and got the full red carpet treatment. You know with that Mak- wish button. I think we just like we were sold and it W- and so when we when we left we decided you know what I think. Because Liam is there's something for everybody Liam is Liam is aware of where he is when he's there Liam's aware of where he is when he's there and You know of course we are to now. Liam is aware in in a way that maybe we didn't expect being deaf blind at this point. Liam was you know he he? He enjoyed the parks by the smells and the different motions of the ride vehicles. And the different You know the the different lilting of the the ride vehicles. The way the ride vehicles were constructed on pirates of the Caribbean he's scratching at the grip tape We're looking at the pirates going nuts. He's he's scratching at the grip tape and cracking up. He's got a huge smile on his face because that was sensory to him. That was the input that was the experience provided to him. And we just thought to ourselves. You know what we're going to. We decided look. We're going to go back all the time. And so the very first trip back was a little nerve racking and I was a little apprehensive because we had really experienced this red carpet treatment and I mean where do you go from there. Yeah because I think it's important to note like the myth is if you're in a wheelchair or you need assistance that you somehow get this red carpet treatment and while you do get accommodations that are other than say a typical family or people who have typical needs You still it. They try to make this fair as possible. We need to contrast this with the absolute like free stuff top with Give kids the world because you have a make a wish button and the cast members are trained to look for that and give extra magic whenever they see literally bypassed the lines. I mean it's every it's all the myths that you hear about just Special needs families. But it's really only a Mako. Wish experience the thing I will say about going back to Disney and the reason that we keep going back to Disney is they do make accommodations for us and they do have some special things and every once in a while we get a little extra magic just like everybody else. But that's those are the key words is that it's like everybody else we Kinda Day. What they do is they level the the vacation experience so if you have typical children my experience may look to you. Like I'm getting special accommodations but I must special needs family. So there are some special accommodations that we need to bring us up to a normal family experience

Mr Liam Disney AMY United States Fiona California Disneyland Phoenix Lanta West Coast Elsa Mika Jeremy MAK Harrison
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro charged in U.S. drug trafficking inquiry

BBC World Service

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro charged in U.S. drug trafficking inquiry

"The Venezuelan government is accused the US of making baseless drug trafficking charges against president Nicolas Maduro to hide its failures in tackling the spread of cave it nineteen American prosecutors have offered a fifteen million dollar reward for information leading to Mr Maduro's arrest they accuse him and other senior officials of colluding with Colombian former left wing rebels to smuggle tons of cocaine into the U. S. the Venezuelan foreign minister Jorge Arreaza Elsa said the trump administration's efforts would not succeed reporter the guy come here they will be at no for the for the same Venezuela the United States policy in trying to force change in Venezuela is destined to file offering a one to reward like grace's cal boys shows the desperation of the elite supremacists in Washington and his obsession with attacking Venezuela in order to gain electoral support in the state of Florida

Venezuelan Government United States President Trump Nicolas Maduro Cocaine Jorge Arreaza Elsa Reporter Venezuela Washington Florida
"elsa" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:02 min | 3 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"The day was March. Twenty six eight hundred eighty eight Swedish nurse and Philanthropist Elsa Brannstrom was born branch trump became known as the angel of Siberia for her work with prisoners of war. Branston was born in Saint Petersburg to avert brench drum and Una villa. Mina ESCO thin. Her father was a Swedish military attache to Russia and her family went back to Sweden for a while. When she was a child her father went back to Saint Petersburg as an envoy in one thousand nine six but she stayed in Sweden where she was training to become a teacher. She went back to Saint. Petersburg in nineteen eight else's mother died in one thousand nine hundred eighteen just before the outbreak of World War One in nineteen fourteen when the war began elsa and her friend. Ethel von Heyden stom-. We're trained as nurses also serving at a military hospital. There's he cared for wounded Russian soldiers but she found that Russia was not providing the necessary support to prisoners of so she and von Heyden stom- work to find private donations to help care for the POW's in one thousand nine hundred fifteen. The Swedish Red Cross asked her to go to Siberia to do relief work in the prisoner camps conditions were poor in the camps. They lacked winter. Clothes blankets medical supplies and other basic necessities. Many people got sick. Because of these conditions and diseases like typhus killed a lot of prisoners of war during these chips. She gave out food clothing and medical supplies to POW's at a Siberian camp cost. Three tenths brand. Strums inspections led to changes that helped slow the typhoid epidemic. When she was in Europe she met with families of Russian. Pow's though the central powers Russia's signed a peace treaty in nineteen eighteen ending Russia's participation in World War One. The Red Cross continued. Its relief work. Elsa was accused of being a spy and arrested at one point. She was even threatened with execution but her sentence was revoked also got typhoid in nineteen nineteen. The next year she was imprisoned but soon released she went back to Sweden July of nineteen twenty in Sweden. She continued to support. Pow's in Siberia. She collected donations insent winter clothing to them and nineteen twenty one. She even published a memoir called among prisoners of war and Russia and Siberia with the money from her book from a lecture tour in the US and from her work at a relief association she was able to fund a health resort a home for the children of POW's and a labor sanatorium to train POW's to work jobs like farming or fishing in the children's home. She only accepted kids who become quote. First Class people and refused those with disabilities and character traits deemed under the table. Elsa Mary Robert eulex In nineteen twenty nine and they moved to dress him. They had a daughter together in nineteen thirty two because she worked with prisoners of war she was recognized by Hitler but she and her husband disapproved of the rise of the Nazis. The family moved to the. Us Hewlett had gotten a job at Harvard. Elsa helped refugees from Nazi Germany and occupied Scandinavian countries get residency permits. She died in one thousand nine forty eight and Cambridge Massachusetts. I'm UCF coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday and if you WanNa leave a message on social media you can do so on Instagram facebook or twitter at T. d. h. feed podcast you can also send us via email at this day at iheartmedia dot com. Thanks again for listening to the PODCAST. And we'll see you.

Pow Russia Elsa Siberia Saint Petersburg Elsa Brannstrom Sweden Swedish Red Cross Ethel von Heyden stom typhoid Elsa Mary Robert eulex Mina ESCO von Heyden Una villa Branston typhus UCF Massachusetts Europe
Fear is What Cant Be Trusted

Energy Healing

09:27 min | 4 months ago

Fear is What Cant Be Trusted

"I'll be perfectly honest with you in saying that. I don't know exactly where this episode is going to go. It has been a rather crazy two weeks here. I live in the Seattle area and things have progressed rather rapidly in the last week you know My son school decided last Friday. So I don't know ten day ten days ago too close for a couple of weeks and then. The state made the decision to close all schools. Statewide until April Twenty. Fourth hospitals are pretty overrun. Healthcare personnel are burned out bars. Restaurants are now required to be closed except for delivery and takeout in that there has been a lot of fear and panic circulating around. Because there's just so much uncertainty and there's so much unknown and this creates a lot of shadow aspects. I would say that are surfacing in a lot of people and we see this take shape in the form of scarcity so scarcity mindset. Watch sparks the hoarding. And feeling like there's not enough. There's and there's not enough to go around so you have to hold it all and it surfaces racism whether that is outright not subtle racism violent racism or whether it's micro aggression. They're both awful. I kind of went through this metamorphosis over the last couple of weeks where at first I was like. I'm not GonNa talk about this virus. I am not going to put any more energy into this than there already is because everybody is panicking about it too okay. I'm going to talk about it but this is not going to be from a place of panic or fear. I am approaching this from a place of vigilance and being informed but not over informed and not feeding into the fear and panic that is surrounding it. So kind of want to touch on this fear you know. I just made the decision and yesterday afternoon. After meditating on it to cancel the rest of my clients for March my in-person clients them not because of fear but because of my love and compassion for them in my community. I care very deeply for them. And it's just what felt was right to do. I have not made any decisions based out of fear because fear is not going to help us get through. This fear will paralyze us. It will cause us to make terrible decisions. Then it'll cause us to say and do things that may hurt someone or our cells is actually just watching frozen to again with my son. And there's this quote net the were Elsa says yes. I'm going to share an elsa quote from frozen. Okay deal with it. She says that's just your fear. Fear is what can't be trusted as like. Oh man that is just so on point for right now. Fear cannot be trusted because fear will screw you over every single time. So how do we deal with fear? How do we deal with the panic? How do we deal with the anxiety? Staying grounded so being present in your body sending roots down into the ground doing some breath work even if you are self quarantining or if you are under a mandatory self quarantine you can still a window and if you have a porch you can go out on your porch getting some fresh air. Some sort of nature. Maybe planting something. Maybe this is a good time to plant some indoor plants and do a little herb garden focusing on things that are within your control. You can't control whatever is going on outside in the world or outside your front doorstep can't control really was going on inside your home either but you can control how you want to feel and how you WanNa react to things and you can control what you decide to do with your time. I understand this is a really stressful time for small businesses and not even just small businesses. I know people who work for bigger and those corporations have closed and now those employees have no income except maybe some unemployment money and that can be very stressful because well how am I going to afford rent helmet going to afford food. How am I going to Ford? Xyz and those are very valid fears? Right I don't WanNA minimize that. That is very valid. But you can control not giving too much into that not feeding that fear too much and just kind of focusing on what is abundant in your life. Community is abundant. Please reach out to your community and just see how anyone can help even virtually. Maybe this is a time for you to think about restructuring your life and maybe there is some kind of offering that you could offer online that will pay for. I have seen a lot of small businesses doing this thinking of ways that they can restructure their business and I think this restructuring piece is going to be really crucial for us and make us push past are limits of what we thought was possible and challenges to push past any self limiting beliefs. That are keeping us from moving forward now before you get caught up in this. How can I help myself? I really encourage you to think about well. How can I help my community munity because we're all going to have to work together to get through this? So how can you help your community whether that's from a standpoint or not? There was somebody in a local facebook group in my community who suggested creating virtual videos and sending them to people in nursing homes because many elderly who are in nursing homes right now are not allowed visitors so even doing something like that. A cow powerful is that and how compassionate is that it's been inspiring to see community. Come together all of the free offerings. That are happening for kids right now. Who aren't in school. All of the offerings to provide kids in low income families with free lunches while schools are closed the people stepping up and helping small businesses. Even I just saw an article yesterday as well about a Seattle business who are doing virtual happy hours to help maintain morale within their company. And I think that's really cool to just finding ways to support each other and keep up. Morale and mental health is so important. Mental health is so important. I always talk about how important mental health as and right now is a challenge to mental health so finding ways to take care of yourself and connecting with others without physical contact. How can we connect? Yeah I feel like this whole thing is also a push for human connection and then also getting us back into the earth because with people more and more people working from home if you have the luxury to do that if that is an option for you more and more people working from home more and more people. Not Out mindlessly consuming. Think about how that's going to help the environment as well not saying that people getting sick is awesome or anything but just thinking about how this has forced us to see how making these changes has created some positive outcomes and how we can evolve that wants this pandemic is under control and were over this hump.

Seattle Elsa Facebook Ford
Introducing SUPERNATURAL WITH ASHLEY FLOWERS

Haunted Places

09:57 min | 4 months ago

Introducing SUPERNATURAL WITH ASHLEY FLOWERS

"By the time police got the call about the bodies Invitation Hill. It was already starting to get dark. The Hill is surrounded by thick forest and brush so for everyone's safety. They decided to hold off until morning. Of course the press didn't take the same precautions when officers finally did arrive on the morning of August. Twenty first nineteen sixty six vin. Tame Hill was already swarming with reporters. The even snapped a few photos before the bodies were carried away unfortunately all the original sources are in Portuguese and more than fifty years later. It's hard to track them all down but some of them were summarized in English in the flying saucer review which despite the name was fairly credible journal in the sixties based on those articles. Here's what we know about. The police investigation. The only easy part of this case was identifying the victims thirty two year old men. Well Pereira de Cruz and thirty four year old. Miguel Giuseppe Viana. Both men were electronics. Technicians from the town called compost dose. Go to causes. Which is about one hundred and seventy five miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro. Both of them were happily married. Well respected in the community and led pretty normal. Unassuming lives according to their families. Miguel and Manuel had left town. On the morning of Wednesday August Seventeenth nineteen sixty six three days before their bodies were found. They said they were heading to Sao Paulo to buy some electronics equipment. Along with a used car. They've been looking at. They took some money with them somewhere. Between two and three million Cruzeiros the conversion rate is a little hard to calculate. But that's somewhere worth like a few thousand. Us dollars today at about nine am. Miguel and Manuel headed out to the bus station accompanied by a friend named L. CEO Gomez. Elsa wanted to go into the bus station. See them off but the other two men insisted that he just drop them off outside. Elsia didn't understand what the big deal was but he didn't think too much of it. He watched Miguel men walk into the bus depot and then he went back home. That was the last time he ever saw his two friends alive now. Even with the minimal evidence police had at this point. There were a few things about this story. That didn't add up. When the bodies were found the only had a combined one hundred sixty one thousand Cruzeiro on them. The rest of the two three million is unaccounted for still to this day. And of course they didn't go to Sao Paulo like they told everyone else. They went to a town called NITA. Roy which is a suburb of Rio de Janeiro. Which is a good couple hundred miles away. The investigators went back to Nita. Roy Hoping to find some answers there but once they piece together the rest of August seventeenth nineteen sixty six. All they had were more questions. Miguel and men wells bus would have arrived in Nita Roy at around two or two thirty that afternoon their first stop was an electronic store. They'd been to that store before so we can assume it carried some kind of equipment that wasn't sold in their own town but for some reason they left the store without buying anything and they didn't even talk to the sales clerk there now. Maybe the store was out of whatever they were looking for. But the taken a five hour bus ride to get there. Why on Earth wouldn't they at least check with the clerk? Before leaving either way after they lead the electronic store it starts to rain so they stop into a clothing store nearby and buy a pair of matching raincoats again. This doesn't raise any red flags on its own. But what is weird? The clerk said that they left in such a rush that they didn't even bother to put on the coats before running out into the rain. The coach that they just bought now. You might assume that the big appointment that they were rushing to was with the owner of that used car that they were looking to buy. But you'd be wrong. They didn't buy any car during the trip so if they weren't buying electronics and they weren't buying a car. What were they doing there? Oddly the next time may surface is at a bar in the same neighborhood as the clothing store and when they get to the bar. They're still very anxious about the time. Miguel goes to the counter and orders a bottle of mineral water according to the bartender. He's acting very like nervous and impatient and while he's ordering he keeps glancing over at the clock after paying for the water. Miguel keeps the receipt and this might not seem like a big clue but Brazil has a recycling policy where you could return empty bottles for a deposit. So whatever or whoever they're waiting for. Miguel assumes won't take too long and he'll have time to return the bottle before heading home that evening no one saw Miguel. Well leave the bar so we don't know if they met someone there or they left alone but at five PM. They're seen at the foot of ENTAME Hill. Which is just outside town. They pull up in a jeep driven by someone with blonde hair. There were two other men in the car as well but the witness couldn't see them clearly. Whoever these three men were they were the last people to see Miguel and well alive. So by this point police had mapped out all of their movements from leaving home in the morning to arriving at the hill that night but none of it offered any clues about what actually happened next. We already mentioned a few the strange details at the scene of the deaths. But if we take a closer look it's even more baffling. Let's start off with what they didn't have the money that they brought with them. The most obvious possibility is that this was a robbery gone wrong but staging a scene like this would have taken a lot of time and effort for not a ton of money and they also left some behind also. There were no injuries on either of the bodies. No CUTS NO BRUISES. No Burns no sign of violence at all. When the corner didn't autopsy there were no internal damages either and strangely. Despite sitting out in the open for three days on a hill that's swarming with wildlife. The bodies were totally untouched by animals. No one can really say what that means but it kind of seems like there was something unnatural about the death if even the vultures didn't WanNa touch them if this wasn't a murder the next possibility was suicide but this theory sort of falls apart too because Miguel still had the empty water bottle and the receipt. If he knew he was going to die. Why go through the trouble of saving that receipt beyond that police find three pages of handwritten notes? That definitely didn't suggest a suicide pact. The first page has a a list of electronics parts. Numbers along with some Algebra work. The equation uses Ohm's law which is E. equals. I are which is used to calculate the strength of an electrical current now. The two men were electronics technicians. After all so everyone assumes these are just notes for a work project now. The next page though is more of an enigma translated from Portuguese. It says quote Sunday one tablet after the meal. Monday one tablet in the morning on an empty stomach. Tuesday one tablet after the meal Wednesday one tablet before bedtime and quote. Obviously this is talking about some kind of prescription. But as far as anyone knows neither Miguel or amend well were sick now. The last dose that Wednesday before bedtime dose would have been taken right before they died but due to decomposition the corner couldn't get useful out of the toxicology report so we still don't know what was in those mysterious tablets and this was a little hard for me to understand because just a second ago I know. He said the bodies kind of untouched by wildlife. I expected them to be in. Good condition. But whatever's going on at the time they either didn't have the technology they didn't have the time and they weren't able to test for it so finally. The third page has another set of instructions. This one said quote sixteen thirty be at the determined location. Eighteen thirty swallow capsules after the effect protect metals week for mask signal end quote. Now the confusion isn't a translation issue. It doesn't make any sense in Portuguese either. It almost seems like the note was kind of scribbled down quickly in some kind of shorthand which probably means someone gave the instructions verbally and someone else wrote them down putting it all together. We can at least gathered that Miguel Aiman. Well weren't the victims of some kind of random attack. They came to the hill for a reason. And that brings us to our last piece of evidence. The lead masks themselves now. You're probably picturing a full mask. That covers your entire face. Almost like what welders wear but these were about the size and shape of sunglasses made out of solid lead. They were apparently homemade and cut. Roughly FROM SCRAP METAL. Lead blocks radiation. So it's often used as a coating protective goggles and facials but these masks were too small to offer any real protection and since they were solid metal. It'd be impossible to see or do anything while wearing them so at first police had no idea what to make of these masks but after some digging it turned out that this wasn't an isolated incident according to flying saucer review. There was another case four years earlier. Where another electronics technician had been found dead on a hill with a lead mask in that previous case the police determined that the man went up to the hill and took some kind of drugs because he was convinced it would allow him to pick up radio and TV signals with his

Miguel Miguel Giuseppe Viana Nita Roy Sao Paulo Rio De Janeiro Tame Hill Invitation Hill Miguel Aiman Technician Entame Hill Pereira De Cruz Manuel United States Elsa Elsia Brazil L. Ceo Gomez Robbery
The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

The Big Picture

13:11 min | 4 months ago

The Monster Movie Hall of Fame and 'The Invisible Man'

"Later in the show. I'll have an interview with Lebron L. The writer director of the new updated edition of the invisible man. A movie that shifts the perspective of the classic horror movie to the victim in this case played by the Amazing Elizabeth Moss when Elsa Clever Jonah craftsman and we had a fun chat about how he's reinventing the work of the historic universal monster movies and some of his aides filmaker. Heroes like James Cameron and Paul Hogan and John Carpenter but I I am joined by ringer contributor and one of the best film minds around Adam Neiman. Thanks for joining me Adam. Thanks for having me Adam. We're here to build another wing in the movie hall of fame. Today we said post and beam on the monster movie hall of fame. Now you know monster. Movies are tricky because there are two distinctions between them. One is your classical scare movie that enrapture audiences but maybe doesn't really mean very much and then. The other is the load-bearing bearing metaphorical monster that communicate something to the world about maybe it's ills or human psychology or things of that nature I assume that you are more fan of the latter. But May maybe that's not the case. I think I'm a fan of the ladder when it's less calculated You know the the joke I liked to tell his one day. Someone's GonNa make really good specific movie about a social problem like documentary and then at a press conference the director. She's going to be like this movie's a metaphor for zombies and just waiting for someone to do but I mean I think that in the last couple years because you have some like Jordan. Peele who has spoken not in terms of monster movies but in terms of horror movies. He's talked about you. Know his office for those social thrillers or Social Horror Movies and the metaphorical dimension to them. And so you know because monsters are a subset of horror movies as you say a delivery device for for scares those streams often do cross but yeah. I think some of the best monster movies of all time are definitely ones where monsters represent something whether it's something inside or outside society or something inside or outside people but I'm also just a a big fan of movies. Where like spooky things jump out at people in eat them? So it's a IT'S A. It's a fine balance before we get started on constructing this this list that we've put together here. Do you remember your first monster movie experience at the movie. That felt like a monster movie to me and I mean it it is a monster is when Pinocchio gets swallowed by the whale. Oh yeah which is. Obviously you know I mean there's a biblical reference there to to Joan in the whale and it's You know like for for for kids. Who Who who see Pinocchio? That whale is just nightmarish and terrifying and and gigantic. I mean my dad. I think that's the first movie he ever told you to. Took me to it. Just absolutely scared the hell out of me that and the giant squid in Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. Same thing oh great both Some Disney spun con there. Well done by in and and you. Well I'm thinking about Pinocchio as you say it and the thing that scared me more than the whale is the sequence in which the boys turn into donkeys boys which is just absolutely disturbing and also kind of metaphorical in its way Not to put too fine a parasite point on it I'm trying to think of my first true scary movie experience. I feel like what I got two young Frankenstein before I got to Frankenstein in. It's funny. How when something like that happens how it can obscure your relationship to movies and I think it actually made me Not so much scared movie theaters but just just sort of happy and smiling and laughing. I tend to laugh at horror movies and monster movies because I get kind of perverse thrill out of them and I so I if young Frankenstein. Ken Count that would be. That would be my number one. I mean obviously. I saw a bunch movies that we'll talk about here on this list that a very young age. And maybe that's an opportunity to just go right into it. So here's what we're going to do. We'RE GOING TO GO CHRONOLOGICALLY. So there's a long history. I would say monster. Movies are essentially as old as movies themselves. So we're going to try to walk through. Essentially I don't know eighty ninety years of movie history and try to capture. What are the absolute most representative interesting compelling fascinating monster movies ever made and the monsters? I think the conversation should really be about the monsters inside of the movies and why they're so effective as devices for either sending those messages or just scaring the shit out of us. So you chosen five. I've chosen five. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA Ariffin vamp little bit. Why don't you give me your first pick going all the way back to the nineteen thirties? Sure and you know it's interesting because now when we've got it arranged chronologically we've got this this interesting blindspot which. Kinda be filled in as we go along. Which is we've both bypassed. The true initial cohort of Universal Monster. Movies right the very late twenties very early thirties because the first movie on my list is King Kong. So I have bypassed Dracula Frankenstein you know bride of Frankenstein Which are all these enduring literary properties that have been made and remade for a long time and I think the thing about King Kong. It just feels like the primal scene for me of monster as spectacle because he's not human sized right. He's not an actor costume he's not You know someone doing an accent or wearing makeup. He's a special effects creation and the thing about the original King Kong. Every time I watch it is. It is just so spectacular visually. In an analog era. You know the the integration of those stop motion special effects into old sets and the exaggerated camera angles on the actors and just the the surrealism of it. I've read that. The actual surrealists the the practicing artists within that within that movement re huge fans of King Kong for one thing. 'cause monster just keeps changing size. You know it's inconsistent it's inconsistent but it's also just stunning because from scene to scene you know when he's just represented by giant hander giants foot or the close ups on the is and then you can also still cut backing these establishing shots and seeing him in these different environments and. I think it's the way also that it goes from this primal island to this urban city. The monster in his home context. And then sort of you know thrashing around in the middle of maternity causing chaos. It's just like the deepest the deepest core horror fantasy. You know that that that I can think of I. I just think it's absolutely astonishing and I never tire of watching it. It's funny I think a lot of the monsters on our list Get repeated and reused and re contextualize over and over again the thing with King Kong is is the actual character of King Kong comes up over and over and over and over again. We're getting another King Kong movie this year. And for whatever reason I would say between King Kong and Godzilla. Those are really the only two significant monsters that we never tire of somehow. That don't don't expire. You know I think that the idea behind what King Kong represents and there's obviously been an extraordinary amount of both academic critical just fun writing about What happens when colonialists enter a less developed world and attempt to steal things from it But in addition to that it is this grand spectacle and we talk a lot on the show about is. It doesn't move. You have a reason to be seen in a movie theater. Then I feel like the original King. Kong is is one of the landmark achievements and you have to see this on a giant screen. There's nowhere else for to be seen. We'll for sure. I maybe just in terms of bridging King Kong with those other brand name monsters of the period he in genders the same kind of complex sympathy. That you have with Boris. Karloff Frankenstein. Right I mean you even have a rhyme in those two movies wherein Frankenstein. He picks the little girl up by the river without doing what he's doing. And you know drowns her accidentally and certainly king kongs intentions towards Aren't violent. They're they're in his sort of chivalrous or desirous or somewhere in between there. I think the reason he endures an even the point that God's Zilla as a character eventually got bent in King kongs direction because the original godzillas dot anthropomorphized sympathetic at all. And then over the years. And they made Godzilla more like King Kong. I think being inside that sort of like destructive force but you're also misunderstood and you're more a victim of circumstance than anything else that's a really appealing escapist fantasy for filmgoers even thinking the original King Kong as terrifying as it is and as brutal as the violences like a people have never seen it. He smush is people into Goo on screen. You know You're still with him and I think that that's a really great monster. Movie needs on some kinds of great monster movies that you need that possible level of identification or sympathy. So it's not just purely a nightmare. I think the original King Kong does that just just amazingly well. So you're next pick actually doesn't do the former thing that you were just describing which is there's no crushing there's no Gu. There's no absolute violence of a kind in your next week. What's your next movie? The next movie I have is is cap. People which is part of a cycle of really low key atmospheric horror movies produced in the mostly in the nineteen forties. Bhai guy named Val Luton and I would say that if you get a chance to see Ken. Jones documentary thou loot man in the shadows. I think it's the best documentary I've ever seen about a filmmaker at particularly about how Luton changed horror movies by using the lack of a budget. And the lack of franchise -able characters. You Know He. He didn't have the roster that universal was working with all these all star. You know horror icons so he made it less more. It's the it's the the the the cinema of of of suggestion and scary around the edges. But it's also movie about people transforming into cats I. It's a booby that plays the the ambiguity of is this or isn't this real up. You know for for a long time but it really does give over to the idea that the main character the heroin does when stimulated or afraid you know actually transform into A cat due to this this this Eastern European mysticism and it's also a movie. I'm sure they'll come later. That gets remade in the eighties and completely liberalised because instead of just talking with someone turning into a cat or remembering someone turning into a cat you actually see it on screen with with special effects and it's It's less effective to me. Do you do you like the Paul schrader version that you're describing the eighties version. I like the Paul schrader version. Because it's wild acid trippy. Paul schrader horror movie. And it's it's glory and it's actually not as full-on like latex hydraulic special effects. His other movies from the period. But I I love the original are you are you. Are you fond of the delude films directed by Jacques Turner? Who did a bunch of the other ones is it a? Is it a a a source of Phantom for you it is? I saw cat people and the Leopard men in a couple of them many many years ago and then actually over Halloween this year my wife and I were looking and you know as I get older Halloween. Getting more and more difficult to program. If we're not gonNA rewatch something. But we watched a couple movies. We watched The criterion collection had the ghost ship which I had never seen which I thought had. It has a very similar approach to kind of What's happening in the shadows? Which is most of his films are using that strategy of not showing the thing and then I watched by myself. The body snatcher and both of them. I thought were pretty great. I mean I this is also a case where I I. I probably saw Kent Jones's documentary before seeing any of the films and while that was a great thing for my film education it also kind of warped perception of the movie because I was seeing it as a kind of intellectual exercise in a way where I understood technique as opposed to some of these other movies that we're GonNa talk about here where I just happened to be nine years old when I saw it in a completely reorganized my brain chemistry in a way but I do like his movies. And especially this one that you've chosen well and then also just the last thing to say but it may be that because it's not special effects and spectacle it anticipates where horror movies would go in the sixties with the idea of the monster within right. I mean here. It's not a an invading apor vampire. It's the idea of a woman who's subconscious and her inner life motivates this transformations client about the link between monstrous and desire and monstrous and repression. Which is why it tends to be. You Know Pretty Beloved Academically but I mean by the sixties. Neither US talk about these movies. But you start having the idea of the human monster in movies like psycho or whatever else and you can kind of trace aligned from the way cat. People stages horror towards that stuff. I think I think that's right. And I think it's probably a capitals nifty double feature with the peg for this film the invisible man because that movie is also as much about.

King Kong Dracula Frankenstein Pinocchio Adam Neiman Paul Schrader Kent Jones King Kongs Ken Count Elizabeth Moss Godzilla James Cameron Lebron L. Director United States Disney Karloff Frankenstein Peele John Carpenter Joan
Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

The Big Picture

10:08 min | 4 months ago

Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

"We have a special sort of conversation. Here we're joined by Mister Robot. Creator the Creator of the film comet The director of Amazon's homecoming. Yes Sam. Esmail saying what's up. Hello how are you? I'm so excited to be here. I'm such a fan. Oh that's very sam. You wanted to play a game with us. I did now. I want to know why you wanted to play that game with us and I also want you to explain the game. Well explaining it okay. I'll let me start by saying I'm a huge film. Learn as I think anybody who listens to the watch probably already gust. And I've always played this game with all my film nerd fans and so I figured one when I started listening to your podcasts. Which obsessed with a huge fan of I figured especially with Amanda Sort of counterpoint? To talk to your thinking Shawn's like I just thought this'll be a fun game to play the game. Basically and again. This is sorry for listeners. Who are not going to be in on this because it's so inside. It's not even that insight. It's but it's it's really not OK okay. I won't apologize here. We go is a good game in and you deserve it. It's the best director per decade and the best director who die who had their debut. That decade does that make sense. Did I explain this? Should we use an example to help people understand it? What's an example that we won't? Won't you trample on the choices that we've made here? Well we look at this decade. We had we had like a number of actually great film. Directors made their debut Jordan. Peele with get ou- Greta Gerwig with Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Man. This favorite with El Camino until nineteen many wonderful. Thanks well actually. Gertler made no thanks. But it's it's it's it's it's. It's good to bring up Vince. As an example because he actually that was his feature directing debut which is all coming up. Now the thing is it's not necessarily not saying what's the best directorial debut? Just the director that we appreciate. The most made that debut made their debut in that decade so I think that there's a couple of semantic complications around now and you know as well as I do that there are student films. Their short film features so. Let's lay the groundwork. Because Vince directed episodes of Britain. He directed the pilot breaking bug which I think was in the prior decade but we're talking feature directorial debut so that seems easy to Parse. It's not as easy to Parse as it seems. Now tell me why well. Are you talking about dual are GonNa be Spielberg is is a particularly complex example? Because of nine or you're talking about nine gallery 'cause that's TV while he made a movie when he was seventeen called firelight for five hundred bucks and is that a film. Is that a feature film even his parents saw. I wouldn't say a featured like a debut meaning. It was released in movie theaters got it. Okay commercially available. Commercially available attack. Those are good ground rules. I'm glad that we established that play into my less later on. I do consider to be because it didn't get released in theaters. Well it is a feature film but it was not this little guy but that is considering his feature debut his first full length movie right what. What's the movie after that? Then Land Express okay all right so yes we'll stick to that okay before we play the game now. The people understand the game I want but just add one other thing the interesting thing about this game and I think will when we go through. We'll see it's where the decades are hard because there's just so many amazing options and where the decades are not A. There's not a lot of options. I just find the conversation around that to be interesting because lanes a little bit about where movies are and where they're doing exactly specifically the nineties which I thought was just a burst of like creative inspirational film makers and then the very decade after the ONS which I struggled I struggled to find. I have some counterpoint to that point but I I wanna use this as an opportunity to pick a bone with you. Oh Wow okay I resent you. I resent your your appearance on this podcast because what I what we need. What this podcast needs is people like you making movies and television shows will but you love movies and you film in a very discreet way. Yes but and I mean I guess we're going to get into it right now. It's gotTa think about think about indie filmmakers. What happened let's say Ryan Kugler? Who Loved Fruitvale? Right mazing what happened to him. After he made fruitvale he went into the machine he went into the machine. And that's what's happening with a lot of these other directors and that. That's the difference between the nineties and now so I think. Pta came out with holiday today. Is he making you know Batman in two years and by the way no not dissing on Batman? I'm excited for When Matt Raises Version of it? Because I'm a fan of his but I think it's just the industry is dictating a lot of what directors are doing now and you know and not to 'em this point that's the machine that we're in right now so and that's more reflective of the decade so t to to get to my TV point. Tv's where you get to make the interesting shit. I don't know if I could have made mister robot as a feature in fact I tried well. That was my fault. Got a little long winded. With how long was that? That forty five. Our film now That feature from I wrote ninety pages of wasn't even into act tune. That's when I realized I was in trouble. Was there a divergent path for you where after comet you could have just doubled down and said I'll stay. I'll continue to stay kind of broke but I'll keep making movies will. Yeah I mean that was the plan I was going to make Mr Buzzing indie feature and got stuck with it and Steve Golan Who You know owns anonymous content who Read the pages of Missouri Button at the time detective had just come out and he just He had just produced. That and I thought women that will this is fucking coal. And I don't need to do anything with this. I don't need to refashion the script that I had in mind and fitted into this to our box and honestly I was just really more. I remember thinking I was way more excited about true detective than I was about anything. Elsa came out there. Trust them into. What are your thoughts on true detective because I have no idea? I don't love thank you. Yeah I think I think I see yes. The first season I think true detective on its face is like a accomplished piece of television filmmaking and also I'm a huge fan of cary Fukunaga always and forever Perhaps not for the same reasons. Assess it to me actually wrap. It was such a turning point. Anything his best thing that he's done. I'm not even going to say Jane Eyre Okay. I haven't I haven't seen that I haven't seen the new Bond movie I but I'm really looking forward to it because I'm also a bond person and also I just you know I think true true detective as this carries best thing. I think that's probably true but my issue with detective is not actually true detective itself. It is the dialogue around your detective. And also I think that's a pivot point in terms of when and how we started evaluating TV in terms of tracking shots and the actual just the athletic like filmmaking as a way to bring the an experience. What is this athletic yet? Flex now and then on twitter people are now saying slaps what what is all? I don't understand that you want to explain the Internet. Let's start with the athletic because Amanda I. I've heard you use a lot and I've I've been on a lot of sets of never heard anyone say the words. I think the first person he was at my friend on the TV critic Philip asking and I think it puts its finger on this idea of money that you bring her up because she wrote this she wrote. It was a harsh. I mean whatever I respect her reviews she dissed my one episode of Mister Robot whereas all one tracking shot. I assume yes is what you mean by athletic because I do think that Filmmaking and TV and everything is more than cameras and more than where the camera is and there is such a absolutely station online. The damore as more aspect of filmmaking and I think that the tracking shot is caption of that and just like. Oh Wow. Did you see what he did. That was so cool. Oh my God. The camera is moving. You know don't you think it but don't you think has a to me every every sort of choice that you make with the camera has an effect and yes to some extent it it takes you out of it and draws attention to itself but to some extent. I really I mean what do you think of the Copacabana Sean? And I and I and I do. Actually I think even tracking protective is effective. But you know we're doing a podcast right now. That isn't essentially about how we talk about. Film and like establishing a Canon of source. And the cannon is so reliant on where do we put the camera and what did they itch on showing us an either. Don't respond to that artistically at some point. I'm just like Yay like fancy camera. Shots you got it. Congratulations to you but I do also think it distracts from the other equally important. I feel making that. Don't get enough credit. I think code is also a specifically athletic is code for Masculinity. You know it's code for this sort of The might of the male filmmaker. Now that's not always true if you watch like strange days for example. Kathryn bigelow is doing a lot with the camera yet. It is unorthodox and cool and might have what would otherwise be deemed kind of masculine energy. But I do think that true detective and largely the dialogue like you're saying was about a lot of dudes being like Yo. This is sick now. Personally I thought it was sick. Oh okay but I I would. I was not a fan of those scripts and I don't think that story is very strong but I thought that was really well

Director Mister Robot Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Amanda Sort Esmail SAM Batman Kathryn Bigelow El Camino Amazon Cary Fukunaga Shawn Gertler PTA Twitter Spielberg Ryan Kugler Mr Buzzing Britain Copacabana Sean
Europe's winter storm moves east, disrupting travel, schools

Dennis Prager

00:35 sec | 5 months ago

Europe's winter storm moves east, disrupting travel, schools

"Strong winter storm but his battered Europe with hurricane force winds and heavy rains have killed several people and cause severe travel disruptions stole Kiara Mr bean in Germany and Switzerland and Elsa in Norway schools flights to be grounded and rail services council in many north European nations there have been fatalities to what a number of drivers died off their vehicles were hit by falling trees Britain which bore the brunt of the storm on Sunday is assessing the damage and working to get power restored to twenty thousand or more homes the storm has now largely passed through

Europe Kiara Mr Bean Germany Switzerland Elsa Britain Norway
Death toll rises as storm moves eastwards across Europe

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Death toll rises as storm moves eastwards across Europe

"A strong winter storm that has battered Europe with how we can force winds and heavy rains have killed several people of course the severe travel disruption storm Kiara the new Sabine in Germany and Switzerland and Elsa in Norway this course flights to be grounded and rail services council in many north European nations there have been fatalities to when a number of drivers died off their vehicles were hit by falling trees Britain which bore the brunt of the storm on Sunday is assessing the damage and working to get power restored to twenty thousand or more homes the storm has now largely passed through Franz the weather experts warn the Mediterranean island of Corsica could see winds as high as one hundred and twenty miles per hour later Monday shells the late this month London

Europe Kiara Sabine Germany Switzerland Elsa Norway Britain London
Grace Kosko: A Collector of Certifications

FitLabPGH

09:32 min | 5 months ago

Grace Kosko: A Collector of Certifications

"We are with grace. Costco Grace is a lifetime mover job. She's a physical therapy assistant. But if that's not enough. She's done a variety of other things so one of the questions. I often ask for my other podcasts. Moving to live is what your thirty second elevator Spiel of what you do so you see somebody somebody comes up to you. We're done interviewing. They said well. Who are you what do you do? What do you tell them? That is a difficult question. Let's see I am in the process of reinventing inventing myself. I am a former hairstylist. And became a yoga instructor. Loved learning about the human body. And I'm now in massage therapy school after completing physical therapist assistant school last year so I'm a collector of certifications and licenses and I may use that collector of certifications in the future thinking down the line. You suspect in the future. After doing the massage therapy there will be additional certifications coming along possibly strength and conditioning coach and I think one of the things grace was mentioning before we started recording is her boyfriend is also a collector of certifications. And he's got some of his own and his business and he us also also said he's branched out into the health and wellness field also very much. So he's a geek so nutrition so so pressure is on. If you get to know grace you have to keep up with the certifications vacations. My favorite question. I always went ask people from Philly. Pittsburgh is. Are you a Pittsburgh native if so why are you still here. If not what brought to Pittsburgh I am a Pittsburgh. Native grew up in a suburb about thirty minutes. Outside of the city in North Huntingdon. I don't know why I'm still in Pittsburgh. I would love to leave but I just don't know of anywhere to go that I love more than Pittsburgh and I know this is a podcast about movement. I always want to ask people. Obviously now is a yoga instructor working as a physical therapy assistant. You're going after. I believe you said at some point strong. I which is a kettle bell training certification which ages no joke. Were you active growing up or were you somebody who's like yeah. I don't like being active and kind of as a follow up to that where you active because mom and Dad said get the hell out of the house. Elsa don't come back until dinnertime or because mom and dad were active. If you had brothers and sisters they were active and you kind of got dragged along with them so my family is not an active family. My mom did tell me to get out of the House and not come home until dinner. I actually my fitness journey didn't start until I was about eighteen. I had ED Attended cosmetology school and gained weight. Because I ate from the vending machine on every ten minute break that we had and ballooned up to you two hundred pounds and I said Nope this has got to stop so stop. Drinking pop started eating better started attending a fitness class. Just that was local in our neighborhood neighborhood and eventually made my way to an official. Jim started taking yoga class. I loved the Yoga Teacher. She worked at a yoga. Studio became came a yoga instructor so it was just this little bits here and there that I collected and then Found that I really love weight training as well I'm unnaturally flexible person. But I noticed I was starting having some aches and pains and I thought maybe I need to do the other end of things and started weightlifting. Dabbled a little bit and cross bit But we have our own gym downstairs with pedal bells because you can do so much with one little weight. And that's why I'm pursuing that certification now now and I'm curious people that you knew when you were growing up or maybe when you first went to cosmetology school that you still keep in touch with. Do they think you're crazy. Do they love what you're doing. Do they look look at you and say what the heck you taking years off your life I would hope. They think that I'd love to be an inspiration to my friends and people that I know. I don't don't think they think I'm crazy. They just let me go. Do my own thing I try to impart that to them as well. I haven't really convinced many people although I do have two two friends that wanted to attend taste of fitness that was hosted at the ace hotel in East Liberty. So we got to do that together. And that was Super Fun thinking now in your fitness journeys said not super active growing up figured it out at eighteen because I know a lot of people. Don't they just continue eating away. They did growing up up thinking vending machine. Food is good looking back on it now a few years later. What do you think made the biggest difference or made you say I need to do something about this Honestly probably wasn't until I met my boyfriend that I really had my a come to Jesus moment with food and started figuring out why I was so emotionally emotionally connected to food. That was the big component for me. My mom always had baked goods in the house. Home Baked goods not little debbie snacks and it was a dessert after every meal will I was also part of the Clean Plate Club So as I started living on my own I started cooking from cooking white magazine so I was able to help myself out with that. But yeah until you go down the emotional path and the mental path of Y. You're eating the way you are and making the decisions that you are. I don't think there can really be changed and that was sweat. Did it for me and I think a lot of people don't hit on with that as it's different for everybody. There's not one magic thing I know we had earlier. podcast guest who transitioned transition from running to was in school and gained some weight and then started cycling because his dad and his brother who were both physical therapists said. Hey you need to do something and I asked the question and I said did they talk to you about your health. He said No. No my brother just guilted me into it so I think it's important for some people that is what it is like peer pressure and for other people it's figuring Out What's the emotional attachment. What works for you doesn't necessarily work for me or somebody else? I know for me. My journey with food was when I made the mistake of taking a nutrition class in college is like ooh. Some of this stuff isn't really good for me so I still like to eat the whole blueberry pie but it's probably after doing an eight or nine hour activity where it's like okay. I need calories. I'm curious also with the progression with fitness. One of the things that people often find. They're eighteen nineteen twenty. They get in school. They're out on their own. It's like okay I got school. I've got maybe work and I've got lots and lots of free time as you've probably figured out as you get older as you collect more certifications that I know from chatting with you you have at least one dog and at least one cat things start to pick up. How do you find the time? I'm to make sure that you stay active or their time. Just say I just can't do this because a lot of people say boy I'd love to work out or I'd love to watch what I eat but I just don't have time. It's easier to go out to eat so a lot of times times. Hearing what other people do is beneficial. Yeah that I don't understand why time gets less as you get older and it's Trying to optimize it as has best you can so I try not to burden myself with the need to exercise. I fit it in. Where can Dan so Mondays are completely obliterated? I don't even think about it Tuesdays are my day off so I fit it in where I can there Instead that of sitting on the couch I'll sit on the floor and I'll do either some stretches or some muscle activation stuff Taking my dog for a walk Crawling around on the floor is a great movements So if I don't really have a ton of time I just have made me fifteen minutes before work. I'll just head down into the basement and just do some mhm animal movement kind of stuff for cycle for ten minutes just to get the blood flowing Parking far away from the grocery store taking the stairs. You know the the normal things that you here as well and just kind of realizing that you don't have to block an hour out to go to the gym to fit movement into your life. We're talking with Grace Costco. I think from what she's just described over. The last few minutes she really is treating movement is a lifestyle from hearing. You mentioned crawling around on the floor doing animal animal movements. I have a suspicion at some point your future the move nat certification is going to become one of the things you do. I know for moving to live. We interviewed Jenny plus lost from New Mexico as a physical therapist who's actually moved using move nat in the clinic. She works with she was actually introduced to it by another physical therapist. And you hit on another thing that I don't think a lot of people take into account as far as making movement part of their lifestyle. You said we've got a gym in our basement and a couple of kettlebells or t-rex machine she into something like that then you don't blow the fifteen twenty thirty minutes going to the gym the ten minutes to park the five minutes of BS ING with the Front Desk Staff. Not In a bad headway. You've got twenty minutes if you've got twenty minutes or you've got ten minutes or five minutes you've always got it there and it's like I've got kettlebells upstairs I've got kettlebells downstairs pedal uh-huh kettlebells in my on my patio in the backyard. And it's it's really. I think you've hit on something enough. People don't do get some stuff for home because that's beneficial official. We have a basket in our living room. That's filled with kind of recovery stuff so balls. Resistance bands are everywhere. My boyfriend has a hand weights in his office. And we are Jim downstairs and in the summertime of course the deck is filled with staff when we have actually have a climbing rope from the bottom of the deck up to the top. I got stuck on it. Maybe next time you could build a climbing wall on the deck also. That's one of the things that I would like to do. That's definitely on our on our list. Climbing is One of our new hobbies that we started last year and definitely love

Pittsburgh Instructor Costco JIM Official North Huntingdon Yoga Teacher Grace Costco DAD Philly East Liberty Elsa Clean Plate Club Studio Front Desk Staff DAN Jenny New Mexico
Amazon Product Photography with Danny Carlson of Kenji ROI

Amazing FBA

09:24 min | 5 months ago

Amazon Product Photography with Danny Carlson of Kenji ROI

"Ladies and Gentlemen Boys Girls Michael Visa hit from the podcast. I'm here with Donny. Calls from Kenji. Roi Why that is one of those underachievers Founded the optimization enlisting agency Kennedy are Y is is to Actualize Freedom Caucus and Waco's a lifestyle enthusiast living in Bali. I guess if I lived in Bali I would probably be more enthusiastic chrome lifestyle as well so along with apparently quite a few of the US by While as an Stocksi living the dream so we had a really fantastic presentation down the summarizing the staying the three elements which you mentioned which keyword optimization key info communication and persuasive desire to Seemed like tastic three so big picture hooks to hang stuff on so the next obviously to look at it. Listing is can we dealt with woods a great Didn't catch folks. I Radi Greedy Edgy. To listen to watch even better. The presentation on the video. Formats educates amazing. FDA DOT com slash. Kenji K. E. N. J. you'll be able to find. And if she downloadable Donnie as well. So let's get into photography that and so what are the basic principles fuel product photography. So you've go to very principle driven strategy driven way of looking at words quite sure you have a similar strategy from the products. What are the first principles would be? Buy Y yes. Product photography is the most important part of an Amazon listening for the conversion rate actually converting people to sail. It's not going to get people to your listing except for the main image because you need the rescuers and everything like that but once they're on your listing that's basically their impression of your products and a lot of people will they're cutting out the wrong impression and just because they have a couple of good images doesn't mean you can get away with having one or two really terrible Just think about it this sway. You know we're human beings and we do actually judge each other based on appearance whether you like to think so or not and if you show up to work does address really nicely for seven days in a row but then on the eighth day you showed up without any pants on people are going to judge you pretty strongly based on that right. I don't think you're go that you're less Depends on what kind of job you have. I suppose. But that's the impression that you're putting if you have six really great images in any seven images just garbage edged like with your iphone and the lighting this you can barely tell what your product is right. So every single image matters on Amazon. The the second biggest principle I think people get wrong is not having a very specific purpose for every single image. Let's just say that a lot of Amazon shoppers. Do not it read. You're listening they're just GonNa read maybe your title and maybe scan the bullet points maybe scan over your description. better if it's an eight plus content or ABC description but probably. They're going to look at the photos the price and they're gonNA make a buying decision. People are lazy and was an image. You can communicate a much more information in much less less time even if there's no text on image br example if there is a model that is wearing a rain jacket for example wearing a rain jacket. And they're out in the forest forest and they're getting rained on his and his ripping over top. There is a ton of information in that image. Right there it is showing roughly how the fit of the rain jacket jacket like is it. Does it show up really drooping model to show up super tight in showing that the hood is over in a show that totally waterproof or shows the water coming off there. It shows edited song geared towards hikers. People are using it outdoors. It just. There's so much information your brain can insulate take in from an image rather than reading which is much slower so you WanNa have a very specific purpose for each one of these. I recommend creating your shot list in advance. Whether you're doing the voters yourself or you're getting a professional the company that you report your your buddy create a shot lists that is based around the most important things to show about your product. So it's kind of comes back to copywriting principals identifying what the most key benefits your product provides are based on your research and then creating the shortlist from that maybe one of the key benefits alleged that you have. Is You know it repels water right. Let's go with the rain. Jacket example again. How is the best way to show that repels water? You could show. That was a graphic design image with like a rain droplet on it with an icon but probably a more effective way to show that it'd be having D'Amato wearing a rain jacket and a bunch of water. Actually she coming off it. It's it's a flasher way to show that but something like sizing is probably better shown in a graphic design image. Where you have the rain jackets sitting when you have some markers showing okay? This dimension is strictly three inches. This dimension like Chess Dimension is twenty two inches and stuff like that so you really gotta think once those who have your amount of images and you have each one of those filled out. What the key benefit? What is the best type of image? Actually show off that benefit and you wanna be using a mixture of less model graphic design images was some graphics added to them and some studio images was white background. Even if it's just only your niche which are just because Amazon requires that that main image so that is just an overall concept that a lot of people just don't put enough time and energy into and one more thing when it comes to you lifestyle images I see this all the time and it makes me cringe so much when you have a model using your product make sure that the model is actually actually in the act of doing something that you're trying to show. The model should not holding the product in posing like looking at the camera. And like the worst is. When it's a supplemental laments? Something like that or like a skin care product and it's like holding the packaging and just like looking at the camera like they're trying to show but it just blows my mind that people think that that's a good idea. The whole point of having a lot is showing the customer. What they're like? There's going to be like after having products and you know what what kind of benefit you're trying it show comprehensive Elsa so Yeah I like the The Klay mindedness. You very very good at cutting to the chase of this. This was something is really helpful site. Where every image masses Yasser that people will judge and rightly has its against world? Djembe sleep trying to put on some kind of best front especially in a work situation but in a sales situation we all know. It's exited the pets tried to put on the best fraud. Said they show some colored biddle problem even when the Up in what north is going to be like what it tends to your house. Rise was the feeding the APP. The question happened lines. Yeah I was just thinking about. It's it's completely relevant to Amazon Bud. This way you get away with wearing pants. New Pants Transition And not get if you look at online. David conferencing type stuff like with say US the other way. If you get away without Kadett craziness so very good point but joking aside Kevin King these very very strong image at Decades says the secret to be judged on your worst image which is a great old of thumb. So I love the you've reminded us about. I think the point where if you can get get five fantastic images out there but at six one in if it's going to be mediocre so very good reminded on the second one is every imaging having a pep is really important and then the cartoon benefits which is the basics of good salesmanship but a Lotta people mess it up completely. They get abused by this object in front of them stop. Budget crossing offing Why are we so tell me a bit more than if we're going to be very clear about the purpose of each image tightly? I don't say the Started image being. I used to communicate bests than how do we decide. What sort of voter or indeed waltz the machines because the missionaries top purpose? Again that it needs to be benefit different but how do we structure listing as whole so that the flow into each other in some logical order. Yeah so the logical order in my opinion is to go off key info optimization if you guys heard the other podcast episode or we're going over the triple optimize listing. One of those. Three pieces is key impo optimization. That's basically just whatever that list of the most key benefits that you came up with the shot list order those and or importance for the your customers your products and the most important ones should be in the most prominent places realistic. So so the two most important places would be the first three images and then the first little snippet every title after Your First Main Keyword is should be your first name followed by. I most important piece of information. So let's say on a really common one is with food containers kind EP free. He has a real trigger word. People were only looking for BP free food containers. They don't want the cheap Chinese ones that are going to need help but this crazy hormone meddling chemical into their bodies I would put. BPA Free in that second all snippet of the title and then after the main image images by regulations has pure white background and just product product. But I would put that whatever image you have created for. EPA would be the second image because it's just the most important thing

Amazon Kenji K. E. N. United States Bali Donny Michael Visa Kennedy Waco Donnie EPA ABC D'amato Fraud BP Elsa Biddle Kadett
Washington Post places reporter on leave after Bryant tweet

Red Eye Radio

03:43 min | 5 months ago

Washington Post places reporter on leave after Bryant tweet

"On the Washington post yesterday actually suspended a reporter assist a reporter twelve tweeted a link to the daily beast yeah so that the disturbing allegations about the Kobe Bryant rape case she actually just tweeted a link to the article in The Washington Post suspended her that's how much quarter he was getting dressed I'm good it was a quick second no he wasn't nope was the civil trial he was gonna go to prison no she decided she he was charged with rape and all unlawful imprisonment and then she decided not to testify but she and to demands for in in it exchange for that that he put on a public apology which he did a written apology he wrote he said I did I realize I thought it was consensual I realize now that she didn't and then the civil case went on and on in two years later he settled he pay seven I know that and then of course he settled the biggest civil case of all which was with Vanessa when he wore a ring for four million dollars we still talk it also was the genesis of his beef which Jack because he he threw shack on the bus he absolutely did tell the police that I should have done which acted which is pear all right I think you through Shaq and Gilbert arenas on the bus but that was the beginning of the Shaq and Kobe war you're right the shock of course when and then he went on to win right I am yet to what twin wait listen not that's fine you want to go there that's it is out there and it wasn't pretty I'm not a good day for Colby I'm not going there ID remember Colby as an unbelievable ambassador to the game and a great father that's to me that that is Kobe Bryant a guy that hundred million dollars in the bank businesses all over the world then picked up his kids at school I don't wanna guys into that burnout I don't know a lot of guys who just regular guys that do that and this little gold Jana he loved us all desperately he was a mentor he was a coach what was your game he was there chip practice he was there well you know it's funny he was actually on with the Jimmy Kimmel and they talk specifically about Jana this is a couple years ago listen to this always say if you look at the eldest daughter she's always like the call responsible thoughtful one you know and then the second sisters like a tornado no way Elsa and Anna you know this you free the city and all that I know she's responsible about and then as I'm just jump off a cliff it's good stuff and that's certainly our house then we have to order yours settles stores geon a right yeah also she really is like on a you get yeah how about that she was correct me if I have anything this wrong but you had a game and it was a playoff game against the Suns you you you tied the game went into overtime and then you scored at like six seconds left then you raced to the delivery room and later that evening like the early in the morning your daughter was born that sounds sounds about right can you do that night like the day after you members I did you know your life was in labor while you're playing the game not she likes it didn't happen during the game would happen after I like so there's no thought like maybe I'll miss this one and head home is that is that again overtime is not a good idea in the long run yeah yeah yeah you are not forcing me out with this if you want to play ten over times if it came down to it would you not no no he was a for his

Washington Post Reporter
Future of the Labour Party, ICC Investigation, Black-Jewish Relations

People of the Pod

11:35 min | 6 months ago

Future of the Labour Party, ICC Investigation, Black-Jewish Relations

"Liam whore is the Europe editor for moment magazine. It has been covering Labor's antisemitism awesome scandal since two thousand fifteen. He joins us now to help us understand. What's next for that party for British Jews and for the United Kingdom Liam? Thank you so much for joining us. I thank you for inviting me for the most part analysts are chalking up. Labour's defeat to having the wrong message on Brexit but there is is no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn. The Labour leader was historically unpopular. And no doubt that a part of that unpopularity was due to the anti eighty. Semitism that he let grow in the party. Are there grumblings on the far left that Jews are responsible for his defeat. And that's something that British Jews are worrying about. I think what we've seen since the election is people on the far left at Labor constituency meetings and online researching the British Jewish Institutions. Such as the Board of Deputies or indeed the chief rabbi Were in fact stories or conservatives I should say and innocent intervening in the election on their side. That's what he wanted to the things that the board of Deputies hope that the future Labour leader will expunge from the and that is one reason why they've come forward with the ten pledges in recent days. You mentioned the list of ten pledges that the Board of Deputies the kind of umbrella Ella Organisation for British Jews that the Board of Deputies released just a couple of days ago they basically say that these are the ten things or perhaps the first ten things the Labor Party needs to adopt needs to do in order to heal its relationship with the Jewish community. And we don't need to go through them one by one but broadly what are these ten pledges calling calling for. Well as you say broadly the first thing is that Outstanding Cases Anti Semitism in the Party needs to be resolved and the discipline under reprocessed to have to be made independent again and sh- interference from the leadership team sort of around. Jeremy Corbyn in this process must come to an end thereafter. What's I think? What's important folder? The board is to reestablish a working relationship with the leader of your party after all when a function is to be a conduit between the panoply of organizations they represent and and the government Foreign bodies and so forth and finally just add that one of the things they want to see done is that the full I h Ra the definition of Anti Semitism. With all of these examples applauses will be introduced and used in disciplinary cases within the party. That was a major eric. Eric disputes within the party last year or earlier this year. And that's one of the things I want to get done here at. AJC We're very proud of having been a part of authoring during the era definition but for our listeners who aren't familiar with the definition and why it's so important. Can you just say a word about that. Well because of dispute within the party I should say making making more specific is that People on the far left of the party were concerned that this definition would prevent them from Criticizing sizing Israel or Israeli policy. Which of course? He's not well. The definition does he's indicate ways in which rhetoric concerning Israel Israel can tip over into antisemitism I believe for example if people would say that the actions of the Israeli government towards what's the Palestinians in some way resemble the actions of Not Towards Jews in Europe in the nineteen forties So really they had nothing to worry about. But this is all tied to a much larger augmented. It was rambling on throughout the entirety of Jeremy Comex leadership of the Liberal Party concerning anti Israel rhetoric break and wearing that becomes at. You haven't ISM or for example. If someone challenging British Jews were to somehow hold them accountable for the actions actions of the Israeli government. I think that would also be seen as anti Semitic under the IRA definition which is really important. Considering the way that often we've seen across Europe and perhaps in Britain specifically people tried to do that. Try to discredit jus. I think there's a slur that has cropped up in the UK. Zayas people who you you know. They're interested in defaming and demeaning. They don't really have any way to do it except to try to tie them to Israel so I think it's important that the Labor Party adopts the definition in order to make very clear to its constituents that that kind of thing is anti Semitic well quite an in recent days we have an example of that which is that There's no sort of I would say online activists By the name of Rachel cousins. Who goes by the alias? Rachel Swindon who has a following of tens of thousands of people on twitter. It's unclear whether she is or is not in fact a member of the party but she's nonetheless very close to the sort of cold and leadership and in response to the boards pledges. She tweeted that as I previously said that the board was essentially a conservative organization and also came out with is her own or Or perhaps found only list of pledges for the board which more or less argue that the board had to come out and condemn Israeli military action. In the West Bank thank or condemn what she calls the ethnic cleansing of Palestinian communities in in the West Bank in other words as you said holding British Jews accountable for the actions. uh-huh office ready government. which if they at the very least a dangerous road to go down and she somebody who has previous four in this regard having tweeted about the rothschilds and the so-called influence in the past so the point of this is to say that changing the Leo Party is only the first step? They won't be root and branch Tusk to erotic antisemitism from the Ponti it is always interesting to see how those people who take part in what is called the new antisemitism this kind of attacking Jews shoes on the basis of what Israel does how at the end of the day they are also just old antisemites in the way that she brings up Rothschild conspiracies and things like that. I wanted to ask you about one of the pledgers. In particular number eight is entitled engagement with the Jewish community to be made via its main representative groups and then in explains Labor must engage with the Jewish community Levi its main representative groups not through fringe organizations and individuals. That sounds like it's referencing. Something like there's some history there. Can you tell us a little bit about that. Sure I mean I mean Jeremy Corbyn is somebody who was throughout the time he was leader of the party. Never very much interested in the views and concerns all mainstream British Jewish ortganizations. He has historically been in most of the time that he was leader. Always much more comfortable with what the board calls fringe organizations for example He wasn't much interested in The Jewish Labor movement which is sort of the mainstream Organiz ation all Jews in Labor Party or affiliated with the party rather Jewish Voice Labor whose membership I think could fit into a phone box. I mean if you look at their rallies and meetings the the next in the Guardian newspaper. It's always the same ten fifteen twenty people who assigning these latches At the same time At one of the times when the relationship between Jerry in British Jewish groups was was at his lowest he attended a Saito organized by a group called choose. Who are legitimate tendency in the Jewish community and represent people who have felt themselves felt this affiliated pushed away from the mainstream left-wing clock but they themselves I'm sure would say the reps and also a a very small number of people also Jeremy's also been affiliated with sort of anti-zionist ultra Orthodox people who live in his community but he did not have a working relationship with the board he did not have a working relationship with the chief rabbi in so far as I know and not that he had a working relationship with with the Jewish Leadership Council? which sort of is a you might say a rival organization to the Board of Deputies also a representative group so this point eight? This engagement group is really about the board wanting to reestablish Atlantic communication and a working relationship with the party which is sort of one of the sort of raison. d'etre foil for the board. It sells I'm going to move on in just a moment. Kind of forward-looking questions but there is one more retrospective effective thing that I'm curious about. which is what are we to make of people who are real friends of the Jews or certainly seem to be who campaigned for Labor in this last election? I'm thinking of people for example like London. Mayor Sadeq Khan who has said all the right things about anti Semitism done many of the things about about antisemitism but nevertheless tried to make Jeremy Corbyn the next prime minister should we hold that against him. I case if someone likes to Econ we should not hold that against against him and I think I think you know people who reunite kind of position which is to say supposedly oh party but not supposed to Jeremy Corbyn were very torn because the reality is the British electoral system that much like the Americans. There's it ends up becoming a two-party system Elections to the House Elsa parliament more or less function like elections to the House representatives. There are six hundred fifty constituencies. Each insurance becomes its own kind of to race and in many any of them the racist between Labour and the Conservatives and so sort of I would say anti anti Semitic Labor supporters found themselves in a very Korea unenvious position of having to decide. Do I vote for the Conservatives and put into power party that I oppose my entire adult life likely. ooh Aw do I grit my teeth and vote for the Labor Party on the basis that I am somehow voting for the Party and voting for the candidate in my constituency. But somehow not Jeremy Corbyn and I you know I as a journalist. I love about the free in this regard. So I don't have to make such compromises but I nonetheless feel for people who know people like I said Connor or you could answer this people like just flips. Who is now a candidate for leadership who it's not about Anti Semitism in the pause About the kind of compromises. They had to make that time. So no we we. We shouldn't hold I bet against As you intimate in about a month the voting will begin to elect a new leader of Labor this kind of an interesting quirk for our American listeners. The voting voting will actually stay open for more than a month through the beginning of April and people can vote. I guess anytime in that span. Who are the names that we need to know who are likely Lee to win the election and are any of them going to be you know kind of on their own? The answer to Labour's antisemitism problem tackling the antisemitism crisis is not as simple as for lack of a better way of putting removing the head from the snake Having Jeremy Corbyn leader suddenly a good thing because the cost was it the crisis could not be it's solution But in terms of who will become the next leader There this prison time probably two main candidates on the one hand you have Rebecca Long Bailey who is perceived to be the continuity Corbin candidate the date.

Party Jeremy Corbyn Labor Party Labor Israel Board Of Deputies Europe Liberal Party Israeli Government British Jewish Institutions Leo Party Semitism Moment Magazine Representative United Kingdom Israel Israel Liam Brexit Jewish Leadership Council Jewish Voice Labor
"elsa" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

08:46 min | 6 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Elsa from the point they were talking about this tiniest lies that you tell good morning Elsa hi good morning morning site I don't know why I do this it's so stupid I do it all the time I always want people to think that I got a better deal on something that I purchased the car I always did not a few thousand dollars on what I actually paid really I love it grated mission if you're like wearing a cute Sir you're like oh my god yeah clearance rack eight Bucks like that type all else you love this it's great twelve dollars for this jacket really three hundred dollars Nordstrom jacket I don't be like your savvy Sally you get two kudos you get the kudos for the good looking outfit yeah you get a good us for being a good deal money saver yeah it's pretty good I also are you I would take that guild I would let it go all right and now he's we're going to file that we're gonna take the rest your calls at one eight hundred five two zero one zero six seven right after sublime on Cape yeah a new six four seven rockets care of Q. it is given in the morning without engines in about twenty minutes we're gonna talk RJ bell about the NFL playoffs this weekend right now we're talking about lies that you told insignificant lies the smaller the better why would you tell people that it just makes no sense let's start with Sasha in Los Angeles morning good morning so first of all you're gonna have to tell us what what band you're into and then tell us why okay so I'm really into gold over dial up I even like six talk yeah okay no I don't know why you know why that I child I started telling us when I first started seeing them with my friends that I have a grandmother great grandmother that is the gypsy and that's not all yes the former Soviet Union each row yeah but it's not your ally and it's because you feel like because their sound like gypsy inspired all that it'll give you better connection to them yeah there is John Ehret quote unquote gypsy pong thought you know that she needs tiniest connection to that would make me feel cooler I don't hate it I mean listen no one's ever going to be able to find out she wasn't just go with that's true all right yeah thank you saucer we proceed your call your name's really Sasha yeah go to is a hyper yeah and where to park a morning good morning morning smallest lie you told I'm I tell people about my kids don't get a lot of screen time when they do yeah I feel like that's I because I even with a toddler we've been shown study after study that says that it could be very bad for the development and I haven't done it because the studies but there been times where he's crying and crying and like if I just turn the TV on he's he's gonna stop absolutely and I imagine I am not a parent but I have a lot of friends or parents just the judgment from other parents just end the conversation nip it in the bud so you don't have to deal with their judging all what do you mean you didn't press feed no I did my boob always on walk away from it it certainly seems like everybody's just trying to avoid judgmental yeah I mean Jamie it shuts them up right I mean yeah you can tell they act like they get yeah nine we don't do any really really angry birds again thank you for the call we appreciate that we appreciate it listen let's go to Albert and like any other morning Albert good morning are they doing this is Jackie kind of embarrassing but I'm in real estate up here in Glendale and locking yada and as a realtor we all have to use the restroom as well and if someone called you know I'm on the can or if I'm tied up I simply tell mom don't SO inspection doing since you know working in working order I think I think it's fine and I think it's a good excuse he I mean he's not lying I she and that Albert said as a realtor we sometimes have to use the bathroom no fact for you I'll tell you this much there's been times where because of my sewage inspection the Myers been pretty pleased with the results yeah and then the buying the property has a time when the sewage inspection went south and the buyer left immediately because he could you know he sent it back to inspection go south that'll come out about yeah you live there now that's good we have a text message I love I lied about is from three one oh I lied about sleeping when my friends call me during the day and they ask I'm sorry were you sleeping I always say no finally yeah yeah I don't know and then also she says once I fell asleep driving an Australian almost went off the road my friend woke up and asked if I fell asleep I said no I was dodging a kangaroo I think probably the only thank you Gina Marie run with it Kevin is this a good morning Hey good morning morning Hey smallest that kinda insignificant live you told yeah I always lie about staying in the loop with like Oscar nominated film work in film I don't think I don't think you're alone Kevin I really don't Hey have you seen parasite it's a great help finally we haven't seen Paris so you need to see if you need to see this is the conversation but let me let me let me let me let's do art let's do a role play ready have you seen Kevin using parasite totally disagree this will all and I believe that very the worst part is when they call you out on it been billing yeah favorite part I'm like the part with the parents are you can answer.

Elsa
"elsa" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:18 min | 7 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Of two point seven kiss FM demons out is great is just too so so so tell to doing so many different things queen Elsa from the number one movie in the world frozen to love scene or how much you make three hundred something dollars million now four hundred one house to it pushing it it's going to become a crazy anyway you said something to me I want to go back to it I uber and the talk about them recording us in the car so what's the story so here's the gist of it so over is going to launch a feature to audio record rights in the United States as a way to insure passenger and driver safety so who records the driver or the passenger so the driver is always recording and then the passenger you can choose and like your safety whatever in the settings to say whether you want to be recording this ride or not so they're testing this out in Mexico and Brazil the next month or so before deciding to bring it to the U. S. but wait the drivers always recording yeah so the driver is always ready to record but if you have your being blocked this is how I read the article at least if you choose on your over at that I don't want to be recorded then use the driver can't record you make sense yeah except I am on the side of being able to record and then then you as the passenger can always have your setting on to record every no as the driver so I'm saying if you get into my car I should be able to record my safety yeah I think so date I guess you're right yeah I think if you get in it like if you're coming into my space as the driver you should know I mean maybe should say you're being recorded yeah but I think that would be okay I wouldn't want to be told you can't record me tried I still on safe drivers can set up the feature to automatically record all rights wall passengers will have to activate the feature to the app's safety talk forever is recording all the rights so then what that's what it is the driver's record all the rides but we are not recording on our end unless we want to exactly that's what it is but what's different is recorded if you just would have a with you but that it would exist the recording exists I am fine what if it's a sick like safety on this is not fine because I don't want to be recorded I say personal things in my uber right sometimes right are you like buy things you give your credit card information you know how bout you don't do that or that don't buy things and give a credit a lot don't say plus just off it just happens you're in a car right sometimes for an hour it's like your life pops up you're talking about this or that or somebody yeah but you should know you're with somebody you don't know save it for when you get our car yeah maybe but born is listen to take a ride with me I know I know our let's come back in just a second we have missed Tati now what is Masaki focused on in the stars I'm well it's the one appointment that you need to make today before the end of the day based on your sign and with the quote of the day which you might find very useful hang on your point is your on air with Ryan Seacrest wouldn't it be great if your winter holidays came with a guide when they find you parking at the mall.

Elsa
"elsa" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:32 min | 8 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"Just when you thought you had pushed it out of your consciousness it's back manager. Danny that of course is the theme song from frozen. The movie was a massive. Hit the Disney film long-held the crown as the highest grossing animated movie worldwide frozen was written and Co directed by Jennifer Lee who has since been named Walt Disney animation studios chief creative officer the first woman to hold such a position during the making making of frozen to. NPR's Elizabeth Blair sent some time. Spent some time with her in frozen to water. Air Fire and earth are important to the story so he's the wind in the movie the characters call her gail sometimes. She's he's playful and sometimes she's angry. We played a little louder in a windowless room at the Disney animation studios in Burbank. Supervising sound editor Odin. Benny test test plays the different wind. Sounds for a group of people working on the film including Jennifer Lien and her co director. Chris Buck because she blasts that. That tree tree limb away from Ana. That's gale goes your the magic and Gail starts to go around Elsa and then spits the others out. This kind of collaboration goes on on for just about every aspect of an animated Disney movie says Jennifer Lea and you go shot by shot moment by moment frame by frame and discuss everything everything from the emotion to the effects to the camera. The first frozen was inspired by Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale the snow queen one of the heroines. Elsa has magical powers she can make ice and snow in a split second for inspiration for the new movie Lee and a team from Disney traveled to Norway Finland and Iceland wasted on a glacier for the first time really hit us. What would elsa feel standing here? The glacier it's a thousand feet deep is thousand years old it's of nature completely and something she would probably be so connected to and we realized is sort of the mythic round her power. That opened up the story to be something even bigger for us. That's something begins as a secret. Siren that calls astounds..

Disney gail Jennifer Lee Jennifer Lien Walt Disney Elsa Hans Christian Andersen Elizabeth Blair Jennifer Lea Danny Burbank Chris Buck NPR Benny Norway Finland Iceland
"elsa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:53 min | 11 months ago

"elsa" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Elsa Anna good bass by Kurt Porter Perot's catching nice big fresh salmon on the Sacramento River the waiting for more fish at cetera etcetera I hope everyone has a wonderful week RV travel world your RV and boat destination huge selection of RV's and boats all on one line and the only dealer in the Sacramento area with the warranty forever program at no extra charge R. V. travel world Roseville in Rancho Cordova or RV travel world dot com it's important to buckle up your kids I know so you're one hundred percent sure you have the right car seat for your child's age and size I don't know don't think you know no you know car crashes are leading killer of children one to thirteen make sure you have the right car seat this at safer car dot gov slash the right seat a message from the national highway traffic safety administration and the ad council do you have retirement anxiety you're not alone nearly half of all Americans don't think they'll have enough money to retire real estate investments are a great way to alleviate that but most people think real estate is complex confusing in and out of reach renters warehouse is changed all of that will bring it really stay down to earth for average Americans your unique process that over fifty thousand people have already used to invest in single family rental properties it's simple use our online research center to find the best single family rental markets buy properties anywhere in the country with ten it's already in place and let our award winning renters warehouse team handle the headaches of property management for you with renters warehouse you can easily invest in America's best rental markets see immediate cash flow day versifi your portfolio generate greater returns and alleviate retirement exciting search properties around the country by yield a return right now and renters warehouse dot com renters warehouse list invest rent all under one roof local.

Kurt Porter Perot Sacramento River Rancho Cordova America Elsa Anna Sacramento Roseville one hundred percent
"elsa" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"elsa" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"Hey guys, it's canvas and Kayla. And we are directionally talent. We thought we would know every single thing to know in the entire universe by the time we were in our thirties. Guess what we don't we don't at all will stay tuned. Because today we have our live episode that we are airing with our guest, Elsa Collins. Just wanted to thank you so much for coming. It means so much that you came from MIR and fire, thank you to the bungalows Fairmont for. Rarely bungalow. Well, yeah, we, we've been recording in in my living room for the past year. We've been we've started this venture about a eight months ago, we started this podcast. And so if you've listened to before, thank you so much. We were so scared to put ourselves out there and try come from new and get out of our comfort zone. So thank you for supporting that and, and growing with growing pains. And speaking going pains, this is a I live up, so. Well, we tried, we tried really hard. We tried so hard. Okay. Here's the deal. We had an incredibly successful I live show. Thank you, guys, so much. Everyone who was able to come and make it. Thank you, Elsa. Thank you, Melissa, our producer and our editor, unfortunately, it just didn't work out. The sound quality did not come through. We wanted to make sure that you guys really got the full experience of this conversation that we had with Elsa about this is about humanity. It was such a powerful conversation that we're like you know what? Let's just do this again. Let's start over. Let's sit down with Elsa on, we're talking about a lot of the same topics that we brought up that night we have a lot of the same questions, and we just kind of wanted to have a more personal conversation. A deeper dive in some of these issues, and we wanted to give you guys the best opportunity to really be able to listen and absorb the conversation that we were having because we. Felt it was really important. You guys so Elsa was raised on both sides of the border in San Diego, and Tijuana, Mexico. Both of her parents were born in Mexico. She is the last of five children. She's a first generation college graduate, receiving her b in communications and master's degree in sociology from Stanford University. She then pursued a juris doctor at from Columbia law school. She is the co founder of the idea tour. She is on the board of alliance for a healthier generation, and an ambassador for the good plus foundation, when she heard about the news of the young children being detained and separated from their parents. Also, along with her sister said that we have to do something, so they took their experience in social impact, and border issues. And they started this is about humanity and this is about humanity's a movement, whose main goal is to help those affected at the border through education and donation efforts, they worked identified those in need, and then they help fill that need. So basically is a about how she is sickly. Superwoman and without further. Ado here is Elsa Collins. Also, we are so glad that you are back with us. Our live episode was a huge success, but this'll be even better second time is the charm who knows..

Elsa Collins co founder Mexico Elsa Kayla MIR Fairmont Melissa Columbia law school Stanford University San Diego Tijuana producer editor eight months
"elsa" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"elsa" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"In recent history. American military technological vantage has been accused pillar of power and predominance today that is starting to change. It's no longer the case that China can't innovate by contrast. Sometimes there's too much hyper exaggeration of China's potential and innovation and reality always falls somewhere between those extreme perspectives. But it is clear that China is catching up and is devoting and mobilize and considerable resources for quantum computing communications and other technologies, applications in the space. This will be important space to watch going forward. And it's been exciting to have the chance to attempt to create an initial baseline and we're China is today what we're they're looking to go and what some of the potential implications of those ambitions maybe. I'm Scott are Anderson. This is the law for podcast for September twenty second two thousand eighteen. If you ask scientists, what is most likely to kick off the next great wave of technological change? Good number winter, quantum mechanics a field whose physics Albert Einstein once described as spooky potential once tapped couldn't exponentially faster computer processors on breakable, cryptography, and new frontiers surveillance technology. No one understands this better than the People's Republic of China over the last several years has built up an aggressive, state-driven campaigned, accelerate the development of quantum technology. I set of policies intended to put it at the very front of the pack for the next two knowledgeable revolution and give it all the competitive advantages. Such technology is likely to bring to discuss this development what it may mean for the future and how the United States should respond. I sat down with Elsa Kenya, Najib fellow with the center for a new American security and the co author of a new report on China's efforts to achieve quantum hegemony. It's the law fair podcast episode, three forty, nine Elsa Kenya on China's quantum quest. This is a really fascinating report, but I wanna start people out with something a little more foundational. You're talking here about quantum technology which encompasses a whole range of different applications. Walk us through this a little bit. What is quantum technology would you mentioned that it's been described as having spooky properties? I think by Stein, what does that mean in application? Where does it were these properties come from? So I find quantum science and technology fascinating that I will admit French. I am not a scientist. I am limited technical understanding of this. I've done my best in this report to present a readable and realistic impression of what the state of science and technology in this field is and where it's going. And with the potential is though I think I'm in good company. Albert Einstein is said to have said, if this is correct, it's advise the end of science. Neal's bore said those were not shocked when they first come across quantum theory cannot possibly have understood it. So it is indeed a spooky and was actually being quite derisive when he characterized. The notion of quantum entanglement as spooky action at a distance. There was a lot of skepticism at first about whether the physics underlying what are today, becoming technologies could possibly make any sense, but it is a fascinating because technologies that actually start to leverage an employee quantum properties such a superposition entangled, intellectually starting to be used to develop a technology such as quantum computing communications togr Affi as well as different forms of radar and sensing. So quantum computing has received the most attention so far. It uses a cubic day quantum analog of the bitch that can be essentially in a superposition between zero and water simultaneously across all possible states rather than a binary that provides exponential increases and computing power. A lot of excitement about the notion of quantum surpremacy or the point at which a quantum computer can surpass, a classical computer, at least by some metrics and certain players in the field, including Google, including. Researchers in China claim to be on track to achieving quantum supremacy as early as this year or next though that is just one quite symbolic milestone in what will be very long road or perhaps a marathon to the development of quantum computers that are actually fully functional and capable of delivering those massive increases in computing power against broad range of applications..

China Albert Einstein scientist Elsa Kenya Google United States Neal togr Affi Stein Scott Anderson Najib twenty second
"elsa" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Elsa elsa yeltsin mark barnaby am well hello nope oh no many and montaigne this hello pundits not a word bags at cash put my mind on a cofounder known for no miles on hundred we go oh free so these.

Elsa elsa yeltsin mark barnaby montaigne
"elsa" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Elsa don't kick whitney home break a few nickel come simmered saving needs to the twin if we bring it back because maddow crackdown even older death row nicot boy in your fist naked check style now tap me more swag take over eat nickel themes what no weapon protection than happen something that can make you do wrong make you somewhat she can happen really feel some together welcome love.

Elsa whitney maddow
"elsa" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Channel 955

"Elsa if you if you if you ben just lucky lucky for you insures the puerto rico do we go static breeze in paris tell me me ben lucky that's lucky.

puerto rico paris
"elsa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wonderful thing i sometimes they see broadway place i have never seen anything like this the technology the lighting the costumes the sound the special effects it's it's like a movie explain some of these things how do you even fit the theater to hold all these affect where you can see all of the things you see on stage that look like they've got the space debris than seventy cramped into parts of this theater because it's all the economics of it very very hard to fathom but the truth is i we were all charged with putting on a broadway musical and that comes with all sorts of other words attached at broadway spectacle you want all sorts of things and people are going to pay to come out to see a show when we wanted very much to make sure we gave them a show a spectacular show from start to finish but i was also in the center of that with all the effects that we were discussing and the costumes and the sets and the lights and the projections and everything i was also away you wanted something that was emotionally charged something that you that you really were able to cry with them laugh with along the way and for that we need actors at the center of and we've been blessed with this company this first company the company that creating the show they are there every night going on a very remarkable journey and they're acting as well as singing and as well as dancing which is the which are the requirements of a broadway musical but i i it's you know many people know the story you saw so at and you know that we have to go to deep and profound places in this story and i wanted to give that side of it as well so it's a combination of all of those things that i think make up the evening the actress play elsa and anna are just stars.

elsa
"elsa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"The two seemed to connect emotionally given their history of romantic trouble elsa had recently gone through a messy divorce a future albert slowly began to see for himself the two started a correspondence most of the time albert simply vented about believer but after a while the letters turned romantic einstein fell for her due to her compassionate nature and sympathy for his plate having gone through a divorce herself in fact part of the allure of taking the director's job in germany was to be closer to elsa albert moved to berlin for his job in april of 1914 malaysia however caught on to the letters in refused to go to berlin she distrusted elsa fearing her as a romantic rival but with albert now alone in berlin believer eventually gave in and arrived in berlin in late 1914 albert and miliver tried to reconcile but that proved impossible their marital discourse only seemed to grow worse it finally got to the point where mileva left the house taking the children she stayed with a mutual friend while she an einstein tried to work things out the to discuss terms of separation not yet divorce and on july 14th 1914 einstein parted with his sons at the train station this was one of the hardest moments for einstein it said he cried all day when he said farewell to them the no one else to turn to einstein went elsa for comfort she welcomed him with open arms soon the to begin an official romantic relationship and elsa sought to mary albert immediately but albert wasn't ready for such a commitment not yet.

elsa albert director malaysia mileva the house einstein germany elsa albert berlin miliver official mary albert
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"She's a pleaser in ah whereas i even add five raza styler lake i know cornered with ash no you have some water hunter warning water for one at all so it was that at five and i ask darrell how the film got started argued spooned an afternoon with also garage and also was taking without account reduce his killing time like say he came by elsa me in the flood files and she would take out twenty by 24 is and then she would tell the story about the people of the photograph and i did think at that time this is a movie that certainly occurred to me and then i kept not putting it off but not doing it was never on the list of of things that i was going to do accept that over the years more so than ever i've come to believe that i should stop thinking about making movies and just make them so win also started pulling polaroid's out of the flat files i remember this very well she held up wad of them she hell it in such a way as to sort of block out almost everything on except you could see the top of her head or hans holding the edges of photograph and they thought is that so good i can't even see elsa and then i thought yes this is really really good he's kind of a literally eat it in some way not obliterated but supplanted it's what you do when you take take your oxy's i'll say half that black screen and anti holding for the person to see it and so help me this is a very.

darrell elsa polaroid hans
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Death hmm mortality in general uh i suppose you could appendage l i t e il it but i don't quite see it that way i think in many ways it's it's one of the richest things that i've done it may not be the longest but i think there are a lot of really really rich theme i mean i guess there's all kinds of reasons we could speculator on for white people that view it that that way may because it's not about war politics i'll this other people that responded to it overwhelmingly very very early on for which i am grateful you're self being one of them might add errol shared the b side with me last summer and i invited it to the toronto film festival like most people outside cambridge i never heard of elsa dorfmann so the film came as a revelation here's a clip in which he describes her struggle to obtain one of polaroid's few twenty by 24 cameras and you had to be in this in this circle it was really had to faith the line of their pets really i was never a path and i just hung in there i always was charged for every roll of film i never got a free bucks a film i never blatter free essex seven d i never got anything than any how i can't complain 'cause i ended up with a camera but that was firm being in nag elsa when erol undertook this project did you have any apprehensions about him no i didn't i took it is a hoops i didn't take it seriously i i thought oh earl he's tomorrow.

errol elsa dorfmann polaroid essex erol toronto
"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"elsa" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Like consumer polaroid's her pictures develop instantly normally for a client shall take to the client picks their favorite and she keeps the other one that she calls the b side now that polaroid film is discontinued and elsa is eighty years old she's mostly retired in eyrle's film she looks back over hundreds of photos and reflects on her career that innocent of any the explanation is in my life i've ever had not to meet life when you down this had met here need to walk around the euro elsa never had much of a national profile but in cambridge she's an institution aero moved their 27 years ago with his wife julia and their son hamilton he told me way i described cambridge's this city fill with very very smart people none of whom have any desire to talk to you but erl and julia became friends with elsa and her husband harvey silverglate in attorney and criminal defense and civil liberties elsa says about harvey so the only people he will have separate with a julian narrow busied rather work lucky me as an aside i should note that one harvey's defense clients is jeffrey macdonald the infamous surgeon convicted of killing his family his case was reexamined in a book by errol called a wilderness of error as our conversation began errol gave credit to julia for bringing the couple's together leads the result of my wife may all of whom i might add including myself love julia every good and i wouldn't know neither elsa or harvey if not for her i always complain that.

polaroid eyrle cambridge julia hamilton erl elsa harvey silverglate attorney jeffrey macdonald errol eighty years 27 years