19 Burst results for "Ellison Aubrey"

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:39 min | 5 months ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Allies in Europe are taking slightly different approaches toward the crisis in Ukraine NATO allies say they're united in promising massive sanctions if Russia should invade But some are less eager than others Germany is seen as hesitant the UK is largely following the U.S. approach preparing to send soldiers to Eastern Europe UK foreign secretary list trusts spoke with Britain Sky News The number one thing that will stop Vladimir Putin taking action is if he understands the costs of that action And like the U.S. the UK is also providing military help directly to Ukrainian forces Trust says it's highly likely Russia plans to invade Ukraine which Russia denies NPR's Frank Langford is in London Heather Frank Good morning Steve How many troops would the UK be sending Not that many what they're saying is they're considering offering double of their troop deployments through NATO and Eastern Europe and the Baltic states but got to say Steve this is all very low numbers Right now 900 British military personnel based in Estonia about maybe more than a hundred in Ukraine training forces there squadron of 150 Manning light armed vehicles over in Poland is also talk ascending jets and warships but trust is emphasized that it's highly unlikely UK soldiers would fight in Ukraine and NATO has said it doesn't want to send forces into Ukraine because you know Ukraine is not a member of the alliance which is what this is all about Putin has been demanding guarantees that Ukraine will never become a NATO member and NATO saying no This sounds a little like the U.S. approach the U.S. also is talking about sending a limited number of troops to Eastern European nations NATO allies but not Ukraine How do extra NATO troops in nearby countries affect the balance and Ukraine itself Well I don't know that it directly will because as we've been saying these troop deployments are for the most part going to be outside of one thing though is that the ones inside Ukraine like the kind that we have seen by the UK would help to fight the Russians But I think the key thing is to put some of these soldiers on the borders with Russia to make sure that if there's fighting it doesn't spill over into territory of a NATO ally I was talking to a guy Steve named Ben Judah He's a senior fellow at the Atlanta council That's a Washington based think tank This is what he had to say The UK's deploying tripwire forces to indicate that if Russia enters these countries that are NATO allies they will immediately have to face the choice of fighting and killing British troops bringing Britain into the war That's why they're there and that's why they're there in those low numbers But he also said the UK is trying to raise the cost to Putin inside Ukraine and as you were saying earlier the British had been providing Ukraine with a lot of training thousands of anti tank weapons and there's been training I think the number is around 22,000 Ukrainian soldiers This is what Ben also added One is a long running program to train snipers which of course could be extremely useful in the event of Russian invasion or Russian occupation and attempt to take over major cities Well that is a pretty dramatic thing if you're thinking about a Russian occupation 22,000 snipers is something that would make a dramatic difference What has prompted the UK to take a more aggressive stance than say Germany Well I think there's no doubt there's genuine concern the UK though also is not as reliant on Russian energy as Germany is so it has more flexibility And the other thing is it's an opportunity to define itself post Brexit as no longer being in the European Union but still being central to the security of Europe Frank thanks for the update really appreciate it Great to talk Steve That ten pierce Frank Langford New coronavirus cases are falling significantly nationwide as the omicron surge loses Steve But hospitalizations are still near pandemic highs and deaths have been rising too So even as cases drop deaths are going up To explain NPR's Allison Aubrey joins us Good morning Good morning Steve So this is something that we've seen before where the deaths it's a crude sounding term They're a lagging indicator The deaths go up after cases start to go down Nevertheless they're still pretty high It's a little disturbing quite disturbing What can we expect in the coming weeks Well new infections have fallen more than 30% since mid January But in areas that are just now peaking or passing their peak Steve it's a pretty intense scene nearly 18,000 people with COVID are still being admitted to hospitals every day I spoke to the head of Houston methodist hospital doctor Mark boom about the situation there We've seen a pretty sharp decline in infections in Houston the best metric is our wastewater Unfortunately we still see many people coming to our hospitals and getting very ill and dying And they're really in two groups They're either unvaccinated individuals or they're particularly elderly or very very immunocompromised It's completely expected as we just said the deaths in hospitalizations with lag behind the peak and infections but the number of deaths about 2300 people are dying each day right now across the country is quite high And that number has been rising Why is this relatively mild variant killing so many people You know it's because of the large number of infections millions and millions and millions of infections even if a small percentage become very ill And die it just speaks to the volume Compared to last January when most people were vaccinated the death toll is lower last January deaths peaked at about 3400 or so But the fact deaths have risen pretty high during this surge was probably avoidable doctor boom argues Our booster rate in the United States is frankly appalling and embarrassing I mean when we look at ourselves versus the UK and ask ourselves why are so many more Americans percentage wise dying of COVID than people in the UK yet we all kind of are acting similarly It comes down to a couple of things but by far the biggest thing is that they have vaccinated much more effectively the vulnerable population And boosted more and this seems to make big difference in new study has found that the third shot of a COVID vaccine boost it protection against death pretty dramatically This was in people 50 and older in the UK infected during this Do those facts cause health authorities to still be pushing for more people to get vaccinated and boosted despite all the resistance to that Absolutely At this point the consensus is that we will be coexisting with COVID for a very long time Variants will come variants will go some may be consequential Others not The latest variant BA two this relative of Ooma Kron which has been circulating in Denmark and other countries has been identified in the U.S. yesterday on CBS former FDA commissioner Scott gottlieb said it is possible that this variant could extend the tale of this wave of infections that will still drop but it could extend the tail But he said vaccinated and boosted people should be protected There's data out of the UK that suggests that a fully boosted person may be more protected against this new variant than they were against the original strain of omicron And in the final question is it more virulent Is it more dangerous And so far based on what we've seen at a Denmark and the UK which are collecting very good data on this it doesn't appear to be a more virulent strain An analysis by the UK health security agency found that the vaccines appear to be about as effective against this new strain BA two as they are against the original omega variant One good thing about Mondays is we usually hear from NPR's Ellison Aubrey Allison thanks Thank you Steve.

NATO UK Russia Steve U.S. Britain Sky News Ukrainian forces Trust Frank Langford Heather Frank Eastern Europe Ben Judah Atlanta council Putin Germany NPR Frank thanks pierce Frank Langford Vladimir Putin Allison Aubrey Good morning Good morning Stev
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Mary Louise Kelly Now to what is becoming a way too familiar headline cases of coronavirus are surging Well right now they are really surging The U.S. is averaging about 240,000 infections a day That is a 60% increase over the last week Omni Kron is driving the rise in cases though there is also some encouraging news hospitalizations are not rising nearly as quickly and peers Alison Aubrey joins us now hey there Hi there Mary Louise So fair to say we're looking at a repeat of last January in terms of the number of infections Yeah a year ago as the winter surge began cases were averaging in the same range more than 200,000 new infections a day so there is an element of deja vu but you know all the scientists and doctors I've spoken to say we are in a very different situation About 66% of eligible people in the U.S. are now considered fully vaccinated and so despite this rapid rise in omega hospitalizations are so far not rising nearly as quickly doctor Anthony Fauci addressed this at a White House briefing today The data as of last night indicate a 126% increase in cases and an 11% increase in hospitalizations Now we must remember that hospitalizations and deaths are lagging indicators Meaning that it does take a while after cases surge to see it rise in hospitalizations but cases have been rising steadily for weeks now in our Louise so Fauci says it's encouraging that so far hospital admissions haven't increased much suggesting illnesses may be less severe Well and is that where other experts seem to be landing this view that so far at least it looks like omicron infections are somewhat less severe You know everyone I talk to use is the evidence is still a preliminary but yes there's a growing sense that even as the variant spread so quickly and is so contagious many people do seem more protected against serious infection due in part to prior infection or vaccination There's data from the UK from Denmark and in the U.S. too I spoke to Ashish jah He's dean of the school of public health and Brown university about this Now we have several cities with enough omicron experience I'm thinking about New York San Francisco highly vaccinated places that have seen large spikes in cases And it's been enough time that we should be seeing a commiserate rise in hospitalizations and hospitalizations are up but not as much as one would have expected with delta or one of the other variants So this is encouraging he says but all the infectious disease experts I've spoken to warn against complacency They point out hospital resources or already stretched very thin and people who are not vaccinated have a higher risk of severe illness Meanwhile New Year's Eve coming right up on Friday which was the best latest advice on what we should do You know this might be another year to tuck away those party heels maybe bonfire admire is more appropriate because the advice from infectious disease experts is that you know it's fine to gather with a small group of close friends or family and Doctor Fauci says the more that your group is fully vaccinated and boost it the better If your plans are to go to a 40 to 50 person New Year's Eve party with all the bells and whistles and everybody hugging and kissing and wishing each other a happy new year I was strongly recommend that this year we do not do that So make it more of a low key celebration Mary Louise that's the advice Alison we will get out our party hills next week Another year All right sounds good Mary Louis And piers Ellison Aubrey In Brazil weeks of heavy rains have caused severe flooding in the northeastern state of Bahia Dozens of people have died tens of thousands are homeless or displaced The governor is calling it the worst disaster in the state's history Reuters correspondent Graham slattery joins us now from Rio de Janeiro Brazil welcome Thank you There are some harrowing stories coming out of by the people escaping through second story windows dinghies being used to evacuate people Where's the rescue efforts stand right now Well at the moment state authorities and federal authorities are still working around the clock to attempt to rescue as many people as possible As you mentioned about 21 people have died so far in fact over 70,000 are currently homeless and The Rain is still continuing So we're seeing a number of municipalities entering into states of emergency or alert and then exiting them and so on and so forth With tens of thousands of people homeless how is the government providing emergency shelter right now Well it's a good question The federal government has already sent about 200 million in relief funds which is about 35 $36 million but the governor recourse that said that's not enough at the very least that they will need twice that amount simply to build about 5000 new homes which she's estimated will be needed for the families that have been displaced The federal government go home is a longer term project What about the immediate need for shelter right now Well so right now obviously the scenes are very chaotic There's a number of families that are in fact homeless state authorities are working to provide shelter in the short term but obviously the scenes are scenes of desperation and the fact is there aren't immediate short term solutions for this problem Can you describe what those scenes look like Sure We've seen thousands of people rescued from homes that are now completely flat and completely.

Mary Louise Kelly Omni Kron Alison Aubrey Mary Louise Fauci U.S. Ashish jah school of public health and Br New York San Francisco Anthony Fauci Mary Louis piers Ellison Aubrey White House Graham slattery Denmark Brazil
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:54 min | 7 months ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With Sondheim and interviews with people who work with him including James lepine who wrote the books for the Sondheim musicals Sunday in the park with George into the Woods and passion Join us Weekdays at two on 93.9 FMW NYC The NAACP legal defense and education fund is preparing for a change in leadership It's going to be I think a very critical period for the legal defense fund because it is a critical period for our democracy I'm talking with janae Nelson the incoming president of the NAACP LDF about her vision for the future of the organization I'm Melissa Harris Perry and that's next time on the takeaway Weekday afternoons at three on 93.9 FM It's morning edition from NPR news I'm a Martinez And I'm Noel king good morning public health officials have confirmed cases of the omicron variant in at least 20 countries Those same officials are working to determine how effective coronavirus vaccines are against the variant Here's Stefan benzel CEO of Moderna on CNBC Given the large number of mutations it is highly possible at the efficacy of a vaccine all of them is going down But we need to wait for the data to know if this is true And how much is it going down I believe it's going to take two to 6 weeks to really know Meanwhile the delta variant is still circulating widely in the U.S. And pierce Allison Aubrey is following this story good morning Allison Good morning Noelle So we have the CEO of Moderna saying essentially we need to wait and see possibly for between two and 6 weeks What else did he say And how did people react to that Well Moderna's Stephan bonsall pointed out what many scientists have already noted that there are lots of mutations on the spike protein of the new variant And given the quick spread he said the vaccines could be much less effective and may need to be modified Now Moderna has already begun work on an omicron specific booster but this will likely take several months And I think his comments were interpreted as bad news Okay so he's the CEO of a company Do scientists do public health officials share his concern about vaccines not working You know many people say it is just too soon to tell And that's just kind of the moment we're in right now in a while but I'll point out that not everyone completely agrees with Moderna's CEO The physician scientist who cofounded BioNTech and together with Pfizer developed the other mRNA COVID vaccine sounded a kind of different note he told The Wall Street Journal that while omicron may lead to more infections and vaccinated people he predicted that they will be protected against serious illness and doctor Anthony Fauci made the same point at a White House briefing yesterday Although partial immune escape may occur vaccines and particularly boosters give you a degree of protection So there's every reason to believe as we talk about boosters when you get a level high enough that you were going to get at least some degree of cross protection particularly against severe disease Now to help figure this out scientists are doing a bunch of things They're testing the plasma of vaccinated people to see if antibodies in the blood can neutralize or fend off a Macron That work is ongoing So we're still a few weeks away from some more firm answers Now in the meantime omicron hasn't been found in the U.S. yet Is there a system in place to look for it Yes Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expanding its surveillance program the agency has stepped up testing at four of the busiest international airports JFK Newark also San Francisco Atlanta in an effort to detect the omicron variant and CDC director Rochelle Walensky says the agency is actively working with airlines to collect information that can be used to do contact tracing if an arriving passenger tests positive Okay There is also we should note a bigger push now on booster shots isn't there That's right I mean the belief is that boosters will really help shore up protection and just yesterday Pfizer said it will ask the FDA to make 16 and 17 year olds eligible for the booster right now It's just 18 and up And another potential tool to fight COVID FDA advisers have voted in favor of authorizing the new antiviral pill from Burke It would be taken within 5 days of first symptoms to reduce the risk of serious illness And Pierre health correspondent Ellison Aubrey thank you Allison Thank you Noel All right today the Supreme Court considers the future of access to abortion in this country Almost 50 years ago the row V wade decision to term that anyone has the constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy So subsequent decisions reinforce that right a Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks directly contravenes row So should it be allowed to stand Sarah mccammon has been following this story closely for NPR good morning Sarah Good morning Noel The Supreme Court has heard other abortion rights cases in the past couple of years but this one today is seen as especially significant Why is that Right now this is arguably the case that the anti abortion rights movement has been working toward and waiting for for decades And one big reason is that there's a much more conservative court in place now after the Trump administration President Trump chose three nominees during his presidency including justice Amy Coney Barrett who was just confirmed on his way out the door All three of those justices he chose have records hostile to abortion rights and they make up a third of the court and it's true This court has been asked to look at other abortion restrictions the court struck down a Louisiana abortion restriction last year but that was a victory for abortion rights supporters but a narrow victory of 5 four victory and it was simply an affirmation of very recent precedent from 2016 when the court struck down a very similar law from Texas So this Mississippi case could go a lot farther The law in question is more expansive It goes to the heart of abortion rights and the court's decision to hear the case at all may signal a willingness to rethink roe V wade And by the way that is what the state of Mississippi has explicitly asked the court to do the state solicitor general is asking the justices to overturn roe and send the issue of abortion back to the states What are the parameters of the Mississippi law exactly Well it bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy as we said It targets abortion providers with fines and potential loss of their licenses There are no exceptions for rape or incest and this law passed in 2018 was blocked in federal court because of the precedent set under roe V wade So this is really a test case There's only one clinic in Mississippi right now doctors there only go up to 16 weeks and providing abortions.

Moderna James lepine NAACP legal defense and educat janae Nelson NAACP LDF Melissa Harris Perry NPR news Noel king Stefan benzel pierce Allison Aubrey Stephan bonsall BioNTech Sondheim Allison Pfizer Rochelle Walensky Centers for Disease Control an Noelle Anthony Fauci CNBC
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

08:41 min | 7 months ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on Short Wave

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Wells Fargo. As a seasoned small business owner, you need checking that fits your complex individual business needs. Wells Fargo's small business checking offers greater efficiency and control over daily finances, so you can focus on running your business. Plus, access to advanced online banking tools and local bankers dedicated to understanding your financial needs. All so you can bank without missing a beat. More at Wells Fargo dot com. Wells Fargo Bank NA member FDIC okay, Selena Simmons duffin, you have been talking to doctors and parents and kids. Share the knowledge like some of the basics we know, kids can get COVID-19. They can spread it. So getting them vaccinated is a good idea. But a lot of parents still have questions. Some in our inbox, here's a question from one of our listeners. Hi shortwave. My name is Maya Juan and I'm calling from Sydney, Australia. I have two kids, a 9 year old, and a 5 year old, who are very different sizes. My son is about twice the size and height and weight as my daughter. And I was wondering how the COVID vaccine could be just as effective and safe for my smaller 5 year old child as it is for my 9 year old. This is such a good question. I think the reason why this feels kind of funny to parents is because mostly what we're giving are kids is like advil or Tylenol and you're looking at the label and you're figuring out the dose based on the weight of your kid. But vaccines don't work like that. The job of the vaccine is to kick off a big immune response. It doesn't have to be a lot of vaccine to kick that into motion, and especially in kids that have really feisty immune systems. So Pfizer in its clinical trial did research to find just the right dose for this age group, they landed on this ten microgram vaccine, which is a third of the dose given to teenagers and adults because it kicked off this impressive really big immune response that gave that protection without a lot of side effects. Got it, okay. So for those parents who still have questions and concerns, can they just wait a bit to see how vaccinations go before vaccinating their kid? So my colleague Ellison Aubrey and I made a bunch of calls to pediatricians to ask this question. When should parents wait? When should they go ahead? Yeah. A 100% of the pediatricians we called said do not wait. Really? Regardless of your situation. Okay. One pediatrician I talked with called it race against time. Cases are actually quite high right now across the country, the way she put it is you are either gonna get COVID or you're gonna get the vaccine. And although most kids don't get very sick, and that's been, you know, widely discussed, some get very sick, and it is impossible to predict which ones are gonna be unlucky and get seriously ill with COVID-19. And so those are the reasons why pediatricians say, do not wait, just go ahead and get your kid vaccinated. Right, take some of the uncertainty away, meeting the uncertainty around how COVID could affect your kid. I mean, here's a question from a listener about kids at higher risks. Hi, my name is Jen Boggs calling from Portland Maine. I have a loved one who is 11 years old and she was just diagnosed with type one diabetes, and I'm wondering how important is it that she get the COVID vaccine? It's so important. I would say, do not wait. The reason is that kids with certain conditions, including diabetes, but also obesity, chronic respiratory conditions, kidney disease, high blood pressure, all of those kids are at higher risk of getting seriously ill if they do get COVID-19. So I think pediatricians would advise your 11 year old loved one to run not walk to get vaccinated. And I should also mention that for families with babies at home or grandparents or other vulnerable people, an immunocompromised family member, vaccinating young kids will help keep those people safe and with the holidays coming up when kids will see these grandparents potentially and younger family members who are also more vulnerable. This is an important time to make sure you get vaccinated. Selina, what about side effects? We've talked about effectiveness. This is the other side of it. We've heard about heart problems. So what do we know about side effects? Yeah, so in the clinical trial that Pfizer did with this age group, there were very few side effects like strikingly few side effects. In fact, there wasn't even much fever or chills among kids. It was just, you know, pain at the injection site, some fatigue, maybe headaches or muscle pain. I should say my 6 year old had nothing. She was like cartwheeling around, like the day she got her shot. So she did it. Yeah. But you mentioned heart problems, right? There are serious side effects that people might be worried about, and one of the big ones that we've heard about in respect to these mRNA vaccines like the Pfizer vaccine is myocarditis, and that is inflammation of the heart muscle in Pfizer's clinical trial for 5 to 11 year olds, there were no cases of myocarditis, although the company acknowledged that the trials weren't really big enough to pick up such rare events it's very rare. It has been seen in older age groups and it's mostly among men around 16 to 19 years old, after vaccination, just stressing again, it's a very, very rare. It's usually short lived in most instances, Aldo lessons who've developed myocarditis have improved quickly usually, you know, they just take some advil and it goes away. And another point that people make in relation to myocarditis is that it can also occur after bacterial and viral infections, including COVID-19. And so, you know, when you're thinking about trying to protect your child from this risk, weigh the fact that if they got COVID-19, there could be hard complications with that infection, as you consider what the potential side effects of the vaccine might be. And this is something you could again talk about with your pediatrician, right? Of course, yeah. I mean, talking to a trusted health professional is always a good idea if you have questions. I should say that pediatricians are being really inundated right now as they kind of kick off this vaccination campaign, so it might take a minute for them to get back to you, but definitely make that effort to have that conversation so that you get to a place where you feel comfortable. Yeah. So what if you say, okay, kiddo, it's time for a vaccine and they're like, mom, I'm actually used to wearing a mask. Can I just rely on that? You know, can parents just use masks for prevention? Well, I don't know of any kids who are like, let me wear my masks, please more. I guess I'm hanging out with some specific kids because it does give you that sense of protection for sure. But I should say that as good as masks are as important as they are, masking can not go on forever, especially in schools, and as cases do drop across the country, we're hoping they're really gonna head down as vaccinations head up. Mask mandates might start to be lifted, which could increase the likelihood that an unvaccinated kid could be vulnerable to COVID-19. That makes sense. Okay, we're moving in a maskless direction. So it's good to get vaccinated. Yeah. Here are some questions about the future we're headed towards. Hi, my name is Laura Schwartz. I'm from whedon, Maryland. I'm a longtime listener in the show really helped me get through the early months of a pandemic with a newborn. She is now almost two and my question is what the outlook for vaccines for kids under 5 looks like. We have spent her entire life being cautious, masking up, never taking her to indoor public places. She's never seen a grocery store or a target, but we want to get her vaccinated as well as soon as we can. One might that be. So I asked Pfizer this question because it's a good one. It's an important one and parents really want to know this. What fier told me is they're hoping to have data from their clinical trial of two to 5 year olds by the end of the year. So once they have that data, it's going to take maybe a couple more weeks to get it submitted to FDA and to then get that regulatory process underway. But if her child is almost two, that's kind of good news for her because that seems to be the next age cohort that is going to be eligible for vaccination. Younger babies, it's going to probably be after that. So still more waiting. And then the other vaccines are further behind Pfizer. So I think the short answer is a couple of months from now. It could be that we start to see this.

Wells Fargo Bank Pfizer Selena Simmons duffin Maya Juan Ellison Aubrey COVID Jen Boggs myocarditis muscle pain NPR FDIC diabetes viral infections Sydney kidney disease Selina Australia high blood pressure
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:38 min | 10 months ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news. I'm jack speer. The department of justice is suing taxes over a new state law that bans abortions after about six weeks before most people realize they're pregnant. Npr's barbara spun explains law all but halts the procedure in the country's second largest state at a press conference announcing the lawsuit attorney. General merit garland said. The state law was enacted quote in open defiance of the constitution. He called the law a statutory scheme and said so far. It's had its intended effect because the statute makes it too risky for an abortion clinic. Stay open. Abortion providers have ceased providing services. This leaves women in texas unable to exercise their constitutional rights and unable to obtain judicial review. At the very moment they need it the. Us supreme court had previously refused to block the texas law in a five to four vote. Barbara sprint npr news. The fda has issued some decisions on which e cigarette products can remain on the market. And those that cannot be sold in the us but as npr's alison. Aubrey explains the agency has yet to decide whether jewel products which account for forty percent of the e cigarette market can continue to be sold. The fda has reviewed hundreds of applications from the makers of electronic nicotine products to determine if the benefit for adult users. Who are trying to quit. Cigarettes outweighs the risk to youth. Who can use the products and become addicted so far. The agency has denied more than one hundred thirty applications covering more than nine hundred thousand flavored products including apple crumble dr cola and cinnamon toast cereal flavors which seemed designed to appeal to teenagers. The agency says many of the remaining applications are in the final stages of review ellison aubrey. Npr news washington president biden is announce sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as one hundred million americans. The government's new rules mandate all employers with more than one hundred workers require them vaccinated or tested weekly by also signing an executive order requiring vaccination for all employees of the executive branch an attorney who helped liz cheney get elected running against her in wyoming wyoming. Public radio's bob. Back reports announced mccain. After she received an endorsement from former president trump trump said in a news release that he strongly endorses harriet haeggman. Who's a former republican national committee woman and gubernatorial candidate trump interviewed hagan and others in an effort to find someone who could defeat cheney after she voted to impeach him in her announcement. Hagan says she's running against cheney because in a quote she betrayed wyoming betrayed the country and she betrayed me unquote. Hagan will join a number of other state. Republicans hoping to defeat cheney including a pair of state. Legislators cheney responded with the announcement quote bring it for npr news. I'm bob back in laramie. After a four year hiatus largely due to the former trump administration's insistence on a southern border wall and efforts to make mexico pay for it. The us mexico again resumed high level. Discussions top advisors to president biden and mexican president. Andres manuel lopez. Ober door are expressing a desire to make headway on a number of important issues including infrastructure trade and migration talks were launched in two thousand thirteen by then vice president biden during the obama administration but halted under trump opioid overdose deaths among black. Americans rose nearly forty percent across four states in two thousand eighteen and nineteen. That's according to a new study published in the american journal of public health. npr's redo chatterjee reports. There was no rise in overdose deaths for other racial and ethnic groups. Death certificates from nearly seventy communities in four states show a thirty eight percent rise in opioid overdose deaths for non hispanic black individuals in the two years. Before the pandemic the increase was highest in kentucky and ohio in comparison opioid overdose. Deaths stayed the same for other racial ethnic groups in most states in new york overdose deaths for white individuals when down. Although recent studies have found that overdose deaths continued to surge foster in the black community in two thousand twenty. The new study calls for an urgent need to address this disparity in part by making sure that evidence based treatments reach the communities than them most rita judgy. Npr news on wall street. The dow was down one hundred fifty one points. The nasdaq closed down. Thirty eight points today. i'm jack speer npr news..

npr news npr jack speer barbara spun Barbara sprint cheney ellison aubrey wyoming fda liz cheney texas trump trump harriet haeggman department of justice Hagan garland biden Aubrey us
Too Soon? The CDC Relaxes Mask Guidance for Fully Vaccinated

Short Wave

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Too Soon? The CDC Relaxes Mask Guidance for Fully Vaccinated

"Okay ellison aubrey. Since the new mass guidance from the cdc came out different groups. Industries have responded. Let's start with businesses. Sure i mean. Many of the big retailers are dropping their masking requirements including walmart. Costco starbucks walmart says. It supports employees. Who may choose to continue to wear masks. Even if they're fully vaccinated and all of these chains are encouraging people who are not vaccinated to continue to mask now over the weekend cd. Rochelle walinsky was pressed about the new policy and she cautioned. That masks will be with us for a while. Likely said a lot of people are not vaccinated and they should be masking in many settings. He or she is on nbc. This was not permission to shed masks for everybody everywhere. This was really science driven individual assessment of your risk. And now we all need to work together and cdc is hard at work now saying what does this mean for schools for travel for camps for businesses. I think what she's getting at here. Mattie is there is more guidance to come now. They've shifted this strategy unmasking. A lot of the other guidance for what to do in the office what to do in schools will need to get looked at again reviewed now given how hard it is to police the new policy. I mean it's hard to know who is or isn't vaccinated. This really just comes down to the honor system and dr walinsky ask people to be honest with themselves because people who are not vaccinated are putting themselves at risk. Yeah i i mean alison. This was the part kind of blew me away. I mean this puts the burden on individuals to do the right thing by themselves and also by others. And i i don't know i don't think we have evidence that an honor system will work in the us especially with the stakes being this high. Well there definitely are critics. Marc perron is president of the united food and commercial workers international union which represents about one point three million frontline retail and grocery store workers. He says the guy insists confusing. And that the cdc has failed to consider how it will impact essential workers who face frequent exposure to people who are not vaccinated. And some refuse to wear masks. I think that the guidance should busy. People should wear masks at least until we get to that herd immunity number. We're not there yet. We only have about forty percent of the population fully vaccinated and i. I think that we could have waited another couple of months. And there's also similar concern from nurses mattie leaders of the national nurses united which is the largest union of registered nurses in the. Us say the new policy threatens the lives of patients nurses and other frontline workers across the

Ellison Aubrey CDC Rochelle Walinsky Walmart Dr Walinsky Costco Starbucks Mattie Marc Perron United Food And Commercial Wor NBC Alison United States National Nurses United
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Coming up a California wildfire trapped hundreds of people in a camping area. I'm Noelle King, and I'm Steve Inskeep, the National Guard sent in helicopters through the smoke. We report in a nighttime airlift that brought people to safety. Also, how much can one teacher do? Rachel talks with a teacher who has 180 remote students and five kids of her own? And a British town voted for Brexit residents now resist one of the consequences. It's Monday, September 7 jazz musicians Sonny Rollins is 90 years old today. Theo News is next. Live from NPR news. I'm door Rahm Firefighters in California are battling dozens of wildfires in a record breaking high temperatures. Alex Hall from member station reports. One of the bigger ones is the creek fire in the Sierra National Forest. This is a fire that started on Friday in an area of the Sierra Nevada Mountains here in central California, not far from Fresno, where a lot of people go just to be outside. No. There's camping, backpacking hiking. People have cabins there. Some people live there, and it's you know, very forested. It's very dry. By Saturday. The acreage that was burning was just around several 1000. But overnight it grew very quickly. It's now over 70,000 acres and 0% contained Alex Hall reporting over the weekend. Military helicopters were used to rescue more than 200 people have been trapped by flames at a popular camping site. Several 100 residents are under evacuation orders. The Senate returns to Washington this week ahead of a September 30th deadline to avoid a government shutdown. NPR's Kelsey Snell reports lawmakers air hoping to reach a spending agreement With or without additional Corona virus relief. Lawmakers and members of the Trump Administration agreed that they want to avoid a government shutdown when the fiscal year ends on September 30th. That likely means that they'll have to pass a short term extension of government funding at current spending levels. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin have already agreed on that goal and that they should approve the funding without any additional policy writers. But the duration of that extension is still up in the air as our talks over additional Corona virus aid. Negotiations over that funding have been at a standstill for weeks. Democrats have said that they're willing to drop the request to $2 trillion, but Republicans say a much smaller figure is in order. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington As public health experts warn Americans to avoid crowds and stay vigilant this Labor Day, the number of new Corona virus cases is declining. NPR's Ellison Aubrey reports, Doctors are urging Americans to get a flu shot in the coming weeks that a combination of covert 19 and flu cases could overburden the health care system This winter. The number of deaths from Corona virus has dipped to about 850 per day, and new cases have dropped to about 40,000 per day, but given continued hot spots and wide circulation of the virus. Position. Michael Ison of Northwestern University says it's important to keep up social distancing and get a flu shot. If you get sick with what you think, maybe the flu, you can't differentiate that based on symptoms from covert 19 and getting both viruses could lead to serious illness. So Ison says the flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself. Allison Aubrey NPR news You're listening to NPR News and 604. I'm Cherry Glaser. With Casey ar w NEWS. Several new brush fires are burning across Southern California. They broke out during this weekend's record shattering heatwave. Ah! Fire near Cogswell Dam in the Angeles National Forest above Azusa has burned at least 80 acres. There is no containment. National Forest Service, fire captain Robert Garcia told Kay BC. The bomb Campfire quickly took off and explosive fire conditions yesterday it's burning in an area that's difficult for fire crews to reach Very remote. It's several.

NPR News flu California Kelsey Snell Alex Hall NPR Michael Ison Washington Sierra National Forest flu vaccine Steve Inskeep Sonny Rollins Sierra Nevada Mountains National Forest Service Noelle King National Guard Corona Rachel Theo News Rahm
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi there happy to be here. So tell me what's known about Convalescent plasma. What is it? Sure, I mean, Basically, it's taking the plasma from people who've recovered from Cove 8 19 and transfusing it into the bodies of patients just diagnosed to give them these beneficial antibodies. You know, it's not a new idea. It's been used for over 100 years earlier this spring and effort to try convalescent Plasma and Cove it patients I was really kick started at the Mayo Clinic, and many hospitals have been using it, including Mount Sinai in New York and Houston Methodist in in Houston. What's the evidence that it is helpful? Well, this is the sticking point. I mean, Currently there are study results, pointing to some benefits. Today we heard the president say it's proven to reduce mortality. But you know most the experts I talked to say it's still early days. They say we need more clinical data. We need data from a randomized controlled trial, which is the gold standard for this type of research to really figure this out. I think that thinking among the administration officials and what we just heard from the FDA commissioner seems to be well convalescent plasma is shown to be safe. It's looking to be then officials, so let's keep using it and find out more. I spark I spoke to Mark boom. He's the CEO of Houston Methodist. He's a physician, he says. With more data, randomized controlled trial, It will become clear just how effective the plasma is compared to say, You know, placebo. I understand completely respect the need to get randomized controlled trial data. We need to know these answers. But the same time we have 100, plus year therapy that's been used that we know is very, very safe and that has some pretty strong signal of efficacy. You know, I should point out no. None of the experts that I've I've spoken to think that this is a you know, a magic bullet. I mean, doctors now have multiple therapies that could be helpful. Rend death, severe antiviral steroids, other drugs being tested now, so to the extent that convalescent plasma becomes part of the mix, it really could be thought of as sort of one more thing, one more option of a part of a cocktail of therapies. I want to go back to something you said earlier. You see, it's been around about 100 years could just tell us a little bit more about that. The history of UCS asthma? Yeah, it was used, you know, instead of pre vaccine era, one scientist currently studying at Arturo Custody ball at Johns Hopkins, he says, it goes back 120 years. That's when doctors first realised that antibodies borrowed from the recovered patients may help save lives. He tells this story about a doctor at a boys boarding school in Pennsylvania Back in 1935, who treated the boy with measles, then took his plasma gave it to other Children and was able to stave off cases so That's sort of the history. Convalescent plasma was also used during the 2009 H one n one pandemic and during the 2012 murders epidemic, So it's based on that experience. The doctors began using it this year. All right, Allison we have about 30 seconds left, So I just want to ask. How unusual is it that the FDA would do something like this? You know, Granting emergency use authorization is unusual, but not so much during the pandemic. We've seen a bunch of these kinds of authorizations of the last couple of months. Bottom line. The approval is likely coming much faster than it would be the case if we were not in the midst of this pandemic. That is NPR's Ellison. Aubrey. Alison. Thank you. Thank you very much. I'm going to talk now about a former member of President Trump's inner circle who now finds himself under indictment. We're talking about Steve Bannon, a former top strategist in President Trump's 2016 campaign, and in the White House. On Thursday, federal prosecutors in New York charged Bannon with fraud, alleging that he and three others funneled money to themselves that they were supposedly raising through Crowdsourcing. To build a portion of Trump's southern border wall. Bannon denies the charges. You wanted to hear more about this formerly prominent figure in Trump's orbit and the latest of his close associates to face criminal charges. So we called Alison Klayman, she directed the 2019 documentary The Brink. Which followed Bannon after he was fired from the White House in 2017 and work to influence the 2018 mid terms in the U. S. And Link far right Populist in Europe. Alison Klayman, Thanks so much for being with us, so nice to be here. Thanks, Michelle. For start back where the film starts. Would you just remind us why Bannon was fired from the White House when his hardline views on immigration were so central to Trump's campaign to begin with? Yeah. Bannon left the White House essentially in the fallout after the Charlottesville far right demonstrations and the death of Heather hire. His exit was Swift in the wake of Charlottesville. And at the time Trump Still, you know, considered him in his good graces. It was only later around the time that Michael Wolff's book came out. And quotes that Bannon said that were disparaging to Trump and his family were published that Trump gave him the moniker Sloppy Steve and this more public rift was on everyone's radar. What was your reaction when you heard that he had been indicted for fraud. When I heard he had been indicted for fraud, there's some element of it being a little surprising, right? He's a former Goldman Sachs investment banker. Who you know, continues to surround himself with friends from that time, including the former president of Goldman Sachs. John Thornton seems like a guy who would know how to be on the right side of avoiding criminal activity. Criminal charges in terms of handling money. But it's sort of not surprising because the time that I spent with Bannon over, you know, 13 months after he left the White House, I saw the kind of people he surrounded himself and.

Steve Bannon President Trump White House Trump president Alison Klayman fraud Houston Methodist FDA Goldman Sachs New York Mount Sinai Pennsylvania Mayo Clinic Houston Mark boom NPR Michael Wolff UCS Michelle
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Dr Anthony Fauci, says states where the percentage of people testing positive for the Corona virus is rising. Those days aren't risk of seeing a surge in new infections. NPR's Ellison Aubrey reports, and then she found she spoke during a live stream event with the editor of the medical journal JAMA. He noted that prior to a surgeon cases in states across the southeast, there was an increase in the percentage of people who tested positive. Early on President. Trump attributed this to increased testing capacity. But the positivity rate points to arise and community spread, even if it goes up by 1 1.5% points. And it continues to go up. Generally doesn't spontaneously come down. It means it's a good predictor of a surge found. She called on everyone to do their part to wear a mask and maintain social distancing. Alison Aubrey NPR NEWS five states are holding primaries today in Kansas Republicans are picking a nominee. To defend a U. S senate see they've held since the 19 thirties That could be in play this year. Jim MacLean of the Kansas New Service has more with Republican Senator Pat Roberts, ending his nearly 40 year congressional career can just Democrats believe they have a shot to in their losing streak. That has US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell nervous. It's why his pack has spent millions in the final weeks of the primary to help two term Congressman Roger Marshall defeat former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. O'Connell and other top Republicans are worried that Kobach and immigration hardliner who lost the 2018 Kansas governor's race would be an easier target for Barbara Bouchet, the presumptive and well funded Democratic nominee. She's a state senator from the Kansas City area who switched parties after the last election. For NPR news. I'm Jim McLean. In Missouri, voters are being asked if they support expanding Medicaid health care coverage to thousands more low income adults. The Republican led legislature has repeatedly rejected Medicaid expansion proposals over the years. Which led supporters to place the issue before the voters. Missouri's Medicaid program has an income threshold that's one of the lowest in the nation. You're listening to NPR news. President Trump signed an executive order yesterday that would allow Medicare to cover the cost of telehealth services and rural communities. Virtual medical visits. Administration officials say the order is a signal to Congress. He would support Telehealth as an option for everyone and Medicare. Even after the public health crisis is over. The president said he wants to ensure that telehealth is here to stay. The Trump Administration. U S. A. I D liaison has been fired over her tweets against same sex marriage and LGBTQ rights. NPR's Michelle Kelemen reports married, Corrigan served as a White House liaison for the U. S Agency for International Development and has been the subject of controversy for her anti LGBTQ views. In a Siri's of tweets. Corrigan accuses the media and Democrats of attacking her for her Christian beliefs. Let me be clear, she writes. Gay marriage isn't marriage Men aren't women, and she claims that the US is losing influence because quote we refused to help countries who don't celebrate sexual deviancy. A spokesperson for Yusa says merit, Corrigan is no longer an employee at the agency. House Democrats said her history of homophobic and xenophobic rhetoric created a hostile environment. Michelle Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington London based oil company BP announced today it's cutting its dividend for the first time in 10 years..

NPR President Trump Corrigan Kansas Michelle Kelemen US President Dr Anthony Fauci Kris Kobach Barbara Bouchet Medicare Ellison Aubrey Senator Pat Roberts Missouri Trump Administration Jim McLean Alison Aubrey Medicaid
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dr Anthony Foulke, says states where the percentage of people testing positive for the Corona virus is rising. Those days aren't risk of seeing a surge in new infections. NPR's Ellison Aubrey reports, Anthony found. She spoke during a live stream event with the editor of the medical journal JAMA. He noted that prior to a surgeon cases in states across the southeast, there was an increase in the percentage of people who tested positive. Early on President. Trump attributed this to increased testing capacity. But the positivity rate points to arise and community spread, even if it goes up by 1 1.5% points. And it continues to go up. Generally doesn't spontaneously come down. It means it's a good predictor of a surge found. She called on everyone to do their part to wear a mask and maintains social distancing. Alison Aubrey NPR NEWS. Five states are holding primaries today in Kansas Republicans are picking a nominee. To defend a U. S senate see they've held since the 19 thirties That could be in play this year. Jim MacLean of the Kansas New Service has more with Republican Senator Pat Roberts, ending his nearly 40 year congressional career can just Democrats believe they have a shot to in their losing streak. That has US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell nervous. It's why his pack has spent millions in the final weeks of the primary to help two term Congressman Roger Marshall defeat former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. McConnell and other top Republicans are worried that Kobach and immigration hardliner who lost the 2018 Kansas governor's race would be an easier target for Barbara Bouchet, the presumptive and well funded Democratic nominee. She's a state senator from the Kansas City area who switched parties after the last election. For NPR news. I'm good. McLean In Missouri, voters are being asked if they support expanding Medicaid health care coverage to thousands more low income adults. The Republican led legislature has repeatedly rejected Medicaid expansion proposals over the years. Which led supporters to place the issue before the voters. Missouri's Medicaid program has an income threshold that's one of the lowest in the nation. You're listening to NPR news. President Trump signed an executive order yesterday that would allow Medicare to cover the cost of telehealth services and rural communities. Virtual medical visits. Administration officials say the order is a signal to Congress. He would support Telehealth as an option for everyone and Medicare. Even after the public health crisis is over. The president said he wants to ensure that telehealth is here to stay. The Trump Administration. U S. A. I D liaison has been fired over her tweets against same sex marriage and LGBTQ rights. NPR's Michelle Kelemen reports married, Corrigan served as a White House liaison for the U. S Agency for International Development and has been the subject of controversy for her anti LGBTQ views. In a Siri's of tweets. Corrigan accuses the media and Democrats of attacking her for her Christian beliefs. Let me be clear, she writes. Gay marriage isn't marriage men aren't women, and she claims that the US is losing influence because quote we refused to help countries who don't celebrate sexual deviancy. A spokesperson for Yusa says merit Gorgon is no longer an employee at the agency. House Democrats said her history of homophobic and xenophobic rhetoric created a hostile environment. Michelle Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington London based oil company BP announced today it's cutting its dividend for the first time in 10 years. It reported a $6.7 billion loss in the second quarter as.

NPR President Trump Dr Anthony Foulke Kansas US Michelle Kelemen Corrigan President Barbara Bouchet Missouri Medicare Mitch McConnell McLean Senator Pat Roberts Kris Kobach Trump Administration Ellison Aubrey Alison Aubrey Yusa
Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County

All of It

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Green, Yellow, Orange Or Red? New Tool Shows COVID-19 Risk In Your County

"Top health officials warning that the Corona virus caseload in this country could rise to 100,000 in a single day. Researchers are racing to find effective ways to doom or contact tracing and testing faster and in the long run cheaper NPR's Alison Aubrey has details about any map. Tula Harvey University team is working on to detect covert 19 outbreaks. You hover over the state and county where you live, you'll see two important things. You'll see a trend line in cases over time, and you'll see a color either green, yellow, orange or red. This is the risk level for your county. Now. This is based on how many new cases there are 100,000 people and the value of tying the alert to this metric is that it's a standard way to measure the risk against the total population. You're getting kind of an apples to apples comparison, NPR's Ellison Aubrey.

NPR Alison Aubrey Ellison Aubrey Tula Harvey University
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the risk level for your county. Now. This is based on how many new cases there are 100,000 people and the value of tying the alert to this metric is that it's a standard way to measure the risk against the total population. You're getting kind of an apples to apples comparison, NPR's Ellison Aubrey. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo says if it's proven that Russia offer Taliban affiliates bounties to kill American troops in Afghanistan, there will be a strong response. The New York Times first reported. President Trump got an Intel assessment about Russia months ago. Trump says he was never briefed. Well. The U. S and the Taliban have a tentative peace agreement that would lead to US troop withdrawals. But Human Rights Watch says in a report that the Taliban are curtailing the human rights of Afghans who lived under their rule. Despite claims that they have reformed we have more from NPR's DEA Hadeed Human Rights Watch interviewed dozens of people who live under the Taliban's rule in scattered places across Afghanistan and found that insurgents in some places on allowing girls to go to school and others they weren't allowing them to continue their education once they became teenagers. The groups had journalists and citizens could be punished for criticizing the group on morality. Police still operate Human Rights Watch says the abuses me in the U. S and other countries, which is supporting the nice and peace process between the Taliban and the government. Have to ensure any agreement the two sides make has strong, enforceable human rights commitments. De Hadid. NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited more women and minorities to its membership. NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports the Hollywood Academy Is responding to a longstanding criticism over its lack of diversity. Five years ago, the Oscarssowhite campaign put the spotlight on a glaring disparity. The vast majority of those privileged to vote for Academy Award winners were white and male. Of the hundreds of artists and executives invited to join this year. The academy says that nearly half are women and more than 1/3 are from underrepresented communities. Actors Aquafina Cynthia Erivo, a native American filmmaker, Sterling hard You are among them. Writer director and producer Lulu Wong tweeted that she is honored to join the academy, She writes, though there is still much work to be done. This class looks more like an actual jury of our peers than ever before. That's Elizabeth Blair, This is NPR. And this is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Rebecca Deborah Indoor Dining will not be returning to the five boroughs anytime soon. Mayor de Blasio said today that recent Cove in 19 upticks in places that have allowed indoor service of bars and restaurants have convinced him it's not safe. Indoors is the problem or more, the science is showing up more and more. So I want to make very clear. We cannot go ahead at this point in time with indoor dining in New York City, the city is poised to enter phase three of the reopening process next week, De Blasio announced an inspector an expansion of outdoor dining last week. And the mayor and the City Council have reached a deal on the budget for the fiscal year that starts today. The proposal would make some cuts to the NYPD, including shifting school safety agents to the Education Department, slashing funding for overtime and canceling July's class of police cadets. And while some advocates say the cuts don't go far enough Bronx Council member of Vanessa Gibson says slashing the NYPD is budget won't necessarily lead to meaningful change. She says constituents in her largely black and Latino district want the police in their neighborhoods. They want to see the CEO and the community affairs officers. They don't want to see excessive force. They don't want to see cops putting their knees in our next but they want to be safe. The City Council passed the budget with the 32 to 17 vote minutes before the 12 a.m. deadline last night. And the.

NPR Taliban President Trump Rebecca Deborah Indoor Dining Afghanistan New York City Hollywood Academy City Council Elizabeth Blair Mayor de Blasio Russia Sterling NYPD ISLAMABAD The Academy of Motio Vanessa Gibson Ellison Aubrey US De Hadid
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And you'll see a color either green, yellow, orange or red. This is the risk level for your county. Now. This is based on how many new cases there are 100,000 people and the value of tying the alert to this metric is that it's a standard way to measure the risk against the total population. You're getting kind of apples to apples comparison, NPR's Ellison Aubrey. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo says if it's proven that Russia offer Taliban affiliates bounties to kill American troops in Afghanistan, there will be a strong response. The New York Times first reported. President Trump got an Intel assessment about Russia months ago. Trump says he was never briefed. The U. S. And the Taliban have a tentative peace agreement that would lead to US troop withdrawals. But Human Rights Watch says in a report that the Taliban are curtailing the human rights of Afghans who lived under their rule, despite claims that they have reformed we have more from NPR's DEA Hadeed Human Rights Watch interviewed dozens of people who live under the Taliban's rule in scattered places across Afghanistan. And found that insurgents in some places on allowing girls to go to school and others they weren't allowing them to continue their education. Once they became teenagers. The groups had journalists and citizens could be punished for criticizing the group on morality. Police still operate Human Rights Watch says the abuses me in the U. S. And other countries, which is supporting the nascent pace process between the Taliban and the government have to ensure any agreement the two sides make has strong, enforceable human rights commitments. See Hadeed NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited more women and minorities to its membership. NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports the Hollywood Academy Is responding to a longstanding criticism over its lack of diversity. Five years ago, the Oscarssowhite campaign put the spotlight on a glaring disparity. The vast majority of those privileged to vote for Academy Award winners were white and male. Of the hundreds of artists and executives invited to join this year. The academy says that nearly half are women and more than 1/3 are from underrepresented communities. Actors Aquafina, Cynthia Revo and Native American filmmaker Sterling Har Jo are among them. Writer director and producer Lulu Wong tweeted that she is honored to join the academy, she writes. Though there is still much work to be done. This class looks more like an actual jury of our peers than ever before. That's Elizabeth Blair. This is NPR. Live from news. I'm Kate Wolf Governor Gavin Newsom says he'll announced new Corona virus restrictions today, those rules could tighten stay at home orders or increased enforcement of the state's mask wearing requirement with a focus on indoor activities. One of the areas of biggest concern is that relates to the spread of cove in 19 in.

Taliban NPR President Trump Hollywood Academy Afghanistan ISLAMABAD The Academy of Motio Elizabeth Blair Russia Mike Pompeo US Sterling Har Jo Ellison Aubrey Kate Wolf Intel DEA Gavin Newsom Lulu Wong
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"This is the risk level for your county. Now. This is based on how many new cases there are per 100,000 people, and the value of tying the alert to this metric is that it's a standard way to measure the risk against the total population. You're getting kind of apples to apples comparison, NPR's Ellison Aubrey. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo says if it's proven that Russia offer Taliban affiliates bounties to kill American troops in Afghanistan, there will be a strong response. The New York Times first reported. President Trump got an Intel assessment about Russia months ago. Trump says he was never briefed. The U. S. And the Taliban have a tentative peace agreement that would lead to US troop withdrawals. But Human Rights Watch says in a report that the Taliban are curtailing the human rights of Afghans who lived under their rule, despite claims that they have reformed we have more from NPR's DEA Hadeed Human Rights Watch interviewed dozens of people who live under the Taliban's rule in scattered places across Afghanistan and found that insurgents in some places on allowing girls to go to school. In others. They weren't allowing them to continue their education once they became teenagers. The group said journalists and citizens could be punished for criticizing the group on morality. Police still operate Human Rights Watch says the abuses me in the U. S and other countries, which is supporting the nice and pace process between the Taliban and the government. Have to ensure any agreement the two sides make has strong, enforceable human rights commitments, De Headed NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited more women and minorities to its membership. NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports the Hollywood Academy Is responding to a longstanding criticism over its lack of diversity. Five years ago, the Oscars so white campaign put the spotlight on a glaring disparity. The vast majority of those privileged to vote for Academy Award winners were white and male. Of the hundreds of artists and executives invited to join this year. The academy says that nearly half are women and more than 1/3 are from underrepresented communities. Actors Aquafina Cynthia Erivo, a Native American filmmaker, Sterling Har Jo are among them. Writer director and producer Lulu Wang tweeted that she is honored to join the academy, she writes. Though there is still much work to be done. This class looks more like an actual jury of our peers than ever before..

Taliban NPR President Trump Hollywood Academy Afghanistan Russia ISLAMABAD The Academy of Motio Mike Pompeo Aquafina Cynthia Erivo US Sterling Har Jo Oscars Ellison Aubrey Intel DEA Lulu Wang Elizabeth Blair
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KCRW

"Says P. Jeannie PS PS that stands for public safety power shut off that's what they're calling them and then it says be safe drive slow the genie says it shutting down power is dry windy conditions have prompted concerns that its equipment could spark another major wildfire like last year's campfire which left eighty five people dead P. Jeannie vice president for wild fire safety sumit saying addressed reporters at an evening briefing to ensure the safety of our customers and our community that a last resort and we're committed to reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfires events outside a seven eleven on sauce lido's Bridgeway Renee is since you own spent Wednesday night in her car in her bathrobe with her son Molokai in the passenger seat they meet the five minute drive from nearby Marin city to pick up snacks as a hundred and fifty dollars worth of recently purchased groceries spoils at their home with the powers been off all day I work in I don't make a lot of money all that one fifty dollars and I will get that back I don't have money like that and the prospect of several more days of no power only frustrates her more for NPR news I'm lily Jamali in Sausalito California across the United States yesterday people held rallies aimed at encouraging teens and young adults who vape to quit in Washington DC activists demonstrated outside the offices of jewel a company that's under the spotlight for its marketing practices we have two stories this morning NPR's John Hamilton explains what nicotine actually does to the teenage brain and NPR's Alison Aubrey introduces us to a former vapor turned activist on the very day that paper Johnson's family was packing up the car to drive her to college she started to feel sick so she mentioned it to her mom I went up to her and I was like my chest kinda hurts as they drove from the Chicago area up to Colorado Piper Johnson knew something was terribly wrong I just kept feeling worse and worse Piper Johnson had been vaping since high school I was vaping majority nicotine she also vape to some T. H. C. but she didn't realize that vaping wasn't making her so sick until she ended up in the ER I was terrified I I had no idea what was happening to me as her oxygen levels plummeted she was put in the I see you and remember struggling to breathe honestly it was the most painful experience of my entire life like I was laying on my bed like sob because it hurts so bad to breathe she says she's feeling much better now not only is she stopped vaping she can't believe she ever got hooked and she wants to help other people quit too she says vaping is just so out of line with her generation's approach to good living we're really like the generation of vegans organic food you know mental health days and self care days and stuff like that but we're pumping our bodies full of chemicals without even knowing what it does to us and the outbreak of Syria's long illnesses has helped to bring this into focus people fail to realize that like you're deeply endangering yourself by doing this stuff I'm John Hamilton vaping is dangerous and not just for your lungs Francis Leslie at the university of California Irvine says the nicotine in vaping products can disrupt a developing brain it's unfortunate that a whole generation of teenagers are basically Guinea pigs for the effects of nicotine the brain Leslie says the problem with nicotine is that it mimics a substance we already have in our brains so it can affect learning and memory and brain development Leslie says nicotine's target is cells that have structures on their surface called nicotinic receptors those parts of the brain that are actively maturing during adolescence are being controlled by nicotinic receptors nicotine also acts on brain areas involved in addiction still not clear precisely how that affects an adolescent human but Leslie says in adolescent mice the result is alarming a very brief low dose exposure to the Katina early adolescence increases the rewarding properties of other drugs including alcohol cocaine methamphetamine and these a long term changes nicotine itself is addictive because it activates the brain's dopamine system but doctor NY addy at the Yale school of medicine wondered whether the flavors additive vaping products might also activate this system if both nicotine and flavors acting on the same dopamine system in the brain is that somehow facilitating and making it more likely that people take products that have both flavors and nicotine to find out Eddie in a team of researchers studied rats what we found is that the sweet flavors can make the nicotine more palpable in the oral cavity but also acts in the brain to increase nicotine taking any says this finding is especially troubling when it comes to teenagers whose brains are extra sensitive to rewards and he says animal research by another Yale scientist suggests that young people who they may be more likely to develop brain disorders like A. D. H. D. F. thurs exposure to nicotine Hurley on that can influence attentional process these later in life so what might help reduce teen vaping Janet Audrain McGovern a psychologist at the university of Pennsylvania says a ban on flavors like bubble gum and pink lemonade could make a difference if the first E. cigarette that you use was flavored then you're more likely to go on and use using the cigarette again Andre McGovern also thinks fewer teens might vape if nicotine products were more expensive and harder to buy online I don't think it's that difficult to click the box that you're eighteen or you're twenty one and if you have a credit card to get those products but she says it's going to be hard for regulators and scientists to keep up with all the changes in the vaping world teens who maybe four years ago were using predominantly vape pens are now using a jewel and some of the pod minds products that can deliver much higher levels of nicotine to their brains John Hamilton Ellison Aubrey NPR news.

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of some of its cruise ships to deliver supplies and Disney's says it's donating a million dollars to relief efforts Shannon van Sant NPR news Dorian slammed into Canada's Atlantic coast Saturday it's no longer a hurricane but still a powerful storm hundreds of thousands. of customers lost electrical service the food and drug administration says at least one of the deaths associated with vaping is related to elicit T. H. C. use that's a psycho active component of cannabis NPR's Ellison Aubrey reports while it's still unclear the cause of the vaping illnesses the FDA says many of the samples tested as part of the investigation have identified T. H. C. and also significant amounts of vitamin eat while the FDA says it doesn't have enough data to conclude that vitamin E. is that because of the long injury the agency says it's prudent to avoid inhaling the substance the agency is warning of the potential harms of vaping and says no one should buy vaping products off the street or black market people should also refrain from using T. H. C. oil the agency says and not add any substances to vaping products purchased in stores Alison Aubrey NPR news this is NPR news from Washington. police in Hong Kong Saturdays stop demonstrators from blocking access to the city's airport in the fourteenth week of one rest pro democracy activists vowed to continue demonstrations Sunday they're demanding the right to elect their own leaders in Hong Kong. nearly half of all British businesses have failed to prepare for Britain's exit from the European Union Vicki Barker reports on a new study showcasing a lack a reading this in the UK even as a scheduled to withdraw from the E. U. next month the British chambers of commerce or BCC surveyed more than fifteen hundred.

UK BCC European Union Hong Kong Washington. NPR Alison Aubrey vaping cannabis Shannon van Sant E. U. Disney Vicki Barker Britain Hong Kong. T. H. C. FDA Ellison Aubrey
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:15 min | 3 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Davis's nephew musician Vince Wilburn junior also joins the conversation and composer Alan reed discusses her opera reserve which deals with sexual assault and trauma and one to twenty nineteen Pulitzer Prize in music I'm Jenna Flanagan filling in for Alison Stewart we'll get to all of it after the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm nor rom secretary of state Mike Pompeii travel to auto with Thursday to meet with his Canadian counterpart as Dan carbon truck reports Pompeii reiterated Washington's support for Ottawa in its diplomatic quarrel with Beijing Pompeii brushed off any suggestions that China's arrest of two Canadians was on par with Canada's detention of a senior Chinese telecom exact last December mon one Joe was detained at Washington's request the US wants to try her over allegations of violating sanctions against Iran extradition hearing is still on going Pompeii said Canada is basically following the rule of law meanwhile Beijing issued comments on the same day saying the fate of the two Canadians is auto was Fulton is linked to months detention Pompeii added that American officials as well as the president have tried to make the case with China on behalf of the two Canadians for NPR news I'm Dan carbon Chuck in Toronto an international outcry over wildfires raging in the Amazon rain forest is gaining momentum NPR's Phillip Rhee's reports the number of fires has surged this year prompting a backlash against Brazil's president pressure is growing on Brazil's president shy of also not over the many thousands of fires burning in the forest known as the lungs of the world federal prosecutors in the state of para one of the worst hit areas have announced an investigation into why this such a huge rise in wild fires this year also not us repeatedly said he wants to open up the Amazon to economic development he's weakened government agencies that penalize people who illegally destroy the forest environmental organizations say that's encouraging cattle ranches logo's and mine is to clear forest land by setting fires anger over these files is growing around the world and also within Brazil where protests calling on the government to save the M. S. in a plan for the next few days for a brief NPR news the H. dental a former presidential candidate is jumping into the fight over potentially hundreds of billions of dollars an opioid settlement money former Ohio governor John case that says along with local and state governments there's another group that should be compensated Ohio public radio's indie channel reports case because lobbying for hospitals and health systems to receive potential settlement money out of the massive opioid lawsuit playing out in federal court he says hospitals can advance treatment for opioid abuse and reduce fatal overdoses everybody who's had to be on the front lines and provide the services all I wanna make sure that they can get the resources we don't want the resources to be credit away a plan is pending that could allow more than thirty thousand municipalities to get in on the money dozens of states have raised objection to that plan critics say case six group is focusing too much on one aspect of the opioid epidemic ignoring others such as law enforcement for NPR news I'm anti Chow in Columbus this is NPR news from Washington scientists at the centers for disease control and prevention are investigating cases of severe lung illness linked to vaping in sixteen states there are one hundred fifty three reported cases NPR's Ellison Aubrey reports this CDC is working with state health departments to better understand the cluster of severe illnesses that have led people to the hospital the CDC says in many cases patients have acknowledged recent use of THC containing products an active ingredient in marijuana but no product has been conclusively linked to the illnesses vaping cartridges can contain a range of substances including nicotine anti H. C. the FDA says anyone who's experienced an unexpected tobacco or E. cigarette related health issue can reported online via the FDA's safety reporting portal Alison Aubrey NPR news a Hawaiian airlines plane made an emergency landing Thursday after smoke filled the cabin the plane was on a flight from Oakland California to Honolulu when it ran into problems the crew deployed emergency slides to evacuate the plane when it landed in Honolulu officials say seven people were taken to the hospital with smoke related symptoms the Federal Aviation Administration is putting out a call for pilots around the world to help test upgraded software for Boeing seven thirty seven MAX planes the plane has been grounded since March after two crashes within five months what in Indonesia and one in Ethiopia three hundred forty six people were killed I'm Nora Raum NPR news in.

Davis assault Vince Wilburn Alan reed five months
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Nora Raum secretary of state Mike Pompeii travel to Ottawa Thursday to meet with his Canadian counterpart as Dan carbon truck reports Pompeii reiterated Washington's support for Ottawa in its diplomatic quarrel with Beijing Pompeii brushed off any suggestions that China's arrest of two Canadians was on par with Canada's detention of a senior Chinese telecom exact last December mon one Joe was detained at Washington's request the US wants to try her over allegations of violating sanctions against Iran extradition hearing is still on going Pompeii said Canada is basically following the rule of law meanwhile Beijing issued comments on the same day saying the fate of the two Canadians is auto was Fulton is linked to months detention Pompeii added that American officials as well as the president have tried to make the case with China on behalf of the two Canadians for NPR news I'm down carbon Chuck in Toronto an international outcry over wildfires raging in the Amazon rain forest is gaining momentum NPR's Phillip Rhee's reports the number of fires has surged this year prompting a backlash against Brazil's president pressure is growing on Brazil's president chargeable Senado over the many thousands of fires burning in the forest known as the lungs of the world federal prosecutors in the state of para one of the worst hit areas have announced an investigation into why the such a huge rise in wild fires this year Wilson autos repeatedly said he wants to open up the Amazon to economic development he's weakened government agencies that penalize people who illegally destroy the forest environmental organizations say that some courage in cattle ranches logo's and mine is to clear forest land by setting fires anger over these files is growing around the world and also within Brazil with protests calling on the government to save the M. S. in a plan for the next few days the Braves NPR news the H. dental a former presidential candidate is jumping into the fight over but fully hundreds of billions of dollars an opioid settlement money former Ohio governor John case that says along with local and state governments there's another group that should be compensated Ohio public radio's indie channel reports case because lobbying for hospitals and health systems to receive potential settlement money out of the massive opioid lawsuit playing out in federal court he says hospitals can advance treatment for opioid abuse and reduce fatal overdoses everybody had to be on the front lines and provide the services all I wanna make sure that they can get the resources we don't want the resources to be frittered away a plan is pending that could allow more than thirty thousand units of pallipes to get in on the money dozens of states have raised objection to that plan critics say case six group is focusing too much on one aspect of the opioid epidemic ignoring others such as law enforcement for NPR news I'm anti Chow in Columbus this is NPR news from Washington scientists at the centers for disease control and prevention are investigating cases of severe lung illness linked to vaping in sixteen states there are one hundred fifty three reported cases NPR's Ellison Aubrey reports this CDC is working with state health departments to better understand the cluster of severe illnesses that have led people to the hospital the CDC says in many cases patients have acknowledged recent use of THC containing products an active ingredient in marijuana but no product has been conclusively linked to the illnesses vaping cartridges can contain a range of substances including nicotine anti H. C. the FDA says anyone who's experienced an unexpected tobacco or E. cigarette related health issue can reported online via the FDA's safety reporting portal Alison Aubrey NPR news a Hawaiian airlines plane made an emergency landing Thursday after smoke filled the cabin the plane was on a flight from Oakland California to Honolulu when it ran into problems the crew deployed emergency slides to evacuate the plane when it landed in Honolulu officials say seven people were taken to the hospital with smoke related symptoms the Federal Aviation Administration is putting out a call for pilots around the world to help test upgraded software from Boeing seven thirty seven MAX planes the plane has been grounded since March after two crashes within five months one in Indonesia and one in Ethiopia three hundred forty six people were killed I'm Nora Raum NPR news in Washington support.

Washington Ottawa NPR Nora Raum Mike Pompeii five months
"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"ellison aubrey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The powers prosecutor has opened an investigation to determine the cause of the fire which for now is being treated as an accident Rebecca Rosman reporting Notre Daum was undergoing renovation when the flames erupted atop the church as Christians around the world. Prepared celebrate Easter a federal appeals court is considering whether the Trump administration may continue forcing asylum seekers from Central America. To wait in Mexico, while they're -application are being processed and US courts K Q E dis for Rita job lot Romero reports at issue as whether the government must halt the so-called remain in Mexico policy as a federal judge in San Francisco ordered last week. But that could take months so panel of three judges must first rule whether the program stays in place. In the meantime, Lisa Knox's, attorney would center Lega, the LaRussa Oakland, one of the groups that sued the government along with eleven central Americans who say they fear for the lives while they're stuck in Mexico or individuals who every every day every hour that this litigation goes on and they're not able to return to US or at risk of being harmed. The court could decide as early as Wednesday for NPR news. I'm Friday that Jack Valero medal. Federal health officials are seeing a rise in measles cases in the United States NPR's Ellison. Aubrey reports at the says the number of cases. So far this year is the second highest since measles was eliminated in two thousand cases of measles have been confirmed in twenty states, nearly two thirds of been in New York. The majority of people who get measles are unvaccinated and over the last few years. Many of the reported cases in New York have been among unvaccinated people and orthodox Jewish communities overall. There have been five hundred fifty five confirmed cases this year NPR's, Alison over reporting actress, Laurie Laughlin and her husband Maasim. Oh, Julie Julie join newly have pleaded not guilty to charges they paid half a million dollars in bribes to get two daughters admitted to UC core paper show the couple waive their right to appear at their arraignment in Boston on Monday. They are among some fifty people including thirty three parents implicated in college, admissions, cheating and bribery scandal. Thirteen of the defendants, including actress, Felicity Huffman, have agreed to plead guilty. This is NPR news. Arago leader Daniel Ortega is offering safe return for exiles who fled his country during the past year of unrest. As NPR's. Carrie Kahn reports opposition leaders are calling the proposal absurd. In the statement Nicaragua's foreign affairs ministry says anyone who left the country in the past year, and does not have any formal court cases or accusations pending will be eligible to return, however, Nicaragua's may not position group. The Civic Alliance has rejected the proposal saying the plan doesn't include any real protections for returnees a spokesman for the alliance called the plan ridiculous and question how anyone would believe that the same government that threaten killed and continues to persecute people would all of a sudden began safeguarding their lives more than three hundred people have been killed in the past year of unrest in Nicaragua. More than fifty thousand fled the country, mostly the neighboring Costa Rica, and at least seven hundred more have been jailed Carrie Kahn, NPR news. Ride. Hailing service lived has pulled three thousand.

NPR measles US Mexico Nicaragua Carrie Kahn New York Central America Civic Alliance Felicity Huffman Rebecca Rosman Julie Julie prosecutor Daniel Ortega San Francisco Jack Valero Notre Daum Lega