16 Burst results for "Ellen Barry"

"ellen barry" Discussed on Bubbly Bibbly

Bubbly Bibbly

08:04 min | Last month

"ellen barry" Discussed on Bubbly Bibbly

"Hi, I'm Carmen and I'm Rachel tonight. We have decided on books and food and we decided on this subject because in our last episode we started talking about the mitford series by Jan karon and we realized that both of us had paid the orange marmalade cake. That was my famous among the mid from readers by Esther Bullock. It reminded us both how much juice And how prevalent food is in books, you know Rachel there's even a name for this food fiction and how I did not know that before. I have no idea but I can tell you that I should have come prepared with a snag because this episode is going to make me pay cash and this episode will be discussing works of fiction with heavy emphasis on food as part of the story as opposed to non fiction stories about food like good books and memoirs. So Rachel, where do you drink tonight? I am drinking a local beer from retail. That's out of Huntsville, Alabama and it's called Rikki-Tikki and it's a mango and fuse double India Pale Ale House. It's a little multi a little fruity a little floral floral e o and don't think that the mango infused skipped my attention know, it's Alicia. So we're going to talk more about that. I have a doze on ice with a splash of Elderberry liqueur. I love Ellen Barry. Yes, it only takes a pinch though Elderberry tonic that you can use to. Oh, yes. I'll share that with you, too. Thank you. So the mitford series are not so obvious about the importance of food in the story line until you read them, but there are some books out there that puts food with friends out and sinner like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. I read that book when I was younger and absolutely loved it. And I must say last episode we talked about but she made into movies. I adored Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka. Yes and speaking of chocolate that's sweet treat seems to be a favorite. There are tons of books with chocolate in the title like chocolate Like Water for Chocolate and The Chocolate War and those are just off the top of my head. As a matter of fact, I Read The Chocolate War which is considered a young adult book a y a and it guided me off. Is About a Boy at an all-boys Catholic school? And they have a chocolate sale every year chocolate bars and it turns out to be really about power and status and the Headmaster and his goons back the bully of the of the chocolate warmer. And this young man who is new to the Catholic School refuses to participate and it's just the story is just so reminiscent of junior high and school bullies and it just gutted me but this one is also frequently challenged and put on the banned books list for a Banned Book week. So it's again, it's got a sweet title, but it's not full of magical realism, like some of the other ones arm. Well it must be off. The same wavelength because one of my favorite books, so I must have read about three years ago was the dinner by Herman Koch these two brothers and their wives who come together in a restaurant to talk about a heinous crime that their two sons committed and the story develops over the book is developed by courses. So you have everything off the appetizer to dessert and it talks about a lot of different things about voids in our life. There's a lot of talk about the small amount of food on the big planes and then status and and our culture and how much would a mother do to be with you know to love their sons and it's really it's not a cozy turn on a Sunday afternoon and you're on your couch and get encouraged at all. It's darken kind of kind of scary, you know, it's it's really wage. It's about the shallowness of our culture and the most interesting character out of that whole book is clear. I find at the end because she becomes a willing participant in a conscious participant in the crime itself. Well aside from chocolate, there is also a fruit one of my favorite authors is Jeanette winterson. She has a really great way of using fruit as an analogy and I particularly loved oranges are not the only fruit. It's about a young girl who is raised in a very strict and fundamental Christian household, but she moved slowly realizing that she is a lesbian and just knowing that that's the premise of the story and it's oranges are not the only fruit. I love the way that song. It'll Embraces the quality that there are lots of us out there were all different but she also wrote another one off fixing the cherry and I haven't read that one. I think that is a great title. It is it's on my to-be-read list and it just sounds very provocative, but I'm not into it because she incorporates the fairytale the 12 Dancing Princesses to kind of push societal norms and help crash found the the ceiling of the patriarchy and the older I get the more feminist. I am so that really speaks to me. I mean fruit is full of symbolism. I mean since the Garden of Eden off and even that forbidden fruit, which is you know, where that term has come from and I've also noticed mangoes in a lot of titles lately and I even looked at mangos and literature and off. Mistral interesting quote from Randy Boyd God. Oh and in the New York Times review in Indian literature mangoes are tend to be luminescent orb app dangling and steamy are glistening was sweetness sacks and being a self waiting to be plucked caressed birth. I mean, I love girls give me a fan. I know I'm sweating. He's gotta try to found an article from 2017 and it's from The Wire and it's called expecting mangos as metaphor in South Asian writing and there are so many references not only two mangos but the mango Blossom as well. It was a very interesting read and we'll put the link in the show notes to both of these articles. It's used so much in South Asian riding that it's almost a cliche so I found that really suck. Interesting and that brings us.

Rachel Chocolate Factory Jan karon mango Blossom Esther Bullock Huntsville Jeanette winterson New York Times Carmen Alabama Charlie Garden of Eden Gene Wilder Ellen Barry Randy Boyd Herman Koch Catholic school Catholic School Willy Wonka
"ellen barry" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:37 min | 4 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hi Valerie hi I'm in New Jersey which I hate I wish I was back in my city again don't tell Chris Christie that yeah my brother I still okay and I wish I could you know see them more often but I can't travel any longer like I'm sorry so are are you okay okay but I I don't my husband died you know like seven and a half years ago and he did the driving sounds so how how so what's up okay I called the board of elections earlier today and to inform them that I no longer want to mail in ballots sent to my home anymore so I found out is that now the coming primary you know it and and just possibly in June but they changed it to July six right along the big John in person you have to do it by mail you have to do it no I'm not it would have to do it by mail yeah it'll be gone by now and I guess they changed it from June that means they can sleep in the Jersey even more than they usually don't that means they can cheat in New Jersey more than they usually do hi what is the state your state is well known for never there was a point which I was kind of embarrassed to be call mayor because all the mayors in Jersey we're going to jail and then I mean it's quite well known that you that there's plenty of voter fraud that goes on from Camden New Jersey to Philadelphia where they send voters over there over the bridge to vote in the in Pennsylvania which is more of a swing state and I can go on and on with the voter fraud that goes on in New Jersey which should be really investigated by the U. S. attorney that would be interesting to see how many dead people vote in New Jersey we never new York we used to have that problem to get people to someplace else recently uncovered a lot of dead people who voted funny thing is that people almost always vote democratic we've never had we've never I've I always feel better mileage because a lot of dead people voted against me and I always used to work on ways with the Roger ailes and David Garth how could we appeal more to the dead people from is there a way we can get their vote was going ahead we could do for dead people because I'm being sarcastic but when when the new York times tell you there's no voter fraud my cal James from Brooklyn yes the mayor James from Brooklyn I think I got my form in the mail to send away for my mail in my absentee voter in case I don't want to show up at the polls I just hope there's a post office around when it comes time to vote the to schools there it is and what the name Diane Ravitch with a new book called the slaying Goliath I guess you got I guess gates there Microsoft then mayor and a former mayor Bloomberg are helping to push that the the charter schools that that they will going to be learning remotely that's the preferred method to do things our days and then as far as the nursing home yesterday from you are going to look like an old worn we're not gonna have school classrooms anymore well I guess they may split or the the lower end the ones that the dissidents who will still attend the public school but the preferred upscale method would be to be privately charted a and yes to be remotely learning she called the situation by an average he calls it disgraceful that but as far as the nursing home yesterday's New York times had an unconscious thing article about the soldiers home in Holyoke Massachusetts soldiers home the article by Ellen Barry veterans words left to languish and basically it's one of is it there were twenty states with the soldiers homes in our operative three hundred and fifty veterans have died like World War two veterans the article countries three particularly one who actually landed at Normandy and and liberated one of those camps that's a shame and he was like ninety six years old and of course the family can't get in to see him and the thing is is that these private equity firms they take over these these nursing yeah the sent the family not getting in to see the people in the nursing homes also means that more people in the nursing homes will die because a lot of nursing homes you need an advocate they just don't take area then we got to be honest about this right and the minute they shut the families out the you you're just gonna end up with more fatalities for that reason alone and then to put people with cold in there and not have special conditions for how it handled the C. O. S. S. some of these governors who have done the same the CDC said you can't discriminate against people with covert but there are there that's only part of what they said they also said that the nursing homes except him had a sort of special conditions so in Florida they did in New York they didn't New York has five times the people dead in nursing homes even though Florida has more people in nursing homes in New York and that's just the reality it also comes it also comes from not setting priorities when you close down the entire society and the only part of decided that at risk of a certain segment then using your resources I mean we're using resources to stop kids from being within six feet of each other hello kids gonna die meanwhile we don't have the resources to help the nursing home segregate people we don't look at it enough because we're spread too thin part of leading is knowing how to set priorities part of it is knowing is to look at statistics and interpret them and when I saw a crime problem in one part of the city and put my cops all over the city more my comes with a crime problems we call that common sense what they did was either stupid he'll do a motion not using common sense I don't know what was the politics I can't tell chat with the mayor was sponsored by boomer naturals dot com effective face coverings and hand sanitizer he's co WABC twenty for twenty percent off coming up in.

Valerie New Jersey Chris Christie
"ellen barry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:35 min | 5 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Welcome back tomorrow here with you so what is being done here in the United States this is pretty remarkable under Merkel in Germany is talking about smelly re opening parts of Germany now how can she pull it off how do you re opened and economy you know there's a there's a deadly virus floating around well it turns out that you do it through contact tracing and testing well yeah I guess the first it would be testing you have to test people not just to our symptomatic yet the test everybody and you don't just test them for an active infection you test them for anybody to find out if they've had an infection in the past and therefore might be more millions of the disease and might actually be an appropriate person to be staffing you know tend to be working in a restaurant or in a factory or whatever it may be because Hey they're not going to catch the virus and somebody said next them because they've already had it while Germany has been doing this for months Germany was the first and most aggressive nation in Europe it was January six I believe when the World Health Organization released well in China released the genome of the crime virus the World Health Organization certified it and and certified the standards for lab tests within a week or so a German company had come up with a lab with a test that the world health organization's certified and said that they would underwrite shipping to sixty different poor countries and by the way if any rich countries water that they were available this is the first weeks of January Donald Trump was like nah nah nah nah everything's good we're good we don't need that there are times by the way reporting yesterday afternoon it's in the two in today's times it's also on their digital edition right now that had trump shut down the country two weeks earlier than California New York did and they didn't shut down the country to shut down their states but had trump shut down the country two weeks before New York and California did when it was obvious to public health experts in the United states around the world that's what needed to be done ninety percent five of the deaths that occur in the United States would not have happened we have over thirty thousand deaths in the United States we would have three thousand twenty seven thousand people who are now dead because of Donald trump's incompetence would still be alive according to this New York times study ad had the country just shut down two weeks earlier that's how fast this virus spreads that's the kind of problem the eight authoritarian follower governors many sociopaths I made I I think this is a question that's worth asking if a governor like that this is this governor in South Dakota that you know racial matters talking about every night if if a governor says yeah I know about the science I read the science of her all about the science but I'm not going to open my state because Republicans and we don't do that I'm following Donald Trump I'm putting the economy ahead of people if the governor says that word or her actions say that does that is that a good and reliable indicator that that governor is probably a sociopath the person who's incapable of empathizing with other human beings who can't relate to people at the level of human to human an automatic on a person with no conscience and no feeling what is simply indicate that they're stupid I think in the case of Rhonda Santos and Brian camp in Florida and Georgia I think you can safely say both I don't know enough about the governor South Dakota to to to make an evaluation bang out that's what Germany is doing they're they're gonna start slowly cracking the door open because they haven't tested in place and they have the contact tracing in place well now it's happening in both Massachusetts and San Francisco Massachusetts by the way has a Republican governor Charlie Baker this is a a beautiful article in today's New York times Alexander cross the newly minted state public health worker dial the strangers telephone number on Monday this is by Ellen Barry her heart racing it was business classes miss classes first day as part of Massachusetts fleet of contact tracers charger tracking down people have been exposed to the coronavirus as soon as possible and warning them on her screen was the name of a woman from Lowell Massachusetts one person was recently been diagnosed has been in contact with the the script told her to say a few minutes to discuss what that exposure might mean for you forty five minutes later Mrs cross miss cross hung up the phone being giggled and commiserated her file was crammed with information she was taking her first steps up on Mount Everest of cases Massachusetts is the first state to invest an ambitious contact tracing program budgeting forty four million dollars to hire a thousand people like Mrs cross miss cross similarly San Francisco has established this is as as a result of Maryland and breed in San Francisco and you contact tracing program to identify everyone an infected patient has interacted with the program will entail interviewing every newly infected person this is from the Huffington post every newly infected by a patient in the city to establish the network of people they may have infected and then informing those people that they could be possible carriers all without really revealing anyone's.

United States Merkel Germany
"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

"The daily is made I feel welcome. Andy Mills Lisa. Tobin Rachel Wester Lindsey Garrison any Brown clay tennis Koetter Pge coward. Michael Simon Lyndon Johnson Brad Fischer Larussa Anderson. Wendy door. Chris Would Jessica Chung Alexandra Leong Jonathan Wolf Lisa. Lisa Chow Eric. Kripke Mark George Luke. Vander blue a decent Egan Kelly. Prime Julia Longoria Sindhu. Yana on a someone. Dumb Jasmine Aguilara. MJ Davis Lynn. Austin Mitchell Sayer Cavuto. Monica F- start gave Dan Powell Dave Chiefs Shaw Sydney Harbour and Daniel special thanks to Sam Donaldson Michaela Bouchard Stella Tan. Julia Simon Common Lauren Jackson and Nora. Keller that's it for the daily. I'm Michael Barbaro. See You on Tuesday after the halting cutting. Hi This is Ellen Barry. I'm a reporter for the New York. TIMES MHM a few years ago. When I was posted in Delhi? I heard about a story that I couldn't forget out very long telephoto Lens and I got an image of this woman mm-hmm it was a story about a royal family living in the woods in complete isolation. When you say weird what do you mean? There's a feeling feeling that she was almost almost as she looks like a human animal and then went into the forest to meet the myself huck and what happened then was not at all what I expected very strange trouble. Finding my way out the jungle prince is a special miniseries by the New York Times. Listen wherever you get your podcasts..

Jessica Chung Alexandra Leong Tobin Rachel Wester Lindsey Ga Andy Mills Lisa Julia Longoria Sindhu Sam Donaldson Michaela Bouchar Lisa Chow Eric Michael Simon Lyndon Johnson Julia Simon New York Times Austin Mitchell Sayer MJ Davis Lynn Brad Fischer Larussa Anderson Mark George Luke Michael Barbaro Ellen Barry Jasmine Aguilara Wendy door Yana New York
"ellen barry" Discussed on After Hours

After Hours

08:02 min | 10 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on After Hours

"Number one. The one thing that I would very about this. Can you move this engineering culture. Closer to how the rest of humanity thinks about privacy and information I do think in myspace. They have a real imperative to demonstrate what corporate responsibility looks like in this domain. So that's what the next five years are going to look like hopefully late for Google. Okay thanks guys okay. So I have been using twitter in a more interactive way and one of the things. I did this week because I have a bunch of travel coming up is a ask people on twitter for some recommendations for things to watch because I needed a new show and I got so many interesting things things. I've never heard of Bletchley circle. Oh Yeah Bletchley circles fantastic. Is that good. Yeah it's like a British don't know that one and then I got this this one that I actually have checked out for an African twenty four hour news network. They said if you watch bits of this you get such a different perspective perspective around. Isn't that fascinating having said that none of those are my recommendation Mike. This week is a book called the over story by Richard Powers. What's that about? It's about trees. I like trees first of all. Well it is the best nature writing. I have read in so long but I should warn readers it is very long and it requires a little bit of stamina. Stamina's it's about trees in the literal sense. It's about trees the forest what we're doing to the planet but it's also a novel so it's trees as a metaphor metaphor for our lives lives and the lives of people we love and how things branch out in commingle it's just so beautiful in places and it incorporates this really fascinating group of characters so my recommendation is that if you see this book just try chapter one and you will know after chapter one if it's for you or not because this possible not 'cause it's a lot about trees uh-huh so it's weird but it's cool super cool. That sounds great. I like when the sometimes these writers Jonathon Franz into this with birds they look at one piece of environmental puzzle and they kind of see the whole world through that that's really powerful. And that's what this is Felix. You're just looking at me me. I heard an interview with him on. NPR I decided. This is definitely a book. I'm not going until okay. Maybe the writing is really spectacular but in that interview at least he was not able to convey any sort of enthusiasm for trees. This is why he's a writer instead of a speaker. Maybe speaking personality is less US alive than his writing personnel. Welby yeah but the over story by Richard Powers. It's really cool. Okay Felix when he had me here. Do you remember our enthusiast. Conversation about San Mixers. How could I forget? Let's do it again. uh-huh wanted to. I wanted to bring no. It's not about Steinbeck's kitchen appliance. So so I've been using sous vide cooking technique that essentially cooks food in plastic bags in water and one of the things that it does is it allows allows you to cook food at much lower temperatures than you would typically do and so. I've been experimenting with one of these appliance. It's called a Novartis. A number of them that seemed quite similar. They used to be super expensive. Because I think it was mostly for professional chefs but now they're actually quite affordable. And after tell you it will change the way you you think about chicken. Wow that's all I say at this point. Change think about success of for instance the realization. That this this is chicken that I'm going to eat cold with say from Caesar Salad or dishes chicken dead. I'm going to eat warm with some sauce completely really different temperature points. Interestingly different eating experiences I love this idea. I've wanted to try that and in part what's interesting to me about Felix is it feels like part heard of this trend of what were historically tools. Only available to professionals are now becoming available like home chefs. And it's fantastic right. Yeah because then you start Some of their magic. So the only comment I have about this is I have very mixed feelings about the invasion of equipment into the kitchen so I started cooking about about a year ago. And there's a part of cooking that's super delicate and you're chopping and you're seasoning and I love all of that and then there's a part of cooking where you're getting blender out or your stand mixer or you're bringing your Sufi thing or you're bringing that thing that has the Cold Ice Senior Blake steaming and and I feel feel like it's like being in the garage and you're building a so far so you're searching builder and you've got all this equipment and that ah I haven't quite gotten comfortable with that. I can completely understand where you come from young. We this this one feels different. I think in two ways because the thing itself is super simple. There's nothing magical about it and also you can do something that you couldn't do before one problem than half with many of the gadgets. This is I can't really see how the dishes going to taste different here. I think alike temperature just really matters fundamentally for how food will taste and the concrete nancy of it. That's a great recommendation. So once in a while there's some of these longer articles that just are transfixed thing and so I came across one a couple of weeks ago that I think was just amazing. It's by woman named Ellen Barry in the New York Times and it's called the jungle Prince of Delhi and it was also made into a three apart episode of the daily podcast. So here's the short version in the mid nineteen seventies. A woman and two children showed up into the train station and said had they were royalty from this small principality known as Awad and they just camped out there because they said they had been displaced and that the government owed them some some property and lived there for several years and I had even heard about this when I was living in Delhi a long time ago and by the mid nineteen seventies in their Gandhi basically I decided to buy them off and gave them a fort in the middle of Delhi. And they've been living there ever since and the story is kind of Lore so this Woman Min decided to investigate it and she tells that story of what this family really is and the story is stunningly. Told and so it's a story about in some ways. It's a story about foreign journalists. But then it's also a story about partition and India about this woman who was ripped from location to location location because of partition which happened seventy years ago. Now and then the mental displacement that was associated with the partition. It is just a stunning story and just to read the original story in The New York Times or listen to the three part podcast which has a lot of her original recordings from all the reporting. So it's actually incredible use of the PODCAST technology Just fantastic so jungle. Princess Delhi so interesting great read to understand India understand partition to understand journalism. It's just a a spectacular read. Great Okay those are recommendations. And that's it for this week. Thanks everyone for listening. This is after hours from the eight fair. PODCAST network.

Felix twitter Richard Powers Delhi Bletchley circle The New York Times myspace Google India Princess Delhi US Jonathon Franz writer Mike Steinbeck San Mixers Ellen Barry Blake
"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

"Was feeling more protective of him but I was also working on a story. He was the last one left with Prince Akina dead Cyrus no longer seemed bound around by the Family Code. Maybe he could tell me more about his past. We asked him questions whenever it could guiding the conversation back to the Kingdom of I was born in luck now and then you can do it all just seemed muddled. Where was he born whose his father didn't they have any living relatives when I asked these questions? His response response was often to deflect deep deck deck Bhushan. Leaving leaving it say for example you let me tell you kill anybody. Okay okay. The new topic pick is Talked about a hus- they'd lived in Kashmir before coming to the train platform. He said someone had burned it down but he didn't WanNa say much more about it they want to do on us. Were you in the house when it burned at it every or viewing viewing these forecasts coming but no money into that US. No I don't want to be for God's sake do not recall this message again for the closer I got to him. The more I thought he was withholding fonder. I grew of him the more. I grew skeptical. You're just a very mysterious person because I don't know who you really are like I don't I don't understand who you are. Yes but Eddie on just sitting before because we never got anywhere in any way I had to go. Oh I had a new assignment in London so listen when I go I go with like six weeks. Okay would you like someone else to come see you consider when I go I I'll be away. Shall I send someone to come visit. Maybe we'll do that on the night of my flight. I went to see him to say goodbye and then at ten ten o'clock pm. I'll go to the plane flight. Leaves at two. Am but you have to be ended early to us off to yard before and he asked me this funny thing he said how do do I get word to you if I die. Can I asked him if he's planning to commit suicide. But I have some some of the. There's that that runs in your family a little bit but you but you've never been interested in it. I do not know about the next steps but the sole fun. I'm I'm moved from Brazil. What I'm disturbed that you are that? Oh you think something might happen to afford a better good. That is you have four Tara. It's the things I promised to call him. Well then I'll see you again younger now. I really thank. You will record but don't do anything in a hurry. I said goodbye but I think you're GONNA be okay so I left. They turned to look back at him from the past. He was replacing the iron bar that separated him from the outside world into slits or Just undercharged time. We should know if the bricks of deal as it now stands will go ahead or not. It's also the British prime minister. Theresa May Hi Michael Ellen Barry From The New York Times I actually I was interviewing. Said wait is Westminster an effective central state which had enormous enormous.

US Prince Akina Family Code Kashmir Michael Ellen Barry Eddie Westminster London Brazil Theresa The New York Times
"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:24 min | 10 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

"I left that day without meeting the princess but Cyrus assured me that I would? He told me this rather formerly that sister had decided her last interview would be given to Ellen Barry of the New York Times Sakina seemed to be the keeper of the family history. Cyrus Cyrus had showed me the leather bound book that she had put together after their mother's death it was an obsessive stream of consciousness. Document that one friend who had seen it compared to Finnegans wake. I could imagine her writing from morning to night as imperious an single-minded as her mother so I left. But I told Cyrus I would be back and forth and and I did come to a very sweet weekdays. It's all one visit turned into two three and four very unusual selection of fruit. Usually you just I have apples kept stopping by waiting for Princess. Sakina to show up. What do you mean change but each time Cyrus would politely explain that? She was still in luck now. He said her injury was taking longer than usual to heal. So in the absence of the princess. Cyrus and I fell into this kind of rhythm. I don't like it well. If you didn't like monotony you wouldn't have stayed in this place for the last that's A. I would ask him questions about his past when you were in the railway station where you physically attacked is answers for animated. But I found that they are not always in light on me so I kept asking about the the princess. She seemed to be the boss here asked if he could call her and he said she didn't use the telephone that if you wanted to communicate with her he would send a servant on the train up to luck right now to whisper something in her year. That's pretty strange even for this family. Is there anything I can bring. You know I wasn't sure where this was all going. Where was the Kena? Eventually I would give up so I'll be back on Friday and leave for the day. This went on for six or seven months but then one night he called me on the phone. He was howling rolling unintelligibly. I remember lying curled up on my daughter's bunk bed listening to him. I couldn't make out what he was saying at first but then he confessed something. He told me his sister had died months earlier in the lodge before we met each other and that he told no one and that he'd buried her alone and that he was afraid the jackals would eat her. And this whole time I had been getting to know him. He'd been living in the lodge alone. This was the Kingdom of odd. It was on the verge of extinction..

Cyrus Cyrus Finnegans wake Sakina Ellen Barry New York Times
"ellen barry" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:20 min | 10 months ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on KCRW

"Up to lake this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelley and I'm Elsa Chang it's hard not to sound like a broken record when it comes to climate change here's what the U. N. said in a new report out today the world is not doing enough we have to learn from our procrastination we cannot afford to fail those three statements and yet according to the report countries are feeling feeling to cut greenhouse gas emissions and thereby putting us on a path to climate catastrophe is just the latest of many dire predictions from the U. N.'s climate scientists in recent years and to help us make sense of it we're joined now by Kelly Levin of the world resources institutes global climate program welcome thank you so much so what's today's the twenty nineteen emissions gap report it's this annual report and I understand that you've been the lead author on it in previous years why is this report important sure so what we know is that the emissions gap which is this gap between where missions are headed and where they need to be to avoid the worst climate change impacts it is large by twenty thirty in just ten years we have to cut in half our missions to meet the temperature targets of the Paris agreement and unfortunately we've delayed action significantly so greater cuts are going to be required the longer that action is delayed and while some countries are on track to meet their emission reduction targets many still are not president trump of course has started the process of pulling the US out of the Paris accord but for other countries do reports like this one that we're talking about today do they have any impact does public shaming actually work is what I'm trying to ask yeah I know it's a great question I mean we certainly can add this report to the pile of reports that are clear calls to action I think the timing of this is important because countries are invited under the Paris agreement to up their commitments by the end of next year by the end of twenty twenty so this is critical because we need to take stock of where we are where we need to be and put mounting pressure on governments to up their commitments what about for the general public I mean how effective are reports like these and grabbing people's attention and changing their daily behaviors I think that we certainly have a public that is waking up to the climate change impacts around them as well as the lack of action there is a growing demand for action and climate justice around the world and if you think about the youth protest right after the climate summit with seven million people across hundred eighty five countries to protest the lack of government action I think increasingly we will hopefully see some more action I'm curious about the choice of language when trying to alert the public about the urgency of this problem the use for example of the word fail in this particular report countries collectively failed to stop the growth in global emissions they remind me of Greta tune Berg's emotional speech at the U. N. climate Acheson it earlier this year let's take a listen you are failing us the eyes of all future generations or upon you and if you choose to face a loss I say we will never forgive you failure I mean does the world the more language like that more gratitude Berg's ever going to see the kind of rapid transformation action that today's report calls for yeah I mean we can sugarcoat this and in many ways we have been failing if you think about it since the first unit permissions gap report was published in twenty ten global emissions have increased around eleven percent that is startling and the impacts and floating around us are just getting worse and worse I'm at the same time what we know is that it is still technically feasible to avoid the worst climate change impacts but our failure is reversible failure is is reversible by with tremendous effort and while there have been examples of rapid change in specific technologies are sectors in the past there is no precedent in our documented history for the rate of change at the scale that we're talking about for limiting warming to avoid the worst climate change impacts Kelly Levin is a senior associate with W. R. I.'s global climate program thank you very much for joining us today thank you in the ever changing world of children's entertainment highlights magazine has stayed a constant you might have grown up reading it your grandparents might have grown up reading at your kids might be reading it right now Ohio public radio's indie child looks at the keys to the magazine success a formula that mixes fun with learning it's reading time for Emily Burke cultures third grade class at evening street elementary school in Worthington when it comes time to picking something to read highlights magazine is a popular choice has like heart of gold I light using gallon yeah the same magazine that was a mainstay in waiting rooms starting in the fifties is still going strong today its headquarters is in Columbus Ohio editor in chief Christine French Kali says part of its popularity comes from recurring games and stories their non negotiable there in each issue so for example we always have a hidden picture in every issue of highlights the fact there's been a hidden picture and every issue of highlights since June nineteen forty six the popular visual puzzle that challenges kids to find small pictures inside a larger scene has been in the magazine for nearly seventy five years since nineteen forty eight kids have been enjoying the parables of two facing gallant with two face modeling bad behavior and gallant modeling good part of its appeal to young children is its lack of ambiguity it's a little black and white it's practice for the big harder moral decisions that are going to complicate her highlight C. E. O. can Johnson's great grandparents started the company shortly after World War two he says highlights through games and stories taps into the universal issues kids have always faced I think adults believe that everything's changed for kids you know we've got devices and it's busy and and all these things but what we know is kids still have some of the same issues they've had since nineteen forty six how do I get along with my siblings what happens when I have a falling out my best friend those things are universal those things aren't changing Ellen Barry is a family development specialist with the group family connections in the Cleveland area she says kids face all sorts of fast paced entertainment with video games and movies but highlights found a way to slow things down and still capture kids' attention with short articles and puzzles being able to do something come back to it see where you left off and where your work was and then pick up where you left off I think is a really important part of how highlights magazine can help with brain development highlights is looking to maintain that five wall of all being it even has a podcast highlights Kirsten right heart is product testing a mobile app that matches shapes to make any animal for example a heart and a triangle.

Mary Louise Kelley Elsa Chang NPR seventy five years eleven percent ten years
"ellen barry" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"Please share them with us. You can tweet it us or write us at the waves at slate dot com, all right recommendations, June. What do you have this week? So my recommendation this week actually came to me to all of us from an Email from a listener, it was a piece that was in Sunday's New York times. But I actually hadn't seen it until Genevieve Nissim of Cincinnati mill. And it's piece that I recommend looking at online because there is really cool video and photography about it. And is a piece called Finland's hobby ho- skills, once a secret society, no prints in public, and it's by Ellen Barry with photographs by Dimitri, Kosta cough. And it is about this phenomenon in Finland which is apparently been happening for decades where girls who like are what I guess in my youth. I would have thought it was old the girls who like. Purses, but not everybody can have a horse. In fact, very very very few. People can have a horse matter how high mature into them. But in Finland of girls didn't they didn't seem to be any mention of any boys whatsoever. Doing this. They do what you do with horses with hobbyhorses. So they are holding a fake horse's head, and they are doing like, the the the dress ause the the jumping that that like their own legs. And in the video, you know, when when I'm saying, I'm watching this video. This. You're thinking what if your mind, but there's something about this? It's it's start most of the girls start this when their ten or in their tween years, and you know, there's something there's a massive dignity about girls at that age were like, you can almost see they're like having to fight off all kinds of influences. And the really they're sitting things that they really want to do is not all the same for every go. Of course, not every go wants to be a horsey girl or a hobby horse girl. But the way that they are it's no kind of sport. It's not playing. They're very keen to say. And it's something that girls do together they go off to the woods together. And they as if they were riding horses, it's bizarre and strange, but there's something really kind of beautiful about it. And I'm just envious of God. This is so amazing. I'm looking at it. It's weird. You remember there was that New York Times photo essay about those women who who who sort of like were really inch of fake. Dolled like baby dolls, you know. And they went around with babe does super-duper creepy. This is like the opposite of that. It's like this fakeness, but the girls faces I have a ten year old, son. So there's just kind of earnestness ten year olds which is the most beautiful and like the fa-. The judge is doing that like like perky upright, judging judges and enforce competitions. Anyway, it's amazing. It's really amazing. So please check in check online because you've got to see the videos and the photos, I am going to recommend the book gingerbread by Helen or Yemi. This is she's a couple books, and I wish Naureen were here because Noreen out of pure jealousy of Noreen book club. I started a book club. And so, yeah, I just one hundred jealous. So that's what I did. And this is the book we're reading, and it's not usually come not like a magical, realism food style person. But this has kind of a realism. Underneath it which which I really like, cool, Nicole. What do you got? I would like to recommend this show. Good girls. It's it comes on NBC. It stars Reta Christina Hendricks and may Whitman as a group of women friends, Christina Hendricks. And may Whitman place sisters on the show, and they start drug dealing. They live in Detroit. And yeah, it's just a really interesting show. And I I kind of pooh-poohed it because I was like, oh, this is just a pink breaking bad. Right. But it's so much more than that. It's really really good Christina Hendricks. Character Beth was with this in marriage that what an idiot. Like is this car salesman like to the tea, right? Her husband who was played by Matthew Lillard and dealing with that and wanting to leave but also being stuck because of the children.

Christina Hendricks Finland New York times Helen Genevieve Nissim Matthew Lillard Noreen Whitman Ellen Barry Cincinnati mill fa salesman Kosta Beth NBC Nicole Dimitri Detroit Yemi
"ellen barry" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"So there was there was one night at our college newspaper, where group of us were sitting around as college students do take ourselves too seriously. And we were we were trying to think about who is the best writer just sort of prose stylist in each class. And I still remember this in the class of nineteen Ninety-three. We decided it was Ellen Barry who's now a celebrated foreign correspondent and a colleague of mine in the class of nineteen Ninety-four, which is my year. We decided was Matt Kaminsky and that made us all mad because Matt's first language was polish not English. But he was still a better writer than any of us. He now is that an executive politico, and that's the ninety ninety five it was the sports writer. Theo Epstein, and I still remember him writing these letters off to try to get an internship with the Baltimore, which he did the beginning of his career say wrote every team in the country, but. Calvin hill who the old football player from Yale was an executive at the Baltimore Orioles. And saw this letter which probably was better than the average solicitation for an internship in higher. Yeah. I mean now huge numbers of kids at colleges like Yale in Chicago wanna go into sports, but a lot of feel sort of the trailblazer. Right. And so people podcast with them. Yeah. I think people he said people thought who's kind of nuts because it's like you get this Yale degree, you should go. You know, go into finance go to law school, go to and numb. I'm going to go into baseball. And it worked both ways right people in the baseball world. I think we're pretty skeptical of pointy headed Ivy league school kids, he did impart one bit of advice that I share all the time with people which she said I figured out that if I that everybody has like twenty percent of the their job that they don't like. And if I could take that off everyone's plate and just do the twenty percent of the job that they didn't want. Me to do that that I could learn the whole thing and be, you know, ingratiate myself and move up in the organization, and so on and of course, of course, he did you were an intern at the Washington Post. I was and and you were hopeful that it would lead to employment extremely hopeful. It was this in your senior year. Yeah. So I did the sort of I don't know whether it's still exists. I doesn't to the same extent. But twenty five years ago there was kind of an internship circuit. I I taught junior high school math in New Haven. And then went when when that workday was over at three o'clock and wrote stories for the New Haven register to get clips. Yeah. So I then get another ship. I'm sure you remember this the whole deal. Yeah. And then I had an internship at the Boston Globe. And then on the city desk, the Washington Post, and it was it was really a phenomenal experience. I learned a huge amount. I got to cover the negotiations to build. What is now the downtown sports arena? The wizards and capitals revitalize neighborhood. Yeah. And so it was just a great experience..

writer Washington Post Matt Kaminsky Theo Epstein Yale Ellen Barry executive baseball New Haven solicitation Ivy league school Calvin hill Baltimore Baltimore Orioles Chicago intern Boston Globe
"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"You know, the the the warnings about what will happen to the economy all say seriously, Mike g-o-v who walls of Brexit to is Brexit here stood up this foam farming conference. Untold farmers that if we had an ideal Brexit things like tariffs on beef and lamb could be up to forty percent every single thing as least up ten percent, even he. Who believes in very much in Brexit thinks no deal will be a disaster for the constituency. He's coming representing, which is farmers Gina. How's your concern? Now that were in twenty nineteen. Do you think about Brexit much over the holidays or? Well, I mean, I'm sadly, never really entirely switch off and was thinking about it quite a lot. I think one of the things that we need to put on minds to here is is to think about the language around this and the gap between metaphor and reality. So we are talking a lot about a clean break. So if you if you define clean break, for instance, a sudden complete end to something such as a relationship or a period of time spent in a place says the dictionary, well, we're not suddenly never going to see France. Again. This is not a clean break. This is shattered jagged horrible thing. And I think that the language is very very misleading. I think that people are being sure being asked a variety of questions. But are they we've seen in the past that we haven't been given enough information or that some sectors of the population? You pops only we'd one kind of media not getting enough information. I think this particular survey targeted at Torrey members as Joyce says they are reading the telegraph or or whatever it is. They're seeing one particular side of it. But I think that that language they use of that language is is very very problematic. I mean, clean break is is is one way to put a bullet DeVos is another way to say. But even in divorce. I mean, there is always collateral damage. We're not going to just be able to move house and forget allows partners. We may well stood still be staying in the spare room Ellen Barry who's been on the show from the New York Times wrote it this way today, there's a yawning Gulf in perception of the economic impact of leaving the union without an agreement in this country. Does that square with you enjoy? Well, I think there's a yawning. I mean, if you read papers financial times, there is not a yawning gap is quite clear, and this already a lead Vecchio Mik indicators about the economy stalling I suppose what we don't see and this is not descended from two thousand eight the impact of the financial crash was felt very far away places. Indeed like Northern Ireland where you went from a five day week two three day, we can factories so people affectively losing forty percent. Our income in order to keep the economy on the road. You know, the the the impact will be felt in the city because an ready, you know, bikes all beginning to kind of shift their weight into Europe. But the first effects will always be felt in this formal fragile industries cross, crunchy, which manufacturing and foaming. I mean, you you talk about Northern Ireland joy. And I think that that's really really important. And I think that a lot of people's visceral dislike of the steel is to do with the buck stop, and and all the rest of it. The backstop has has become a bad word for lots of people. But it it's an insurance policy. It's it's a backup plan. It's it's you know, if we don't have that it hopefully will never have to use it. But we we need to ensure that the vote of between Northern Ireland and Ireland remains open and invisible. Otherwise, I mean there I think it's the I think the figures it's something like one hundred forty seven hundred and fifty seven different areas of cross-border work in cooperation in Ireland north and south those will stop. I mean, you know. You know, we we talked about the bulges in the Irish Sea which carried electric generators is because currently there is across Northern Ireland Republic of Ireland and let Christie deal which just stops. So we actually have to provide a country that has no electricity supply electricity..

Northern Ireland Brexit Mike Ellen Barry Vecchio Mik Irish Sea New York Times Torrey Europe France DeVos Joyce Christie forty percent two three day ten percent five day
"ellen barry" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on KPCC

"Miles an hour. And that Lou was running alongside the car when he fired seven shots four of which struck Garcia, the use of deadly force in this case said lacy was unreasonable and unnecessary KPCC's. Frank Stoltze deputy, Luke Lou is forty years old. He faces up to twenty one years in prison. If he's convicted the family of a homeless man who was fatally shot by a security guard at the Walgreens store in Hollywood says it will sue the pharmacy chain for more than half a billion dollars the family of twenty one year old Jonathan hard says he wasn't shoplifting, but was targeted by an armed security guard because he was black attorney Carl Douglas represents the family. He says Walgreens should shoulder the blame for the fatal shooting executives at Walgreens made a conscious decision to protect their money by employing armed security. Guards law. Green says it has cut ties with the firm that had hired to handle security at the Hollywood store. Cal State Northridge plans to remain open. After two anonymous warnings that threatened a mass shooting on campus tomorrow. GPC's Emily Elena. Doug, Dale visited the Northridge campus today? It's eerily quiet here. It's finals week, but students say some of their classes were cancelled after a letter was found threatening a mass shooting last week. A similar message with a swastika was scrawled on a wall. In Sierra hall where classes are held third year student. Kyle Brammer says he surprised the threats are getting so much attention tactics to get out of finals. But others are worried senior Liana Ramirez says she thinks the university should have closed the campus this week she's trying to avoid going into Sierra hall. It just feels weird to go into that building. Because I do have a class there. A petition with almost fourteen thousand signatures, urged officials to shut the school campus administration said the threats might not be credible. They're working with the Los Angeles Police Department to investigate. I'm Emily Elena. Doug, del L A county supervisor Sheila today called for a review of the Wolsey fire. She wants to know exactly what. What caused it pow firefighting resources were deployed and how effective emergency alerts were during and after the fire. She plans to introduce emotion next week that calls for that detailed review. And Allie county supervisors today approved a long debated development of nearly twenty thousand homes plan for the northern part of the county. We get details from KPCC's k wells, the homes are about seventy miles outside the city onto hone ranch where the five freeway hits the LA Kern county line, they're part of the centennial housing project, a massive planned community, which will include businesses park space in retail all to be built over the next thirty years supervisor Catherine Berger says with high homelessness and low home ownership the county needs more houses on the market. I believe we have an obligation to prove conditions for Arkansas and help to alleviate the housing crisis, which brings us closer to achieving the school more than a hundred people turned up to speak, including opponents who site negative effects on the environment and traffic. Many of those brought up recent wildfires as a reason not to build in a high fire risk area. Syntactical is a recipe for more, scorched homes loss of human life. And skyrocketing firefighting costs if I were a supervisor I would not want the deaths of centennial residents on my conscience up in smoke the motion passed four to one, but they added the condition that the developers need to increase affordable housing from fifteen percent of units to eighteen percent. I'm Kelly wells, our producers, Megan Irwin and leader. Martinez. Parker mcdaniels handles the sound. I'm Nick Roman in the Steve Julian studio more news at our website, L, A dot com. L A I S T dot com. One eight comes up at eight o'clock. It's time for the daily from the New York Times. From the New York Times, I'm Michael Barr. This is the day. In a humiliating last minute move, Prime Minister, Theresa may has cancelled today's historic vote on the terms of Britain's divorced from the European Union Ellen Barry and Stephen council on why Britain is so frustrated by Brexit before Brexit has even begun. It's Tuesday December..

Luke Lou Emily Elena supervisor shoplifting Walgreens Sierra hall Wolsey fire Doug New York Times Carl Douglas Hollywood GPC Frank Stoltze Los Angeles Police Department Allie county Kyle Brammer Liana Ramirez Kelly wells lacy Britain
"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on The Daily

"The from the New York Times, I'm Michael Barr. This is the day. In a humiliating last minute move, Prime Minister, Theresa may has cancelled today's historic vote on the terms of Britain's divorce from the European Union. Ellen Barry and Stephen cast on why Britain is so frustrated by Brexit before Brexit has even begun. It's Tuesday December. The ice of the right? Three hundred eleven the nose of the left two hundred ninety three. This has been very strange week in British politics. The is to the right three hundred eleven the nose to the left two hundred ninety three. So the is h the is heavy. A number of things have happened that haven't happened decade. This tale is not a plan for Britain's future. So for the good of the nation. The house has very little choice. But to reject this deal. This is all sort of unfolding drama of Theresa May's Brexit agreement. People have been on the streets on both sides because they're dissatisfied with what may has brought home. And in this particular story has gone from us extremely low boil to absolute bedlam. Back. In wine now. So this is the moment you and a half years after the referendum to leave the European Union when the government has to secure the agreement of parliament for the terms of leaving the EU. Okay. So they voted two and a half years ago to leave the EU and now in order to actually do that they have to agree on how to leads right? But it's like it's hard to even remember that this action made anyone happy to ask years ago because it's been such as log I had spoken to people who described the referendum day as the most sort of euphoric thrilling day of their lives, and those people are also clemmie right now. So in other words, it's been a really long two and a half. Years. It's been a long ten half years. It's been grueling. So my colleague Steven castle. I'm Steven causal correspondent in the London bureau. I think he hasn't written a non Brexit story for. I don't know that's life. It is a completely or consuming story because this always political crisis the brewing or actually happening in Britain. So remind me how this all began what got Britain to this point. Yes. Thinking back. It was the twenty third of June in twenty sixteen and good evening and welcome at the end of this momentus day when each one of us has had the chance to say what kind of country we want to live with voting on whether to leave the European Union at ten o'clock. The police stations closed off two weeks months years of argument, and we'll have the answer to the question. That's haunted. British politics for so long. Do we want to be in or out of the EU? What I remember that day was I came in a little late and completely by coincidence. As always walking to the bureau, I happened to bump into somebody who was ashlin canvassing in the street, and it was an adviser to David Cameron. He was then the prime minister, and we had a conversation. He assured me that remain was going to win. Brendan. So I came into the office pretty relaxed about one of what was going to happen. I hereby gif notice that I have certified the full owing the total number of ballot papers come to wars. But then the results started coming in total number of votes cast in favor of leave was sixty three thousand five hundred ninety eight chose the leave campaign just a little bit behind remain not nearly as much behind as only experts had been saying, we should expect very soon became clear that things were not going according to plan for Downing Street. The title number of eights casting faith of leaf walls, eighty two thousand. Slides results. Interesting is an understatement. As the results went on through the ninety became clearer and clearer actually Britain had voted to leave the European Union. The British people have spoken and the answer is where out against almost everybody's expectations. And this is vote that has huge consequences not just for our country. But also implications for a whole continent, and it unleashes a period of huge uncertainty, maybe huge opportunity, but also maybe huge risks to. And

European Union Britain Theresa May prime minister Prime Minister New York Times Brexit Ellen Barry Michael Barr London Steven castle Brendan Stephen two weeks
"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Earn his new life joined now by Ellen Barry, chief international correspondent at the New York Times Ellen. What have we learned from this new book about why? So scrip all was so valuable to my six. We learned. A lot of of context for for a script halls betrayal. I mean, I should say that the thing we don't learn in this book is why he was targeted, which has been sort of the persistent question why someone who is apparently relatively obscure from the Russian point of view would be the target of such a spectacular tack. That said, yeah, you know tons of information sort of about the background to his betrayal and what he passed onto 'em. I six three get me sense of scribbles own motivations, whether he it's no small change for anybody, I guess, to engage in the betrayal of the country, especially if you are somebody who serves that country for a living was a principal was at money was at some sort of grievance of his own. So because this account comes from crawl himself, it's, you know, it's serving his own interests. He is telling it the way he wants to tell it. But it is sort of remarkable story. So so the the craziest part of it is that he says, after the collapse of the Soviet Union in nineteen ninety two, he felt that he that his loyalty, his oath of loyalty to the Soviet Union had in fact been invalidated by the fact that the country no longer existed and that he went to the GRU. He got an appoint with general and he and he went to this guy and he said, I can no longer be loyal to this organization. I don't like the new government. He didn't like Yeltsin and that. The Russian intelligence was in such a shambolic state at that time that they refused his resignation and instead sent him abroad to the west, a place where he would be surrounded by temptations of all kinds. Do we get a sense of how big a risky was actually running or perceived himself to be running in toning information over to mow six. Well, again, you know, lots and lots of context, one of the main thing, but he apparently passed onto 'em. I six in that time according to his book is, is he was he was passing on information about graft. Perpetrated by officers of the GRU in the Madrid resident, Torah that is his colleagues. GRU officers were skimming. They were creating fake line items and they were pocketing a lot of budgetary money with support from some of the higher ups back home. And this is something that that he passed on to the British who's then would go to some of these corrupt officers and try to compromise them or try to turn them, which seems to have been somewhat successful. So so he's talking about corruption in the Russian system to the Brits. Is that where he was useful to the British? Because obviously the the idea that corruption and graft were endemic in mid nineties Russia was not uncommon knowledge. Was it just the British were seeking Kompromat if you will, to enable the recruitment of even further of his colleagues? Exactly. I mean, I think that's what he was giving them and, and there is a specific story urban uses uses pseudonyms here, but a story of a naval officer who worked with him who as Paul succeeded in in getting turned to then work for the Spanish for many years and then got caught in two thousand four by the Russians. Presumably by the same person who exposed for Paul. Who was interrogated at great length by the FSP and then found strangled in a hospital bed in a military hospital with several of his fingers missing at this point. According to this account, m I six offered to get ripple out of Russia and repel refused that offer went back home and obviously was arrested soon thereafter. The reason the whole world knows scruples name. Now, of course, is this bizarre attempt to partly to assess ninety minutes Salisbury early this year? No. You said earlier that he, he professes mystification at why he would have been targeted, but it it is a such a strange event on a number of levels because he was, of course he.

Ellen Barry Yeltsin Russia GRU principal New York Times Soviet Union Paul chief international correspond Salisbury FSP Kompromat officer Madrid ninety minutes
"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"And how did you get in explaining why gay scruple was targeted, whether actually fled Putin had any direct hand in his poisoning. So actually we, we can't. We in our reporting, we weren't able to answer that question. I, there's going to be a lot more reporting on this case Mark urban from the BBC. Has seventeen hours of interviews with Sergei's cripple which and he's going to publish that book in three weeks. So we will know more about that. But no, we weren't able to answer that. I think what we what we were able to do is sort of put together a psychological portrait which explains why for Putin. This issue of traders, keeping track of them keeping a list of them in his mind and making sure that they are that they are punished is really existential to him. It's really very important for biological biographical reasons because he during those last kind of tumultuous months of of his while the Soviet Union was unraveling. He physically sort of. He physically tried to defend the identities of Soviet informants in east Germany against crowds that were trying to seize them. And that is an episode in his life that he's gone back to again. And again as what he sees as the low water Mark of sort of Russian or Soviet power, and it's something he's been trying to counter counteract, I think, ever since then. And there's also this swap of which scruple is part of into anti ten, which your article brilliantly describes his reaction to seeing this will take place. So it's a bit paradoxical because no one who studies the Russian government believes that he didn't approve the swap they. But it occurred at a time when the president was Dmitry Medvedev and Medvedev was engaged in a kind of brief thaw of relations with the United States. He, in fact, when they were discussing the swap, he was on his way to visit Obama in Washington. And that was, I think if anyone recalls that trip, it was sort of full of happy talk and sort of positive optics. But when Putin was asked twice during press conferences about the swap, he responded and incredibly caustic fashion. Once he basically said that all of these guys are going to die. I hope they choke on their thirty pieces of silver and another time he said, you know, if they don't die, they're going to have to hide their whole lives. They'll never see their. Families again. So he responded with, you know, obvious loathing about all of these four gentlemen who were freed on what is this loyalty? The Putin finds when betrayed is, is is such a terrible crime. Is it loyalty to the Soviet Union of which he say, case cripple our report of the idea of Russia today or to Putin himself? Well, I suspect that the thing that matters most immediately to him is loyalty to the brotherhood of intelligence agents. This is his tribe. This is what he grew up into, and I think it matters to him deeply. He talks about it all the time, and I think he would also say that loyalty to the Soviet Union is cannot be distinguished from loyalty to Russia, and that I believe with something that's our gaze cripple may have questioned. He, you know, his friend said he was totally not ideological. But this was a moment of of capitalism in Russia, and he was part of that moment. And have you spoken to any of the others who part of the spice weapon? Twenty ten. And if so, what did they say. They have been ferry quiet, and I will say that we have spoken to to several people who are involved in that swap. But one of the things that has changed since March is that a whole category of people who had been considered relatively safe are now considered to be at risk so they are. Not speaking publicly. Thank you very much. David talking to us that was Ellen Barry, the chief international correspondent from the Neo time. Thank you very much for joining us on the Monaco daily still.

Putin Soviet Union Russia Dmitry Medvedev BBC Sergei Russian government east Germany Monaco Obama chief international correspond United States Ellen Barry president David Washington seventeen hours three weeks
"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"ellen barry" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"It is nineteen minutes past the hour time for a review of the day's newspapers with Monica, financial Gupta, projector, financer, thanks for popping in a way. Shall we start. Let's start. We feel it some polish today, and there's a very interesting story here Ben, as you know, we're in. Electra season in Brazil, but full at Impala did in new thing. It's called the electro match basically is more of an online finger. They're explaining here on the website how he works. So this is the with the little info graphic on the front page him. Exactly. So basically, it's kind of a, it looks. It looks like Tinder in a way, but more instead of choosing a partner, you choose your your favorite MP because you know there's so many impeded around quite clever. Yes, it is clever and actually I did the police. They have twenty questions and you have to answer, you know, if you agree completely. If you disagree a little bit, there's kind of, you know, all different options on your views on abortion to how you should do the in to how issue hire someone, for example. And actually, apparently I should vote to guy coalition silver from the Brazilian communist party. We had a ninety point, seven percent match, and even from the Brazilian communist party executive, well, if policy telling me this, but it's quite interesting because I think they'd done a proper research. A questionnaire to all the MP's, the potential MP's war in this election for the state of some Paulo. And yeah, and I think it's a great idea. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. So this is actually an app that you can have on your phone in Brazil. Yeah, you it's. I'm not sure if it's an app, but we can go to match later l. dot faller dots. Cone dot, EU dot b. r. well, I would like to see where my vote ends up, although I'm going to do that. Yeah, that's actually very good point vendor. Let's move along. Where else have you been looking today? The garden, a nice. I live Austin, arts, preview, whatever. I like similar provide, like all sorts of previous. But this time is an interesting one, and I love the Kover. Here is Constance food. The the main actors of crazy rich Asians, which is the film that everyone is talking about -solutely it's getting so much exposure. And I think we were just talking how we like a good polish Bronco event. So I think probably we will be watching this right absoulutely. I'm definitely curious because the romantic comedy has had a very long. Intas from the cinemas lately. So hopefully this is the beginning of something bigger. Absolutely. And then you know is not only film here they have TV as well. Again, if you like Victorian Roma's, which I don't spend apparently people here in Britain. They do love area, big appetite back straighter as well. My mother is all over them. I don't understand the appeal, but yet there's a new reputation vanity fair's all of people if you like, it's about time. We had one of those. Exactly. So, yeah, very good preview here from the guardian. And finally, let's go to the internet. The New York Times here internationally, dish in a very interesting story about the region of Cristiana in in Denmark. You know, this kind of utopian axe. Project in the city. Basically kind of the police don't go there. You know, there's kind of lot of drugs or you live the way you want to be. But here in the article by Ellen Barry, she said that this is changing in Denmark is becoming more about law and order. And even that part of town, which you know before the police didn't really interfere that much say they might have to do it, you know? So you know, apparently has been increasing violence there as well. So it's a very interesting article balls Christian have been to Copenhagen, but I have to say, never been to Christianity, but I'm, I would be very curious to visit. Yeah, very fascinating piece. So that's in today's edition of the New York Times. Exactly. Excellent. For to project. Thank you for taking us through today's newspapers. You're listening to the briefing. And finally four any photographer. There may be no greater recognition than being trapped by the legendary cooperative magnum photos. Despite being co founded by polish photographer magnum.

Brazilian communist party Brazil The New York Times Ellen Barry Denmark financial Gupta Ben Monica partner executive Austin Britain Copenhagen Cristiana nineteen minutes seven percent