19 Burst results for "Elizabeth Smith"

OK Bloomer!

The Past and the Curious

10:20 min | 8 months ago

OK Bloomer!

"First story you're going to hear today is about. Amelia bloomers preferred article of clothing which did a lot to advance the cause of women's suffrage this year. Of course marks the one hundred the anniversary of the nineteenth amendment which was a big step towards all Americans. Earning the right to vote this episode also features a story written told by Melinda Beck. Melinda works with me at the Frazier History Museum in Louisville and has thoroughly researched and created a performance about the incredible turn of the century bicyclist. Tillie Anderson the performance can be seen live at special times during the run of the exhibit which is called what is about worth suffrage. Then and now there's a lot the story is about and it certainly doesn't cover everything in a nutshell. It's a tale of votes bikes and bloomers. Which wasn't a chant from the time period but might as well have been in the late nineteenth century which is a confusing way to say. The eighteen hundreds many women were fed up with certain aspects of their lives. Yes the size and lack of comfort in their clothes was frustrating but ladies were also longing for freedom to move about their cities rather than be stuck at home and they wanted to vote. Can you believe that they couldn't Amelia? Bloomer was one such supper just which is a confusing way to say that she worked to get women the right to vote. Her name is also synonymous with an article of clothing. We think of it as underwear today to be fair. Amelia didn't invent bloomers. She just knew a good idea when she wore one. It was another uncomfortably. Clad lady named Elizabeth Smith Miller who made them a reality like many other women. Elizabeth spent years and address seemed as big as a church bell and nearly as heavy at the time people would've told an unsatisfied upstart like Elizabeth. That the constricting close. She was expected to where. We're no big deal. A woman's work at the time was supposedly much less demanding than a man's therefore what need would she have for a silly indulgence like mere comfort but Elizabeth was not buying it for she was investment visionary? Some would call her crazy but she longed for the simple pleasures of sitting down without eclipsing behind the giant upturned hoop skirt and he was a beautiful dream of hers to bend over with ease to grab something off the floor or even walk through a living room. Without leaving everything they're scattered on the ground. Like a bunch of dead bowling pens. Perhaps most of all she just wanted to breathe but these were things her clothes at didn't really allow for so she scrapped the suffocating course and bird cage like structure under her skirt tossed the mess of fabric into the closet and set to work with scissors and thread inspired by the memory of something that she had seen on a trip across the ocean. She finished one fateful day in eighteen fifty one and stepped out her door and into the free air wearing billowy white leg coverings that reached her ankles and covering these long underwear like leggings was a skirt that broke well below her knee. She said no to the dress at the time the outfit was most often referred to as Panta. Let's which were the leg coverings and tunic. Which was the skirt. Imagine people shock and disgust when she crossed the yard and not a single twig got stuck in her new outfit now. Elizabeth didn't even knock over any tables in her living room. How undignified perhaps most shocking of all? It didn't take an hour. Or more to send her course at breathtakingly tight and install all of the necessary parts that would provide the poof underneath. What on Earth would she do with all of the time she saved by wearing something so simple something devilish no doubt the criticisms roll off of Elizabeth like water off of a beaver cler swimsuit because she had the courage to wear a skirt with simple pantaloons as underwear. If there had been cars they would act as she strolled by. If there had been cameras the Paparazzi would have tumbled over one another for the snap on the whole the eighteen fifties were pretty free from these modern inventions. Though and the only thing there was to spread the shocking word of her costume was well the written word. Some people love the outfit but plenty of people simply couldn't handle it. Those detractors made sure to get plenty of ink in the newspapers talking. About what an abomination the clothing Combo was history can confirm anything. It can confirm that haters have always hated. Amelia bloomer on the other hand fell head over heels for the outfit that broke just above her ankles and Luckily Amelia had her own really popular newspaper called the Lily. The newspaper had begun when she a group of her friends had the idea to start a publication for women dedicated to promoting the things that they truly believed in keeping paver. Going wasn't one of those things for the other ladies because they didn't follow through quitting to leave Amelia high and dry and alone to do the job she could quit to. No one would have really known but Amelia resolved not to walk away so she became the editor and pretty much everything else. The Lily ran articles mostly about two original guiding principles. The first was temperance. The newspaper hated alcohol. The other focus of the paper was on women's rights. Amelia made the argument that a growing set of laws were made that affected every woman in America and not a single one of these women had any say in the matter. This was completely unfair. Women couldn't vote. They couldn't hold office and they couldn't even have much control over their own lives for its first few years. Amelia published the paper to a subscription audience of around four hundred women and men. Then she got involved in dress reform. It happened when a few notable friends saw the fashion forward society angering Panta let and Tunic Combo and they ditched their dresses to one of those dress. Stitchers was Amelia's friend. Elizabeth Katie Stanton and donning the outfit. She paid a visit to our PAL and as soon as Amelia thought. She was smitten and she knew that others would be too and she bet that the lily was a great way to spread the word. The paper published descriptions of the Panta. Let's and depictions of the TUNIC. Amelia waxed poetic on the mini freedoms it would give women inside the home and out and she even printed instructions for making your own set. This wasn't a time period where you can head to the store and easily purchased fitted clothing in your size so most people took a diy approach and could so their own underwear and outerwear bolstered by people's rabbit interest and the radical new clothing. The paper subscription ballooned to nearly four thousand names. Meanwhile the ladies and the daring new outfits were strolling through the dirty streets of towns all over the country scaring the establishment with the threat of Easy Movement. Dirt-free hemlines and healthy unsquashed internal organs. One big question still lingered on everyone's minds though. What do we call this outfit? Though somewhat descriptive mantelet and Tunic Combo had about the same amount of sparkle as a muddy chunk of coal because so many people learned about it through her newspaper. The outrageous ensemble began to be called the bloomer costume and eventually bloomers became the name for the long pants worn underneath the skirt for several years. The bloomer costume was a ferocious fashion trend. Empowering women all over the country eventually Amelia herself gave up on the garments so she actually grew tired. All the controversy they created. People just wanted to talk about clothes rather than the real issues which was women's rights. The bloomer costume may have been a little bit ahead of its time but a few decades later. There was a resurgence in eighteen nineties. America was dominated by a new fad. Everyone wanted to be riding bicycles and no longer. Did people have to struggle to climb aboard one of those huge wheeled monstrosities called the penny farthing? There was a new kind of bike called the safety bicycle and it closely resembles the bike. That you might right around your neighborhood today. Women constantly stuck at home adopted this bike as their own so much so that one was often called a ladies bike. Big billowy dresses again caused a problem. All that fabric flying around could get stuck in the gears spinning tires a wrong move and the writer could be graded like cheese or sent flying up and tumbling to the ground below. The solution was simple. The bloomer costume with its separate underwear and covered legs and skirt. It allowed a writer to straddle the seat and conquer the world or at least one city after decades of struggle and fight. The Nineteenth Amendment was passed in nineteen twenty as a result. Some women though not all women finally had the right to vote. It would take decades more before people were allowed to vote without discrimination. Native Americans were not able to vote until nineteen twenty four and Chinese American citizens not until nineteen forty three and it wasn't until the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five that all American citizens were granted the right to vote and protected in doing so Susan B. Anthony perhaps the most famous suffer just in America said women earning. The right had a lot to do with bicycles. Let me tell you what I think of bicycles. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives women a feeling of freedom and self reliance I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel. Picture OF FREE UNTRAMMELLED WOMANHOOD. It was a symbol of self reliance and resistance for women of the time and it wouldn't have been possible or at least safe without bloomers.

Amelia Amelia Bloomer Amelia Bloomers Elizabeth Panta America Melinda Beck Elizabeth Smith Miller Elizabeth Katie Stanton Writer Tillie Anderson Louisville Bowling Frazier History Museum Easy Movement Susan B. Anthony Editor
Gone From Home: The Disappearance of Susan Mcfarland

True Crime Brewery

09:11 min | 10 months ago

Gone From Home: The Disappearance of Susan Mcfarland

"So huck and and Mary. Elizabeth Smith had three children. There were fifteen thirteen and eleven and then their youngest daughter Susan was born. She was born on New Year's Steve in nineteen fifty eight now because she was born when her mom was forty and a data's forty eight. And there's like eleven years between the third and the fourth worth child. Susan was often tease. She was an accident now. Her response was I was a bonus huck was an FBI agent. And he had received a letter of congratulations for the birth of his daughter. Susan that was signed by the FBI Director J Edgar Hoover as an adult. Susan kept him framed glitter on a wall in her home yes. She grew up in Missouri where her older sister. Anne was responsible for baby sitting her quite a bit but as you got older her and decided it was fun to hang out with her baby sister. She was an easy going child and very affectionate with their family so an sometimes took sue along with her or even under dates. And it wasn't a problem you know at least not for. I don't know maybe the guys didn't like it but her thinking maybe one time time okay. Circumstance are less date well. After an moved away for college she frequently had sue. Come visit her on the weekends. The other students at our school loved sue. She was like everyone's little sister. susie big brother Harley had a daughter named Kristen when Assu was just five years old and when Kristen stayed with her grandparents they paid sued to keep her busy but as they got older the age difference really diminished and soon became good friends with her niece. Kristen Sumit her best friend when she was thirteen years old sandy row. Sandy and sewer inseparable spending spending time hanging out at a local bakery and attending high school classes together. Su worked as a lifeguard at a hotel. Swimming Pool in the Summers and Sandy would sit by the pool with earn play cards when the pool was busy so sue was just an upbeat energetic type of person she was always busy doing something finer bonner. Planning something fun. One thing the girls left to do was to shop. They could shop for hours and not even spend much money they also like go to the movies. Sue Play tennis but Sandy never got good at sport. Even though she tried sue was a really busy kit. She ice skated. She was a hockey cheerleader. And she also served on the student council the PEP club and the French club. She was also a really big reader sometimes sometimes reading one or two novels a week even during the school year but suicide human half draw and certainly far from perfect especially as a teen. She could be rebellious. She sometimes with skipped class or went home for lunch and just didn't bother returning to school after lunch but she got away with a lot. She was talented at making elaborate excuses. That are teachers and parents usually believed so sue and sandy graduated high school together in nineteen eighteen. Seventy seven sue then went to a private girls' college in Fulton Missouri. Sandy stayed in Saint Louis and went to Washington University so they are less. Listen two hours apart. So they're able to visit each other pretty often. Yeah but when sue announce she was majoring in accounting. Her friends were pretty surprised. She seemed to fund fund to be a serious number crunching office person but sue really enjoyed accounting. She was fun and adventurous but she also was very disciplined organized also. She really admired her dad. who had an accounting degree? So after graduating in the top of her class suit took a position with Santa the energy in Amarillo Texas while she was working there she got her. CPA and the next summer. She traveled to Saint Louis to be Sandy's maid definer Sandy's marriage would last only four years but soon would always be there to listen to her and give her advice then ensued took a second job after working for a while with Santa Fe energy. She moved to Midland Texas and had a position with N run run. Yes the notorious company but at the time it was well respected. It was a good company. This is before they had their slippery slide. Yes now after six months of working with Enron. She is transferred to their headquarters in Houston and in Houston. Sue spent a lot of time with her former sister-in-law. Debbie Debbie had had been married and divorced. Sue's older brother Pete. Souza would go to her nephew soccer games and she had shopped the Debbie on the weekends she left to shop for clothing and and she dressed nicely so she set up an exchange with your friends and Murillo so that they ought quadruple their wardrobes by sharing so in nineteen eighty seven. Sue took took a position with southwestern Bell Corporation in Saint Louis her position and the people she worked among their lead her into a more glamorous life if she started attending charity Events Dinner Parties and Gallery openings and she was happy to be back living near her friend Sandy. They began spending more and more time together having lunch taking aerobics classes which was a big thing at the time she was also reunited with her niece Kristin during this time they were only a few years apart and became good friends so they went out on the weekend nights and sue was happy to pay kristen's way because Sumeida good it. Salary and Kristen was still struggling but a suge close to thirty. She began to worry about finding a partner and having a family. She told a French French. She wanted to have kits and she'd like to stay home and raise them while loving husband would work to support them and they live in a nice suburban house and and then she met Rick Mcfarland and he seemed to fit the bill of the Kinda guy she wanted at least to begin with. Yeah so rick was the second son of Dick and and Mona McFarland of Kirkwood Missouri. When he is a young kid the family moved to Saint? Louis he grew up in webster groves with his two brothers. David David and done in high school. He is a big water polo player and he worked on the staff of the school newspaper. He went to southwest South West Missouri State University in Springfield after high school but had difficulty concentrating so while he was here his diagnosed with attention deficit disorder and put on medication. And with the mets he was able to maintain a B average so he graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration nation and got a job with stockbrokerage company. Shearson Lehman. I did pretty well. There drove a beamer. Had a carriage Charles lived in an upscale port town right so from just hearing that you'd say Oh this is a pretty great guy. Why would you because he's got a BMW BMW? Well it seems like a good prospect. He's got a job right. He's having heard anything. Says he's a jerk right. That's what I'm saying but you know like everybody else. He did have issues but he was pretty good at hiding them for most people. He did get in trouble one time in college for stealing but the charges were dismissed. One of his former dates said that rick made her very uncomfortable after they had two dates his because she told him she didn't want to see him anymore but he persisted calling her to the point where she was afraid of him and then she caught him hiding in the bushes outside of her house stalking getting her concern. Yes but of course. Sued doesn't know about any of this right and sue and Rick had actually attended the same high school all but they didn't really meet each other until they bumped into each other at a party in Saint Louis. Rick was much quieter than Su so they seemed like kind of unlikely unlikely couple when they began dating but to sue she felt like she hit it off with him again. Not not to demean sue. But we've already talked about how she's hitting thirty and she's thinking like time is running out so maybe she settled for something not quite the top of her list list. Yeah that's what a lot of people close to her. Actually thought bird. No he review would do in a pinch enough. I'd go that far but I guess she didn't seem like she was head over heels like he was you know her prince charming but thought he would do you would do when he seemed like a nice stable guy but he wasn't nearly as clever or witty. Assu you know sue was really fun but you know. Rick seemed like he could be a good match for her. She could be the outgoing one and he could keep her grounded but still sandy and kristen thought that sue probably was settling a bit with Rick just because she wanted to start a family and she was getting being older

SUE Sandy Kristen Sumit Rick Mcfarland Saint Louis Susan FBI SU Huck Director J Edgar Hoover Elizabeth Smith Debbie Debbie Missouri Hockey Steve Fulton Missouri Houston Anne
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

10:23 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Zero five four six two six hundred remarkable person. This this book spells out a story that indeed and the New York Times put it not all superheroes wear capes. And Elizabeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of the future wonder woman movie, I have to ask you Jason for a has. There been any discussion of of a movie about the subject of your book. Yes. It's being developed into a streaming cable or cable or streaming TV series. So that's happening now. Wonderful if you had the right? First of all, let me ask you this. Will you want to write the screenplay or or or plays? Would you wish to be involved in that aspect of this? I the rights were brought by a very capable and talented producing and writing team. That's that's had a lot of success getting stuff on on TV and and getting aid. So I I will I will leave I'll leave the screenwriting to them. It's not my not my area of expertise enough. Now, did would you like to be involved in selecting the lead actress, and if you had your pick are there any names that come to your mind? Yeah. I'm not going to pretend that I haven't done fantasy. Fifty times. I mean, I think there are a lot of a lot of actresses who could do Elizabeth. I I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of Amy Adams. She's a really wonderful. Never I've seen her in. But. There are probably five or six others. Who would do it Justice? Very good now. Then Elizabeth Smith had a Quaker background. Was there ever any conflict that she expressed regarding the fact that that she was in fact engaged in work, which led in many cases directly to people dying. Yeah. That's that's a great question. She struggled with that tension all of her career. She was brought up tweaker by parents. She did believe what Quakers believe in basic crease out one of them being nonviolence. And know even into World War Two lousy was helping to sort of pinpoint. The locations of Nazi spies. So that teams ground could go and arrest them, disrupt the rings, while she was, you know, decrypted messages that, you know, would directly lead to the enemy getting killed or or at least captured she she was copying down pacifist, poems and keeping them in a mill file. That she she kept interpersonal sacks. So I think that she reconciled it by which just sort of a sense of duty and sacrifice. I think was was common in that generation. And a lot of people who served she never glorified war. She thought that it was horrible. I think that she felt that her government had asked her to do a job and. That's it was a time of global crisis. And that she had. She had to accept that challenge. Because you know, in a lot of ways she was indispensable. She was just too good at what she did. So it's a lifelong complaints affairs. Actually, she she always complains that men from the government were always showing up on her doorstep asking her solve puzzles for America. And the only way it's nothing go away. What's to solve the puzzles? Problems who's too good at what she did. Now. Of course, you mentioned how how later sexism principally manifested by j Edgar Hoover prevented her from getting the credit. She deserved. But this story begins before she even had the right to vote in this country. I'm wondering about early encounters with sexism. Yeah. She she's smart. But she's only a woman that kind of thing. Right. She she complained about the guy a lot in her diary intercollegiate tire. Actually, she she felt that she was very easily dismissed by man that she was dismissed by professors justness Spiderman around they didn't take her seriously, partly because she was a woman also partly because she was very fatigued who's physically she was about five foot three and very key Bill. She also she also thought that it was what's her name that contributed to to being minimized or race? She was named Smith. She did most common name in English language, and she she couldn't stand that. She she complained to her diary, that's as soon as she introduced herself as somebody named Smith, and whoever she was talking to immediately assume assume that she must be ordinary, and if there was anything that she wanted it was a life that was unusual and something out of the ordinary. So she so she definitely experienced sexism in her life very early on. And I think. You know, one of the one of the major manifestations of it was the fact that she couldn't find any other job after she graduated from college accept a job teaching school. And that was that was what she was doing when she was twenty three suicide. Principal small high school in Indiana. At the time. You know, this is before there were any significant number of female professors at college is only a handful of women who are even getting PHD's in America. Sort of the end of the line. If you're a bright young woman. I educated wise, you taught you're taught middle school. You've thought on interest. Go you got married. You had kids you died. And she just wanted something more than that. Those are all added up to a quote, a woman's place unquote, at the time were there any instances who came across in looking into her story Jason in the woman who smashed codes of not just sexism. But just flat out an outdoor jealousy that she just salt stuff that other people couldn't solve. Sure. This was a this was a recurring problem in in her career to that. She was. She would solve these spectacular cases. And and then she would get written about in the paper because she was a story. You know, she was she was this American housewife who had two kids and yet. During the twenties and thirties. She lies taking on these gangsters since she wasn't just taking them on in an office, you know, solving their messages and getting them convicted. She was actually attending their trials and testifying. So they knew who she was right. They knew or face could see her, and it's just not necessarily the safest thing to be doing. Right. You can you can you can imagine. And and so yeah. So there were there would be, you know, there'd be gangsters on trial. A lot of these a lot of these rum running rings. We're international crime syndicates. It was essentially the mafia. And so she didn't she would walk into court unprotected with, you know, a pink dress in an NF. Hat with a flower pinned to the brand. And she would stare down these guys the defense table five three and she would explain exactly how she had broken their codes. Exactly how she essentially stolen their thoughts. And you know, and she did it fairly fearlessly all through that time. But it was it was necessary for her to actually get into the trade craft in a court of law. That's that's remarkable in today. Of course, the minute anything like that came up, a federal agent would would would walk in with some kind of a federal court order and would immediately shut down that testimony at least in part of a public trial. I mean that that's remarkable. You know? This leads are things were these are things that that let me put it this way when I left the army, I took an oath not to talk about certain things, which I have not many many decades later, I was even forbidden to visit a an iron curtain country for five years after I left the army, and I was a a relatively small player albeit with a top secret clearance, and the idea that she was sauntering into corden. Well, this is how we did it. I mean that that's remarkable. Well, I mean, so you're you're in your career, you you weren't able to expose your sources and methods that would get the last thing that you'd be able to be a good way for me to spend some time at Fort Leavenworth Kansas behind bars. That's correct. Exactly, exactly. And that's that was true then and it's true today. But the fact the fact lead at the time she had no choice, she when she was asked acid testimony by a federal prosecutors because the prosecutors needed to make cases against some of these international crime rings. That were killing people and that were controlling the the rump trade, and so they they wanted to get these guys in prison. They wanted to take down these syndicates me only way to do that. What's actually try to make a case against them? So in in would step Elizabeth, and ultimately, you know, there would be a lot of publicity around these trials because it's kind of a spectacular. Israel to see this petite America. You know, American woman American mother testifying against these guys. So she got all kinds of newspaper coverage there were front page newspaper stories about Elizabeth south through the nineteen thirty s and and the tone of them were it sort of was like there was a woman doing things that men could enjoy I'm looking right now at one of my favorite clips, which is a story. A true story published about Elizabeth in in magazine called true detection detective fiction weekly isn't a true story about her though, title, lady men, and there was this this line in the story about how small slender American woman stepped in and smashed crime where men had sailed. So she was she was a spectacular. She was she was a spectacle for one. And obviously that made a lot of her superiors, very happy. I'm sure okay. We're gonna come back and talk some more with Jason. But Goni the book the woman who smashed codes again, Elizabeth Smith. Friedman just a name that we should have known more about, and I guess we still will mortem.

Elizabeth Smith Elizabeth Elizabeth Smith Friedman Jason America New York Times j Edgar Hoover army Amy Adams Indiana Israel Spiderman Principal Fort Leavenworth Kansas Goni detective fiction weekly
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Six hundred remarkable person. This book spells out a story that indeed as your times, but not all superheroes. Wear capes. And Elizabeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of a future wonder woman movie, I have to ask you Jason for Goni. Has there been any discussion of a movie about the subject of your book? Yes. It's being developed into a streaming cable or about cable or streaming TV series. So that's happening now. Wonderful if you had the right? I will let me ask you this. Will you want to write the screenplay or or plays? Would you wish to be involved in that aspect of this? The rights were bought by a very capable and talented producing and writing team. That's that's a lot of success getting stuff on on TV and getting made. So I I will I will leave. I'll leave the screenwriting spam. That's not my not my area of expertise fair enough. Now, did would you like to be involved in selecting the lead actress, and if you had your pick are there any names that come to your mind? Oh my gosh. Yeah. I'm not going to pretend that I haven't done fantasy Kostic. Fifty times. I I think there are a lot of a lot of actresses who could do Elizabeth. I I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of Amy Adams. She's a really wonderful everything I've seen her in. But. There are probably five or six others. Who would do it Justice? Very good now then. Elizabeth Smith had a Quaker background was there ever any conflict that she expressed regarding the fact that that she was in fact engaged in work, which led in many cases directly to people dying. Yeah. That's that's a.

Elizabeth Smith Elizabeth Smith Friedman Amy Adams Jason Goni Elizabeth
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

10:29 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"This this book spells out a story that indeed as the New York Times put that all superheroes wear capes and Elizabeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of the future wonder woman movie, I have to ask you Jason for Goni. Has there been any discussion of of a movie about the subject of your book? Yes. It's being developed into a streaming cable or cable or streaming TV series. And so that's happening now. Wonderful if you had the right first of all let me ask you this. Will you want to write the screenplay or plays? Would you wish to be involved in that aspect of this? I the the rights were bought by very capable and talented producing and writing team. That's that's had a lot of success getting stuff on on TV. And and getting a mate. So I I will I will leave I'll leave the screenwriting. It's not my not my area of expertise enough. Now, did would you like to be involved in selecting the lead actress, and if you had your pick are there any names that come to your mind? Oh my gosh. Yeah. I'm not going to pretend that I haven't done fantasy Caspit. Fifty times. I mean. I think there are a lot of a lot of actresses who could do Elizabeth Justice. I I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of Amy Adams. She's a really wonderful everything I've seen her in. But you know, there are probably five or six others. Who would who would do it Justice? Very good now then. Elizabeth Smith had a Quaker background was there ever any conflict that she expressed regarding the fact that that she was in fact engaged in work, which led in many cases directly to people dying. Yeah. That's a that's a great question. She struggled with that tension all of her career. She was brought up tweaker by parents. She did believe what Quakers believe in basic crease out. So one of them being nonviolence. And you know, even into World War Two while she was helping to sort of pinpoint locations of Nazi spies. So that teams with ground go in arrest and disrupt the rings while she was, you know, decrypted messages that. You know, would directly lead to the enemy getting killed or at least captured she she was copying down past this, poems and keeping them in a file. That she she kept interpersonal effects. So I think that she reconciled it by with just sort of a a sense of duty and sacrifice. I think was was common in that generation. And a lot of people who served she never glorify war. She thought that it was horrible. But I think that she felt that her government had asked her to do a job, and that it was a time of global crisis. And that she had she had to accept that challenge. Because you know, in a lot of ways she was indispensable. She was just too good at what she did. Lifelong complaint that there's actually she she always complains that men from the government were always showing up on her doorstep asking her solve puzzle for America. And the only way it's not gonna go away was to solve the puzzles. That was her problems who's good at what she did. Now. Of course, you mentioned how how later sexism principally manifested by j Edgar Hoover prevented her from getting the credit. She deserved. But this story begins before she even had the right to vote in this country. I'm wondering about early encounters with sexism. Yeah. She she's smart. But she's only a woman that kind of thing. Right. She she complained about the guy a lot in her diary, intercollegiate IRA, actually, she she felt that she was very easily dismissed by by Ned that she was dismissed by professors dismiss Spiderman around for they didn't take her seriously, partly because she was a woman also partly because she was very petite shoes physically. She was about five foot three and very petite built. She also she also thought that it was it was her name that contributed to to being minimized or race. She was named Smith did most common name in English language, and she she couldn't stand that. She she complained in her diary, that's as soon as she introduced herself as somebody named Smith. Whoever she was talking to immediately assume assume that she must be ordinary, and if there was anything that she wanted it was a life that was unusual and something out of the ordinary. So she so she definitely experienced sexism in her life very early on. And I think one of the one of the major manifestations of it was the fact that she couldn't find any other job after she graduated from college accept a job each school. And that was that was what she was doing when she was twenty three whose principal small high school in Indiana. And at the time, you know, this is before there were any significant number of female professors at college is only a handful of women who are even getting PHD's in America. Sort of the end of the line. If you're a bright young woman educated was that you taught high school you're taught middle school. You've thought on entry school. You got married. You had kids died, and she just wanted something more than that. Those are all added up to a quote, a woman's place unquote, at the time were there any instances who came across in looking into her story Jason in the woman who smashed codes of not just sexism. But just flat out an outdoor jealousy that she just sold stuff that other people couldn't solve. Sure, this was this was a recurring problem in in her career to that. She would. She would solve these spectacular cases. And and then she would get written about in the paper because she was a story. You know, she was she was this American housewife who had two kids and yet during the twenties and thirties, she was taking on these gangsters, and she wasn't just taking them on in an office, you know, solving their messages and getting them convicted who's actually attending their trials and testifying. So they knew who she was right. They knew or face. They could see her, and it's just not necessarily the safest thing to be doing. Right. You can you can you can imagine. And and so yeah. So there were there would be, you know, there'd be gangsters on trial. A lot of these a lot of he's running rings were international crime syndicate was essentially the mafia. And so she didn't she would walk into court unprotected with, you know, a pink dress in an NF. A hat with a flower pin to the brand and she would stare down these guys the defense table five three and she would explain exactly how she had broken their codes exactly how she had essentially stolen their thoughts. And you know, she did it fairly fearlessly all all through that time. But it was it was necessary for her to actually get into the trade craft in a court of law that that's remarkable in today. Of course, the minute anything like that came up, a federal agent would would would walk in with some kind of a of a federal court order and would immediately shut down that testimony at least in part of a public trial. I mean, that's remarkable things were these are things that that let me put it this way when I left the army, I took an oath not to talk about certain things, which I have not many many decades later, I was even forbidden to visit a an iron curtain country for five years after I left the army, and I was. A relatively small player albeit with a top secret clearance, and the idea that she was sauntering into corden. Well, this is how we did it. I mean that that's remarkable. Well, I mean, so you're you're in your career, you you weren't able to expose your sources and methods. That would get the last thing that you'd be a good way for me to spend some time at Fort Leavenworth Kansas behind bars. That's correct. Exactly. Exactly. And and that's that was true then and it's true today. But the fact the fact was at the time she had no choice. She was she was asked asked to do this testimony by a federal prosecutors because the prosecutors needed to make cases against some of these international crime rings. That were killing people and that were controlling the the rump trade, and so they they wanted to get these guys in prison. They wanted to take down these syndicates me only way to do that. What's actually try to make a case against them? So in in would step Elizabeth, and ultimately, you know, there would be a lot of publicity around these trials because it's kind of a spectacular visual to see Petit America. You know, American woman American mother testifying against these guys. So she got all kinds of newspaper coverage there were frontage newspaper stories about Elizabeth so through the nineteen thirty s and and the tone of them were sort of was like there was a woman doing things that men couldn't do. I'm looking right now at a at a one of my favorite clips, which is a story. A true story published about Elizabeth in in a magazine called true detection detective fiction weekly true story about her though. In title was lady manhunter. There was this line in the story about how small slender American woman stepped in and smashed crime where men had. Failed. So she she was a spectacular. She was she was a spectacle. And obviously that made a lot of her superiors, very happy. I'm sure okay. We're gonna come back and talk some more with Jason Goni the book the woman who smashed codes again, Elizabeth Smith. Friedman just to name that we should have known more about, and I guess we we still will more to come. The natural habitat. Creepy doll is a horror movie it can't help being creepy. It's that small fixed smile, and has never closing is always watching.

Elizabeth Smith Jason Goni Elizabeth Smith Friedman Elizabeth America Elizabeth Justice New York Times Goni army j Edgar Hoover Amy Adams Indiana principal Fort Leavenworth Kansas Ned Spiderman detective fiction weekly Petit America
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"What are you married cold? Breaking her story is on until I just wanted to alter with us from breaking Japanese German soldier World War Two. So she continued after a war craft reward you and how it how was she was she the equivalent in America, spies bread. Boy, you're you're all over the the area that is in fact, here, I it even goes beyond that, DACA. Jason, I guess she was quite active in World War Two. And and and also active in between the wars working on of all things gangsters at end the Nazis in South America. Give us a little outline. If you will of the of the rough history of Elizabeth Smith Friedman's activities. That's a great question. So so briefly a rough outline is that she she got her start during World War Two scripting tournament kids, then after the war, she moved to Washington. He went to work for the army and would go on to create the team that during World War Two broke the Japanese diplomatic cipher known as purple and while Elizabeth went on a different patch. She went to work for the treasury department, specifically the coast guard and the coast guard in those days, the twenties and thirties was on the front lines of fighting the rumour trying to stop the tide of illegal liquor that was being shipped all around the world. Runners were running circles around the coast guard, which was underpowered and corrupt and Elizabeth figured out. How to intercept the radio messages that the run boats were were sending? Encrypted with with codes and ciphers to control their their shipments of liquor. So she would she would intercept fees shortwave radio messages that run runners were sending stationed on shore. And she would break the codes read the messages and figure out where the boats were and send the coastguard after them cheap. She caught a number of sort of notorious gangsters of of her day with these techniques, and it turned out that at the dawn of World War Two. She she was really well positioned to go after Nazis fights who are spreading across South America because the Nazi spies happen to be using very similar radio and very similar types of codes as the runners so it wasn't that she had had had had any training specifically to to go after a German intelligence agents. It's just that kind of threw an accident of history and through long experience and skill she'd gotten very very good at this disciplined intercepting. Radio messages breaking them and trying to try to light up dark in network. Whether that d a hidden network of rum ships on oceans or hidden network of Nazi spies spreading into the western hemisphere. And I would add. After after the war after the after World War Two. Yeah. And but by which time, I guess she was getting on in years was g. Sure. Well, I think she was in her late forties at the end of World War. She was still she was still, you know, still sort of in the prime of her professional career. But this is one of the this is one of the sad or tragic parts the story, which is that even though all through World War Two she'd done this incredibly vital important work of lighting up these hidden find she she was providing thousands of messages to the FBI to British intelligence the army and the navy. He's messages were used to destroy the Nazi spy networks. Alternately render them harmless and give the allies an advantage in the war. She did all of this really difficult work, and the FBI was not able to do it because they didn't have the code breaking expertise. So she she did it for them. And then after the war Jaeger Hoover and stuck up his hand and essentially told America you went on a publicity blitz. And he told America that the FBI had done all this work. He did not credit. Elizabeth you did not credits. Her team that she dealt the coast and. And. And Elizabeth was not able to do anything about it or protest because all of that work was part of the top secret ultra program. So she was she was bound to secrecy and Jaeger Hoover took the credit for which she did. So as a result of that. Yes. The I was kind of known as the author of this wrote deed, and nobody ever knew this, man. And as a result in nineteen forty six. While the FBI was sort of reaping the benefits of of this adulation for the American public for doing this cool saying Elizabeth team was sort of uncertain Mony, slowly disbanded, and she was fired giving a reduction force. So she was let go. Amazing. Thanks for your call doc and more calls to come for our guest. Jason Elizabeth Smith Friedman. At important Dame. And do we'll find out more about. In fact, how Jason found out about her when we continue with our conversation here in just a moment. One eight six six five O, JIMBO back in just a moment. Rates may apply. When did it become ok for men.

Elizabeth Smith Friedman Jason Elizabeth Smith Friedman FBI Jaeger Hoover South America America army Washington treasury department Mony
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

10:28 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"This book spells out a story that indeed as New York Times put it not all superheroes. Wear capes. And Elizabeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of the future wonder woman movie, I have to ask you Jason for Goni. Has there been any discussion of of a movie about the subject of your book? Yes. It's being developed into a streaming cable or cable or streaming TV series. So that's happening now. Wonderful if you had the right? I will let me ask you this. Will you want to write the screenplay or plays? Would you wish to be involved in that aspect of this? The rights were bought by a very capable and talented producing and writing team. That's that's had a lot of success getting stuff on on TV and getting a mate. So I I will I will leave I will leave the screenwriting to that's not my not my area of expertise Sarah enough. Bowden would you like to be involved in selecting the lead actress, and if you had your pick are there any names that come to your mind? Oh my gosh. Yeah. I'm not going to pretend that I haven't done fantasy. Fifty times share with her? There are a lot of a lot of actresses who could do Justice. I I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of Amy Adams. She's a really wonderful everything I've seen her in. But you know, there are probably five or six others. Who would do it Justice? Very good now then. Elizabeth Smith had a Quaker background was there ever any conflict that she expressed regarding the fact that that she was in fact engaged in work, which led in many cases directly to people dying. Yeah. That's a that's a great question. She struggled with that tension all of her career. She was brought up Quaker. By Sierra, Lisa's out. Parents she did believe what Quakers believe in basic crease out one of them being nonviolence. And you know, even into World War Two while she was helping to sort of pinpoint locations of Nazi spies. So that teams in the ground could go in arrest them, disrupt the rings, while she was, you know, decrypted messages that, you know, would directly lead to the enemy getting killed or or at least captured she she was copying down past this poems and keeping them in a Manila file. That she she kept interpersonal effects. So I think that she reconciled it by with just sort of a a sense of duty and sacrifice that I think was was common in that generation. And a lot of people who served she never glorified war. She thought that it was horrible. But I think that she felt that her government had asked her to do a job, and that it was a time of global crisis. And that she had she had to accept that challenge. Because you know, in a lot of ways she was indispensable. She was just too good at what she did. Lifelong complaint affairs, actually, she she always complains that men from the government were always showing up on her doorstep asking her to solve puzzles for America. And the only way to go away with the solve the puzzles. That was her problems who's good at what she did. Now. Of course, you mentioned how how later sexism principally manifested by j Edgar Hoover prevented her from getting into credit. She deserved. But this story begins before she even had the right to vote in this country. I'm wondering about early encounters with sexism. Yeah. She she's smart. But she's only a woman that kind of thing. Right. She she complained about the guy a lot in her diary, intercollegiate dire. Actually, she she felt that she was very easily dismissed by by men that she was dismissed by professors dismissed by other men around her. They didn't take her seriously, partly because she was a woman also partly because she was very petite. She was physically she was about five foot three and very key built. She also she also thought that it was it was her name that contributed to to being minimized survey. She was named Smith did most common name in English language, and she she couldn't stand that. She she complained to her diary, that's since she introduced herself as somebody named Smith, and whoever she was talking to assume that she must be ordinary. And if there was anything that she wanted it was a life that was unusual and something out of the ordinary. So she so she definitely experienced sexism in her life very early on. And I think. One of the one of the major manifestations of it was the fact that she couldn't find any other job after she graduated from college accept a job teaching school. And that was that was what she was doing when she was twenty three principal small high school in Indiana. And at the time, you know, this is before there were any significant number of female professors at colleges. Yeah. There were only a handful of women who are even getting PHD's in America sort of the end of the line. If you're a bright young woman educated was that you taught high school or you're taught middle school you go. You got married. You had kids you died. And she just wanted something more than that. Those are all added up to a quote, a woman's place unquote, at the time were there any instances who came across in looking into her story Jason in the woman who smashed codes of not just sexism. But just flat out and out jealousy that she just salt stuff that other people couldn't solve. Sure, this was this was a recurring problem in in her career to that. She would. She would solve these spectacular cases. And and then she would get written about in the paper because she was a story. You know, she was she was this American housewife who had two kids and yet. During the twenties and thirties, she was taking on these gangsters, and she wasn't just taking them on in an office, you know, solving their messages and getting them convicted who's actually attending their trials and testifying. So they knew who she was right. They knew or face. They could see her, and it's just not necessarily the safest thing to be doing. Right. You can you can you can imagine. And and so yeah. So there were there would be, you know, there'd be gangsters on trial. A lot of these a lot of these rum running rings were international crime syndicates, it was essentially the mafia. And so she didn't she would walk into court unprotected with, you know, a pink dress and a and a. A hat with a flower pinned to the brand. And she would stare down these guys the defense table five three and she would explain exactly how she had broken their codes. Exactly how she had essentially stolen their thoughts. And you know, and she did it fairly fearlessly all all through that time. It was necessary for her to actually get into the trade craft in a court of law that that's remarkable in today. Of course, the minute anything like that came up, a federal agent would would would walk in with some kind of a federal court order and would immediately shut down that testimony at least in part of a public trial. I mean, that's remarkable. These are things that were these are things that that let me put it this way when I left the army, I took an oath not to talk about certain things, which I have not many many decades later, I was even forbidden to visit a an iron curtain country for five years after I left the army, and I was a relatively small player albeit with top secret plus clearance, and the idea that she was sauntering into corden. Well, this is how he did it. I mean that that's remarkable. Well, I mean, so you're you're in your career, you you weren't able to expose your sources and methods. That would get the last thing that you'd be able to be a good way for me to spend some time at Fort Leavenworth Kansas behind bars. That's correct. Exactly, exactly. And and that and that's that was true then and it's true today. But the fact the fact lead at the time she had no choice. She was she was asked asked to do this testimony by a federal prosecutors because the prosecutors needed to make cases against some of these international crime rings. That were killing people, and that were controlling the the rum trade. And so they they wanted to get these guys in prison. They wanted to take down these syndicates me only way to do that. What's actually try to make a case against them? So in in would step Elizabeth, and ultimately, you know, there would be a lot of publicity around these trials because it's kind of a spectacular visual petite American. You know, American woman American mother testify against these guys. So she got all kinds of newspaper coverage there were front page newspaper stories about Elizabeth through the nineteen thirties. And and the tone of them were sort of was like that. There was a woman doing things that men could do I'm looking right now at a at one of my favorite clips, which is a story. A true story published about Elizabeth in a magazine called true detection detective fiction weekly. This is a true story about her though. In title was lady men, and there was this line in the story about how small slender American woman stepped in and smashed crime where men had. Sales. So she was she was spectacular. She was she was a spectacle. And obviously that made a lot of her superiors, very happy. I'm sure okay. We're gonna come back and talk some more with Jason Goni the book the woman who smashed codes again, Elizabeth Smith. Friedman just a name that we should have known more about it. I guess we still will mortem the natural habitat of the creepy horror movie. It can't help being creepy. It's that small fixed smile, and there's never closing is always watching you,.

Elizabeth Smith Jason Goni Elizabeth Smith Friedman Elizabeth America New York Times Goni j Edgar Hoover army Bowden Amy Adams Sarah Indiana principal Fort Leavenworth Kansas Sierra detective fiction weekly
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Out a story that indeed as the New York Times put it not all superheroes. Wear capes. And Elizabeth Smith Friedman should be the subject of the future wonder woman movie, I have to ask you Jason for a has. There been any discussion of of a movie about the subject of your book. It's being developed into a streaming cable or cable or streaming TV series. So that's happening. Wonderful. If you had the right? I will let me ask you this. Will you want to write the screenplay or plays? Would you wish to be involved in that aspect of this? I know the the rights were bought by a very capable and talented producing and writing team. That's that's had a lot of success getting stuff on on TV and getting it made. So I I will I will leave I'll leave the screenwriting to them. That's not my not my area of expertise Sarah enough. Now, did would you like to be involved in selecting the lead actress, and if you had your pick are there any names that come to your mind? Yeah. I'm not going to pretend that I haven't done fantasy. Fifty times. I mean, I think there are a lot of a lot of actresses who could do lizard of Justice. I I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of Amy Adams. She's a really wonderful everything I've seen her in. You know, probably five or six others. Who would do it Justice? Very good now then. Elizabeth Smith had a Quaker background was there ever any conflict that she expressed regarding the fact that that she was in fact engaged in work, which led in many cases directly to people dying. Yeah. That's a that's a great question. She struggled with that tension all of her career. She was brought up Quaker by parents. She did believe what Quakers believe and basic crease out so one of them being nonviolence. And you know, even into World War Two while she was helping to sort of pinpoint locations of Nazi spies. So that teams in the ground go in rest and disrupt the rings while she was you know, decrypted messages that. You know, would directly lead to the enemy getting killed or at least captured she she was copying down past this, poems and keeping them in a file. That she she kept interpersonal effects. So I think that she reconciled it by. What's just sort of a sense of duty and sacrifice that I think was was common in that generation. And a lot of people who served she never glorified war. She thought that it was horrible. But I think that she felt that her government had asked her to do a job, and that it was a time of global crisis in the. She had to accept that challenge. Because you know, in a lot of ways she was indispensable. She was just too good at what she did. Lifelong complaint affairs, actually, she she always complains that men from the government were always showing up on her doorstep asking her solve puzzles for America. And the only way to go away. What's to solve the puzzle? Problems whose too good at what she did. Now. Of course, you mentioned how how later sexism principally manifested by j Edgar Hoover prevented her from getting the credit. She deserved. But this story begins before she even had the right to vote in this country. I'm wondering about early encounters with sexism. Yeah. She she's smart. But she's only a woman that kind of thing. Right. She she complained about the guy a lot in her diary in her collegiate diarrhea, actually, she she felt that she was very easily dismissed by by men that she was dismissed by professors justness by other men around for they didn't take her seriously, partly because she was a woman also partly because she was very fatigued. She was physically she was about five foot three and very petite built. She also she also thought that it was what's her name that contribute to to being minimized or race? She was named Smith did most common, man, Madonna English language, and she she couldn't stand that. She she complained to her diary, that's as soon as she introduced herself as somebody named Smith, and whoever she was talking to assume that she must be ordinary. And if there was anything that she wanted it was a life that was unusual and something out of the ordinary. So she's so she definitely experienced sexism in her life very early on. And I think one of the major manifestations of it was the fact that she couldn't find any other job after she graduated from college accept a job teaching school. And that was that was what she was doing when she was twenty three suicide principle flaw high school in Indiana. And at the time, you know, this is before there were any significant number of female professors at colleges there were only a handful of women who are even getting in America. Sort of the end of the line. If you're a bright young, and educated wise that you taught high school you're taught middle school. You've thought on interest school you got married yacht. Kids you died, and she just wanted something more than that. Those are all added up to a quote, a woman's place unquote, at the time were there any instances who came across in looking into her story Jason in the woman who smashed codes of not just sexism. But just flat out an out jealousy that she just sold stuff that other people couldn't solve. Sure. This was this was a recurring problem in in her career to that. She was. She would solve these spectacular cases. And and then she would get written about in the paper because she was a story. You know, she was she was this American housewife who had two kids and yet. During the twenties and thirties, she was taking on these gangsters, and she wasn't just taking them on in an office, you know, solving their messages and getting them convicted who's actually attending their trials and testifying. So they knew who she was right. The newer faith that could see her, and it's just not necessarily the safest thing to be doing. Right. You can you can you can imagine. And and so yeah. So there were there would be, you know, there'd be gangsters on trial. A lot of these a lot of these rum running rings international crime syndicates, it was essentially the mafia. And so she didn't she would walk into court unprotected with, you know, a pink dress in an NF. A hat with a flower pinned to the brand. And she would stare down these guys the defense table five foot three and she would explain exactly how she had broken their codes. Exactly how she had essentially stolen their thoughts. And you know, and she did it fairly fearlessly all all through that time. But it was it was necessary for her to actually get into the trade craft in a court of law that that's remarkable today. Of course, the minute anything like that came up, a federal agent would would would walk in with some kind of a federal court order and would immediately shut down that testimony at least in part of a public trial. I mean that that's reminds you know, these are things that were these are things that that let me put it this way when I left the army, I took an oath not to talk about certain things, which I have not many many decades later, I was even forbidden to visit a an iron curtain country for five years after I left the army, and I was. A relatively small player albeit with top secret plus clearance, and the idea that she was sauntering into court. Well, this is how he did it. I mean that that's remarkable. Well, I mean, so you're you're in your career, you you weren't able to expose your sources and methods. That would get the last thing that you'd be a good way for me to spend some time at Fort Leavenworth Kansas behind bars. That's correct. Exactly, exactly. And that's that was true then and it's true today. But the fact the fact lead at the time she had no choice. She was she was asked asked to stop the money by a federal prosecutors because the prosecutors needed to make cases against some of these international crime rings. That were killing people, and that were controlling the the rum trade. And so they they wanted to get these guys in prison. They wanted to take down these syndicates me only way to do that. What's actually try to make a case against them? So in in would step Elizabeth, and ultimately, you know, there would be a lot of publicity around these trials because it's kind of a spectacular. To see this petite American. You know, American woman American mother testifying against these guys. So she got all kinds of newspaper coverage there were front page newspaper stories about Elizabeth south through the nineteen thirty s and and the tone of them were sort of was like that. There was a woman doing things that men couldn't do. I'm I'm looking right now at a at one of my favorite clips, which is a story. A true story published about Elizabeth in magazine called true detection detective fiction weekly story about her though title was lady manhunter. And there was this line in the story about how small slender American woman stepped in and smashed crime where men had sailed. So she was she was a spectacular. She was she was a spectacle. Obviously that made a lot of her superiors. Very happy out of sure, okay. We're gonna come back and talk some more with Jason Goni the book the woman who smashed codes again, Elizabeth Smith. Friedman just to name that we should have known more about and I guess we still will more to come the natural habitat. The creepy doll is a horror movie it can't help being creepy. It's that small fixed smile, and has never closing is always.

Elizabeth Smith Jason Goni Elizabeth Smith Friedman Elizabeth America New York Times j Edgar Hoover army Indiana Amy Adams Sarah Fort Leavenworth Kansas detective fiction weekly five foot five years
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Up tickets come meet 'as i'd love to hang out anyway for this week's classic episode where rewinding back to when we landed the wonderful jason for goni on the program he's this incredible writer and he has his extraordinary story about a woman who broke codes it's honestly one of my favorite things ever and he was actually living in philly when we did this interview so it ties back perfectly enjoy guess what mango what's that well all right so tell me this doesn't sound like a great premise for a movie about a century ago a young woman from a small town in indiana heads off to college to study poetry and philosophy now she does this against her father's will by the way so she finished his college travels to chicago to figure out what to do with their life already following so far because here's where the crazy plot twists comes in she's about to give up and then she's discovered and hired by this really eccentric tycoon makes a major shift in her life and realizes she has this remarkable ability to break coke she then goes on to become one of the greatest codebreakers in history helps the us win world war one helps us defeat the nazis in world war two and plays a major role in building the foundation for the intelligence agencies in the usa today boom what do you think about this i'd watch that movie yeah and it should be a movie but here's the thing it's all true and thanks to the years of research and writing by jason fa goni we now have a brilliant book it's called the woman who smash codes and it tells the story of elizabeth smith friedman i can't stop thinking about this story so let's dive.

writer us jason fa elizabeth smith friedman philly indiana chicago
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on WREK

"Began spreading west from berlin hamburg against the western hemisphere looking for intelligence on america and britain and a lot of them went to south america south america was kind of up for grabs it was neutral continent and it was a very close it was good listening post and so these nazi spies set up shop in south america in multiple countries they brought clandestine radio equipment radio transmitters and they set up little pirate radio stations they began sending encrypted messages back to berlin and hamburg and this is a real problem for american intelligence to find out what these nazi spies were saying and the fbi was completely unprepared to solve this problem because the fbi didn't have any kind of code breaking unit all the fbi had at that point was a technical research laboratory which is more like a crime lab is kind of where they analyzed bullets and fibers from crime scenes and that sort of thing and yet the fbi is responsibility it was to try to to try to find these nazis firings and industry and then they just didn't have the technical ability to do that and so they had to rely on somebody who did and that turned out to be elizabeth smith friedman because you know for fifteen years at that point she had been doing target practice on rum runners and drug smugglers it just so happened that elizabeth had the right set of skills when world war broke out to go after these nazi spies because it turned out that the spies were using very similar radio and very similar codes as the runners and the drug smugglers had used so elizabeth was was ready to go and and that's this is what she spent world war two doing she she monitored up to fifty clandestine radio circuits that were used by nazi spies she and her unit salt about four thousand different nazi messages and they provided these messages to allied intelligence agencies to the army to.

south america fbi elizabeth smith friedman army berlin america britain hamburg fifteen years
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"But they were you know in the beta testing phase basically still the first long distance call about six miles had happened just a little over a decade prior to seventy six and telephones were extraordinarily rare and the police they they didn't have so that alone would make detective work extremely difficult local knowledge witness accounts logic expert opinions hoping to catch a criminal in the act where the primary means of catching criminal that time in mostly just catch them red handed was the way you you almost had to do it you know like short of catching someone literally red handed these cases were extremely difficult to definitively solve and before we get to the other possible suspects let's talk about some of those other possible victims i mentioned victims summit story in some armchair investigators have chalked up to the ripper but the general consensus on these next ones is highly doubtful that whoever killed these women we spoke of earlier also committed these murders that they come up often enough that it felt worthy of include them today suck em elizabeth smith was another east end prostitute who was murdered a few months before polly and eighteen eighty eight with a few hundred yards that same location shit survive long enough to walk nearly a mile to london hospital before succumbing to her injuries the next day man this is the most brutal part of this episode she claimed have an attack by four men wasn't sure how to identify them now jeeze brace yourself for this next detail if you're eating don't take a bite right now if you're drinking might want to go put down before proceeding her face of and beaten and bloodied but her internal injuries or what killed her and this is fucking horrific a blunt object had been rammed into her vagina with enough force that it broke through the wall separating her vagina from her rectum broke through the membrane jesus why does someone fucking do that to anyone oh my god i hope that those four motherfuckers who did this if it was those guys which sounds like it was died of the worst four cases of syphilis at the world has ever seen i hope that they're.

elizabeth smith polly london hospital hundred yards
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And let's not forget never talked about it much turner long swell she never talked about it because what she was doing was solving secret messages of nazi spies so i you know when world war two broke out nazi spies began spreading west from berlin hamburg into the western hemisphere looking for intelligence on america in britain and a lot of them went to south america south merck was kind of up for grabs it was neutral continent and it's very close it was a good listening post and so these nazi spies set up shop in south american multiple countries they brought clandestine radio equipment radio transmitters and they set up little pirate radio stations they began sending encrypted messages back to berlin and hamburg and this is a real problem for american intelligence to find out what these nazi spies were saying and the fbi was completely unprepared to solve this problem because the fbi didn't have any kind of code breaking unit all the fbi had at that point was a technical research laboratory which is more like a crime lab is kind of where the analyst bullets and fibers from crime scenes that sort of thing and yet the fbi is responsibility was to try to uh to try to find these nazis firings in and destroy them they just they didn't have the technical ability to do that and so they had to rely on somebody who did not turned out to be elizabeth smith friedman because you know for fifteen years at that point she had been doing targetpractice unrun runners in drug smugglers it just so happened that elizabeth had the right set of skills when world war to broke out to go after these nazi spies because it turned out that the spies were using very similar radio equipment and very similar codes as the run runners and the drug smugglers had years and so elizabeth was was ready to go and that this is what she spent world war two doing she she monitored up to fifty clandestine radio circuits they're used by nazi spies she inner unit solved about four thousand different nazi messages may provide of these messages to allied intelligence agencies to the army to the navy on to.

world war america britain fbi elizabeth smith friedman radio equipment berlin hamburg analyst fifteen years
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Speaking with journalists jason for goni we're talking about the pioneering career of code breaker elizabeth smith friedman and his book the woman who smashed codes a story of love spies and the unlikely heroine who outwitted america's enemies that did i get this number right during this period she was seen twenty thousand messages a year that's correct must have really been lousy of encoding messages there are like could nail a lot of as it may not be sorted out yamuna's it's an incredible before computers this is this is among other things just incredible sort of managerial tasks deal figure there's two hundred businesses in the air round numbers so that meant uh she decoded a hundred messages a day if that's all she did and and by hint by aren't and so in all abuse not all of the not all the messages turned out to be a useful some of them were not communicating useful information by the keep honor him but you had you had you had to solve all of them to know which ones were useful in which ones weren't and so restore law had to be filed they had to be transmitted and down and elizabeth was due until nineteen thirty one elizabeth was doing these thousands of messages a year tens of thousands um with just one assistant there was there was one clerk typist says in her unit and elisabeth and so simply these two women about inside the coast guard from twenty five to 1931 were handling all of them you know could breaking traffic for the us treasury department's in this in this giant rumoi it's it's it's really impressive to think about it at the at the point where elizabeth would produce a stack of solve puzzles that were an inch thick they would bind up the solutions into a book that was the rule when the stack of paper got an inch high they would make a book of that by 1931 she had thirty of these books each an inch thick and so essentially uh uh cyclopes media of the the conversations of the criminal underworld that that she compiled essentially on and after prohibition is repealed what is our next criminal activity drugs drug gangs breaking of drug gangs because a lot of these syndicates simply move to drugs after a prohibition was to a from nineteen thirty three until the end of.

jason goni elizabeth smith friedman yamuna coast guard us america elisabeth treasury department
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on WREK

"Goni we're talking about pioneering career of code breaker elizabeth smith friedman and his book the woman who smashed codes a true story of love spies and the unlikely heroine who outwitted america's enemies shall now did i get this number right during this period she was voting twenty thousand messages a year obstruct must have really been lousy at encoding messages uh there are liked uh top well a lot of averages and they had to be sorted out john i mean it's it's an incredible before computers this is this is among other things just incredible short of managerial tasked rate deal figure there's two hundred business days in the year just round numbers and so that meant uh she decoded a hundred messages a day if that's all she did rights and and uh by hands firing at answer in all of these eu's not all of the not all the messages turned out to be a useful some of them were not communicating useful information via the keep it all in her head but you had you had you had to solve all of them to no one's ones work and so the ones that were useful had to be filed they had to be transmitted and um and elizabeth was due until nineteen thirty one elizabeth was doing these thousands of messages a year tens of thousands um with just one assistant there was there was one clerk typist who was in her unit and death and so simply these two women inside the coast guard from nineteen 25 tonight thirty one were handling all of the you know code breaking traffic for the us treasury department's in this in this giant rumoi it's really impressive to think about now at at the at the point where elizabeth would produce a stack of solve puzzles that were an inch thick they would bind the solutions into a book that was the rule will neighbor got an inch high they would make a book of it by 1931 she had thirty of these books each an inch thick and so is essentially an encyclopedia of the the conversations of the criminal underworld type that she compiled essentially on and after prohibition is repealed what is our next criminal activity drugs drug gangs breaking of drug gangs because a lot of these syndicates simply moved to drugs after a prohibition was repeal so a from nineteen thirty three until the end of.

Goni elizabeth smith friedman eu coast guard us america treasury department
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

"In our state still hoping for a pay raise after all there was a vote goma's kelly coupons looks at one local city here were people them waiting for a long time and still continue their fight november 2013 this city of seatac became the first in the state to pass a fifteen dollars minimum wage but almost immediately faced challenges i recount recounts now legal battle over whether goma applied to companies at the airport which went all the way to the state's highest court very frustrated allen sample is one of the thousands of workers in seatac who say their employers still own them back pay most of that covered january first 2014 through august twentieth 2015 states cream court issued its ruling that the wage ordinance does apply to the airport well i think everyone believes that they should be getting the money hurts did start paying that full minimum wage but didn't address the back pay so sample filed a complaint with the state department of labor in industries if i think something so is unfair that i like to attack that and say it all listless make affair he's complaints led ellen i to issue its first citation against hurts last year i think seatac whereas main the first more complex than is an area where it's then more contentious elizabeth smith works in fraud prevention at allen i in says they have now issued a hundred and fifty three citations against hurts more than any other company in seatac other citing companies have settled hurts has not and hasn't paid a sense.

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"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

"State still hoping for a pay raise after all there was a vote comas kelly coupons looks at one local city here were people them waiting for a long time and still continue their fight november 2013 this city of seatac became the first in the state to pass a fifteen dollar minimum wage but almost immediately faced challenges i i'll recounts now a legal battle all over whether gonna apply the company's at the airport which went all the way to the state's highest court very frustrated allen sample is one of the fao sense of workers in seatac who see their employers still own then back pay most of that hey covered january first 2014 through august twentieth 2015 with the state supreme court issued its ruling the wage ordinance who does apply to the airport well i think everyone believes that they should be getting the money hurts did start paying that full minimum wage but didn't address the back pay so sample filed a complaint with the state department of labor in industries if i think something is on unfair that i like to attack that and say it oh let's let's make it fair his complaint lead ellen i to issue its first citation against hurts last year i think seatac was being the first more complex than is an area where it's then more contentious elizabeth smith works in fraud prevention at allen i in says they have now issued a hundred and fifty three citations against hurts more than any other company in seatac other cited companies have settled hurts has not and hasn't paid a sense of the two million dollars in back wages the state argues that they owe and that can be very frustrating the state says hurts owes workers anywhere from a a couple thousand dollars of to twenty seven thousand dollars for a single employees i completely understand the perspective of the workers who are are working today and who are waiting for the wages that they believe that they are owed it doesn't make sense to me hurts disagrees and issued a statement tacoma news saying hurt has fully complied with the city.

seatac supreme court ellen elizabeth smith allen department of labor fraud tacoma twenty seven thousand dollars two million dollars thousand dollars fifteen dollar
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

"Point four more well homo new check in the komo forecast for today a few clouds early otherwise mostly sunny and a daytime high of seventy one degrees for tonight mostly clear skies and a low of fifty four can't for back to work monday sunshine with a daytime high of 74 degrees in for tuesday continued sunshine with a high of seventy eight degrees i'm eric heintz in the komo weather center on news one thousand fm 97 7 you'll world is changing stay connected stay informed many people in our state were supposed to get a raise this year thanks to a voterapproved minimum wage increase but just because it passes on the ballot doesn't always mean workers get that raise comas kiliku putin's goes in depth to show how workers in one city have waited years get paid and why they still face a fight november 2013 this city of seatac became the first in the state to pass a fifteen dollar minimum wage but almost immediately faced challenges i a recount then a legal battle over whether gomaa try dick companies at the airport which went all the way to the state's highest court very frustrated allen sample is one of the foul signs of workers in seatac who see their employers still own then back pay most of that hey covered january first 2014 through august twentieth 2015 state supreme court court issued its ruling that the wage ordinance does apply to the airport well i think everyone believes that they should be getting the money hurts did start paying that full minimum wage but didn't address the back pay so sample filed a complaint with the state department of labor in industries if i think something that's unfair that i like to attack that and say it oh let's let's make it fair his complaints led ellen i to issue its first citation against hurts last year i think seatac whereas main the first more complex in is an area where it's then more contentious elizabeth smith works in fraud prevention at allen i in says they of now issued a hundred and fifty three citations against hearts more than any other company in seatac other citing companies have settled kurds has not and hasn't paid a cent of the two million dollars in back wages.

eric heintz kiliku putin seatac ellen elizabeth smith komo komo allen department of labor fraud seventy eight degrees seventy one degrees two million dollars fifteen dollar 74 degrees
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

"Next report at six twenty four are more clamp comas in the komo forecast for today a few clouds early otherwise mostly sunny and a daytime high of seventy one degrees for tonight mostly clear skies and a low of fifty four km for back to work monday sunshine with the daytime high of 74 degrees import tuesday continued sunshine with a high of seventy eight grease america in the komo weather center komo news one thousand fm 97 7 reporting the news understanding new many people in our state were supposed to get her raise this year thanks to a voterapproved minimum wage increase but just because it passes on the ballot doesn't always mean workers get that race come was killing kookmin's goes in depth to show how workers in one city have waited years get paid and why they still face a fight november 2013 gene this city of seatac became the first in the states of passive fifteen dollar minimum wage but almost immediately faced challenges i a recount then a legal battle over whether goma apply did companies at the airport which went all the way to the state's highest court very frustrated allen sample is one of the thousands sense of workers in seatac who say their employers still own them back pay most of that hey covered january first 2014 through august twentieth 2015 state supreme court issued its ruling that the wage ordinance does apply to the airport well i think everyone believes that they should be getting the money hurts did start paying that full minimum wage but didn't address the back pay so sample filed a complaint with the state department of labor in industries if i think something is unfair that i like to attack that and say it all let's let's make it fair his complaint lead ellen i to issue it's i say tation against hurts last year i think seatac was being the first more complex than is an area where it's then more contentious elizabeth smith works in fraud prevention at allen night in says they have now issued a hundred and fifty three citations against hurts more than any other company in seatac other cited companies have set settled kurds has not and hasn't paid a cent of the two million dollars in back wages.

kookmin seatac ellen elizabeth smith komo komo allen department of labor fraud seventy one degrees two million dollars fifteen dollar fifty four km 74 degrees
"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"elizabeth smith" Discussed on KOMO

"The top headlines for today a federal judge has extended the list of family relationships with american citizens that visa applicants can use to get into the us the ruling further weakens president trump's visa policies affecting citizens from six muslimmajority countries a man accused of shooting his wife to death during an override in seattle pleaded not guilty thursday to second degree murder and in sports the mirrors returned to play today in chicago against the white sox komo news time is now four forty six many people in our state we're supposed to get a raise this year thanks to a voterapproved minimum wage increase but just because of passes on the ballot doesn't always mean workers get that raised comost kelly kookmin's goes indepth to show how workers in one city have waited for years to get paid and why they still face a fight november 2013 this city of seatac became the first in the state of fifteen dollars minimum wage but almost immediately face challenges i a recount then a legal battle over our weather go law applied the companies at the airport which went all the way to the state's highest court very frustrated allen sample is one of the thousands of workers in seatac who see their employers still own then back pay most of that covered january first 2014 through august twentieth 2015 the state supreme court issued its ruling that the wage ordinance does apply to the airport well i think everyone believes that they should be getting the money hurts did start paying that full minimum wage but didn't address the back pay so sample filed a complaint with the state department of labor and industries if i think something is unfair but i like to attack that and say it oh let's let's make it fair his complaints led ellen i to issue its first citation against hurts last year i think seatac was being the first more complex than is an area where it's then more contentious elizabeth smith works in fraud prevention at elena hi in says they have now issued a hundred and fifty three citations against hurts more than any other company in seatac other cited companies have settled hurts has not and hasn't paid a sense.

us trump seattle second degree murder chicago kelly kookmin seatac supreme court ellen elizabeth smith president allen department of labor fraud fifteen dollars