19 Burst results for "Elizabeth Loftus"

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

04:12 min | Last month

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"That kind of does require you to sort of take apart whatever memories you have of particular things or be willing to take them apart in certain ways. Is that what confabulation is also that you're my mom is the worst, by the way. And I'm really worried about myself as I age, or how much I'm confabulated without knowledge of it. Yeah, it's scary. I mean, it's scary how those things work. I think that's the way we sell ourselves on this is by saying, actually, it's just a sign of how creative I am. Yeah. This is just a terrible side effect. But yeah, I think there's, and I also think that there are probably individual differences across those kinds of things. And it would maybe make sense that there would be in terms of how much those things happen. So for confabulation, it's so tricky. So I think it can happen in a couple of different ways. I mean, the kinds of ways that confabulation in the more clinical sense where you have this happening in broader cases of mental disorder, dysfunction. In schizophrenia or something like that, those might be slightly different, there might be ways that you're not doing a good job of thinking about how you generate plausible representations of what you did the other day and weed them out. But for other people, some of it is sort of could be source monitoring kinds of effects. I mean, that's how you get some of the Elizabeth Loftus style studies, right? You ask people lots of questions about ask them to imagine something. And then over time, you think about this event later, and you've thought about it so much that it now feels it has the feeling of a real event and so you sort of misinterpreted as such. And I think sometimes people tell you stories, I have one of these confabulation things of my brother and I, when we were little, we're on a vacation, like boogie boarding in California.

Elizabeth Loftus schizophrenia California
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

03:14 min | 10 months ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

"Event. And way back in 1978, long before the nightmare that is the Internet and its remarkable ability to spread misinformation, psychologist Elizabeth Loftus conducted a study in which she successfully distorted people's memories by feeding the misinformation. She would show them a series of pictures and then show them written descriptions of the pictures with some of the information changed. So one picture would show a car stopped at a stop sign, but in the description of the picture, the sign the car was stopped at was a yield sign. Consistently, people then misremembered the picture as being of a yield sign. Basically, the study showed that the brain will grab on to the most recent information and memory will be altered because of the new info. Weirdly enough, certain personality types seem to be more susceptible to altered memory from misinformation. That said, the Myers Briggs personality type indicator was what was.

Elizabeth Loftus Myers Briggs
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Jurisprudential ties with some of the justices to her right. Of course, first she has to get there. Thanks very much for your time, Stephen. Thank you for having me. I'm Gordon coulter. For many years, I served as a law enforcement officer. Today it's my privilege to host this program on a little known area in law enforcement, but important to every small community and every large city across our vast country. It's the area of satanic cults. The year is 1994, and this training video is called law enforcement guide to satanic cults. A so called satanic panic had swept through America. The theory went that thousands of ordinary people were secretly members of devil worshiping cults that abused and murdered children on an industrial scale. On the strength of testimony by alleged victims, many people went to prison. But in time, it became clear that practically none of the hysteria was based in fact, and the whole affair cast lasting doubt on the primacy of memories. One after effect of the satanic panic was to really make it obvious to the public, just how unreliable eyewitness testimony can be. Tim cross writes about science and technology for The Economist. And so that skepticism is sort of the way that both the public and I guess the criminal justice system has thought about eyewitness testimony ever since, but there was some interesting research presented at the annual meeting of the American association for the advancement of science that suggested that maybe the pendulum swung a bit too far the other way and that blanket skepticism isn't always warranted. But what was it about the satanic panic that really cemented this skepticism in the public's mind? I think it was a couple of things. Psychologists had already started to suspect that memory was much more malleable than people up to that point of thought. So you had people like Elizabeth Loftus who ran a whole series of experiments that demonstrated that memory is not like taking a picture of a scene and sticking it in a filing cabinet then coming back to it and looking at it years later. It's much more fuzzy than that. What the satanic panic kind of did is prove in a very sort of lurid and un ignorable way just how powerful this effect can be and just how untrustworthy even sort of strong memories that people claim to be very sure of can potentially be. And this is more than just an academic concern because eyewitness testimony is often used in trials. And if you look at the work done by the innocence project, for instance, which is an American charity, one piece of work they did looked at 375 cases of wrongful convictions where someone had been convicted of a crime and then exonerated sometimes many years later. And they found in that dataset that witnesses misidentifying suspects was a factor in about 70% of those miscarriages of justice. So this stuff really matters in the real world. How is it that this new research challenges that assumption we now have about eyewitness testimony? So this is based on many years of research done by a guy called John wickstead, who's a psychologist at the University of California. And essentially what it says is that eyewitness memory can actually be very reliable, but only in the right set of circumstances. And those circumstances are sort of very peculiar and you have to get them right. What do you mean conditions just right? What conditions are those? There were kind of two strands to his research, I guess, and the first was that actually people are pretty good at assessing the accuracy of their own memories. So this is based on lab work where you show people a simulated crime and then you present them with a photo lineup. And if they can spot the suspect in the lineup and they're quite certain that they can. Then most of the time, they're right. Things only get dicey when they can't be sure either way. The second strand is that that only holds true the first time you ask them the question. I suppose it's a little bit like in quantum mechanics where when you try to measure the position of a particle, the very act of measuring it changes it, and something similar, it seems, happens with memories, where if you present someone with a photo lineup, the very act of looking at all the faces, that seems to contaminate the witness's memory with those faces and mean that subsequent tests are much, much less reliable. So the upshot of doctor wick says research is that you can use eyewitness evidence and it is reliable when you do it if the eyewitness says that it is, but you can only do it once. And once you've asked them the question once, you then can't ask them again if you want a reliable answer. That makes plenty of sense. I'm just wondering how much police departments and the like will put this kind of knowledge into you. So this just sort of an academic finding of some interest. It's worth noting that the police department in Houston have done a field test that seems to back up doctor wickstead general arguments. I just go back to the point about the satanic panic, this stuff really does matter in the real world and doctor wickstead ends his lecture with several examples of people who'd been convicted of crimes, including murder, and these are people who are now on death row and basically said, if my research is right, some of these convictions look more than a little shaky because they relied on eyewitness.

Gordon coulter Tim cross Elizabeth Loftus American association for the a John wickstead Stephen America cabinet un University of California wick wickstead police department Houston
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Well, Harriet wistrich is the founder and director for the center of women's justice and is a solicitor and she joins me now. Harriet, let's start by just thinking about those four women who have been testifying in that New York courtroom. Today we got this sort of outpouring of relief. Just what have they been through in the past weeks? Well, and anyone who chooses to come forward to report sexual violence and anyone who eventually gets to the courtroom and we know that there are so many other women who were accusers as well who haven't participated in that trial. But for these women, going through the trial process and being subject to great scrutiny, fierce cross examination from the defense will have been incredibly tough. And it's a huge relief to them and on this occasion they have got justice. But we know that women across, well, whether they're accusing somebody famous or not, do not get a regular justice in the UK less than 1.5% of women who report rape, for example, end up with their cases charged and the trial process itself is incredibly hard. So it's incredibly tough. And it just shows how important it is that women will put themselves through this. Sometimes for years, constantly facing suspicion and their credibility being questioned in order. That is what happened in this case. I'm going to line that stood out from me was used by one of the U.S. lawyers Lisa bloom. She said that the lesson is that you do not have to be perfect to stand up for justice. All four of Maxwell's accusers endured pretty tough cross questioning. I mean, they're asked about their drug use, their sexual behavior, inconsistent statements. Is that something that all victims have to be prepared for? Well, unfortunately, that is the way in which these cases tend to be tried. And you know, it's really unfortunate that they feel like the people that are on trial themselves rather than the person they're accusing their credibility in anything that can be found to undermine their credibility. What we do know is that women who tend to be targeted and groomed will often come from more damaged backgrounds. That's why they're easier to groom often. And so there will be things that one can try and find to cross examine them on. And of course, once they've suffered abuse, often they will resort to drugs and other ways in which to survive. So the fact of the abuse itself, then works to undermine their credibility. And that's very common in many of these cases. And certainly, with young women who are trafficked, that they suffer immense damage. And that's why these convictions are so important. But it's very hard. Yeah, I wanted to ask you about something that the defense relied on. They had an expert talking about memory. She was called doctor Elizabeth Loftus. And so the implication was that when women are when people suffer from very traumatic events, they're often wrongly.

Harriet wistrich center of women's justice Harriet Lisa bloom New York Maxwell UK U.S. Elizabeth Loftus
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on WTOP

"Find a better company to deal with Remember with roof masters the proof is in the roof Welcome back It's 5 36 here on WTO P the last 12 hostages that were kidnapped by a gang in Haiti are back in the United States CBS's Manuel orcas reports Ordeal over there were hugs and smiles at Christian aid ministries headquarters in Haiti Thursday then a convoy to the airport where the 12 freed hostages boarded this coast guard plane bound for Miami Their results of jubilation at the organization's Ohio base Those good God's instrument prayers We were rejoicing a great load is lifted Half of those finally released were from one family in Michigan At least 5 children were among the group held captive for two months The lane Maxwell will not be taking the witness stand in her sex trafficking trial BBC's defeat has a story In her first remarks since her trial opened last month Ghislaine Maxwell told the judge there was no need for her to testify because the prosecution hadn't proven their case beyond a reasonable doubt This trial continues to move much faster than anticipated 9 witnesses in total testified for the defense Miss Maxwell's legal team also called on the psychologist Elizabeth Loftus an expert on false memories to challenge the recollections of the cases for accusers closing arguments are set for Monday Maxwell is accused of helping Jeffrey Epstein sexually abuse for teenage girls and coming up after traffic and weather while some local teachers are upset about returning to virtual learning It's 5 37 At weipa what matters to you matters to us too wave his mission is to promote.

Manuel orcas Christian aid ministries headq Haiti Ghislaine Maxwell WTO CBS Maxwell Miss Maxwell Miami Elizabeth Loftus United States Ohio Michigan BBC Jeffrey Epstein
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But none would ever speak to you on the record. You know, she cut such a lonely figure now. And Ian Maxwell, her brother is kind of banging the drum for her. And her family are rallying round. But the friends are now nowhere to be seen, of course. As to the women who have accused her of these crimes, you know, I think what's interesting is how they are going to now be torn apart by Maxwell's lawyers. You know, they're going to be their credibility is going to be undermined at any point. At every point, sorry, as money grabbers, they're going to call a false memory expert a woman very well known in a miracle called professor Elizabeth Loftus. You know, she testified at the trial of Jeffrey Epstein not Jeffrey Epstein Harvey Weinstein easily confused sometimes and O. J. Simpson. And she is going to be talking about how women and people can develop false memories. And so for the accusers now, the next 6 weeks are going to be an incredibly challenging time. And in terms of the U.S. justice system as well. I mean, it's just worth reflecting on, of course, we're at the beginning of this, but it is different. There are differences to it, and also there's been a much made from very well at the beginning of a trial. There'll be a jury and all of that. So it's a careful of that in mindful of that. But of course, she's been in prison for some time and there's been quite a lot of detail about the conditions of that and how that differs and also the length of sentences sometimes in comparison to the UK. So I think that there's some differences there aren't there as well. Yeah, absolutely. And look, if she is found guilty and if this does not go her way, she will be in prison for the rest of her life. She'll turn 60 on Christmas Day. I do, by the way, think about what her 60th would have been like, had her life gone in a different direction kind of glittering party on a super yacht. But now it's almost inevitable. The trial will still be going on. And she will still be behind bars. But, you know, the jury were asked if they had strong views about people who led luxurious lifestyles. They were also asked whether they had expressed support for the me too movement in the past. I think one of the things that Ghislaine Maxwell's team were incredibly nervous about were the fact that in dummy panels, Ghislaine Maxwell was found to be wholly unlikeable, I think the quote was..

Jeffrey Epstein Ian Maxwell Elizabeth Loftus O. J. Simpson Harvey Weinstein Maxwell U.S. UK Ghislaine Maxwell
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Ed murder. Perfect. Yeah. We have no right. That's right. That was me behind him. I'm totally useless in that situation. Those other guys had a perfectly good handle on the steam. But if you set situations up in just a way that people kind of know what they're supposed to do, they'll probably do it. And another one is implanted memories. And in fact, Elizabeth Loftus in her talk yesterday, which is fantastic. She gave some excellent tips as an addendum to this talk. You can implant memories with imagination, dream interpretation, hypnosis, exposure to other people's memories, false information, even doctored photographs, take advantage of those digital tools. So there you go. Lots of ways to appear that you have Supernatural powers by performing Supernatural acts. Method number 7 is really simple. Just say that those things happen. You don't even have to do it. You know, that's even easier. You know, maybe Jesus appeared to 500 people after he resurrected, or maybe just one person wrote that he did, you know? You always have to keep that as a possibility, but just know that, again, if you've already kind of convinced people that you have this connection that you can just sort of assert things and they will believe it, because, you know, why would you lie? It's very hard to call someone on untruths. It's very awkward and so most people won't do it. They'll just take your word for it. Speaking of which, and speaking of people doing a lot of work for you, you can gather testimonials and carry and I see it on every alternative medicine website. There's always like, you know, if you're lucky, there's a little science page, and that's really interesting to see what they say about the science behind it. But there's also a testimonial section. And you can find just dozens of stories. It doesn't matter what you're saying. You can find people who will say they just want to make you happy or maybe they really did feel like they benefited. They will write about it for you. So you can visit one of those Christian science reading rooms and just ask, hey, where are your testimonies of healing? And they've got books. They collect them every year and publish like these just accounts of people's illnesses going away just because they had the right form of thinking. Well, I could give countless examples of this, but one of my favorites is this guy named brought so the gays are. And I think he's just got to figure it out. All he does is get up, he stares at the audience for a long time, just meaningfully and soulfully. He looks at you with his big puppy dog eyes and people make the claims for him. They say, oh, wow, he healed me of this and just my life was changed around. Super clever. Now, Kerry did some digging and found that he had earlier said some extraordinary things, but it seems like he never needs to do that at one of his appearances. He just shows up in stairs. So maybe that one's already been done before, but I bet you could find some way to work that yourself. And then Carrie reminded me of this as I was talking about some of these methods I was pulling together. She said, well, and of course, you could just sort of wait and take over once the original person dies, because even though they may say that they've got the method to live forever, eventually they're going to die. So another method is just defined different cult leader and get in early on, help run things become like a really useful functionary, and then take over when they're gone. So, you know, you've got David miscavige, who famously sort of orchestrated this real stabbing in the back of all these other people within Scientology and took himself from one of the Commodore's messenger is up to the ecclesiastical leader of Scientology and he's still there is free Harold klemp is one of our favorites from ecken car. He's not a direct successor. But, you know, he kind of grabbed the reins of powers of power by being in the actually it's the rod of power. That's what it's literally called within the group. And you know, got to take over. And he's just like the most boring Midwest guy. But he is now like the spiritual leader who visits people in their dreams. Break them young. You know, very active leader. But he didn't have to come up with all this. He got to sort of ride on what Joseph Smith had established. Paul, you could very easily argue that modern Christianity is more reliant upon Paul's teachings than even Jesus is. And so he really took that fledgling religion and made it his own without even having met Jesus in person. And that's great. I don't know how Tim Cook got there. Anyways, so these are all really powerful ways that you can create your own connection to the Supernatural to establish your own personal influence. And like I said, a lot of people will do work for you. But just keep in mind that you may have to be comfortable with lying flat to people's faces. And just saying, crazy things that you yourself may not believe. And it may, it may be a bit of a faustian bargain, this may backfire on you in the future. There may be, I don't know skeptics who come along and point out what you're doing or maybe you'll just get tired of it, want to get out. It's really hard to call backsies once you started a cult. And I think Harry and I have spotted certain leaders at moments where they're trying to distance themselves and say, yeah, you know what? I'm going to get out of the day to today operations or you know what? I'm not getting those messages anymore. People are going to say, well, maybe this is a test or they won't let you get out of it that easily. So things to think of before you fully get going. But with that, I will leave open any additional time. We have for Q&A. That was absolutely a blast. Thank you so much Ross. I really enjoyed that. I took notes. And I think that maybe we should have had you on for another hour. Okay. All right, yeah. I'm going to talk about there for sure. This was a lot of great talks about boy. That was really interesting. You guys can catch him on oh no Ross and Carrie. The show is just terrific. It is so entertaining and he goes into a lot of detail of some of these wonderful things that are going on. I wanted to mention really quickly that Harold camping thing we did in Hollywood with the IID was so much fun..

Elizabeth Loftus Harold klemp Ed David miscavige Jesus Carrie Kerry Paul Tim Cook Joseph Smith Midwest Harry Ross Harold Hollywood
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Hello, welcome to oma Ross and Carrie the show where we don't just report on fringe science, spirituality, claims of the paranormal, cults, we start them ourselves. That's right when they make the claims we make bigger claims to start our own cults. That's right. Thank you so much for joining. Yeah, I'm Ross blacher. I'm Gary poppy. And yeah, this is a fun look at a talk that I gave to skeptic Al con. Yes. I know what you're thinking. Isn't that just skeptical? No. Absolutely. Skeptical as in California. This is a conference held yearly in the San Francisco Berkeley area. I went to the first one back in the day. Oh, really? Had a great time, got to meet y'all man Chandler among many other people. I think I remember you talking about that. Seth shostak was there. Lots of good people anyways. I was invited to give a talk. Actually, last year, but then this pandemic thing happened. Yes. And so they didn't part of it. Then they had it this year, and it was going to be on person. I was all ready to head up there, but then it ended up being online. Okay. Which is cool because that means that that content is available online. And so this talk that I'm about to give is called how to start your own cult. And it is a how to guide. I would say actually useful information if you do want to start a cult. Hopefully that is not the real takeaway. Ross is squinting. What did I do? What have I done? Wait a minute. Yeah. This could come back. Call it this. In the future, well, I just did what Ross told me to do. Uh oh. But here's the other way to look at it. The blueprints to build are also the blueprints to deconstruct. I'm Carrie poppy. I came up with that on the spot. That was pretty good. Yeah, but you figured it out. Which is exactly this was also a way to spot colts in progress and not just cults, but this covers a lot of ground about the things that we talk about on the show. And I think it was kind of a fun framework. So like I said, skeptic Cal con. It's spelled, I think just like you would think, though maybe you think different. So it's. Dot com. Okay, oh. Nope, that's it. Okay. We're done. Not only was I giving a talk, but if you go there, you can still get access and you can see my talk with the visuals and everything because there's a fun slide show. And you can also see talks by some of our former guests like Bret Hermes, Elizabeth Loftus. This year was just it was like they were they listened to our show and they were like, well, these people are perfect. Yeah. This line them right up. Paul offit, he was on it. And you can still view all of those including my talk at skeptic outcom dot com. You like that more than you should. It's really good. Thank you. I gave a similar talk the night before kind of a version one. Thank you. To my wife, and then I gave another one to the satanic temple. Yes, Friends of ours. It's just fun. So now they know how to start a cult too. Some would argue. They already knew. But I wouldn't argue that. Okay. She's saying it in that voice to be a dick. Gotcha. So I do reference some of the visuals in the talk. I won't be posting the video 'cause like I say you can get that at skeptic calc on. I think they'll be releasing it publicly. Sometime in the future. But I will post a Facebook album with some of the images from the talk. So you can see some of the slides there. I paid $20 to attend this in the moment. Did you get your money's worth? Oh, definitely. Yeah. Carrie was there an active you will hear her reference. Yes, but Q for you. If someone were to say, well, I want to see the video now not in a year. Can they pay $20 now and still see it? Okay. Yeah, yeah, absolutely. If you go to the site now, you can access the whole conference and damn. Watch all those talks. Yeah. I say we're good. I only got to tune in for you and Loftus, but for ten bucks each put a pretty good. Well, and now you can go back and listen to Paul offit. He's on it. Yeah, that's right. And Hermes, yeah, I got a lot of the talks and they were great. So also, I've removed a lot of the ums and Oz so there you go. That's a benefit. Great, great. Didn't notice a lot of Amazonas, but good. Even better. And my apologies for all the desk thump sounds. And I really, really enjoyed this talk. Oh, thank you. Yeah, I did. And drew was watching along with me and afterward he was like, that's such a good introduction to your show. People are gonna come and listen to your show now. Excellent. I said, I hope so. Good. Okay, well hopefully this will be a fun revisit of some of our investigations. There will be lots of mentions of things we've covered before. But hopefully some new observations as well. Yeah, some good syntheses between different investigations. And there was a really wonderful introduction by Susan gerbic, it got a little clipped, so I figured I would take that out, but just know that our friend Susan, who has been on the show a couple times, she introduced me and you'll hear her a little more toward the end. I'll introduce you then. Oh, hi, everyone. Welcome to skeptical Khan. I'm Cary, and this is my normal voice. Boy, today we just really have such a treat. This man, he has for ten years. Been working in undercover investigations of fringe science spirituality and claims that the paranormal. He's one of the best speakers out there. He looks quite a lot like David Duchovny, right around the mid 90s. And he's also just so funny, so smart, so personable. Everyone was asking us, when are you going to have him as a speaker? And we'd say, well, last year, you dumbass, why didn't you come? But that's okay. Not everybody follows exactly what's happening. So anyway, he's here this year, Ross, blotcher. Thank you, Gary. You're welcome. It's hilarious. All right, well, today we're going to learn about how to start your own cult with Ross blotcher. And yes, the double reading there is intended if you get a good cult going, I want in on the ground floor. That's all I asked for sharing these tips with you. Clearly, we have some weighty terms here that need defining. For example, what is a Ross blotcher? Well, Susan told you a bit about me. I co host the podcast owner Ross and Carrie, which Susan was on very recently. So you can see Carrie and myself there in the middle photos and we both share a really strange interest in investigating fringe science, alternative medicine, claims of the paranormal and doing that firsthand and then sharing that..

Paul offit oma Ross Ross blacher Gary poppy Al con Seth shostak Carrie poppy Carrie Ross Bret Hermes Elizabeth Loftus Chandler Berkeley colts San Francisco California Susan gerbic Loftus Amazonas
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"No i mean it's already happened like for the people who are on board with this like the andrews oven essentially treat like peter because as if he was fired. It's like he. He put up with like the harassment as long as he could but then finally he had to step down. He was a a non tenure track Professor at portland state. I my guess. Is you make a lot more money. Being you know the free speech martyr being the i'm standing up to like critical race theory and stopping the soon nami of illiberal ideologies from sweeping the land. Then you just kind of teaching a few courses a year absolutely. I mean this. This is a failure of the market to to adequately compensate tenure track faculty. But i don't know if he was trying to get into the tenure track or if he was gonna i don't know what was going on but you know the the. The reason that he was disciplined was for Not having cleared his research through human subjects that that quote unquote research where they sent out fake journal articles because technically they were involving editors in in an experiment and they you know they. They think that this is the stupidest most unfair bias treatment. Because who would think that that's human subject human subjects research but that should happen in fact it happened to elizabeth loftus university of washington where she was disciplined by her own university at least not supported by her in university. Because she did some research there was. She said he's false. Memory and there was a person who is claiming that they had evidence that patient had actually experienced memory recovery like this false memory recovery and they had published this article like a case study in the case that he was like. I had this young girl who was traumatized by this incident and then years later. It's like the claim was that they had videotape evidence of her spontaneous recovering. Memory so elizabeth loftus in her co author went And did some like journalistic investigation to try to find out who this patient was so that they could like write an article like whatever defending themselves. Well they uncovered who it was that woman sued elizabeth loftus for having whatever investigated her in like sacrificing her anonymity and then university of washington said you never cleared this through human subjects and elizabeth loftus was like no this was.

elizabeth loftus university of portland elizabeth loftus peter university of washington
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

"Dr elizabeth loftus who is an internationally known psychologist and the distinguished professor at the university of california in extremely well. I called the cross examination. The state attempted to diminish the science of memory. It's a recognized. Sinus dr loftiness. Lifetime of research has focused on human memory. I witness testimony and also on courtroom procedure. She's not some hired gun as was suggested. She is respected internationally known scholar. The prosecution tried to belittle her on cross examination spending really no time on the science but much time criticizing who she represents as a lawyer and as jurors. I want you to rely on. She testified at trial about the workings of human memory effects of suggestion on memory the mechanism of creation of false memories and the characteristics of false memories moreover she unidentified some of suggested activities that occurred in the current case such leading questions and outside external information including media affecting the testimony of witnesses chestnut spent over an hour. Dr loft assists theories on false memory. In the possibility that susan's friends were an error. When they testified this argument seemed to contradict durst own statements on cross examination that he believed the witnesses. Were not lying. But rather ra- laying alive from susan. David chasnoff next argued that susan's true killer was never found due to an incompetent. Investigation tried to argue that under. No circumstances would. Susan opened the door for a stranger. That's not true. We don't know how the killer entered the home due to the bad police investigation. But we do know this. People were sneaking into the house after she was murdered. Her manager. now brenner crawled in through a window and one of her girlfriends crawled in through a window. This is one of the places supposed to be secured by the police. The idea that somehow no one could be in that house because it was impenetrable is just not the not the case testified that susan had the ability to make lots of enemies. What.

Dr elizabeth loftus Dr loft susan university of california David chasnoff durst Susan brenner
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"The podcast by telling a friend giving it a positive review that really helps hopes and he doesn't take too long. It doesn't cost anything. That's a one on the scale. We also have social media Phase and find it you can also find us at a couple upcoming presentations. One is at the sacramento free. Thought day day. Would you can find it. Free thought day dot org. We're going to be part of a really cool lineup. There and we'll be on a panel talking about podcasting Will also be giving a fun talk during the opening reception and that's all online so sign up. You can do it from anywhere. Yeah and that's going. Be on october ninth and tenth. So sign up. Free thought day dot org and later that same month on october. Twenty third and twenty fourth. There's going to be the skeptic. Cal conference spelled skeptical but skeptic cow berkeley california. Yeah and. I've always fell to a kinship to this conference. 'cause it's near my hometown i went to the first couple of them or at least the first one and So yeah again october. Twenty third and twenty fourth also online. So you can go to skeptic cal con dot com so as k. e. p. t. i c. a. l. c. o. n. dot com. I will be giving a talk. Alongside elizabeth loftus heard of air. Paul audit of them. Britt murray hermes. They've all been on the show Susan gerg will be running india Yes so a lot of alumni of no rawson carey will be there including ross. And i'm going to be giving talk. That's titled how to start a cult. It's going to be about some of the fun things that people use that appear to be supernatural to kind of create a hook for them various claim. So y- should be great and of course related to what we do here on the podcast. So sign up. Is that one a paid comforts. yes it is. Tickets are on sale now for the two thousand twenty one skeptical conference. It's a twenty dollars for an online pass. So i'm gonna do it awesome. Well well excellent totally worth it. And by the way while we've been talking in the last couple of hours here. I got an email from megan bell saying hi kerry. Thank you for your email. What's your podcast. you have link. I'd love to do your interview with you. How did you hear about us. Oh yeah do you think it'll happen once i give for this link. There's a chance. See saying there's a chance. Yeah it's a little bit like that but that would be amazing if she wanted to come on the show. Go off all right and remember. My name is dr. Fred bill scientists. I guess i was a kid. I worked for a firm up called. Eh research for a long time in oakland california on my job there was to instrument is over two thousand projects. All over the united states. I went in about three thousand different firms when after the other and instrumentation. So i at that time. I was free much abreast of everything that was scientifically going on in america. Almost every project at fifty fifteen years of secret clearance so i left out and started my own. Latronic manufacturing company in seoul that retired for awhile study with emily and masters became a lady in contact the nineteen seventy-one and began to educate people including myself time into the technology science which we currently use today. As a result i started a company called paradyne developed several hundred products Which are used worldwide. Not only by our firm but other firms as well. I do a lot of formulations in nutrition minerals bodybuilding consciousness. Changing i've developed work lasers we have crystal minds in arkansas. So we do a lot of crystal mining which we use conjunction with our laser work which changes consciousness came in seventy one and they the first time they spent from seventy one eighty nine giving scientific information about the condition of the world in what was going on behind the scenes times with our own government. That people didn't know about ninety nine became an and drama and contact -i until the presence and the pleadings have come and gone primarily to give support dealing with the android phones because there are different life form. They're all humanoid in appearance. But when you deal with different lifeforms. The communication tell to telepathic especially these parameters that you had to use self disciplined to maintain clarity change. So i've had difficulty with the dominance because of the Graphic communications that they use. It's almost like you're paralyzed when you're communicating with them is completely control your central nervous system I'm jesse thorn this week on. Bullseye david byrne on the talking heads. Easing back into live performance. And the magic of doo-wop you don't get it. Very much people doing debited. Dip dip.

elizabeth loftus Britt murray Susan gerg rawson carey megan bell Fred bill sacramento california berkeley paradyne ross kerry america Paul india oakland seoul emily arkansas
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"What i another. Researchers have found over and over again is that our memories are fallible and the implications of this extend far beyond how we think about our own childhoods the extended to serious settings like the criminal justice system where we constantly ask people to make recollections or remember things under oath do people remember things accurately in the early nineteen seventy s elizabeth loftus and john palmer ran an experiment out what they were really interested in. Was how people recollect a witnessed event And how the way in which questions are phrased influence our recollection. The research showed their volunteers short films of car accidents then the volunteers some questions about what they had just seen and there was a critical manipulation in the first experiment what they did Between groups of participants was the changed. One word in the question. Some people were asked. How fast were the cars going. When they contacted each other others were asked a question with a more vivid verb. Like how fast were the cars going when they bumped into each other smashed into each other or hit each other. The people who had the word smashed or collided recall. the cars. Were going faster than the people who heard the word bumped so changing. Just one word in the question changed people's memory of the speed of the cars then there was something else. The volunteers were asked whether there was broken glass at the scene of the accident. The researchers found that volunteers were much more likely to remember seeing broken glass if the words smashed or hit had been used. And i think it's really important to note that there was no broken glass in any of the images. Fat participants were shown in the study. So not only did it. Change their estimates of speed which is subjective in and of itself but participants distorted recollection in the act of recalling because of the word that was used and so with no broken glass being present participants remembered broken glass because that question was posed in a particularly suggestive way so this has really important implications for criminal justice And how we questioned witnesses how we get information about investigations from witnesses. The way in which officers at the scene of crime investigators during the context of interviews the ways in which the question witnesses whether witnesses are questioned together whether witnesses talk to one another after the fact and now in the age of social media now witnesses being able to do their own online investigations. All of these elements are serving to introduce factors that can distort the recollection of witnesses. I'm wondering fag jurors as well because jurors often hearing about these stories in the media in some ways. Are you know i. I was taught when i was a young journalist. That if you're describing a car crash you don't say bump you say collided because it's a more active. It's using more active language. It brings the scene to life more vividly. But something that happens routinely in the media. Sort of dramatizing. How stories work. What you're saying is that that can have the unintended effect of basically creating effectively false memories in people's heads indeed at it and you said it in your description of using the word collided it. It creates a more dramatic and vivid scene. Creating that vivid scene is what is going to be remembered and so that post event information that jurors are may be hearing or or reading In the newspapers and so on and so forth that information is what's going to be recalled as opposed to maybe their original experience or what they heard in the context testimony so it's quite problematic from the perspective of thinking about how investigations unfold because clearly witnesses to criminal activities crimes are extraordinarily important in directing the investigation and leading to success enclosing an investigation. I think that you have to understand. Jurors have to understand that their memories are susceptible and that witnesses memories are susceptible to these systematic errors. What is what is especially You know dangerous about this. Is that when people think back vacant. Actually tell which of those memories is real in which was made up after some time icon distinguish between the things. I actually remember and the things that i've reconstructed. They both feel exactly the same. And i think you're hitting on one of the issues right you. You think that some memories that you have are as you say actually remembered. But they're all reconstructed. The question is which reconstructed memories are more accurate. And can you learn to monitor that process. And i think people can coming up. We delve more deeply into hannah's research to understand the many ways our memories can fail us. I'm shankar anthem. And you're listening to hidden brain support for hidden brand comes from good rx getting the care. You need to stay healthy. Shouldn't be hard or expensive. Everyone should be able to afford their medications with good rx. You can instantly compare prices for your prescription at every pharmacy in your neighborhood and save up to eighty percent. Good rx free and easy to use. And it's often cheaper than using your insurance co pay or medicare with good rx. You can find discounts at more than seventy thousand pharmacies. Millions of americans use good rx to get affordable healthcare every month. Start saving to eighty percent on your prescriptions. Today go to good rx dot com slash hidden brain. That's good rx dot com slash hidden brain. Good rx dot com slash hidden brain. Good rx is not.

elizabeth loftus john palmer shankar hannah medicare
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

"Timing discrepancy sydney's he has been before i was getting married. Worst governor incense. Are you more exactly for your certain of what was said. Let me ask this house. 'red you that whatever. This conversation was saying period of time that capital months. Yes news as early time period that you read. Her advice was that generally the same time period this day year. Yes within weeks. Yeah and so. By getting lofts to acknowledge that memories of receiving disturbing information might be more accurate than other details surrounding the receipt of that information. Lou and appears to be reinforcing for the jury. Billions framing of which miriam barnes. Memories are more accurate finally lou and asked about the correlation between a witnesses confidence in a memory and the accuracy of that memory. I wanna talk about confidence versus accuracy. Would you agree. There is a correlation in memory between how confident someone is of their memory versus how accurate their meaning. Meaning that it correlates that the more confident a person is in their memory. The more accurate the memory tends to be again. dr loftus initially equivocated. I well certainly. That's that seems to be true. If there's no contamination or post event suggestion that there is some relationship between confidence and accuracy. Eventually however lewin managed to pin down a more definitive answer. And you'd acknowledge there's a body of research that supports this correlation correct a body of research that supports the correlation between confidence in memory and accuracy. Yes i just said that. No you said that was your position. Now ask you. If there's a body of research that supports yes to discuss these developments were joined by reporter. Charlie bagley who's covering the case for the new york times and for crime story dot com. Charlie thanks for being with us. So charlie dr elizabeth loftus. What did you make of that. Four day seven our saga number one. This case spans forty years. so we're talking about witnesses. Dredging their memories about events forty years ago in kathy's case and then at least twenty one years. In the instance of morris. Black and susan berman. So of course you were on a call a memory expert. Dr lofta skied up there and many of the things that she said about memory. I found interesting. But it didn't seem particularly relate to the witnesses that were emits. Case in the sense that a lot of susan's friends didn't even know each other. So they were not contaminating each other's memories right charlie. Do you care to speculate on which witnesses in particular. The defense seemed to be referencing without actually naming. Any names will sure. I think Some of them were pretty obvious. Mela susan's quasi daughter. I think another one was. Miriam barnes another one lorraine newman and then finally. I think there were a couple of cracks at even right well. I don't know if you charlie. But i was absolutely dumbfounded when lou asked her about ted bundy and we found out that she had testified on behalf of the rock star of the true crime. World like absolutely unbelievable that she was advocating for him and harvey weinstein so many others. Do you think that tipped the scales at all for the jury. Like how do you think our list of clients played with them. Given the notorious reputation of a lot of the people. She's testified on behalf of it. I think that does have an effect and then as the prosecutor repeatedly brought home is she testified in a hundred different cases ninety nine of more for the defense. If the jury does find dr loftus credible how would it be possible. Do you think that they could apply that logic. To the prosecution's witnesses and not to bob durst himself wouldn't his own memories. Be impugned in the same way. If she's to be believed you know the the the funny thing is with bob. You're talking about somebody that's given multiple versions some of them diametrically opposed to each other. So which one should we believe. In which one do we label ally whereas the witnesses and the case they may not have immediately spoken up but they did express quite a bit of confidence in their memory loss of a particular event or or something that susan had told them. That's very different than giving multiple versions rape. That's a great point. Everybody has really been remarkably consistent. And then the case of nick shaven who was only slightly inconsistent. The prosecution took great pains to show why that was his journey to coming around. The you know you kinda got like the first of the week. Whichever story he wants to go with brittany. I have a question for you. What do you make of john lewis. Nhs style of interrogating dr loftus. I don't know that he's always doing himself. A favor by becoming what strikes me as emotionally involved in the questioning you know. I'm not giving him an acting note or anything like that. I think i you know. I'm a very conflict averse person and i have a hard time listening to people. Argued will britney. And charlie thank you again for being with us today and we're looking forward to more testimony and we will be back with another special episode. Every day that robert durst testifies. You're on jury duty. The trial of robert durst want the high stakes stuff. The believe the hype stuff the criminally good emotional roller coaster can't believe what you're seeing stuff you know the good stuff. Amc plus has it all obsessed with the walking dead dive deeper than ever with the walking dead origins narrated by the cast before the new season. Premiers on august fifteenth. Wanna be chilled. The core set sail with the north water. A thrilling arctic. Drama starring jack o'connell and colin farrell plus uncover gripping true crime content ad free and on demand expect the epoch with amc plus sign up today at amc plus dot com amc. Plus only the good stuff. Please remember that you can receive. Alerts and news breaks on developments in robert durst murder trial as well as new episodes of season. Two of jury duty the trial of robert durst by subscribing now on apple spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts again. If you want to refresh your memory on where. The prosecution and defense are heading with their arguments in the trial. Go back and re listen to episodes from season one and head. Over to crime story dot com for in-depth coverage of the durst story jury duty the trial of robert durst is created and produced by carey. Anthony lewis this episode was written and edited by yours truly britney bookbinder it was co produced by alexis note of bartolo and britney kinder music was provided by strike audio. Thanks for joining us. And we hope you'll come back for the next episode of jury duty. The trial of robert durst..

dr loftus robert durst miriam barnes Charlie bagley charlie dr elizabeth loftus susan berman Dr lofta lou Mela susan Miriam barnes lorraine newman charlie lewin Lou susan sydney ted bundy nick shaven harvey weinstein the new york times
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

"People forget shorts things at allegedly happened even develop false memories ted bundy hillside strangler timothy mcveigh. Oj simpson the menendez brothers. Michael jackson phil. Spector martha stewart. Jerry sandusky bill cosby harvey weinstein. Do you actually leave at the individuals. That i just need victims of either false memories or bad identification. If false information is incorporated into question the person adopted into their memory. Absolutely yes so. Dr loftus have you and i met for welcome back to season. Two of jury duty the trial of robert durst. I'm your host carryanne. solis. I'm joined by my co host brittany bookbinder tomorrow. We will release episode covering the third day of robert durst testimony today. We focus on the defenses. Only other live witness. Dr elizabeth loftus is a memory expert with an extensive resume both in terms of her professional accomplishments as well as the number of high profile criminal cases in which she has testified as an expert witness. She is generally called to cast doubt on the memories of witnesses. Why was dr loftus called to testify in this case. And why did the defense team choose her. As the opening act for robert durst himself in this episode will speculate on the possible reasons behind calling loftus and examine how effective that strategy has proven to be. We'll also explore the subtext of deputy. Da john lewis extensive cross examination of this witness. That's coming up after the break. Want the high stakes stuff. The believe the hype stuff criminally. Good emotional roller coaster can't believe what you're seeing stuff you know the good stuff. Amc plus has it all obsessed with the walking dead dive deeper than ever with the walking dead origins narrated by the cast before the new season. Premiers on august. Fifteenth to be chilled. The core set sail with the north water. A thrilling arctic. Drama starring jack o'connell and colin farrell plus uncover gripping true crime content ad free and on demand expect the epoch with amc plus sign up today at amc plus dot com mc plus only the good stuff during their opening. The defense team offered this context for loftus testimony. She is prepared to testify this out the workings of you in the memory effects of suggestion on memory mechanism creating false memories and the characteristics of false memories and review materials. In this case moreover she would identify some suggested activities. That occurred in this case. Such as leading questions with people are being interviewed outside research including media including the jigs. She will testify trial regarding her studies. You memories can be changed by things that people are told by other people in other words. She's gonna talk about how ideas and suggestions other post event. Information had modify people's memories people. Forget the story. Things at allegedly happened or even develop false memories and reese can be contaminated misinformation from leading questions media reports and other witnesses. False recollections. While sam reese to be expressed with a great deal emotion and the belief that they're true as time passes in memory is getting weaker. Weaker you become even more vulnerable. Host yvette. fish as we've reported robert durst long-held version of events that he was not in los angeles at the time of berman's murder and that he did not write. The so-called cadaver note changed shortly before this trial began. He now admits that he was in los angeles and did in fact write the cadaver note however since his narrative is uncorroborated by any other witnesses. The jury had to wait for durst testimony which is expected to continue into next week to learn his complete story for the night that burma was murdered. Aside from presenting the jury with dirt zone words. It appears that the defense team strategy is to cast doubt on the deluge of evidence presented by the prosecution that points to dir skilled thus the defense called an expert witness whose role in this trial seems to be to impugn the memories of those who have testified to the damning statements made by both the defendant and the victim in this case on tuesday august third. Dr elizabeth lofter's took the stand and sad for close to seven hours over four different days on direct examination. Defense attorney david. Czeslaw asked loftus about her extensive curriculum vitae including her list of honorary degrees czeslaw. Then got to the heart of his examination. His questions seemed to take direct. Aim at the prosecution. In this case. Six to eight people are interrogated by the search person and they say the same thing that's still indicate a false memory. It can if if so six eight people are subjected to the same. Maybe problematic Interviewing or post amount suggestion some kind of suggestive information name. They might all end up believing something. That isn't accurate. It's important to note that the defense and prosecution cannot refer to specific witnesses or testimony when questioning this memory expert witness but chestnuts line of questioning begs the question. Who are the six to eight people that he is referencing. The defense team's narrative suggests that chasnoff is taking aim at the memories of a handful of susan berman's close friends who testified about information they had regarding susan's involvement in the alleged cover-up of kathy durst. Death czeslaw continued. If false information is incorporated into a question in the person adopted into their memory absolutely. Yes you explain how that works well. That's the kind of thing that we've actually done. In some of my experiments we incorporate false information into a question and we look to see what people do with that suggestive questions. So you show people say a simulated accident where a car goes through a yield sign before the accident and ask a leading question like did another car past the red car. When it was at the intersection with a stop sign that can cause many people to now believe in remember they saw a stop sign instead of yields time. That's just one experimental example of how a question that has embedded in some misinformation can be adopted by people. Both the question and answer appear to insinuate that the prosecution might have implanted false memories in witnesses by asking leading questions but who specifically among susan's friends is chestnut referencing. Could it be nick shaven. Nick you also mentioned that susan said to you that bob had confided in her to more easily set up an alibi. Do you remember telling the police. That is yes amused fourteen years now. We're not saying whether this is necessarily true or not. We're trying to figure out what susan told you that. Somehow she helped with an alibi and early. Yeah yeah yeah. I would say about tasks and again. It's not that year saying you believe to.

robert durst loftus menendez brothers Spector martha stewart Dr loftus brittany bookbinder Dr elizabeth loftus dr loftus Da john lewis ted bundy harvey weinstein Jerry sandusky Oj simpson timothy mcveigh sam reese bill cosby Host yvette solis jack o'connell Michael jackson
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Jury Duty: The Trial of Robert Durst

"But i didn't know what to make of it at the time but there was a lot of concern as the session ended on thursday and the judge didn't tell us what the hell was going on but i later gathered from talking to people inside outside the courtroom That the person who <hes> had tested positive was related to a member of the defense team. Britney is gone back through the audio of wednesday's proceedings and there appear to have been a number of moments coughing. That punctuate some of the testimony from dr loftus about memory. We grabbed one of those instances. And we're gonna play for you now in a typical situation. There's a crime. There's a suspect. And there's an attempt to identify the person who was seen before brittany when you were observing on thursday and everything came to a sudden halt. What were your impressions. Is you watched the proceedings from the live feed well there had been a number of pauses leading up to that last one. The testimony of dr elizabeth loftus has been contentious to say the least and every so often one side or the other would ask for sidebar and occasionally even judge wyndham would ask for a sidebar. So in the last instance when he called for a sidebar. I and i imagine others may have assumed that they needed to talk about the objections. So it came as a real shock when he announced that they would be recessing early and that the jury was getting along weekend. A must say. I'm a bit surprised that the judge has decided to resume the trial on monday. As i understand it. The entire defense team was around. This person for relatively extended period of time and the risk reward ratio. Here seems to be completely out of whack. The risk that one of those defense attorney could give robert durst or one of the jurors. The virus would seem to outweigh the reward of keeping the trial going. And i'm very much aware that we all want to get this trial finished and get it to the jury. But given the exposure of all these people to someone who has tested positive with the virus and is symptomatic. I wonder if either of you are as surprised as i am. That judge windham has decided to resume court on monday rather than taking a period of ten days or so to allow people to properly quarantine you know this was not daytona beach where nobody has a mask on or anything. I think that most of the people if not all of them in the courtroom have been inoculated and everyone was wearing a mask including the person who tested positive. I also confess that. I very much want to see the end of the trial and that probably colors some of my impressions. Yeah and i guess. I assumed that in waiting the twenty four hours to release this memo that everybody involved in the trial must have had a chance to be tested and would have received a negative test. Do we not know if that's the case. We don't at this point. But i got to imagine that the very least all the lawyers in the room got tested charlie not to violate your hip rights. But did you get tested. I'm still trying to get an appointment. Good luck alright. Well it gives us one. More reason to tune. In on monday as the trial of robert durst for the murder of susan. Berman resumes with the conclusion. Let's hope of the testimony of dr elizabeth loftus. And the beginning of the testimony of robert durst on his own behalf. Amen to that. Please remember that you can receive. Alerts and news breaks on developments in robert durst murder trial as well as new episodes of season. Two of jury duty the trial of robert durst by subscribing now on apple spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts again. If you want to refresh your memory on where. The prosecution and defense are heading with their arguments in the trial. Go back and re listen to episodes from season one and head. Over to crime story dot com for in-depth coverage of the durst story jury duty the trial of robert durst is created and produced by carey. Anthony lewis it was co produced by alexis note of bartolo and britney finder music was provided by strike audio. Thanks for joining us. And we hope you'll come back for the next episode of jury duty. The trial of robert durst.

robert durst dr elizabeth loftus dr loftus judge wyndham judge windham Britney brittany daytona beach Berman charlie susan Anthony lewis alexis note apple britney finder bartolo carey
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Ephemeral

Ephemeral

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on Ephemeral

"Were recalling was betty streams got the story. Was that of a many inconsiderate with the right and part of the naked talked about it enough. The data associated with that missing period of a couple of hours. He points out that she has very rich detailed story with conversations and things she sees and stuff she does barney who didn't have those dreams which is heard them history is basically. I had my eyes closed the whole time. So even simon at the time who is serve eliciting these quote unquote memories. Didn't think that they were literally true. The way it was put to me by this woman. Elizabeth loftus who has. I think. Sort of the foremost expert on that stuff. Hypnosis is really good if you want to quit smoking or lose weight but if you're trying to remember something that happened ten years ago. It's not really all that useful in october of nineteen sixty five but in barney hill suddenly became household names. This reporter john latrell for now. Defunct newspaper called the boston. Traveler writes a multi heart newspaper series about this whole encounter. And then it's out there. They become the first well-known ufo and their minor. Celebrities is right about betty bunny hill story. Time and time again and fascinating hamster. We're gonna we're talking with betty hill from portsmouth new hampshire. We're talking with betty hill famous and first abductee there on the radio all the time. My name is bonnie hill. Barney was on one of those game shows where he got three people pretending to be barney hell including him well. Real barney hill plead the kind of the face of your own abductions. All thank you. One piece of the abduction story would still surface later. The map that betty said she was shown on board the alien craft at some point. Later betty sat down with just a piece of eight and a half by eleven paper and drew which he remembered. Just the star. She can remember. There were more stars. Some of them are dots and some of them are circles and then she draws lines between some of them have multiple lines so this is her star map and she says this is what she saw then..

betty streams betty hill Elizabeth loftus barney hill john latrell barney betty bunny bonnie hill simon Defunct boston portsmouth new hampshire Barney betty drew
"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"elizabeth loftus" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Building structures or some visual outlines But if you ask them to remember facts they probably just as bad or worse than the average person even for those skylines you can probably implants a few buildings that were actually there you could like and if you took that skyline and put it next it's it's not exactly one to one either. It's just incredibly close compared to what any normal person do because we are poor at it. It looks at first glance. Like wow. that's person's that's right. It looks perfect because ours is so imperfect that we can't even tell that it's imperfect that's the secret that's the secret to success slightly less imperfect than others my whole bag. I love this quote for your book. This is sort of a summary of everything we said. But our but if you've never heard this and i remember like a decade ago when i was mentioning the work of elizabeth loftus in lectures and stuff. This was always like a moment for most people. Our past is these are. Your words are passes fictional representation and the only thing we can even somewhat be sure of is what is happening now. It encourages us to live in the moment and not to place too much importance on our past forces us to accept the best time of our lives and our memory is right now. You still believe that it do. I also think it's a really freeing thought so. I think that there are a lot of people who sort of live in the past and living their memories. And i think that realizing that every single day you wake up with a slightly different brain and slightly different memories and that you're constantly reinventing the memories and changing them into starting them and that other people's memories are contaminating your memories. I think that means he kind of. Let go and kind of say okay. Maybe these.

elizabeth loftus
Harvey Weinstein's lawyers call on memory expert

Hugh Hewitt

00:24 sec | 3 years ago

Harvey Weinstein's lawyers call on memory expert

"Everyone seems attorneys are calling in a memory expert to stand in his rape and sexual assault trial in New York Elizabeth Loftus who also testified in the defense of OJ Simpson said memories fade over time and can also become distorted prosecutors have tried to show how the disgrace movie mogul used his power to prey on young women or hoping to advance their careers in

Rape Elizabeth Loftus Oj Simpson Assault New York
At Weinstein trial, defense takes aim at accusers' memories

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 years ago

At Weinstein trial, defense takes aim at accusers' memories

"Cognitive psychologist Elizabeth Loftus told jurors it doesn't take a PhD to no memory fades over time and people become more vulnerable to post event information locked as pointed out actress Annabel oscura alleges wine steam barged into our apartment and raped her in nineteen ninety three or nineteen ninety four Weinstein is charged with raping a woman in a Manhattan hotel room in twenty thirteen and sexually assaulting a different woman in two thousand six Loftus testified the emotion is not a guarantee your dealing with an authentic memory his lawyers have not said yet if Harvey Weinstein himself will testify I'm a Donahue

Elizabeth Loftus Annabel Oscura Harvey Weinstein Donahue Manhattan